Gaza: La lutte en cours à Gaza et dans toute la Palestine est la nôtre (In today’s upside-down world, it is remarkable when a world leader simply tells the truth and turns out not to be a hypocrite, a political coward, or an appeaser)

22 juillet, 2014
http://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/07/20/world/20HOSPITAL/20HOSPITAL-master675.jpg

A Palestinian paramedic touches the hand of a dead girl in the overflowing morgue of Shifa Hospital in Gaza City on Sunday (NYT)

Israeli troops fired toward the Gaza Strip from their position near the border on Saturday. Israeli strikes killed 20 people in Gaza (NYT)

http://s2.lemde.fr/image/2014/07/21/534x0/4460403_5_a2a1_dans-chadjaiya-quartier-de-la-ville-de-gaza_74212df4f6dbb41f3c1143906a6f6c0f.jpg

Dans Chadjaiya, quartier de la ville de Gaza frontalier d’Israël, le 20 juillet (Le Monde)

http://pbs.twimg.com/media/BtFonmfCMAAqqUV.jpg
http://www.metronews.fr/_internal/gxml!0/4dntvuhh2yeo4npyb3igdet73odaolf$dcn1zz8gkk0xutjihmz06fbasig8xhd/sarcelles.jpeg

Un manifestant, dimanche, durant les émeutes à Sarcelles (Métronews)

J’ai une prémonition qui ne me quittera pas: ce qui adviendra d’Israël sera notre sort à tous. Si Israël devait périr, l’holocauste fondrait sur nous. Eric Hoffer
La libération de la Palestine a pour but de “purifier” le pays de toute présence sioniste. (…) Le partage de la Palestine en 1947 et la création de l’État d’Israël sont des événements nuls et non avenus. (…) La Charte ne peut être amendée que par une majorité des deux tiers de tous les membres du Conseil national de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine réunis en session extraordinaire convoquée à cet effet. Charte de l’OLP (articles 15, 19 et 33, 1964)
Israël existe et continuera à exister jusqu’à ce que l’islam l’abroge comme il a abrogé ce qui l’a précédé. Hasan al-Bannâ (préambule de la charte du Hamas, 1988)
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique est un mouvement palestinien spécifique qui fait allégeance à Allah et à sa voie, l’islam. Il lutte pour hisser la bannière de l’islam sur chaque pouce de la Palestine. Charte du Hamas (Article six)
Les enfants de la nation du Hezbollah au Liban sont en confrontation avec [leurs ennemis] afin d’atteindre les objectifs suivants : un retrait israélien définitif du Liban comme premier pas vers la destruction totale d’Israël et la libération de la Sainte Jérusalem de la souillure de l’occupation … Charte du Hezbollah (1985)
Qui se cache dans les mosquées ? Le Hamas. Qui met ses arsenaux sous des hôpitaux ? Le Hamas. Qui met des centres de commandement dans des résidences ou à proximité de jardins d’enfants ? Le Hamas. Le Hamas utilise les habitants de Gaza comme boucliers humains et provoque un désastre pour les civils de Gaza ; donc, pour toute attaque contre des civils de Gaza, ce que nous regrettons, le Hamas et ses partenaires sont seuls responsables. Benjamin Nétanyahou
Les attaques aveugles à la roquette à partir de Gaza vers Israël constituent des actes terroristes que rien ne justifie. Il est évident que le Hamas utilise délibérément des boucliers humains pour intensifier la terreur dans la région. L’absence d’une condamnation de ces actes répréhensibles par la communauté internationale encouragerait ces terroristes à poursuivre ces actions consternantes. Le Canada demande à ses alliés et partenaires de reconnaître que ces actes terroristes sont inacceptables et que la solidarité avec Israël est le meilleur moyen de mettre fin au conflit. L’appui du Canada envers Israël est sans équivoque. Nous appuyons son droit de se défendre, par lui‑même, contre ces attaques terroristes, et nous exhortons le Hamas à cesser immédiatement ses attaques aveugles à l’endroit d’innocents civils israéliens. Le Canada réitère son appel au gouvernement palestinien à désarmer le Hamas et d’autres groupes terroristes palestiniens qui opèrent à partir de Gaza, dont le Jihad islamique palestinien, mandaté par l’Iran. Stephen Harper (premier ministre canadien, 13.07.14)
It’s the moral equivalence which is so devastating. When Egypt this week proposed its ceasefire in Gaza, a BBC presenter asked whether both sides would now conclude that there was no point carrying on with the war. From the start, restraint has been urged on both sides — as if more than 1,100 rocket attacks on Israel in three weeks had the same weight as trying to stop this onslaught once and for all. Israel has been bombing Gaza solely to stop Hamas and its associates from trying to kill Israeli citizens. But for many in the West, the driving necessity is not to stop Hamas but to stop Israel. Moral equivalence morphs instantly into moral bankruptcy. People have looked at the casualty count — around 200 Palestinians killed at the time of writing, while only a handful of Israelis have been injured or killed — and decided that this proves Israel is a monstrous aggressor. No concern at all for the Israelis who have only a few seconds to rush to a shelter when the sirens start to wail, car drivers flinging themselves to the ground at the side of the road. No concern for the elderly or disabled Israelis who can’t get to a shelter, the hospital patients left helpless while the rockets slam into the ground nearby. Just imagine if the Scots, for example, had for years been firing at England volleys of rockets that were now putting 40-50 million people within range. Unimaginable? Of course it is. No country would tolerate it. But that’s the equivalent situation in which tiny Israel has found itself. Yet it is simultaneously having to fight another war: against a West determined to demonise it with accusations of deliberate atrocities, lack of restraint or an attempt to conquer more land. To these people, whatever Israel does to defend itself is bad. Killing Gazans is bad, warning them to flee so they won’t be killed is bad, the Iron Dome missile defence system is bad because, while Palestinians are being killed, Israelis are not. Ah yes, that’s the real outrage, isn’t it? Not enough dead Jews. How dare they defend themselves so effectively! And so the West does Hamas’s dirty work for it. Hamas cannot defeat Israel militarily. Its strategy is not just to kill Israelis and demoralise the population, but also to de-legitimise Israel so that the West, too, will work for its destruction. Hamas’s rockets have failed in the first two objectives — but the third is a runaway success. In its hundreds of tunnels, Hamas has built an underground infrastructure of industrialised terror the length of Gaza. As a Fatah spokesman blurted out, it has situated its arsenal among civilians, underneath schools and hospitals and mosques, for the infernal purpose of using its population as human shields and human sacrifices. It has urged Gazans to make themselves the target of Israeli air strikes. It has ordered them to ignore the Israeli warnings to evacuate, which are delivered by leaflet, phone, text and warning shots. Doesn’t the Israel-atrocity brigade ever pause to wonder why Hamas has provided no air-raid shelters for its people, while Israel has constructed a national shelter system? Gazan civilians are dying in order to maximise their numbers killed in the war, so that Hamas can incite against Israel in both the Muslim world and the West. And it openly games the PR system. Hamas social media guidelines instruct Gazans not to post pictures of missiles launched from ‘residential areas’ and always to add the term ‘innocent citizen’ to any casualty’s name. So the figures it issues for civilian as opposed to terrorist casualties, re-circulated by the UN, are worthless. Israel is waging this war in accordance with international law, which states that when houses are used for military purposes they may become legitimate military targets. But as Ibrahim Kreisheh, the Palestinian delegate to the UN Human Rights Council, admitted in a remarkable TV interview, while Israel’s killing of civilians is considered in law merely a mistake, Hamas is committing war crimes by deliberately targeting Israeli civilians. Indeed, given its use of Gazan human shields, it is guilty of war crimes twice over. All civilian casualties, however, are deeply to be regretted and to be avoided wherever possible. And so Gaza presents Israel with a hideous dilemma. Either it inescapably kills a lot of civilians as a by-product of destroying the infrastructure of mass murder, or it leaves that infrastructure at least partly in place to spare the civilians. Until now, it has chosen the latter. It is also allowing food and fuel into Gaza; its offer of blood supplies was turned down by the Palestinian Authority. When a Hamas rocket downed a power line supplying electricity to 70,000 Gazans, workers from the Israel Electric Company braved Hamas rocket fire to restore power to Gaza — enabling it to fire more rockets at Israel. Yet it is Israel which is said to be ‘out of control’, guilty of indiscriminate slaughter and even — as ludicrous as it is obscene — ‘genocide’. Those who demonise Israel in this way should realise just what they are supporting. Palestinian society, both through Hamas and Mahmoud Abbas’s Fatah (whose military wing has also been firing rockets from Gaza), brainwashes its children that glory lies in killing Jews. It routinely pumps out Judeophobic incitement straight from the Nazi playbook.(…) Every western supporter of the Palestinian war against Israel is also tacitly supporting such anti-Jewish derangement. This psychotic bigotry is the true driver of that war, as well as the Islamist war against the West. Yet astoundingly it is never, ever mentioned. The intractable problem of Gaza has been exacerbated by the meddling incomprehension of a western world that just doesn’t grasp how Islamist fanatics play by entirely different rules. The West insists on moral equivalence between Israel and the Palestinians, as if the century-old conflict between the Arabs and the Jews were simply a squabble over the equitable division of land. It is not. It is a war to destroy the Jewish national homeland by people driven into frenzy by forces immune to reason. Melanie Philips
Conformément à la pratique de l’ONU, les incidents impliquant des munitions non explosées qui pourraient mettre en danger les bénéficiaires et le personnel sont transmises aux autorités locales. Après la découverte des missiles, nous avons pris toutes les mesures nécessaires pour faire disparaître ces objets de nos écoles et préserver ainsi nos locaux. Christopher Gunness (directeur de l’UNRWA à Gaza)
A Gaza, les combats urbains tournent au carnage. Titre du Monde
Something important is missing from the New York Times’s coverage of the war in Gaza: photographs of terrorist attacks on Israel, and pictures of Hamas fighters, tunnels, weaponry, and use of human shields. It appears the Times is silently but happily complying with a Hamas demand that the only pictures from Gaza are of civilians and never of fighters. The most influential news organization in the world is thus manufacturing an utterly false portrait of the battle—precisely the portrait that Hamas finds most helpful: embattled, victimized Gaza civilians under attack by a cruel Israeli military. A review of the Times’s photography in Gaza reveals a stark contrast in how the two sides are portrayed. Nearly every picture from Israel depicts tanks, soldiers, or attack helicopters. And every picture of Gaza depicts either bloodied civilians, destroyed buildings, overflowing hospitals, or other images of civilian anguish. It is as one-sided and misleading a depiction of the Gaza battle as one can imagine. (…) Maybe all of this is an illustration of just how biased against Israel the Times has become—so biased that Times photographers and editors are simply blind to any image that doesn’t conform to their view of the war. Or maybe, in the interest of the safety and access of their journalists, the Times is complying with Hamas instructions. As reported by MEMRI, Hamas published media guidelines instructing Gazans to always refer to the dead as "innocent civilians" and to never post pictures of terrorists on social media. Hamas is currently preventing foreign journalists from leaving the Strip, in effect holding them hostage. These journalists must be terrified—and they also must know that the best way to ensure their safety is to never run afoul of the terrorists in whose hands their fates lie. It would appear that Hamas’s media instructions have been heard loud and clear at the New York Times, and the response is obedience. But the Times also isn’t bothering to inform its readers that the images they’re seeing of Gaza are only the ones Hamas wants them to see. It’s time for the Times to tell its readers exactly why they are being presented with such a distorted picture of this war. Noah Pollak (Weekly standard)
La lutte en cours à Gaza et dans toute la Palestine est la nôtre : il s’agit de mettre en échec un projet colonial qui allie une idéologie raciste à une technologie meurtrière dont le but est de nous neutraliser. Incapables d’arrêter les roquettes de la résistance palestinienne, les sionistes massacrent les familles et bombardent aveuglément maisons, dispensaires, mosquées. Cette bataille ne sera pas finie tant que le siège de Gaza est maintenu et que les sionistes emprisonnent et torturent les nôtres. Cette guerre ne sera gagnée que quand nous serons tous unis, pour notre dignité… et la libération de la Palestine. La lutte armée en Palestine se prolonge ici par notre mobilisation, dans la rue, et en intensifiant, partout, la campagne pour le boycott et les sanctions contre l’Etat sioniste. GUPS (Union général des étudiants de Palestine – France)
Samedi 19 juillet, pendant qu’Israël, face à la résistance déterminée des combattants palestiniens, décidait de réduire en poussière le quartier de Shajaiya à Gaza, faisant plus de 100 mort-e-s et 60000 déplacé-e-s en moins de 24 heures, notre premier ministre, Manuel Valls, était occupé. Il était occupé à empêcher la solidarité avec le peuple palestinien de s’exprimer. Il était occupé à attaquer les personnes et organisations solidaires de la Palestine et de sa résistance. Pour cela, la méthode a été simple: utiliser une manipulation de la Ligue de Défense Juive, une organisation sioniste violente et raciste, pour interdire la manifestation de soutien à Gaza prévue à Paris et se servir ensuite des affrontements causés par cette interdiction pour charger puis interpeler. Le résultat, ce sont plusieurs heures d’affrontements avec la police à Barbès, des nuages de gaz lacrymogènes dans tout le Nord de Paris, 44 arrestations et 19 personnes toujours en garde à vue en ce moment. Il faut dire clairement que tout ceci a été voulu et préparé par le gouvernement. L’interdiction officielle de la manifestation moins de 48 heures avant son déroulement, les forces de l’ordre lâchées dans un quartier populaire en plein samedi après-midi, les menaces voilées du gouvernement, tout a été mis en place pour nous faire réagir et pour permettre au gouvernement de justifier sa répression. Le lendemain, le gouvernement signe son forfait en accusant les manifestant-e-s d’un “antisémitisme” imaginaire censé justifier ce déploiement de force. C’est un piège politique et policier qui a été tendu aux personnes qui ont exprimé leur solidarité avec le peuple palestinien à Paris ce samedi 19 juillet. Ses conséquences dramatiques ont été cyniquement utilisées dans l’agenda étatique, notamment par Manuel Valls, lors de la commémoration de la rafle du Vel’ d’Hiv le lendemain. GUPS (Union générale des étudiants de Palestine – France)
Dans toute la France, ce sont aujourd’hui des milliers de manifestant-e-s qui sont descendus dans la rue pour exiger l’arrêt de l’intervention militaire de l’État d’Israël dans la bande de Gaza, pour crier leur révolte face au plus de 300 morts palestiniens depuis le début de cette intervention. En interdisant dans plusieurs villes et notamment à Paris, les manifestations de solidarité avec la Palestine, Hollande et le gouvernement Valls ont enclenché une épreuve de force qu’ils ont finalement perdue. Depuis l’Afrique où il organise l’aventure militaire de l’impérialisme français, Hollande avait joué les gros bras « ceux qui veulent à tout prix manifester en prendront la responsabilité ». C’est ce qu’ont fait aujourd’hui des milliers de manifestant-e-s qui sont descendus dans la rue pour exiger l’arrêt de l’intervention militaire de l’État d’Israël dans la bande de Gaza, pour crier leur révolte face au plus de 300 morts palestiniens depuis le début de cette intervention. Et pour faire respecter le droit démocratique à exprimer collectivement la solidarité. En particulier à Paris, plusieurs milliers de manifestants, malgré l’impressionnant quadrillage policier, ont défié l’interdiction du gouvernement. C’est un succès au vu des multiples menaces de la préfecture et du gouvernement. En fin de manifestation, des échauffourées ont eu lieu entre des manifestants et les forces de l’ordre. Comment aurait-il pu en être autrement au vu de dispositif policier et de la volonté du gouvernement de museler toute opposition à son soutien à la guerre menée par l’Etat d’Israël. Le NPA condamne les violences policières qui se sont déroulées ce soir à Barbès et affirme que le succès de cette journée ne restera pas sans lendemain. Dès mercredi, une nouvelle manifestation aura lieu à l’appel du collectif national pour une paix juste et durable. La lutte pour les droits du peuple palestinien continue. Le NPA appelle l’ensemble des forces de gauche et démocratiques, syndicales, associatives et politiques, à exprimer leur refus de la répression et leur solidarité active avec la lutte du peuple palestinien. NPA
“I cannot condemn strongly enough the actions of Hamas in so brazenly firing rockets in the face of a goodwill effort to offer a ceasefire,” Secretary of State John Kerry declared on July 15. Actually, there are a number of things that Secretary Kerry could be doing beyond issuing statements expressing dismay. The Obama Administration could take meaningful actions to show Hamas that there is a political price to be paid for its terrorism against Israel. Let’s start with the money. The United States gives $500-million each year (more than $10-billion since 1994) to the Palestinian Authority regime. Even after the PA earlier this year created a new unity government with Hamas – long designated by Washington to be a terrorist organization – the Obama Administration kept writing the checks. How does the Administration justify maintaining a half billion dollars annual subsidy to a PA-Hamas coalition? By pretending that Hamas, the coalition partner, actually has nothing to do with the coalition. The individual functionaries in the government are not Hamas members but “technocrats,” the Administration insists. That’s the favorite new word of U.S. Mideast policymakers. Their theory – as absurd as this may sound – is that if someone is appointed by Hamas, but does not actually carry a laminated Hamas membership card in his wallet, then he’s just a “technocrat,” not a Hamas appointee. Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn
By pressing for “restraint” and a “truce,” Obama and Kerry are, in effect, trying to save Hamas from being crippled or destroyed by Israel. Is that their idea of “having Israel’s back” ? Now contrast the Obama-Kerry line that with the words of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper this week: “The indiscriminate rocket attacks from Gaza on Israel are terrorist acts, for which there is no justification.” “It is evident that Hamas is deliberately using human shields to further terror in the region.” “Failure by the international community to condemn these reprehensible actions would encourage these terrorists to continue their appalling actions.” “Canada calls on its allies and partners to recognize that these terrorist acts are unacceptable and that solidarity with Israel is the best way of stopping the conflict.” There was really nothing controversial in Harper’s words. They were simple statements of fact. But in today’s upside-down world, it is remarkable when a world leader simply tells the truth about Israel and the Palestinians. It’s almost as if we are surprised when a world leader turns out not to be a hypocrite, a political coward, or an appeaser. We’re so used to the international community’s outrageous double standards, that it becomes remarkable when a national leader acts like a mensch. Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn

A l’heure où, suivant à la lettre le droit international, la seule véritable démocratie du Moyen-orient se voit accusée de disproportion pour avoir réussi à protéger efficacement ses civils …

Où, à l’instar de ses voisins égyptiens, une barrière de sécurité ayant permis d’arrêter l’essentiel des attentats terroristes se voit qualifier de "mur de la honte" …

Où, en violation systématique du droit international, un mouvement terroriste armé de missiles toujours plus puissants qu’il envoie jour après jour sur les populations civiles israéliennes utilise sa population comme boucliers humains en installant son armement et ses postes de commandements dans ou sous ses hôpitaux, écoles, terrains de jeux ou habitations …

Où une agence des Nations Unies qui découvre un stock de roquettes dans l’une de ses écoles la rend gentiment à ses propriétaires pour l’usage que l’on sait …

Où une communauté internationale continue à financer une organisation terroriste qui utilise l’essentiel de ses ressources pour amasser par milliers roquettes et missiles toujours plus sophistiqués pouvant transporter des charges lourdes d’explosifs sur la totalité du territoire israélien mais aussi des drones armés et pour construire, avec les milliers de tonnes de ciment qu’elle importe non des abris pour sa population mais des tunnels pour semer la terreur chez ses voisins …

Où, à l’instar de ses homologues du monde dit civilisé et à coup de photos exclusivement de femmes et d’enfants palestiniens couplées à celles de chars, hélicoptères et soldats israéliens, le premier quotidien américain joue les attachées de presse du Hamas

Où, derrière ses appels officiels à la paix,  le chef d’une OLP dont la charte n’a toujours pas abrogé sa volonté de rejeter Israël à la mer envoie non seulement ses félicitations au Gazeur-en-chef de Damas mais multiplie les déclarations de soutien au moment où son frère jumeau de Gaza fait pleuvoir les roquettes sur la population israélienne  …

Où, après avoir abandonné à leur sort les populations iraniennes, syriennes, irakiennes et bientôt afghanes et derrière un discours de soutien officiel,  le prétendu chef du Monde libre et Exécuteur-en-chef comme ledit Monde libre lui-même ne trouvent rien de mieux à faire que d’appeler Israël à la retenue

Comment ne pas se réjouir, en ce monde sens dessus dessous et avec ces nouvelles drôles de guerres, de la remarquable franchise du premier ministre canadien appelant un chat un chat …

Dénonçant comme actes terroristes tant les attaques aveugles à la roquette à partir de Gaza vers Israël constituent des actes terroristes que l’utilisation délibérée de boucliers humains par le Hamas et rappelant que "la solidarité avec Israël est la meilleure façon d’arrêter le conflit" ?

Mais comment aussi ne pas voir, plus près de chez nous et au-delà de la naïveté voire du cynisme de nos belles âmes, tout le mérite des organisateurs des manifestations semant le pillage et la destruction dans nos rues …

Qui, comme l’Union générale des étudiants de Palestine en France, n’hésitent pas à rappeler explicitement que "la lutte en cours à Gaza et dans toute la Palestine est la nôtre" …

Et qu’à l’instar des mouvements terroristes qu’ils soutiennent,  l’objectif est rien de moins que la "libération de la Palestine" ?

Sixth Lesson of the Gaza War: Obama Should Learn From Canada
Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn
The Algemeiner
July 17, 2014

Israel long ago learned that you can tell who your real friends are when the chips are down. The Gaza war is proving that again.
During the 2012 election campaign, when polls showed that President Barack Obama might lose a significant portion of the Jewish vote in key electoral states, he declared that he “will always have Israel’s back.”

But this past week, as hundreds of Hamas rockets rained down upon the Jewish State, and Israel really needed an ally to have its back, President Obama called Prime Minister Netanyahu to demand that Israel show “restraint.”

That was followed the next day by a phone call from Secretary of State John Kerry to Netanyahu, warning against “escalating tensions” and pressing Israel to let him “mediate a truce.”

The last thing Israel needs is a “truce” with Hamas. The Israelis have had two of those already. A “truce” means Hamas gets several more years to build up its supply of rockets, in preparation for the next round.

And with every new round, Hamas has new rockets that can reach even further and cause even more devastation.
By pressing for “restraint” and a “truce,” Obama and Kerry are, in effect, trying to save Hamas from being crippled or destroyed by Israel. Is that their idea of “having Israel’s back” ?

Now contrast the Obama-Kerry line that with the words of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper this week:

“The indiscriminate rocket attacks from Gaza on Israel are terrorist acts, for which there is no justification.”
“It is evident that Hamas is deliberately using human shields to further terror in the region.”
“Failure by the international community to condemn these reprehensible actions would encourage these terrorists to continue their appalling actions.”
“Canada calls on its allies and partners to recognize that these terrorist acts are unacceptable and that solidarity with Israel is the best way of stopping the conflict.”

There was really nothing controversial in Harper’s words. They were simple statements of fact. But in today’s upside-down world, it is remarkable when a world leader simply tells the truth about Israel and the Palestinians.

It’s almost as if we are surprised when a world leader turns out not to be a hypocrite, a political coward, or an appeaser. We’re so used to the international community’s outrageous double standards, that it becomes remarkable when a national leader acts like a mensch.
The sixth lesson from the Gaza war: Israel has a true friend in Ottawa. The White House could learn a thing or two from Stephen Harper about what it really means to have someone’s back.

Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn are members of the board of the Religious Zionists of America.

Voir aussi:

Fifth Lesson of the Gaza War: Trust Obama’s Actions, Not His Words
Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn
The Algemeiner
July 16, 2014

“I cannot condemn strongly enough the actions of Hamas in so brazenly firing rockets in the face of a goodwill effort to offer a ceasefire,” Secretary of State John Kerry declared on July 15.

Actually, there are a number of things that Secretary Kerry could be doing beyond issuing statements expressing dismay. The Obama Administration could take meaningful actions to show Hamas that there is a political price to be paid for its terrorism against Israel.

Let’s start with the money.

The United States gives $500-million each year (more than $10-billion since 1994) to the Palestinian Authority regime. Even after the PA earlier this year created a new unity government with Hamas – long designated by Washington to be a terrorist organization – the Obama Administration kept writing the checks.

How does the Administration justify maintaining a half billion dollars annual subsidy to a PA-Hamas coalition? By pretending that Hamas, the coalition partner, actually has nothing to do with the coalition. The individual functionaries in the government are not Hamas members but “technocrats,” the Administration insists. That’s the favorite new word of U.S. Mideast policymakers. Their theory – as absurd as this may sound – is that if someone is appointed by Hamas, but does not actually carry a laminated Hamas membership card in his wallet, then he’s just a “technocrat,” not a Hamas appointee.

State Department spokesperson Jen Psaki took this absurdity to a new level in her daily press briefing on July 7, by converting “technocrat” from a noun to a proper noun. She twice referred to the PA-Hamas regime as “the Technocratic Government,” as if that is its official name.

So here’s our first action item for Secretary Kerry: admit that Hamas is part of the PA-Hamas government, and stop giving it American taxpayer dollars.

What else could the Obama Administration do, aside from professing outrage at Hamas? Plenty.

1. Obama could insist that Palestinian Authority chairman Mahmoud Abbas carry out a real crackdown on the Hamas terror cells that operate in PA-controlled territories. The New York Times reported on March 23 that Israeli troops entered the Jenin refugee camp in pursuit of terrorists because although Jenin is under the “full control” of the Palestinian Authority, “the Palestinian [security forces] did not generally operate in refugee camps.” Yet those camps are the worst incubators of Hamas terrorist activity.

2. Secretary Kerry could also be calling America’s allies to demand that they make their financial aid to Gaza conditional on Hamas ceasing its terrorism.

3. The Obama Administration could stop pressuring Israel to remove security checkpoints in the Judea-Samaria (West Bank) territories – checkpoints that help capture Hamas terrorists.

4. The Administration could stop pushing Israel to ease up on its blockade of Gaza, a blockade that has prevented weapons and dual-use materials from reaching the Hamas regime.

5. The Administration could offer a reward for information leading to the Hamas terrorists who kidnapped and murdered three Israeli teenagers, one of whom was an American citizen. For some inexplicable reason, the Rewards for Justice website, http://www.rewardsforjustice.net, still makes no mention of the kidnap-murder of 16 year-old Naftali Fraenkel. Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Rep. Brad Sherman (D-California) have introduced bipartisan legislation requiring such a reward. It shouldn’t take Congress to force the Obama Administration to take such a simple and obvious step.

Strongly-worded condemnations of Hamas make for good sound bites, but unless backed by real action, they’re meaningless.

The fifth lesson from the Gaza war: It’s time for the Obama Administration’s actions against Hamas to speak louder than its words.

Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn are members of the board of the Religious Zionists of America

Voir encore:

Third Lesson of the Gaza War: Abbas Sides With Hamas
Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn
The Algemeiner
July 14, 2014

The Israeli-Palestinian peace process is anchored in the premise that the mainstream Palestinian leadership has truly given up its old terrorist ways. Yasser Arafat and his Fatah movement – the largest faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization – put down their guns and “recognized” Israel. The bad guys became the good guys, and the only bad guys are left are a small minority of Hamas extremists.

The Gaza war provides an opportunity to test that theory. Hamas kidnaps and murders Israeli teenagers, and fires hundreds of rockets into Israel. How has Arafat’s successor, Mahmoud Abbas, chairman of the Palestinian Authority and Fatah, responded?

If Abbas and his Fatah movement are truly moderate and against terrorism, then they should side with Israel against the terrorists. If Abbas and Fatah are indeed the good guys, then they should be opposed to the bad guys.

Unfortunately, it hasn’t turned out that way.

On the very first day of the war, Fatah’s official Facebook page, called “Fatah – The Main Page” posted what it called “A message to the Israeli government and the Israeli people.” Here’s what Abbas’ Fatah had to say to Israelis as hundreds of rockets were being fired at them from Gaza: “Death will reach you from the south to the north. Flee our country and you won’t die. The KN-103 rocket is on its way toward you.”

And that was just the beginning.

On July 9, a cartoon on the Fatah Facebook page, titled “Israel Fires Rockets at Gaza,” showed an Israeli bomb, adorned with a huge swastika, about to strike a Palestinian child. (It’s worth recalling that the then-Secretary of State Colin Powell, among others, has said that comparing Israel to the Nazis is anti-Semitic.)

Perhaps the most telling item of all on Fatah’s Facebook page is a dramatic full-color illustration of three heavily-armed Palestinians – one from Hamas, one from Islamic Jihad, and one from Fatah, standing together. The text reads: “Brothers in Arms: One God, one homeland, one enemy, one goal!” If anyone doubts whose side Fatah is on, this makes it crystal clear.

A video segment on Fatah’s Facebook page shows a masked Fatah member standing amidst a huge arsenal of rockets, declaring: “Praise Allah, our jihad fighters have managed to develop these rockets so they will reach the Zionist depth, Allah willing, to a distance of 45 kilometers inside the occupied Palestinian territories…With these rocket we will liberate our Jerusalem. With these rockets we will crush the Zionist enemy…”

And it’s not just words. On July 7, Fatah’s Facebook page announced that Fatah’s military unit, the Al Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, “targeted the enemy’s bases and settlements with 35 rockets.” (All translations are courtesy of Palestinian Media Watch.)

When the Oslo Accords between Israel and the Palestinians were signed in 1993, the U.S. State Department removed Fatah from its list of terrorist groups. Removing it was not just a statement of how the U.S. views Fatah; it also made it legally possible for the U.S. to start sending $500 million to the Palestinian Authority and the PLO, of which Fatah is the largest faction. Now that Fatah has openly boasted that it is carrying out rocket terrorism against Israel, it’s time to put Fatah back on the U.S. list of terrorist groups.

Fatah and Hamas both belong on that list because, in the end, they are birds of a feather. Certainly there have been moments of tension between the two movements. But those clashes reflected either internal disputes unrelated to Israel, or differences in tactics regarding Israel – not differences in their overall goals.

The third lesson from the Gaza war: The “moderate” Palestinian leadership has shown its true colors. It sides with the terrorists, not with Israel.

Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn are members of the board of the Religious Zionists of America.

Voir également:

All The News Hamas Sees Fit to Print

Noah Pollak

The Weekly Standard

July 20, 2014

Something important is missing from the New York Times‘s coverage of the war in Gaza: photographs of terrorist attacks on Israel, and pictures of Hamas fighters, tunnels, weaponry, and use of human shields.

It appears the Times is silently but happily complying with a Hamas demand that the only pictures from Gaza are of civilians and never of fighters. The most influential news organization in the world is thus manufacturing an utterly false portrait of the battle—precisely the portrait that Hamas finds most helpful: embattled, victimized Gaza civilians under attack by a cruel Israeli military.

A review of the Times‘s photography in Gaza reveals a stark contrast in how the two sides are portrayed. Nearly every picture from Israel depicts tanks, soldiers, or attack helicopters. And every picture of Gaza depicts either bloodied civilians, destroyed buildings, overflowing hospitals, or other images of civilian anguish. It is as one-sided and misleading a depiction of the Gaza battle as one can imagine.

Today’s Times photo essay contains seven images: three of Gaza civilians in distress; one of a smoke plume rising over Gaza; and three of the IDF, including tanks and attack helicopters. The message is simple and clear: the IDF is attacking Gaza and harming Palestinian civilians. There are no images of Israelis under rocket attack, no images of grieving Israeli families and damaged Israeli buildings, no images of Hamas fighters or rocket attacks on Israel, no images of the RPG’s and machine guns recovered from attempted Hamas tunnel infiltrations into Israel.

Another report yesterday was accompanied by a single image: that of a dead child in a Gaza hospital.

A second report yesterday, ostensibly about Hamas tunnel attacks on Israel, bizarrely contained not a single picture related to those attacks. The three pictures it contained presented the same one-sided narrative of Israelis as attackers, Palestinians as victims. One picture showed an IDF artillery gun firing into Gaza; a second showed Palestinian mourners at a funeral; a third showed Palestinians waiting in line for food rations.

Indeed, a check of the Twitter feed of the Times’s photographer in Gaza shows not a single image that portrays Hamas in a negative light. It’s nothing but civilian victims of the IDF.

Likewise, the Twitter feed of Anne Barnard, the Beirut bureau chief for the Times currently "reporting" from Gaza, is almost entirely devoted to one thing: anecdotes, pictures, and stories about civilian casualties. Perusing her feed, one would think there are simply no terrorists in Gaza who started this war, who are perpetuating it, who are intentionally attacking Israel from neighborhoods and apartment buildings and thereby guaranteeing the very civilian casualties Barnard appears so heartbroken over.

Maybe all of this is an illustration of just how biased against Israel the Times has become—so biased that Times photographers and editors are simply blind to any image that doesn’t conform to their view of the war.

Or maybe, in the interest of the safety and access of their journalists, the Times is complying with Hamas instructions. As reported by MEMRI, Hamas published media guidelines instructing Gazans to always refer to the dead as "innocent civilians" and to never post pictures of terrorists on social media. Hamas is currently preventing foreign journalists from leaving the Strip, in effect holding them hostage. These journalists must be terrified—and they also must know that the best way to ensure their safety is to never run afoul of the terrorists in whose hands their fates lie.

It would appear that Hamas’s media instructions have been heard loud and clear at the New York Times, and the response is obedience. But the Times also isn’t bothering to inform its readers that the images they’re seeing of Gaza are only the ones Hamas wants them to see. It’s time for the Times to tell its readers exactly why they are being presented with such a distorted picture of this war.

Voir encore:

Israel abandoned
The anti-Semitic West almost seems to want Israelis to suffer
Melanie Phillips
19 July 2014

It’s the moral equivalence which is so devastating. When Egypt this week proposed its ceasefire in Gaza, a BBC presenter asked whether both sides would now conclude that there was no point carrying on with the war. From the start, restraint has been urged on both sides — as if more than 1,100 rocket attacks on Israel in three weeks had the same weight as trying to stop this onslaught once and for all.

Israel has been bombing Gaza solely to stop Hamas and its associates from trying to kill Israeli citizens. But for many in the West, the driving necessity is not to stop Hamas but to stop Israel.

Moral equivalence morphs instantly into moral bankruptcy. People have looked at the casualty count — around 200 Palestinians killed at the time of writing, while only a handful of Israelis have been injured or killed — and decided that this proves Israel is a monstrous aggressor.

No concern at all for the Israelis who have only a few seconds to rush to a shelter when the sirens start to wail, car drivers flinging themselves to the ground at the side of the road. No concern for the elderly or dis-abled Israelis who can’t get to a shelter, the hospital patients left helpless while the rockets slam into the ground nearby.

Just imagine if the Scots, for example, had for years been firing at England volleys of rockets that were now putting 40-50 million people within range. Unimaginable? Of course it is. No country would tolerate it. But that’s the equivalent situation in which tiny Israel has found itself. Yet it is simultaneously having to fight another war: against a West determined to demonise it with accusations of deliberate atrocities, lack of restraint or an attempt to conquer more land.

To these people, whatever Israel does to defend itself is bad. Killing Gazans is bad, warning them to flee so they won’t be killed is bad, the Iron Dome missile defence system is bad because, while Palestinians are being killed, Israelis are not. Ah yes, that’s the real outrage, isn’t it? Not enough dead Jews. How dare they defend themselves so effectively!

And so the West does Hamas’s dirty work for it. Hamas cannot defeat Israel militarily. Its strategy is not just to kill Israelis and demoralise the population, but also to de-legitimise Israel so that the West, too, will work for its destruction. Hamas’s rockets have failed in the first two objectives — but the third is a runaway success.

In its hundreds of tunnels, Hamas has built an underground infrastructure of industrialised terror the length of Gaza. As a Fatah spokesman blurted out, it has situated its arsenal among civilians, underneath schools and hospitals and mosques, for the infernal purpose of using its population as human shields and human sacrifices.

It has urged Gazans to make themselves the target of Israeli air strikes. It has ordered them to ignore the Israeli warnings to evacuate, which are delivered by leaflet, phone, text and warning shots.

Doesn’t the Israel-atrocity brigade ever pause to wonder why Hamas has provided no air-raid shelters for its people, while Israel has constructed a national shelter system? Gazan civilians are dying in order to maximise their numbers killed in the war, so that Hamas can incite against Israel in both the Muslim world and the West.

And it openly games the PR system. Hamas social media guidelines instruct Gazans not to post pictures of missiles launched from ‘residential areas’ and always to add the term ‘innocent citizen’ to any casualty’s name. So the figures it issues for civilian as opposed to terrorist casualties, re-circulated by the UN, are worthless.

Israel is waging this war in accordance with international law, which states that when houses are used for military purposes they may become legitimate military targets. But as Ibrahim Kreisheh, the Palestinian delegate to the UN Human Rights Council, admitted in a remarkable TV interview, while Israel’s killing of civilians is considered in law merely a mistake, Hamas is committing war crimes by deliberately targeting Israeli civilians. Indeed, given its use of Gazan human shields, it is guilty of war crimes twice over.

All civilian casualties, however, are deeply to be regretted and to be avoided wherever possible. And so Gaza presents Israel with a hideous dilemma. Either it inescapably kills a lot of civilians as a by-product of destroying the infrastructure of mass murder, or it leaves that infrastructure at least partly in place to spare the civilians. Until now, it has chosen the latter.
Tensions Remain High At Israeli Gaza BorderTensions remain high at the Israeli Gaza border Photo: Getty

It is also allowing food and fuel into Gaza; its offer of blood supplies was turned down by the Palestinian Authority. When a Hamas rocket downed a power line supplying electricity to 70,000 Gazans, workers from the Israel Electric Company braved Hamas rocket fire to restore power to Gaza — en-abling it to fire more rockets at Israel.

Yet it is Israel which is said to be ‘out of control’, guilty of indiscriminate slaughter and even — as ludicrous as it is obscene — ‘genocide’.

Those who demonise Israel in this way should realise just what they are supporting. Palestinian society, both through Hamas and Mahmoud Abbas’s Fatah (whose military wing has also been firing rockets from Gaza), brainwashes its children that glory lies in killing Jews. It routinely pumps out Judeophobic incitement straight from the Nazi playbook.

A few days ago, Yahya Rabah, a member of the Fatah Leadership Committee in Gaza, recycled the medieval blood libel when he wrote in Al-Hayat al-Jadida that the Jews offer sacrifices during Passover ‘made from the blood of our children’.

Every western supporter of the Palestinian war against Israel is also tacitly supporting such anti-Jewish derangement. This psychotic bigotry is the true driver of that war, as well as the Islamist war against the West. Yet astoundingly it is never, ever mentioned. The intractable problem of Gaza has been exacerbated by the meddling incomprehension of a western world that just doesn’t grasp how Islamist fanatics play by entirely different rules.

The West insists on moral equivalence between Israel and the Palestinians, as if the century-old conflict between the Arabs and the Jews were simply a squabble over the equitable division of land. It is not. It is a war to destroy the Jewish national homeland by people driven into frenzy by forces immune to reason.

Israeli parents are now steeling themselves for the nightmare of their sons in the Israel Defence Force being deployed in a Gazan land war to stop the rockets. Some of those boys will be killed. But it will be the Palestinian casualties, the Hamas war crime, which will be used once again to blame the Jews for their own destruction.

Melanie Phillips is a columnist for the Times.

Voir de même:

Décryptage des mensonges de Michèle Sibony, l’invitée extrémiste anti-sioniste sur LCI
JSSnews
21 juillet 2014

Michele Sibony ment, Michèle Sibony ment, Michèle Sibony est… bon, elle n’est pas allemande, mais côté propagande, elle a du aller à bonne école !

Mme Sibony est vice-présidente de l’UJFP, l’Union « Juive » Française pour la Paix. En réalité, ils n’ont de juif que le nom et ne mettent en avant leur ascendance juive que pour l’utiliser comme paratonnerre et être les « bons juifs » des anti-sionistes ; une vraie bonne caution morale pour dire « ben non, vous voyez bien qu’on n’est pas antisémites! ».
On a en connu déjà dans l’histoire juive, que ce soit Nicolas Donin au moyen-âge et autres Pablo Christiani (tous deux juifs convertis au christianisme), donc rien de nouveau sous le soleil.
Comme le dit très justement Laurent Sagalovitsch, l’antisémitisme est une drogue tellement dure, que le monde n’ayant pu s’en passer, lui a trouvé un substitut, comme la méthadone avec l’héroïne: l’antisionisme.
Prétendant avoir une quelconque compétence en la matière, elle a donné un entretien à LCI.

C’est le droit de LCI de lui donner la parole.
Michèle Sibony y a raconté des éléments factuellement faux.
C’est son droit de mentir.
C’est notre obligation de les corriger.
Il faut rappeler que la grande majorité des Français ne connaissent rien au conflit. En discutant avec un certain nombre d’entre eux, beaucoup pensait que la bande de Gaza était encore remplie de colons. Sibony le sait, et elle en joue.
Mensonge 1 à 0mn50 : Elle met en rapport la situation à Gaza et la colonisation.
Faux. Il n’y a plus un seul israélien à Gaza, civil ou militaire depuis 2005.
Mensonge 2 à 1mn13: En répondant à la question de la journaliste sur les roquettes, elle répond que Gaza est l’un des territoires les plus densément peuplé du monde.
Faux. Une simple calculatrice est 3 mn sur Google suffisent à contredire ce mensonge qui est répété depuis des années.
La densité de population à Gaza est de 5046 hab./km2… on va comparer avec d’autres territoires.
Singapour? 7126 hab./km2
Hong Kong? 6544 hab./km2
Bordeaux? 4800 hab./km2
Lyon? 10 000 hab./km2
Paris? 21 000 hab./km2
Rien à rajouter.
Mensonge 3 à 1mn20: Elle affirme que le blocus est « déclaré illégal par toute la communauté internationale »
Faux. Le Rapport Palmer de l’ONU en 2010 suite à une demande sur la validité du blocus naval dans l’affaire du Mavi Marmara a déclaré que le blocus était légal.
Sibony invente de toutes pièces une illégalité du blocus.
De plus, le blocus n’est pas simplement israélien, mais israélo-egyptien, la « responsabilité » égyptienne n’est pas mentionnée par Sibony, alors même que les Gazaouis s’en plaignent.
Ainsi, en moins de 30 secondes, elle nous a déjà pondu 3 mensonges que chacun peut démonter rapidement.
Mensonge 4 à 1mn38: Elle affirme qu’un arrêté de la Cour International de Justice déclare le mur illégal.
Il n’y a eu aucun arrêté, mais en réalité une réponse à une question, c’est à dire un avis consultatif, et non pas un jugement, qui sera suivi d’un vote de l’assemblée générale de l’ONU et non pas du conseil de sécurité, ce qui signifie en droit international qu’il n’est pas contraignant.
Mensonge 5 à 2mn 30: Elle veut nous faire la chronologie des évènements, entre l’échec des négociations, et le gouvernement d’unité palestinien… sauf qu’elle ne semble pas au courant, mais le gouvernement n’était pas un gouvernement Fatah/Hamas, mais un gouvernement technique soutenu par les deux partis.
Mensonge 6 à 3mn: Elle reproche à Israël de ne pas vouloir reconnaitre l’union palestinienne, en omettant de préciser que la raison en est simple: le Hamas continue de prôner la destruction d’Israël et l’extermination de tous les Juifs (article 7 de sa charte).
Mensonge 7 à 3 mn10: Elle affirme que le Hamas n’aurait rien à voir avec l’enlèvement et que tout ça n’était qu’un prétexte du gouvernement israélien. Sauf qu’au moment de l’enlèvement, les personnes identifiées sont bel et bien rattachées au Hamas. Le seul élément que l’on ignore est de savoir si le Hamas l’a bel et bien commandité.
Sibony détourne la réalité et les faits et ne sélectionne que ceux qui l’arrange.
Mensonge 8 à 4mn: Elle affirme que ce serait Israël qui imposerait son calendrier pour la trêve, hors c’est l’Egypte qui a proposé le cessez-le-feu qu’Israël a accepté sans condition préalable. Le cessez-le-feu était la solution en urgence pour pouvoir arrêter les violences immédiatement. Sibony se cale sur les positions du Hamas, qui a préféré poursuivre la guerre et ses morts que d’avoir un cessez-le-feu, quitte à négocier par la suite son prolongement.
Mensonge 9 à 4mn40: Elle affirme que la synagogue de la Roquette accueillait un rassemblement de soutien à Israël, que des Juifs soutiennent Israël, seul état juif, n’est pas étonnant, mais surtout ce rassemblement était en fait une prière pour la paix en Israël et non pas pour la guerre. Pour la chronologie des évènements, les vidéos, et les témoignages, nous y revenons sur Rootsisrael et y répondront plus profondément.
Ce que Sibony omet également de préciser, c’est qu’en se focalisant sur la synagogue de la Roquette, ça lui permet de ne pas parler des autres synagogues visées et des propos antisémites qui ont été entendus et enregistrés.
Pour le reste, nous avons le droit à sa propagande.
On a tout à fait le droit, si on le souhaite, de soutenir les Palestiniens, ceux de Gaza, de vouloir la paix pour eux, et leur bien-être, mais quel intérêt à mentir pour appuyer sa démonstration?
L’UJFP qui prétend représenter d’autres juifs, représente 300 personnes (juives?), et ce n’est pas en mentant qu’elle en recrutera plus… Heureusement.

Par Israel Tavor – Pour RootsIsrael -
JSSNews

La presse égyptienne soutient Israël contre le Hamas
F24
July 20, 2014

Dans la presse égyptienne, le pilonnage de la bande de Gaza ne fait vibrer ni le sentiment anti-israélien, très fort en Égypte, ni la traditionnelle solidarité arabe. Ces derniers jours, c’est plutôt par leur condamnation virulente du Hamas, voire de l’ensemble des Palestiniens, que les médias égyptiens se sont illustrés.

Adel Nehaman, un éditorialiste du journal égyptien "El-Watan", affirme ainsi sans détour : "Désolé, habitants de Gaza, je ne compatirai pas avec vous tant que vous ne vous serez pas débarrassés du Hamas". Une journaliste du quotidien gouvernemental "Al-Ahram", Azza Sami, n’hésite pas de son côté à féliciter sur Twitter le Premier ministre israélien pour l’offensive sur Gaza : "Merci Netanyahou, et que Dieu nous donne plus d’hommes comme vous pour détruire le Hamas !" Tandis que le présentateur vedette de la chaîne El-Faraeen, Tawfik Okasha, un partisan affiché du pouvoir militaire égyptien et l’un des plus violents détracteurs des Frères musulmans, a attaqué en direct l’ensemble de la population de l’enclave palestinienne : "Les Gazaouis ne sont pas des hommes, s’ils étaient des hommes ils se révolteraient contre le Hamas !" Une chaîne de télévision israélienne n’a pas hésité à diffuser la séquence, interprétée comme une preuve du soutien de l’Égypte à l’opération israélienne dan la bande de Gaza.

Cette hostilité envers le Hamas et les Palestiniens est une conséquence de la vie politique égyptienne où l’affrontement entre islamistes et pouvoir militaire occupe tout l’espace politique. Les journalistes, qui ont soutenu le coup de force de l’armée contre le président islamiste Mohamed Morsi en juillet 2013, ne voient dans le Hamas rien d’autre que la branche palestinienne des Frères Musulmans, aujourd’hui interdits en Égypte. Depuis, une grande partie des médias égyptiens appelle à "liquider" les Frères musulmans et applaudissent l’offensive israélienne censée désarmer le mouvement islamiste.

Le Hamas jugé responsable de la guerre larvée dans le Sinaï

Les journalistes qui encouragent Tsahal invoquent aussi les violences en cours dans le Sinaï, la péninsule frontalière de Gaza et d’Israël. Depuis un an, des groupes islamistes armés attaquent presque quotidiennement la police et l’armée égyptiennes dans cette région déshéritée, longtemps négligée par le gouvernement central.

Le pouvoir actuel affirme que les Frères musulmans et le Hamas sont derrière ces troubles, même si d’autres groupes, dont les djihadistes de Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis ou de Ajnad Masr, revendiquent régulièrement les attaques en question. Pour les médias égyptiens qui ont adopté la ligne politique du pouvoir militaire du maréchal Sissi, la neutralisation du Hamas mettrait fin, selon eux, à la guerre larvée en cours dans le Sinaï.

Cependant, cette presse va beaucoup plus loin. Au-delà du Hamas, ce sont les Palestiniens qui sont dans son collimateur. Elle multiplie les critiques vis-à-vis des "habitants de Gaza", incapables, selon eux, de se révolter contre les islamistes du Hamas comme les Égyptiens l’ont fait en manifestant contre Mohamed Morsi le 30 juin 2013. Une généralisation qui choque Tarek Saad Eddin, rédacteur en chef adjoint du magazine égyptien "El-Moussawer". "Ces journalistes font partie de médias qui reçoivent leurs ordres du pouvoir. Ils affirment que le Hamas est responsable du meurtre des manifestants de la place Tahrir pendant le soulèvement de janvier 2011, et de la libération des leaders islamistes qui étaient en prison à cette époque… Mais en critiquant tous les Gazaouis, ils se trompent complètement de cible", commente-t-il pour le site en langue arabe de France 24.

Une méfiance généralisée à l’encontre des Palestiniens

Ce type de campagne médiatique dirigée contre une communauté n’est pas inédite en Égypte. Les Syriens ont été la cible du même genre d’attaques à l’été 2013, après le renversement de Mohamed Morsi par l’armée. Une partie des médias égyptiens, dont le présentateur Tawfik Okasha, avait accusé les réfugiés syriens en Égypte d’être des alliés des Frères musulmans. Cette campagne médiatique avait débouché sur des attaques physiques contre des Syriens dans les rues du Caire.

Tous les Égyptiens ne sont pourtant pas aussi hostiles au Hamas et aux Palestiniens. Des manifestations de soutien à Gaza ont également eu lieu ces derniers jours au Caire et à Alexandrie. Elles n’ont toutefois rassemblé que quelques milliers de personnes. Des jeunes activistes égyptiens, pour la plupart proches de mouvements de gauche, ont organisé un convoi de solidarité avec Gaza : 400 d’entre eux se sont rendus jusqu’au poste-frontière de Rafah, entre l’Égypte et Gaza, où l’armée égyptienne les a stoppés et renvoyés vers Le Caire.

Mais hormis ces militants, les Égyptiens semblent globalement peu sensibles au sort des Gazaouis. La méfiance générale envers les Palestiniens, que le régime de Moubarak a entretenue pendant des années en accusant les "terroristes du Hamas" de vouloir déstabiliser l’Égypte, est aujourd’hui réactivée par les médias qui soutiennent le nouveau pouvoir.

Adaptation d’un article de Boualem Rhoubachi

Voir par ailleurs:

Face aux crimes sionistes et à la complicité de l’Etat français : résistance !

* Face aux crimes sionistes et à la complicité de l’Etat français : résistance !

Vous aussi signez l’appel et envoyez vos dons pour soutenir la mobilisation

Nous étions 30 000 à Paris dimanche 13 juillet en soutien à la résistance palestinienne et contre la complicité du gouvernement français avec les criminels sionistes. Pour contrer notre mobilisation populaire, les lobbys sionistes ont inventé une attaque contre une synagogue et mobilisé leurs réseaux, de la LDJ au sommet de l’Etat, en passant par le CRIF et les médias dominants, afin de disqualifier notre lutte contre le colonialisme.

Ils souhaitent nous interdire d’exprimer notre soutien à la lutte héroïque du peuple palestinien. Ils souhaitent nous interdire de clamer fièrement notre opposition au sionisme. Nous répondons : résistance !

Face à un système raciste et islamophobe, une gauche et une droite françaises qui n’ont pas rompu avec les vieux réflexes coloniaux, alors que l’oppression s’abat sur les nôtres, arabes, musulmans, noirs, habitants des quartiers populaires, un droit et un devoir s’imposent à nous : nous opposer aux dirigeants corrompus et hypocrites qui soutiennent Israël.

La lutte en cours à Gaza et dans toute la Palestine est la nôtre : il s’agit de mettre en échec un projet colonial qui allie une idéologie raciste à une technologie meurtrière dont le but est de nous neutraliser. Incapables d’arrêter les roquettes de la résistance palestinienne, les sionistes massacrent les familles et bombardent aveuglément maisons, dispensaires, mosquées.

Cette bataille ne sera pas finie tant que le siège de Gaza est maintenu et que les sionistes emprisonnent et torturent les nôtres. Cette guerre ne sera gagnée que quand nous serons tous unis, pour notre dignité… et la libération de la Palestine.

La lutte armée en Palestine se prolonge ici par notre mobilisation, dans la rue, et en intensifiant, partout, la campagne pour le boycott et les sanctions contre l’Etat sioniste. Prenons nos responsabilités, organisons-nous de façon autonome, rallions tous les soutiens sincères à notre juste cause !

Halte à l’agression contre Gaza – Halte au blocus
Soutien total et inconditionnel à la résistance palestinienne sous toutes ses formes
Liberté pour tous les prisonniers palestiniens
Soutien à la campagne BDS – Boycott, Désinvestissement, Sanctions contre Israël
Halte à la complicité des dirigeants français et européens

Premiers signataires :

Union Générale des Etudiants de Palestine-GUPS Paris; Mouvement des Jeunes Palestiniens-PYM France; Associations de Palestiniens en Ile-de-France; Fatah France; Génération Palestine; PIR; Uni-T; IJAN; Ameddias; La Courneuve-Palestine; Actions Terres du Monde; Abna Philistine; Comité Action Palestine; ISM-France; Europalestine; Collectif des musulmans de France; GAB; Campagne Abrogation des Lois Islamophobes (A.L.I); Association des Marocains en France; Mouvement Echaâb (Tunisie); Ailes-femmes du Maroc; Al Massar; collectif BARAKA; AMDH-Paris/IDF; Ettakatol (FDTL); Américains contre la guerre (AAW); Respaix Conscience Musulmane; L’Action Antifasciste Aube Champagne-Ardenne; Bouge qui Bouge (77); H2B (77); L’Association la Colombe et L’Olivier; Amatullah (Bagnolet); Ziri (Bagnolet); collectif HAMEB; ARAC NOISIEL; Cuba Si France; Le front populaire de Tunisie; Federation des Associations des Marocains en France; AFAPREDESA; Etudiants Musulmans de France; Culture&Solidarité; UniEs-vers-elles;

pour signatures orgas : gupsparis@gups-france.org

Voir enfin:

Une seule réponse, la résistance

Communiqué de Génération Palestine

Samedi 19 juillet, pendant qu’Israël, face à la résistance déterminée des combattants palestiniens, décidait de réduire en poussière le quartier de Shajaiya à Gaza, faisant plus de 100 mort-e-s et 60000 déplacé-e-s en moins de 24 heures, notre premier ministre, Manuel Valls, était occupé.

Il était occupé à empêcher la solidarité avec le peuple palestinien de s’exprimer. Il était occupé à attaquer les personnes et organisations solidaires de la Palestine et de sa résistance. Pour cela, la méthode a été simple: utiliser une manipulation de la Ligue de Défense Juive, une organisation sioniste violente et raciste, pour interdire la manifestation de soutien à Gaza prévue à Paris et se servir ensuite des affrontements causés par cette interdiction pour charger puis interpeller. Le résultat, ce sont plusieurs heures d’affrontements avec la police à Barbès, des nuages de gaz lacrymogènes dans tout le Nord de Paris, 44 arrestations et 19 personnes toujours en garde à vue en ce moment.

Il faut dire clairement que tout ceci a été voulu et préparé par le gouvernement. L’interdiction officielle de la manifestation moins de 48 heures avant son déroulement, les forces de l’ordre lâchées dans un quartier populaire en plein samedi après-midi, les menaces voilées du gouvernement, tout a été mis en place pour nous faire réagir et pour permettre au gouvernement de justifier sa répression. Le lendemain, le gouvernement signe son forfait en accusant les manifestant-e-s d’un “antisémitisme” imaginaire censé justifier ce déploiement de force. C’est un piège politique et policier qui a été tendu aux personnes qui ont exprimé leur solidarité avec le peuple palestinien à Paris ce samedi 19 juillet. Ses conséquences dramatiques ont été cyniquement utilisées dans l’agenda étatique, notamment par Manuel Valls, lors de la commémoration de la rafle du Vel’ d’Hiv le lendemain.

Comme par hasard, les autres villes de France où les manifestations n’ont été ni bloquées et ni attaquées, ont vu se dérouler des manifestations massives, sans aucun des fameux “troubles à l’ordre public” tant redoutés par le gouvernement.

En protégeant la LDJ et en s’en prenant à nous, le gouvernement a fait un choix clair. Un choix clair et cohérent avec son soutien au colonialisme israélien et avec son premier ministre déclarant son “amour pour Israël”. Un choix ni parisien, ni ponctuel : comme face à la campagne BDS, la réponse des gouvernements successifs a été la criminalisaiton et la répression. Dans la rue comme dans les tribunaux, c’est le soutien à la résistance palestinienne qui est attaqué dès qu’il prend de l’ampleur. Nous en prenons acte et savons à quoi nous attendre de leur part.

Il en faudra plus pour nous faire renoncer. En ce moment même, les Palestinien -ne-s résistent à l’occupation, à la colonisation et à l’apartheid dans toute la Palestine: à Gaza, à Ramallah, à Haïfa, à Naplouse, à Hébron, à Jérusalem … Ils résistent par les armes, par les pierres, par les études, par leur détermination à rester toujours et encore sur leurs terres, à refuser de céder. Malgré la complicité de notre gouvernement, et contre cette complicité, nous sommes à leur côté dans la résistance.

Les palestinien-ne-s ont le droit de résister face à un état colonial qui souhaite s’approprier toujours plus de leurs terres, de leurs ressources et de leurs vies. Nous avons le droit de manifester notre solidarité avec cette résistance dans toute la France. Nous réclamons donc la libération des personnes emprisonnées lors de la manifestation du 19 à Paris, et soutenons les revendications palestiniennes, notamment l’arrêt total de l’offensive israélienne, la fin du siège de Gaza qui dure depuis maintenant 7 ans et la libération des prisonniers capturés à nouveau par Israël après leur libération l’année dernière.

Nous appelons à une nouvelle manifestation le 23 juillet à 18h30, Denfert Rochereau (Paris) ainsi que le samedi 26 juillet, place de la République (Paris) à 15h.

Liberté pour les interpellé-e-s du 19 juillet

Soutien à la résistance palestinienne sous toutes ses formes

Boycott, Désinvestissements et Sanctions contre l’Etat israélien


Gaza: En droit de la guerre, la proportionnalité n’a rien à voir avec le nombre relatif des victimes (It is ironic that Israel is charged with disproportionality for successfully protecting its civilians by following international law)

21 juillet, 2014
https://scontent-a-fra.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/v/t1.0-9/10524312_4450865086796_1913747810205322816_n.jpg?oh=40466309645ea6092e30209f8bd616ec&oe=54594E05

http://www.europe-israel.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/terror2.jpg

http://www.jpost.com/HttpHandlers/ShowImage.ashx?id=249662&h=236&w=370

https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t1.0-9/10561604_4449284327278_2283345156004203018_n.jpg
J’ai une prémonition qui ne me quittera pas: ce qui adviendra d’Israël sera notre sort à tous. Si Israël devait périr, l’holocauste fondrait sur nous. Eric Hoffer
A 100% effective Iron Dome wouldn’t serve Tel Aviv’s strategical interest slightest bit since the regime relies on the public’s fear of Palestinian attacks. Add to that the huge cost of the defence system’s missles as compared to that of the primitive projectiles fired by the Gazan resistance. From the Palestinian perspective, before Iron Dome the qassams hardly ever caused damage to the Israeli military, but did spread fear and incite the Israeli public opinion against them. Today, thanks to Iron Dome, every airborn sewer pipe is guaranteed to inflict substantial financial loss to the IDF, at least if the system would be programmed to react to every threat. So my take is the Israeli army intentionally limited the effectiveness of the defence system. Pasparal da Beira do Canal (11 March 2013)
Qui se cache dans les mosquées ? Le Hamas. Qui met ses arsenaux sous des hôpitaux ? Le Hamas. Qui met des centres de commandement dans des résidences ou à proximité de jardins d’enfants ? Le Hamas. Le Hamas utilise les habitants de Gaza comme boucliers humains et provoque un désastre pour les civils de Gaza ; donc, pour toute attaque contre des civils de Gaza, ce que nous regrettons, le Hamas et ses partenaires sont seuls responsables. Benjamin Nétanyahou
Les attaques aveugles à la roquette à partir de Gaza vers Israël constituent des actes terroristes que rien ne justifie. Il est évident que le Hamas utilise délibérément des boucliers humains pour intensifier la terreur dans la région. L’absence d’une condamnation de ces actes répréhensibles par la communauté internationale encouragerait ces terroristes à poursuivre ces actions consternantes. Le Canada demande à ses alliés et partenaires de reconnaître que ces actes terroristes sont inacceptables et que la solidarité avec Israël est le meilleur moyen de mettre fin au conflit. L’appui du Canada envers Israël est sans équivoque. Nous appuyons son droit de se défendre, par lui‑même, contre ces attaques terroristes, et nous exhortons le Hamas à cesser immédiatement ses attaques aveugles à l’endroit d’innocents civils israéliens. Le Canada réitère son appel au gouvernement palestinien à désarmer le Hamas et d’autres groupes terroristes palestiniens qui opèrent à partir de Gaza, dont le Jihad islamique palestinien, mandaté par l’Iran. Stephen Harper (premier ministre canadien, 13.07.14)
En ce 13 juillet 2014 on mesure à nouveau le déséquilibre moral vertigineux entre Israël qui suit à la lettre le droit de la guerre et le Hamas qui le bafoue sans vergogne. En effet, les Palestiniens vivant au nord de la Bande de Gaza dans des zones d’où sont tirées à l’aveuglette des dizaines de roquettes sur les populations civiles d’Israël, ont été avertis par Tsahal d’évacuer les lieux pour permettre une opération de nettoyage de cibles militaires sans faire de victimes civiles. Ce que nombreux Palestiniens font, se réfugiant dans des bâtiments de l’UNRWA. Le Hamas, qui utilise sa population comme boucliers humains, leur ordonne de retourner dans ces zones. Pour la seule journée du 12 juillet 2014 plus de 129 roquettes ont été tirées depuis Gaza vers Israël. 117 roquettes au moins ont frappé Israël 9 roquettes ont été interceptées par le Dôme de Fer Tsahal a frappé 120 cibles terroristes dans la Bande de Gaza On est bien loin d’un soi-disant combat de David contre Goliath, le Hamas possédant un arsenal considérable. Fabriqué localement pour partie – d’où les restrictions israéliennes sur la nature des transferts à Gaza, qui se poursuivent actuellement en dépit des attaques terroristes – mais importé pour une plus grande partie. Fourni par l’Iran ou ses alliés, importé dans la Bande de Gaza via des tunnels de contrebande dont la construction est devenue une spécialité locale ayant bénéficié jusque récemment de complicités égyptiennes. L’Égypte aujourd’hui saisit ce type de matériel à destination de Gaza-. (…) C’est dans ce contexte que Tsahal, se conformant au droit international et au droit de la guerre a averti le 12 juillet des Gazaouis du nord de la Bande de Gaza, qui vivent autour de rampes de lancement de roquettes et autres installations terroristes militaires de partir de chez eux avant midi le lendemain avant que soit lancée une opération pour les détruire. Ce que rapporte même l’agence de presse palestinienne Maan News.. Qui fait également état du départ de milliers de Palestiniens qui vont se réfugier dans des écoles ou des bâtiments de l’UNRWA. Ce qui montre d’ailleurs qu’ils savent que les tirs israéliens ne sont pas aveugles, à la différence des tirs lancés depuis Gaza. Et que fait le Hamas ? Son ministère de l’Intérieur ordonne à ces Palestiniens de regagner immédiatement leur domicile, affirmant que ces avertissements entreraient dans le cadre d’une guerre psychologique et ne sont pas à prendre au sérieux, alors qu’il sait pertinemment que tel n’est pas le cas…., Le mouvement terroriste qui utilise sa population comme boucliers humains démontre une fois encore son peu de respect pour leurs vies. Les Gazaouis n’étant pour lui que de la chair à canon. Hélène Keller-Lind
News media coverage of the Gaza war is increasingly focusing on the body count. It’s an easy way to make Israel look bad. And it tends to obscure who the real aggressor in this conflict is, and who is the real victim. Each day, journalists report an ever-higher number of Gazans who have been killed, comparing it to the number of Israeli fatalities, which is still, thank G-d, zero. This kind of simplistic reporting creates a sympathetic portrayal of the Palestinians, who are shown to be genuinely suffering, while the Israeli public just seems a little scared. But there are important reasons why there are so many more Palestinian casualties than Israeli casualties. The first is that the Israeli government has built bomb shelters for its citizens, so they have places to hide when the Palestinians fire missiles at them. By contrast, the Hamas regime in Gaza refuses to build shelters for the general population, and prefers to spend its money buying and making more missiles. It’s not merely that Hamas has no regard for the lives of its own citizens. But even worse: Hamas deliberately places its civilians in the line of fire, in the expectation that Palestinian civilian casualties will generate international sympathy. On July 10, the Hamas Ministry of the Interior issued an official instruction to the public to remain in their apartments, and “and not heed these message from Israel” that their apartment buildings are about to be bombed. A New York Times report on July 11 described in sympathetic detail how seven Gazans were killed, and many others wounded, in an Israeli strike despite multiple advance warnings by Israel to vacate the premises. In the 18th paragraph of the 21-paragraph feature, the Times noted, in passing: “A member of the family said earlier that neighbors had come to ‘form a human shield.’ ” Isn’t that outrageous? Israel voluntarily gives up the advantage of surprise in order to warn Palestinian civilians and save their lives. Hamas responds by trying to ensure that Palestinian civilians get killed. And the international community chastises Israel for the Palestinian fatalities! Another reason there are so many more Palestinian casualties is that Hamas deliberately places its missile-launchers and arms depots in and around civilian neighborhoods. Hamas hopes that Israel will be reluctant to strike such targets because of the possibility of hitting civilians. Hezbollah does the same thing in southern Lebanon. This is by now an old Arab terrorist tactic, going back more than three decades. (…) The final reason the Palestinian casualty toll is higher than that of Israel is that Israel has a superior army, and it’s winning this war. Those who win wars almost always have fewer casualties than those who are defeated. In Israel’s case, that’s a good thing. Israel need not feel guilty or defensive about winning. It’s a lot better than losing, as the Jewish people have learned from centuries of bitter experience as helpless victims. Anyone with knowledge of history can appreciate how misleading casualty statistics can be. In World War II, the United States suffered about 360,000 military deaths. The Germans lost 3.2-million soldiers and 3.6-million civilians. Does that mean America was the aggressor, and Germany the victim? Japan estimates that it suffered 1 million military deaths and 2 million civilian deaths. Does that mean America attacked Japan, and not vice versa? The fourth lesson from the Gaza war: The body count is a form of Arab propaganda, which actually conceals who is the aggressor and who is the victim. Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn
Un simple cessez-le-feu serait de facto une victoire pour le Hamas. Il donnerait au Hamas le temps et l’espace de respiration dont il a besoin pour faire passer plus d’armes, réparer ses tunnels terroristes, et lancer de nouvelles attaques terroristes contre Israël. Il ne durerait que pour mieux prolonger la guerre. (…) les sous-sols de la ville de Shuja’iya que les israéliens ont bombardés cette nuit [représentent] tout un arsenal et des postes de commandement terroristes sous les immeubles d’habitation, la mosquée et l’hôpital. (…) Certes, nettoyer Gaza de ses armes et de son infrastructure militaire ne serait pas une tâche facile, compte tenu du vaste arsenal que le Hamas a amassé depuis le dernier cessez-le-feu il y a deux ans. Au début de la guerre actuelle, le Hamas avait environ 10.000 roquettes à portée de main. Ces missiles sont plus sophistiqués que les années précédentes, ils transportent des charges lourdes d’explosifs et peuvent atteindre Israël partout, même jusqu’à Nahariya, le long de la frontière nord d’Israël avec le Liban. Le Hamas a également des drones armés. Il a d’énormes dépôts d’armes et des laboratoires de fabrication de bombes. Il a des tunnels en béton où les terroristes se cachent et où passent les armes qui sont introduites en contrebande. En mars de cette année, la marine israélienne a intercepté un navire d’armes iranien à destination de Gaza. Cachées sous des sacs de ciment de fabrication iranienne il y avait des dizaines de roquettes M-302 sol-sol d’une portée de 75 à 150 km. (Remarque: la distance entre la bande de Gaza à Tel-Aviv est de 60 km.) La cache d’armes comprenait également près de 200 obus de mortier, et 400 000 cartouches de munitions. En 2009 et à nouveau en 2011, Israël a bombardé les convois d’armes transportées du Soudan à Gaza. Qui sait combien d’autres de ces livraisons d’armes iraniennes ou soudanaises ont réussi à échapper aux Israéliens et à atteindre Gaza? Ce n’est pas seulement un problème pour Israël. C’est un problème pour l’ensemble du monde libre. Israël est en première ligne dans la guerre internationale contre le terrorisme. Gaza n’est qu’un champ de bataille. Comme nous le savons depuis longtemps, ce qui commence à Gaza ou Bagdad ou Kaboul se propage vite à Londres, Madrid et New York. La communauté internationale a démontré que quand elle rassemble sa volonté, elle peut désarmer les terroristes. Une pression internationale sévère et des sanctions ont contraint la Syrie à entamer le démantèlement de ses armes chimiques l’année dernière. (…) Au lieu de continuer à verser des milliards de dollars d’aide financière dans le trou noir connu sous le nom de «économie de Gaza», la communauté internationale doit porter son attention sur les armes de Gaza. Il est temps à l’instar de ce que l’Irlande a réussi et des progrès faits en Syrie, de démilitariser la bande de Gaza. Les habitants de Gaza ont besoin de beurre, et non pas de munitions, et les gens du monde libre ont besoin de paix, et non pas de terrorisme. Moshe Phillips et Benyamin Korn
Curieux reportages : on ne parle que de femmes d’enfants et de vieux retrouvés dans les décombres, pas un seul homme, bizarre non ? Comme si en effet les hommes étaient dans les tunnels faisant déboucher leur rampe de lancement dans les maisons mêmes, les toits coulissants ou des verrières, avec obligation pour les femmes et enfants de vivre et mourir avec, voilà les conditions de la guerre que ne connaissent évidemment pas les casseurs de "juifs" à Barbès et de Sarcelles. En 2008 sur les 1500 morts gazouis, plus de la moitié étaient des combattants… Les autres sont les otages d’amoureux de la mort. Iris Canderson
Dans toute la France, ce sont aujourd’hui des milliers de manifestant-e-s qui sont descendus dans la rue pour exiger l’arrêt de l’intervention militaire de l’État d’Israël dans la bande de Gaza, pour crier leur révolte face au plus de 300 morts palestiniens depuis le début de cette intervention. En interdisant dans plusieurs villes et notamment à Paris, les manifestations de solidarité avec la Palestine, Hollande et le gouvernement Valls ont enclenché une épreuve de force qu’ils ont finalement perdue. Depuis l’Afrique où il organise l’aventure militaire de l’impérialisme français, Hollande avait joué les gros bras « ceux qui veulent à tout prix manifester en prendront la responsabilité ». C’est ce qu’ont fait aujourd’hui des milliers de manifestant-e-s qui sont descendus dans la rue pour exiger l’arrêt de l’intervention militaire de l’État d’Israël dans la bande de Gaza, pour crier leur révolte face au plus de 300 morts palestiniens depuis le début de cette intervention. Et pour faire respecter le droit démocratique à exprimer collectivement la solidarité. En particulier à Paris, plusieurs milliers de manifestants, malgré l’impressionnant quadrillage policier, ont défié l’interdiction du gouvernement. C’est un succès au vu des multiples menaces de la préfecture et du gouvernement. En fin de manifestation, des échauffourées ont eu lieu entre des manifestants et les forces de l’ordre. Comment aurait-il pu en être autrement au vu de dispositif policier et de la volonté du gouvernement de museler toute opposition à son soutien à la guerre menée par l’Etat d’Israël. Le NPA condamne les violences policières qui se sont déroulées ce soir à Barbès et affirme que le succès de cette journée ne restera pas sans lendemain. Dès mercredi, une nouvelle manifestation aura lieu à l’appel du collectif national pour une paix juste et durable. La lutte pour les droits du peuple palestinien continue. Le NPA appelle l’ensemble des forces de gauche et démocratiques, syndicales, associatives et politiques, à exprimer leur refus de la répression et leur solidarité active avec la lutte du peuple palestinien. NPA
Il faut dire que le réseau souterrain du Hamas a de quoi inquiéter Israël. "Des dizaines de tunnels parcourent la bande de Gaza, affirme Tsahal. Il s’agit d’un réseau sophistiqué, très bien entretenu, qui relie des ateliers de construction de roquettes, des rampes de lancement et des postes de commandement." A une vingtaine de mètres sous terre, ils sont parfois équipés du téléphone et de l’électricité. Les galeries, dont la construction peut prendre des années, sont devenues une fierté pour le Hamas, expliquait un ancien responsable de l’armée israélienne au journal Haaretz. Francetvinfo
Les tactiques de combat et l’idéologie du Hamas sont, "par excellence, un cas d’école" de violations systématiques du droit international humanitaire. Il n’y a "presqu’aucun exemple comparable" où que ce soit dans le monde d’aujourd’hui d’un groupe qui viole aussi systématiquement les accords internationaux liés aux conflits armés. Irwin Cotler (ancien Ministre de la Justice canadien, membre du parlement de ce pays et professeur de droit à l’Université McGill de Montreal)
En droit de la guerre, la proportionnalité n’a rien à voir avec le nombre relatif des victimes des deux côtés. Il fait plutôt référence à la valeur militaire d’une cible (combien d’impact la destruction de la cible aurait sur l’issue d’une bataille ou guerre) par rapport à la menace attendue pour la vie ou la propriété de civils. Si la cible a une haute valeur militaire, alors elle peut être attaquée même si cela risque d’entrainer des pertes civiles. Ce qui doit être "proportionnel" (le terme n’est en fait pas utilisé dans les conventions pertinentes), c’est la valeur militaire de la cible par rapport au risque pour les civils. En particulier, l’Article 51 du protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève de 1977 interdit aussi comme sans discrimination : 5 b ) les attaques dont on peut attendre qu’elles causent incidemment des pertes en vies humaines dans la population civile, des blessures aux personnes civiles, des dommages aux biens de caractère civil, ou une combinaison de ces pertes et dommages, qui seraient excessifs par rapport à l’avantage militaire concret et direct attendu. Par cette mesure, les efforts d’Israël pour détruire les missiles avant qu’ils puissent être tirés sur des civils israéliens, même si cela place des civils palestiniens en péril, semble se conformer parfaitement aux lois de la guerre. Rien n’oblige Israël à placer la vie de ses citoyens en danger pour protéger la vie des civils palestiniens. (…) Au-delà de cela, placer ses propres civils autour ou près d’une cible militaire pour servir de « boucliers humains » est interdit par la quatrième Convention de Genève : Art. 28. "Aucune personne protégée ne pourra être utilisée pour mettre, par sa présence, certains points ou certaines régions à l’abri des opérations militaires". L’article 58 du protocole 1 additionnel aux Conventions de Genève de 1977 va même plus loin à cet égard, exigeant que Hamas éloigne les civils palestiniens de la proximité de ses installations militaires, ce qui comprendrait tout endroit où seraient produits, stockés ou actionnés les mortiers, bombes et armes et ce en tout lieu où s’entrainent, se rassemblent ou se cachent ses combattants. Voici le texte qui engage les parties au conflit à: … a) s’efforceront, sans préjudice de l’article 49de la IVe Convention, d’éloigner du voisinage des objectifs militaires la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens de caractère civil soumis à leur autorité ; s’efforcer de supprimer la population civile, les civils et les biens de caractère civil sous leur contrôle du voisinage des objectifs militaires ; b éviter de placer des objectifs militaires dans ou près de zones densément peuplées ; (c) prendre les autres précautions nécessaires pour protéger la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens de caractère civil sous leur contrôle contre les dangers résultant des opérations militaires. Le Hamas, en tant que gouvernement de facto dans la bande de Gaza, a clairement violé l’ensemble de ces trois dispositions : ils n’ont fait aucun effort pour éloigner les civils du voisinage des objectifs militaires. Au contraire, ils cachent systématiquement des combattants et des armes dans les écoles, les mosquées et les maisons privées, et ils tirent des missiles et mortiers sur des civils israéliens à partir de ces lieux. Contrairement à Israël, le Hamas n’a fait aucun effort pour fournir des abris pour l’usage des civils palestiniens. Alors que le Hamas a importé des quantités énormes de ciment, celles-ci ont été détournées de force du secteur civil et utilisées à la place pour construire des bunkers et des tunnels pour les dirigeants du Hamas, ainsi que des postes de tir de missiles cachés. En revanche, l’exigence d’Israël, depuis le début des années 1990, est que toutes les maisons neuves soient dotées d’une salle sûre et renforcée et sa construction d’abris anti-bombe (souvent rudimentaires) dans les communautés près de Gaza a contribué à protéger les civils israéliens contre les attaques du Hamas, bien qu’à un coût de plus d’un milliard de dollars. Il est ironique de constater qu’Israël est accusé de disproportion pour avoir réussi à protéger efficacement ses civils en accord avec le droit international. Camera
Article 51 – Protection de la population civile
1. La population civile et les personnes civiles jouissent d’une protection générale contre les dangers résultant d’opérations militaires. En vue de rendre cette protection effective, les règles suivantes, qui s’ajoutent aux autres règles du droit international applicable, doivent être observées en toutes circonstances.
2. Ni la population civile en tant que telle ni les personnes civiles ne doivent être l’objet d’attaques.
Sont interdits les actes ou menaces de violence dont le but principal est de répandre la terreur parmi la population civile.
3. Les personnes civiles jouissent de la protection accordée par la présente Section, sauf si elles participent directement aux hostilités et pendant la durée de cette participation.
4. Les attaques sans discrimination sont interdites. L’expression «attaques sans discrimination» s’entend :
a) des attaques qui ne sont pas dirigées contre un objectif militaire déterminé ;
b) des attaques dans lesquelles on utilise des méthodes ou moyens de combat qui ne peuvent pas être dirigés contre un objectif militaire déterminé ; ou
c) des attaques dans lesquelles on utilise des méthodes ou moyens de combat dont les effets ne peuvent pas être limités comme le prescrit le présent Protocole ;
et qui sont, en conséquence, dans chacun de ces cas, propres à frapper indistinctement des objectifs militaires et des personnes civiles ou des biens de caractère civil.
5. Seront, entre autres, considérés comme effectués sans discrimination les types d’attaques suivants :
a) les attaques par bombardement, quels que soient les méthodes ou moyens utilisés, qui traitent comme un objectif militaire unique un certain nombre d’objectifs militaires nettement espacés et distincts situés dans une ville, un village ou toute autre zone contenant une concentration analogue de personnes civiles ou de biens de caractère civil ;
b) les attaques dont on peut attendre qu’elles causent incidemment des pertes en vies humaines dans la population civile, des blessures aux personnes civiles, des dommages aux biens de caractère civil, ou une combinaison de ces pertes et dommages, qui seraient excessifs par rapport à l’avantage militaire concret et direct attendu.
6. Sont interdites les attaques dirigées à titre de représailles contre la population civile ou des personnes civiles.
7. La présence ou les mouvements de la population civile ou de personnes civiles ne doivent pas être utilisés pour mettre certains points ou certaines zones à l’abri d’opérations militaires, notamment pour tenter de mettre des objectifs militaires à l’abri d’attaques ou de couvrir, favoriser ou gêner des opérations militaires. Les Parties au conflit ne doivent pas diriger les mouvements de la population civile ou des personnes civiles pour tenter de mettre des objectifs militaires à l’abri des attaques ou de couvrir des opérations militaires.
8. Aucune violation de ces interdictions ne dispense les Parties au conflit de leurs obligations juridiques à l’égard de la population civile et des personnes civiles, y compris l’obligation de prendre les mesures de précaution prévues par l’article 57 .
Protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève (du 12 août 1949 relatif à la protection des victimes des conflits armés internationaux (Protocole I), 8 juin 1977, article 51)
Article 58  – Précautions contre les effets des attaques
Dans toute la mesure de ce qui est pratiquement possible, les Parties au conflit :
a) s’efforceront, sans préjudice de l’article 49de la IVe Convention, d’éloigner du voisinage des objectifs militaires la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens de caractère civil soumis à leur autorité ;
b) éviteront de placer des objectifs militaires à l’intérieur ou à proximité des zones fortement peuplées ;
c) prendront les autres précautions nécessaires pour protéger contre les dangers résultant des opérations militaires la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens de caractère civil soumis à leur autorité.
Protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève (du 12 août 1949 relatif à la protection des victimes des conflits armés internationaux (Protocole I), 8 juin 1977, article 58)
Aucune personne protégée ne pourra être utilisée pour mettre, par sa présence, certains points ou certaines régions à l’abri des opérations militaires. Convention (IV) de Genève (relative à la protection des personnes civiles en temps de guerre, 12 août 1949, Zones dangereuses, article 28)
Conformément à la pratique de l’ONU, les incidents impliquant des munitions non explosées qui pourraient mettre en danger les bénéficiaires et le personnel sont transmises aux autorités locales. Après la découverte des missiles, nous avons pris toutes les mesures nécessaires pour faire disparaître ces objets de nos écoles et préserver ainsi nos locaux.  Christopher Gunness (directeur de l’UNRWA à Gaza)
L’offensive terrestre décidée par le gouvernement israélien vise à « frapper les tunnels de la terreur allant de Gaza jusqu’en Israël » et protéger ses citoyens. A l’origine destinés à la contrebande des marchandises, les tunnels ont très vite été utilisés par les terroristes islamistes pour faire passer des armes de guerre via la frontière avec l’Egypte. En 2013, l’armée égyptienne sous l’égide de Mohamed Morsi, a décidé d’inonder les tunnels de contrebande pour « renforcer la sécurité à la frontière ». Une véritable foutaise de la part des autorités égyptiennes, alors issues comme le Hamas de la confrérie des Frères musulmans. Avec donc l’argent des contribuables européens, le Hamas a pu construire de nombreux tunnels reliant la bande de Gaza à Israël. L’objectif était de déjouer les systèmes de surveillance israéliens pour infiltrer des terroristes en vue de commettre des attentats dans des localités et prendre des otages israéliens. Plusieurs tunnels pénétraient « de plusieurs centaines de mètres en territoire israélien » construits pour mener des « attaques terroristes ». Les tunnels étaient construits avec des dalles de béton et à une profondeur de 5 à 10 mètres. Le réseau souterrain du Hamas est très sophistiqué, très bien entretenu, il relie des ateliers de construction de missiles et roquettes, des rampes de lancement et des postes de commandement. Plus de 600.000 tonnes de béton et de fer qui auraient pu vous servir a construire des écoles, des routes, des hôpitaux ont servi au Hamas à construire des tunnels en dessous des écoles, mosquées et hôpitaux et en territoire israélien. Pendant que des millions d’Européens vivent dans la misère, l’UE préfère financer les tunnels du terrorisme palestinien. Jean Vercors

Dôme de fer serait-il trop efficace ?

A l’heure où nos belles âmes n’ont à nouveau pas de mots assez durs pour fustiger le seul Israël de vouloir protéger sa population ….

Et, avec l’augmentation quotidienne du nombre des victimes, jamais assez de raisons pour excuser le Hamas d’exposer la population dont il est chargé de la protection …

Pendant qu’avec l’incroyable réseau souterrain creusé sous ses quartiers résidentiels et après les roquettes cachées dans une école de l’ONU, le monde découvre enfin toute l’étendue de sa perfidie …

Et que, poussées par les pyromanes de l’extrême-gauche, nos chères têtes blondes jouent à la guérilla urbaine dans nos propres rues

Comment ne pas voir, avec le site de réinformation américain Camera, l’incroyable ironie de la situation …

Quand Israël se voit accusé de disproportion …

Pour avoir réussi à protéger efficacement ses civils en accord avec le droit international ?

Voir aussi:

Myths and Facts about the Fighting in Gaza
Alex Safian, PhD
Camera
January 8, 200

Myth: Israel’s attacks against Hamas are illegal since Israel is still occupying Gaza through its control of Gaza’s borders and airspace, and it is therefore bound to protect the civilian population under the Fourth Geneva Convention.

Israel has control over Gaza’s air space and sea coast, and its forces enter the area at will. As the occupying power, Israel has the responsibility under the Fourth Geneva Convention to see to the welfare of the civilian population of the Gaza Strip. (Rashid Khalidi, What You Don’t Know About Gaza , New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 8, 2009)

Fact: Of the land borders with Gaza, Israel quite naturally controls those that are adjacent to Israel; the border with Egypt at Rafah is controlled by Egypt. Beyond this, it is clear under international law that Israel does not occupy Gaza. As Amb. Dore Gold put it in a detailed report on the question:

The foremost document in defining the existence of an occupation has been the 1949 Fourth Geneva Convention "Relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War." Article 6 of the Fourth Geneva Convention explicitly states that "the Occupying Power shall be bound for the duration of the occupation to the extent that such Power exercises the functions of government in such territory…." If no Israeli military government is exercising its authority or any of "the functions of government" in the Gaza Strip, then there is no occupation. (Legal Acrobatics: The Palestinian Claim that Gaza is Still "Occupied" Even After Israel Withdraws, Amb. Dore Gold, JCPA, 26 August 2005)

But what if despite this we take seriously Khalidi’s claim that Israel is the occupying power and is therefore legally the sovereign authority in Gaza? In that case the relevant body of law would not be the Geneva Conventions as Khalidi claims, but would rather be the Hague Regulations, which in the relevant article states:

The authority of the legitimate power having in fact passed into the hands of the occupant, the latter shall take all the measures in his power to restore, and ensure, as far as possible, public order and safety, while respecting, unless absolutely prevented, the laws in force in the country. (Article 43, Laws and Customs of War on Land (Hague IV); October 18, 1907)

Under this article Israel’s incursion into Gaza would therefore be completely legal as a legitimate exercise of Israel’s responsibility for restoring and ensuring public order and safety in Gaza. This would include removing Hamas, which by Khalidi’s logic is an illegitimate authority in Gaza. Under international law Hamas certainly has no right to stockpile weapons or attack Israel, and Israel is therefore justified in taking measures to disarm Hamas and prevent it from terrorizing both the Israeli population and the Gaza population. That is the inescapable logic of Khalidi’s position.

Myth: Since more Palestinians than Israelis have been killed in the fighting this means Israel is acting “disproportionately” or has even committed “war crimes.”

• [Israel] is causing a huge and disproportionate civilian casualty level in Gaza. (Christiane Amanpour CNN, Jan. 4, 2009)

• WAR CRIMES The targeting of civilians, whether by Hamas or by Israel, is potentially a war crime. Every human life is precious. But the numbers speak for themselves: Nearly 700 Palestinians, most of them civilians, have been killed since the conflict broke out at the end of last year. In contrast, there have been around a dozen Israelis killed, many of them soldiers. (Rashid Khalidi, What You Don’t Know About Gaza , New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 8, 2009)

Fact: First of all, contrary to Khalidi, three quarters of the Palestinians killed so far were combatants, not civilians, including 290 Hamas combatants who have been specifically identified.

Beyond this, real world examples obviate any charges about right or wrong based on the number of people killed. Consider that the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor killed about 3,000 Americans. Does it follow that the US should have ended its counterattacks against Japanese forces once a similar number of Japanese had been killed? Since it did not end its attacks, does that mean the US acted disproportionally and was in the wrong and that the Japanese were the aggrieved party? Clearly the answer is no.

Taking this further, counting the number of dead hardly determines right and wrong. For example, again looking at the Pacific Theatre in World War 2, over 2.7 million Japanese were killed, including 580,000 civilians, as against only 106,000 Americans, the vast majority combatants. Does it then follow that Japan was in the right and America was in the wrong? Again, clearly the answer is no. Just having more dead on your side does not make you right.

Proportionality in the sense used by Rashid Khalidi and Christiane Amanpour is meaningless.

Myth: Israel’s actions are illegal since International Law requires proportionality.

International law … calls for the element of proportionality. When you have conflict between nations or between countries, there is a sense of proportionality. You cannot go and kill and injure 3,000 Palestinians when you have four Israelis killed on the other side. That is immoral, that is illegal. And that is not right. And it should be stopped. (Dr. Riyad Mansour, Palestinian ambassador to the United Nations, CNN, Jan 3, 2009)

Actually, proportionality in the Law of War has nothing to do with the relative number of casualties on the two sides. Rather it refers to the military value of a target (how much of an impact would the target’s destruction have on the outcome of a battle or war) versus the expected threat to the lives or property of civilians. If the target has high military value, then it can be attacked even if it seems there will be some civilian casualties in doing so.

What has to be “proportional” (the term is not actually used in the relevant conventions) is the military value of the target versus the risk to civilians.

In particular, Article 51 of Protocol 1 Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1977 prohibits as indiscriminate:

5(b) An attack which may be expected to cause incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians, damage to civilian objects, or a combination thereof, which would be excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated.

By this measure, Israel’s efforts to destroy missiles before they can be fired at Israeli civilians, even if that places Palestinian civilians at risk, seems to conform perfectly to the Laws of War. There is no requirement that Israel place the lives of its own citizens in danger to protect the lives of Palestinian civilians.

Myth: Hamas has no choice but to place weapons and fighters in populated areas since the Gaza Strip is so crowded that is all there is.

[Hamas has] no other choice. Gaza is the size of Detroit. And 1.5 million live here where there are no places for them to fire from them but from among the population. (Taghreed El-Khodary, New York Times Gaza reporter, on CNN, Jan. 1, 2009)

In fact there is plenty of open space in Gaza, including the now empty sites where Israeli settlements once stood. The Hamas claim, parroted by the Times reporter, is nonsense.

Beyond this, placing your own civilians around or near a military target to act as “human shields” is prohibited by the Fourth Geneva Convention:

Art. 28. The presence of a protected person may not be used to render certain points or areas immune from military operations.

Article 58 of Protocol 1 Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1977 goes even further in this regard, requiring that Hamas remove Palestinian civilians from the vicinity of its military facilities, which would include any place where weapons, mortars, bombs and the like are produced, stored, or fired from, and any place where its fighters train, congregate or hide. Here is the text, which calls on the parties to the conflict to:

(A) … endeavour to remove the civilian population, individual civilians and civilian objects under their control from the vicinity of military objectives;

(b) Avoid locating military objectives within or near densely populated areas;

(c) Take the other necessary precautions to protect the civilian population, individual civilians and civilian objects under their control against the dangers resulting from military operations.

Hamas, as the defacto government in Gaza, has clearly violated all three of these provisions:

They have made no effort to remove civilians from the vicinity of military objectives.
On the contrary, they systematically hide fighters and weapons in schools, in mosques and private homes, and they fire missiles and mortars at Israeli civilians from these places.
Unlike Israel, Hamas has made no effort to provide bomb shelters for the use of Palestinian civilians. While Hamas has imported huge amounts of cement, it has been forcefully diverted from the civilian sector and instead used to build bunkers and tunnels for Hamas leaders, along with hidden missile firing positions.

On the other hand, Israel’s requirement since the early 1990′s that all new homes have a secure reinforced room, and its building of (often rudimentary) bomb shelters in communities near Gaza have helped to shield Israeli civilians from Hamas attacks, though at a cost of over $1 Billion dollars.

It is ironic that Israel is charged with disproportionality for successfully protecting its civilians by following international law.

Myth: Israel violated the ceasefire with Hamas in November, and is thus to blame for the conflict.

• Lifting the blockade, along with a cessation of rocket fire, was one of the key terms of the June cease-fire between Israel and Hamas. This accord led to a reduction in rockets fired from Gaza from hundreds in May and June to a total of less than 20 in the subsequent four months (according to Israeli government figures). The cease-fire broke down when Israeli forces launched major air and ground attacks in early November; six Hamas operatives were reported killed. (Rashid Khalidi, What You Don’t Know About Gaza , New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 8, 2009)

• Mustafa Barghouti, Palestinian Legislator (video clip): … The reality and the truth is that the side that broke this truce and this ceasefire was Israel. Two months before it ended, Israel started attacking Rafah, started attacking Khan Yunis …

Rick Sanchez: And you know what we did? I’ve checked with some of the folks here at our international desk, and I went to them and asked, What was he talking about, and do we have any information on that? Which they confirmed, two months ago — this is back in November — there was an attack. It was an Israeli raid that took out six people. (CNN, Dec. 31, 2008)

In fact, contrary to Khalidi, Barghouti and CNN’s Rick Sanchez, the Palestinians violated the ceasefire almost from day one. For example, the Associated Press published on June 25, just after the truce started, an article headlined Palestinian rockets threaten truce

The article in its lead paragraphs reported that:

Palestinian militants fired three homemade rockets into southern Israel yesterday, threatening to unravel a cease-fire days after it began, and Israel responded by closing vital border crossings into Gaza.

Despite what it called a "gross violation" of the truce, Israel refrained from military action and said it would send an envoy soon to Egypt to work on the next stage of a broader cease-fire agreement: a prisoner swap that would bring home an Israeli soldier held by Hamas for more than two years.

There were many further such Palestinian violations, including dozens of rockets and mortars fired into Israel during the so-called ceasefire. And there was also sniper fire against Israeli farmers, anti-tank rockets and rifle shots fired at soldiers in Israel, and not one but two attempts to abduct Israeli soldiers and bring them into Gaza. Here are some of the details:

(Most of this data is from The Six Months of the Lull Arrangement, a detailed report by the Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center, an Israeli NGO.)

From the start of the ceasefire at 6 AM on June 19 till the incident on November 4th, the following attacks were launched against Israel from Gaza in direct violation of the agreement:

18 mortars were fired at Israel in this period, beginning on the night of June 23.
20 rockets were fired, beginning on June 24, when 3 rockets hit the Israeli town of Sderot.
On July 6 farmers working in the fields of Nahal Oz were attacked by light arms fire from Gaza.
On the night of August 15 Palestinians fired across the border at Israeli soldiers near the Karni crossing.
On October 31 an IDF patrol spotted Palestinians planting an explosive device near the security fence in the area of the Sufa crossing. As the patrol approached the fence the Palestinians fired two anti-tank missiles.

There were two Palestinian attempts to infiltrate from Gaza into Israel apparently to abduct Israelis. Both were major violations of the ceasefire.

The first came to light on Sept. 28, when Israeli personnel arrested Jamal Atallah Sabah Abu Duabe. The 21-year-old Rafah resident had used a tunnel to enter Egypt and from there planned to slip across the border into Israel. Investigation revealed that Abu Duabe was a member of Hamas’s Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades, and that he planned to lure Israeli soldiers near the border by pretending to be a drug smuggler, capture them, and then sedate them with sleeping pills in order to abduct them directly into Gaza through a preexisting tunnel. For more details click here and here.

The second abduction plan was aborted on the night of Nov 4, thanks to a warning from Israeli Intelligence. Hamas had dug another tunnel into Israel and was apparently about to execute an abduction plan when IDF soldiers penetrated about 250 meters into Gaza to the entrance of the tunnel, hidden under a house. Inside the house were a number of armed Hamas members, who opened fire. The Israelis fired back and the house exploded – in total 6 or 7 Hamas operatives were killed and several were wounded. Among those killed were Mazen Sa’adeh, a Hamas brigade commander, and Mazen Nazimi Abbas, a commander in the Hamas special forces unit. For more details click here.

It was when Israel aborted this imminent Hamas attack that the group and other Palestinian groups in Gaza escalated their violations of the ceasefire by beginning to once again barrage Israel with rockets and mortars.

Note also that, contrary to Khalidi, Israeli figures do not show that Palestinian violations of the ceasefire during the first four months amounted to “less than 20” rockets.

Considering this long list of Palestinian attacks, charging that Israel broke the ceasefire in November is simply surreal.

Myth: Israel violated the ceasefire by not lifting its blockade of Gaza.

• Negotiation is a much more effective way to deal with rockets and other forms of violence. This might have been able to happen had Israel fulfilled the terms of the June cease-fire and lifted its blockade of the Gaza Strip. (Rashid Khalidi, What You Don’t Know About Gaza , New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 8, 2009)

• Mustafa Barghouti, Palestinian Legislator: … [Israel] never lifted the blockade on Gaza. Gaza remains without fuel, without electricity, with bread, without medications, without any medical equipment for people who are dying in Gaza — 262 people died, 6 people because of no access to medical care. So Israel broke the ceasefire. (CNN, Dec. 31, 2008)

Contrary to Khalidi and Barghouti, Israel did open the crossings and allowed truckload after truckload of supplies to enter Gaza. Closures until November were short, and in direct response to Palestinian violations, some of which were detailed above.

To quote from the ITIC report on the "Lull Agreement":

On June 22, after four days of calm, Israel reopened the Karni and Sufa crossings to enable regular deliveries of consumer goods and fuel to the Gaza Strip. They were closed shortly thereafter, following the first violation of the arrangement, when rockets were fired at Sderot on June 24. However, when calm was restored, the crossings remained open for long periods of time. On August 17 the Kerem Shalom crossing was also opened for the delivery of goods, to a certain degree replacing the Sufa crossing, after repairs had been completed (the Kerem Shalom crossing was closed on April 19 when the IDF prevented a combined mass casualty attack in the region, as a result of which the crossing was almost completely demolished).

Before November 4, large quantities of food, fuel, construction material and other necessities for renewing the Gaza Strip’s economic activity were delivered through the Karni and Sufa crossings. A daily average of 80-90 trucks passed through the crossings, similar to the situation before they were closed following the April 19 attack on the Kerem Shalom crossing. Changes were made in the types of good which could be delivered, permitting the entry of iron, cement and other vital raw materials into the Gaza Strip.

… Israel, before November 4, refrained from initiating action in the Gaza Strip but responded to rocket and mortar shell attacks by closing the crossings for short periods of time (hours to days). After November 4 the crossings were closed for long periods in response to the continued attacks against Israel. (Rearranged from p 11- 12)

Day to day details of the supplies delivered to Gaza and the numbers of trucks involved have been published by the Israeli Foreign Ministry and are available here. The figures confirm that the passages were indeed open and busy.

Myth: Israel is using excessively large bombs in populated neighborhoods and is therefore to blame for any Palestinian civilians killed in the present fighting.
Fact: On the contrary, Israel is using extremely small bombs precisely because Hamas has violated international law by intentionally placing military facilities in densely populated civilian areas (see Article 58 of Protocol 1 Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1977 cited above). To attack these targets while minimizing civilian casualties, Israel is using the new GBU-39 SDB (Small Diameter Bomb), an extremely precise GPS-guided weapon designed to minimize collateral damage by employing a small warhead containing less than 50 lbs of high explosive. Despite its small size, thanks to its accuracy the GBU-39 is able to destroy targets behind even 3 feet of steel-reinforced concrete.

Many of the Palestinian civilian injuries have therefore likely been caused not by Israeli bombs but by Palestinian rockets and bombs which explode after Israel targets the places where they are stored or manufactured, such as mosques and other civilian structures. Numerous videos have been posted of Israeli bombing runs which clearly show the Israeli bomb causing a relatively small initial explosion followed by much larger secondary explosions. Some of the videos also show Palestinian missiles and other projectiles flying in all directions.

Here are two examples. On the left is video of an Israeli strike on December 27 against a hidden missile launcher. After the initial explosion a Palestinian missile flies out to the side and seems to impact in or near a populated area. The video on the right is of an Israeli strike on January 1st against a mosque in the Jabaliya refugee camp that was being used as a weapons storehouse. Right after the initial Israeli strike caused a small explosion, there were multiple huge secondary explosions as the stored Grad missiles and Qassam rockets detonated, and large amounts of ammunition cooked off:

Israeli strike on Dec. 27, 2008 against a hidden missile launcher; a Palestinian missile then seems to hit near a Palestinian neighborhood. Israeli strike on Jan. 1, 2009 against mosque in Jabaliya being used as a weapons depot, causing huge secondary explosions.
No doubt Palestinian civilians anywhere near the mosque were killed or injured by the multiple huge blasts and exploding ammunition and rockets. But it is difficult to see how Palestinians injured by Palestinian bombs and missiles can be blamed on Israel.

(updated 19 Jan 2009)

Voir également:

Chair à canon : Israël avertit les Palestiniens de quitter des zones qui vont être attaquées, le Hamas leur ordonne d’y retourner

Hélène Keller-Lind

Des Infos

13 juillet 2014

En ce 13 juillet 2014 on mesure à nouveau le déséquilibre moral vertigineux entre Israël qui suit à la lettre le droit de la guerre et le Hamas qui le bafoue sans vergogne. En effet, les Palestiniens vivant au nord de la Bande de Gaza dans des zones d’où sont tirées à l’aveuglette des dizaines de roquettes sur les populations civiles d’Israël, ont été avertis par Tsahal d’évacuer les lieux pour permettre une opération de nettoyage de cibles militaires sans faire de victimes civiles. Ce que nombreux Palestiniens font, se réfugiant dans des bâtiments de l’UNRWA. Le Hamas, qui utilise sa population comme boucliers humains, leur ordonne de retourner dans ces zones.

La terreur palestinienne et les répliques israéliennes

Pour la seule journée du 12 juillet 2014 plus de 129 roquettes ont été tirées depuis Gaza vers Israël.
117 roquettes au moins ont frappé Israël
9 roquettes ont été interceptées par le Dôme de Fer
Tsahal a frappé 120 cibles terroristes dans la Bande de Gaza

On est bien loin d’un soi-disant combat de David contre Goliath, le Hamas possédant un arsenal considérable. Fabriqué localement pour partie – d’où les restrictions israéliennes sur la nature des transferts à Gaza, qui se poursuivent actuellement en dépit des attaques terroristes – mais importé pour une plus grande partie. Fourni par l’Iran ou ses alliés, importé dans la Bande de Gaza via des tunnels de contrebande dont la construction est devenue une spécialité locale ayant bénéficié jusque récemment de complicités égyptiennes. L’Égypte aujourd’hui saisit ce type de matériel à destination de Gaza-.

L’Iran à Vienne et à Gaza

Le 13 juillet le Premier ministre Nétanyahou, lors de la réunion hebdomadaire du Cabinet ministériel, soulignait d’ailleurs,que alors que « les grandes puissances discutent aujourd’hui à Vienne de la question du programme nucléaire iranien » il convient de « leur rappeler que le Hamas et le Djihad Islamique sont financés, armés et entraînés par l’Iran, L’Iran est une puissance terroriste majeure..On ne peut permettre à cet Iran-là de pouvoir produire des matières fissiles pour des armes nucléaires. Si cela se produit ce que nous voyons se passer autour de nous et se passer dans le Moyen-Orient sera bien pire… ».

Israël avertit les populations civiles dans le respect du droit de la guerre

C’est dans ce contexte que Tsahal, se conformant au droit international et au droit de la guerre a averti le 12 juillet des Gazaouis du nord de la Bande de Gaza, qui vivent autour de rampes de lancement de roquettes et autres installations terroristes militaires de partir de chez eux avant midi le lendemain avant que soit lancée une opération pour les détruire. Ce que rapporte même l’agence de presse palestinienne Maan News.. Qui fait également état du départ de milliers de Palestiniens qui vont se réfugier dans des écoles ou des bâtiments de l’UNRWA. Ce qui montre d’ailleurs qu’ils savent que les tirs israéliens ne sont pas aveugles, à la différence des tirs lancés depuis Gaza.

Populations civiles palestiniennes qui sont de la chair à canon pour le Hamas

Et que fait le Hamas ? Son ministère de l’Intérieur ordonne à ces Palestiniens de regagner immédiatement leur domicile, affirmant que ces avertissements entreraient dans le cadre d’une guerre psychologique et ne sont pas à prendre au sérieux, alors qu’il sait pertinemment que tel n’est pas le cas…., Le mouvement terroriste qui utilise sa population comme boucliers humains démontre une fois encore son peu de respect pour leurs vies. Les Gazaouis n’étant pour lui que de la chair à canon. Ce que dénonçait à nouveau en ces termes Benjamin Netanyahou lors de la réunion de son Cabinet ministériel du 13 juillet 2014 « Qui se cache dans les mosquées ? Le Hamas. Qui met ses arsenaux sous des hôpitaux ? Le Hamas. Qui met des centres de commandement dans des résidences ou à proximité de jardins d’enfants ? Le Hamas. Le Hamas utilise les habitants de Gaza comme boucliers humains et provoque un désastre pour les civils de Gaza ; donc, pour toute attaque contre des civils de Gaza, ce que nous regrettons, le Hamas et ses partenaires sont seuls responsables ».

Pour faire bonne mesure le Hamas terrorise aussi sa population en faisant assassiner en pleine rue dans la ville de Gaza, par ’des combattants palestiniens’, sans autre forme de procès, un homme accusé d’être ’un collaborateur’,

Israël laisse sortir binationaux et malades graves et laisse entrer des biens de première nécessité

On notera que les binationaux qui le choisissent peuvent quitter la Bande de Gaza par le passage d’Erez et sont des centaines à le faire. Des patients palestiniens continuent à y transiter pour aller se faire soigner en Israël et des biens de première nécessité entrent dan la Bande de Gaza par le passage de Keren Shalom. On trouvera tous les détails de ces livraisons ici.

On rappellera également qu’une grande partie de l’eau potable et de l’électricité consommés dans la Bande de Gaza sont fournis par Israël.

Voir également:

Fourth Lesson From the Gaza War: Don’t Trust Body Counts and Hamas Propaganda
Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn
The Algemeiner
July 15, 2014

News media coverage of the Gaza war is increasingly focusing on the body count.

It’s an easy way to make Israel look bad. And it tends to obscure who the real aggressor in this conflict is, and who is the real victim.

Each day, journalists report an ever-higher number of Gazans who have been killed, comparing it to the number of Israeli fatalities, which is still, thank G-d, zero. This kind of simplistic reporting creates a sympathetic portrayal of the Palestinians, who are shown to be genuinely suffering, while the Israeli public just seems a little scared.

But there are important reasons why there are so many more Palestinian casualties than Israeli casualties.

The first is that the Israeli government has built bomb shelters for its citizens, so they have places to hide when the Palestinians fire missiles at them. By contrast, the Hamas regime in Gaza refuses to build shelters for the general population, and prefers to spend its money buying and making more missiles.

It’s not merely that Hamas has no regard for the lives of its own citizens. But even worse: Hamas deliberately places its civilians in the line of fire, in the expectation that Palestinian civilian casualties will generate international sympathy.

On July 10, the Hamas Ministry of the Interior issued an official instruction to the public to remain in their apartments, and “and not heed these message from Israel” that their apartment buildings are about to be bombed.

A New York Times report on July 11 described in sympathetic detail how seven Gazans were killed, and many others wounded, in an Israeli strike despite multiple advance warnings by Israel to vacate the premises. In the 18th paragraph of the 21-paragraph feature, the Times noted, in passing: “A member of the family said earlier that neighbors had come to ‘form a human shield.’ ”

Isn’t that outrageous? Israel voluntarily gives up the advantage of surprise in order to warn Palestinian civilians and save their lives. Hamas responds by trying to ensure that Palestinian civilians get killed. And the international community chastises Israel for the Palestinian fatalities!

Another reason there are so many more Palestinian casualties is that Hamas deliberately places its missile-launchers and arms depots in and around civilian neighborhoods. Hamas hopes that Israel will be reluctant to strike such targets because of the possibility of hitting civilians. Hezbollah does the same thing in southern Lebanon. This is by now an old Arab terrorist tactic, going back more than three decades.

“One must understand how our enemy operates,” Prime Minister Netanyahu pointed out at the most recent cabinet meeting. “Who hides in mosques? Hamas. Who puts arsenals under hospitals? Hamas. Who puts command centers in residences or near kindergartens? Hamas. Hamas is using the residents of Gaza as human shields and it is bringing disaster to the civilians of Gaza; therefore, for any attack on Gaza civilians, which we regret, Hamas and its partners bear sole responsibility.”

The final reason the Palestinian casualty toll is higher than that of Israel is that Israel has a superior army, and it’s winning this war. Those who win wars almost always have fewer casualties than those who are defeated. In Israel’s case, that’s a good thing. Israel need not feel guilty or defensive about winning. It’s a lot better than losing, as the Jewish people have learned from centuries of bitter experience as helpless victims.

Anyone with knowledge of history can appreciate how misleading casualty statistics can be. In World War II, the United States suffered about 360,000 military deaths. The Germans lost 3.2-million soldiers and 3.6-million civilians. Does that mean America was the aggressor, and Germany the victim? Japan estimates that it suffered 1 million military deaths and 2 million civilian deaths. Does that mean America attacked Japan, and not vice versa?

The fourth lesson from the Gaza war: The body count is a form of Arab propaganda, which actually conceals who is the aggressor and who is the victim.

Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn are members of the board of the Religious Zionists of America.

Gaza : les "tunnels de la terreur", cibles de l’offensive israélienne
Les galeries souterraines creusées par le Hamas sont la priorité de l’opération terrestre lancée le 17 juillet par l’armée israélienne, mais aussi une source de ravitaillement pour les Gazaouis malgré le blocus.
Louis Boy

Le Point

19/07/2014

"La décision de réoccuper Gaza n’a pas été prise." A en croire le ministre de la Sécurité publique israélien, l’offensive terrestre entamée par l’armée israélienne dans la nuit du jeudi 17 au vendredi 18 juillet n’est qu’une opération temporaire, même si Benyamin Nétanyahou s’est dit prêt à l’"élargir de manière significative".

Depuis le début des frappes aériennes, le 8 juillet, l’objectif affiché est le même : mettre le Hamas hors d’état de nuire aux Israéliens. Mais Tsahal semble avoir estimé que les frappes aériennes ne suffiraient pas pour détruire un des atouts principaux du mouvement palestinien : son réseau de souterrains, que le Premier ministre a surnommé les "tunnels de la terreur".
Une attaque souterraine déjouée le 17 juillet

C’est une attaque du Hamas qui semble avoir convaincu Israël de frapper ces tunnels, ou du moins lui avoir fourni le prétexte parfait. Dans la journée qui a précédé l’offensive terrestre, 13 combattants du Hamas pénètrent en Israël en empruntant un de leurs souterrains, à proximité d’un kibboutz. Repérés, ils sont repoussés par des soldats et l’armée de l’air avant de rebrousser chemin. Pour le porte-parole de l’armée, c’est "une attaque terroriste majeure" qui vient d’être déjouée.

Il faut dire que le réseau souterrain du Hamas a de quoi inquiéter Israël. "Des dizaines de tunnels parcourent la bande de Gaza, affirme Tsahal. Il s’agit d’un réseau sophistiqué, très bien entretenu, qui relie des ateliers de construction de roquettes, des rampes de lancement et des postes de commandement." A une vingtaine de mètres sous terre, ils sont parfois équipés du téléphone et de l’électricité. Les galeries, dont la construction peut prendre des années, sont devenues une fierté pour le Hamas, expliquait un ancien responsable de l’armée israélienne au journal Haaretz. Une de ces galeries, découverte par l’armée israélienne en 2013, est visible dans cette vidéo (non sous-titrée) de la chaîne américaine CNN.

Contrebande avec l’Egypte

Certains tunnels aboutissent en plein territoire israélien. Des habitants du sud du pays affirment même entendre des bruits de forage la nuit sous le sol de leurs maisons. Les responsables de l’armée israélienne craignent donc que le Hamas utilise ce réseau pour lancer des attaques en contournant le dispositif de sécurité qui borde la bande de Gaza. En 2006, c’est par ces tunnels que s’étaient évaporés les ravisseurs du soldat israélien Gilad Shalit.

Pourtant, ces tunnels n’avaient, au départ, pas une vocation militaire. Ils apparaissent en 1979 quand la ville de Rafah est divisée en deux : une moitié dans le sud de la bande de Gaza, l’autre moitié sous contrôle égyptien. Les tunnels relient alors les deux côtés de la frontière, et servent à transporter des marchandises de contrebande, voire de la drogue. Un rôle de contrebande qui s’est renforcé depuis 2007 et la mise en place d’un blocus de Gaza par l’Egypte et Israël, en réaction à l’élection du Hamas à la tête de la région. Depuis, les tunnels se sont multipliés, essentiellement à la frontière avec l’Egypte, et sont devenus un lien vital avec l’extérieur. Une partie d’entre eux, les plus secrets, sert aussi à acheminer des combattants et des armes pour le Hamas.
1 400 tunnels détruits par les Egyptiens

Un réseau qui s’est grandement affaibli en 2013, quand le nouveau pouvoir égyptien, hostile au Hamas, décide de s’attaquer aux tunnels. Près de 1 400 d’entre eux sont bouchés entre 2013 et mars 2014, selon l’armée égyptienne. Un chiffre qui témoigne de l’étendue du réseau. Depuis, l’approvisionnement de Gaza en nourriture, en matériaux de construction ou encore en carburant s’est fortement compliqué, affaiblissant aussi le Hamas.

Pour le site américain Vox, l’objectif officiel de l’opération militaire israélienne ces dernières semaines – affaiblir les infrastructures du Hamas – pourrait signifier qu’elle souhaite ne pas s’attaquer uniquement aux tunnels qui mènent en Israël, comme annoncé, mais bien à la totalité du réseau, y compris les tunnels que l’Egypte "pourrait avoir manqués". De quoi rendre encore plus pesant le blocus sur Gaza et, peut-être, porter un coup fatal au Hamas.

Voir encore:

Septième leçon de la guerre de Gaza: Nous devons démilitariser Gaza

Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn

The Algeimeiner

traduction Europe Israël

juil 20, 2014
Septième leçon de la guerre de Gaza: Nous devons démilitariser Gaza

Un exemple des tunnels terroristes et de contrebande du Hamas entre le poste frontière de Rafah avec l’Egypte et la bande de Gaza.

Un simple cessez-le-feu à Gaza laisserait au Hamas le temps de réarmer et de renouveler ses activités terroristes.

La démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza mettrait fin aux activités terroristes du Hamas.

Quel but est le plus logique?

Le président Barack Obama et le secrétaire d’Etat John Kerry travaillent dur pour parvenir à un cessez-le-feu entre Israël et le Hamas. Cet effort est à courte vue – et pire encore. Un simple cessez-le-feu serait de facto une victoire pour le Hamas. Il donnerait au Hamas le temps et l’espace de respiration dont il a besoin pour faire passer plus d’armes, réparer ses tunnels terroristes, et lancer de nouvelles attaques terroristes contre Israël. Il ne durerait que pour mieux prolonger la guerre.

Lorsque le Premier ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahu a accepté le 15 Juillet la proposition de cessez-le-feu, il a expliqué sa décision en ces termes: « Nous avons accepté la proposition égyptienne afin de permettre la démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza – de ses missiles, roquettes et tunnels – par des moyens diplomatiques. »
Ainsi, Netanyahu a déclaré lors d’une conférence de presse télévisée le 16 Juillet:«La chose la plus importante vis-à-vis de Gaza est de s’assurer que l’enclave soit démilitarisée».

terror1Voici les sous-sols de la ville de Shuja’iya que les israéliens ont bombardés cette nuit : tout un arsenal et des postes de commandement terroristes sous les immeubles d’habitation, la mosquée et l’hôpital.

Dans un plan présenté au bureau du premier ministre et au Comité Knesset des Affaires étrangères et de la Défense la semaine dernière, l’ancien ministre de la Défense, Shaul Mofaz, a présenté un plan détaillé pour la démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza.

De même, Tony Blair, l’ancien Premier ministre britannique qui est maintenant l’envoyé du Quartet pour le Moyen-Orient, a déclaré sur la chaîne israélienne TV 10 le 15 Juillet qu’il doit y avoir un « plan à long terme pour Gaza … qui traite des exigences de la sécurité réelle d’Israël de façon permanente … le Hamas ne peut pas poursuivre l’infrastructure militaire dont il dispose. »

Certes, nettoyer Gaza de ses armes et de son infrastructure militaire ne serait pas une tâche facile, compte tenu du vaste arsenal que le Hamas a amassé depuis le dernier cessez-le-feu il y a deux ans. Au début de la guerre actuelle, le Hamas avait environ 10.000 roquettes à portée de main. Ces missiles sont plus sophistiqués que les années précédentes, ils transportent des charges lourdes d’explosifs et peuvent atteindre Israël partout, même jusqu’à Nahariya, le long de la frontière nord d’Israël avec le Liban.

Le Hamas a également des drones armés. Il a d’énormes dépôts d’armes et des laboratoires de fabrication de bombes. Il a des tunnels en béton où les terroristes se cachent et où passent les armes qui sont introduites en contrebande.

En mars de cette année, la marine israélienne a intercepté un navire d’armes iranien à destination de Gaza. Cachées sous des sacs de ciment de fabrication iranienne il y avait des dizaines de roquettes M-302 sol-sol d’une portée de 75 à 150 km. (Remarque: la distance entre la bande de Gaza à Tel-Aviv est de 60 km.) La cache d’armes comprenait également près de 200 obus de mortier, et 400 000 cartouches de munitions. En 2009 et à nouveau en 2011, Israël a bombardé les convois d’armes transportées du Soudan à Gaza.

Qui sait combien d’autres de ces livraisons d’armes iraniennes ou soudanaises ont réussi à échapper aux Israéliens et à atteindre Gaza?

Ce n’est pas seulement un problème pour Israël. C’est un problème pour l’ensemble du monde libre. Israël est en première ligne dans la guerre internationale contre le terrorisme. Gaza n’est qu’un champ de bataille. Comme nous le savons depuis longtemps, ce qui commence à Gaza ou Bagdad ou Kaboul se propage vite à Londres, Madrid et New York.

La communauté internationale a démontré que quand elle rassemble sa volonté, elle peut désarmer les terroristes. Une pression internationale sévère et des sanctions ont contraint la Syrie à entamer le démantèlement de ses armes chimiques l’année dernière. La pression et la fermeté britannique ont entraîné le désarmement des terroristes de l’IRA. Peut-être que cette expérience est à l’origine de l’appel de l’ancien Premier ministre Tony Blair pour le démantèlement de l’infrastructure terroriste du Hamas dans la bande de Gaza.

Au lieu de continuer à verser des milliards de dollars d’aide financière dans le trou noir connu sous le nom de «économie de Gaza», la communauté internationale doit porter son attention sur les armes de Gaza. Il est temps à l’instar de ce que l’Irlande a réussi et des progrès faits en Syrie, de démilitariser la bande de Gaza. Les habitants de Gaza ont besoin de beurre, et non pas de munitions, et les gens du monde libre ont besoin de paix, et non pas de terrorisme.

La septième leçon de la guerre de Gaza: la démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza, pas un cessez le feu, doit être l’objectif non seulement d’Israël, mais de l’ensemble du monde libre.

Moshe Phillips et Benyamin Korn sont membres du conseil des sionistes religieux d’Amérique.

Voir de même:

Gaza: les tunnels de la terreur financés par l’Union Européenne
Jean Vercors

JSSNews

20 juillet 2014

Depuis son arrivée au pouvoir en janvier 2006, le Hamas a lancé plus de 10,000 missiles et roquettes sur la population civile d’Israël. Le Hamas, est considéré par le Quartet (Etats-Unis, Russie, UN et Union européenne, Australie, Canada, Japon) comme un mouvement terroriste.

L’idéologie et les objectifs de ce mouvement sont contenus dans sa charte, adoptée le 18 août 1988. Les buts du Hamas sont la destruction de l’Etat d’Israël et la création d’un Etat islamique en Palestine, avec Jérusalem comme capitale. Le Hamas se base entièrement sur l’islam et considère que le territoire palestinien dans son ensemble, ce qui inclut donc l’Etat d’Israël, est une terre islamique.

La population de gaza a voté majoritairement pour le Hamas, ils ont choisi des leaders terroristes et irresponsables.

La population civile paie la note du Hamas qu’ils ont élu massivement.

99.9% des gazaouïs approuvent toutes les actions du Hamas, le 0.10% est au cimetière.

L’UE est le principal bailleur de fonds de l’Autorité palestinienne et fournit chaque année plus de 450 millions de dollars par an d’aide directe. Sans compter les aides « privées » des Etats et des collectivités et sans compter également les dons faits aux organisations islamiques et arabes qui pullulent en France en faveur des palestiniens.

De nombreuses associations dites caritatives comme : le Comité de Bienfaisance et de Solidarité avec la Palestine, la Fondation Al-Aksa, le Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development, le Palestinians’ Relief and Development Fund (Interpal) et le Palestine and Lebanon Relief Fund, actifs respectivement en France, en Allemagne, aux Etats-Unis et en Grande-Bretagne, servent ainsi au Hamas à récolter des fonds, sous couvert de solidarité et de charité.

L’offensive terrestre décidée par le gouvernement israélien vise à « frapper les tunnels de la terreur allant de Gaza jusqu’en Israël » et protéger ses citoyens.

A l’origine destinés à la contrebande des marchandises, les tunnels ont très vite été utilisés par les terroristes islamistes pour faire passer des armes de guerre via la frontière avec l’Egypte. En 2013, l’armée égyptienne sous l’égide de Mohamed Morsi, a décidé d’inonder les tunnels de contrebande pour « renforcer la sécurité à la frontière ». Une véritable foutaise de la part des autorités égyptiennes, alors issues comme le Hamas de la confrérie des Frères musulmans.

Avec donc l’argent des contribuables Européens, le Hamas a pu construire de nombreux tunnels reliant la bande de Gaza à Israël. L’objectif était de déjouer les systèmes de surveillance israéliens pour infiltrer des terroristes en vue de commettre des attentats dans des localités et prendre des otages Israéliens.

Plusieurs tunnels pénétraient « de plusieurs centaines de mètres en territoire israélien » construits pour mener des « attaques terroristes ».

Les tunnels étaient construits avec des dalles de béton et à une profondeur de 5 à 10 mètres.
Le réseau souterrain du Hamas est très sophistiqué, très bien entretenu, il relie des ateliers de construction de missiles et roquettes, des rampes de lancement et des postes de commandement.

Plus de 600.000 tonnes de béton et de fer qui auraient pu vous servir a construire des écoles, des routes, des hôpitaux ont servi au Hamas a construire des tunnels en dessous des écoles, mosquées et Hôpitaux et en territoire Israélien.
Pendant que des millions d’Européens vivent dans la misère, l’UE préfère financer les tunnels du terrorisme palestinien

Et La France, toujours prête à jouer les bons samaritains par l’intermédiaire de ses différents intervenants, consacre 7M€ par an aux collectivités territoriales palestiniennes : 2 M€ sont mobilisés annuellement par les collectivités françaises pour financer des projets, et 5M€ par l’Etat, via l’Agence Française de Développement (AFD)
La France accordait en mars 2012, 10M€ aux palestiniens pour la construction d’une usine de dessalement dans la bande de Gaza.

Où est donc passée cette usine?

Les télévisions du monde montrent sans relâche des images de Gazaouis blessés et morts comme si la responsabilité incombait à Israël.

Le Hamas utilise des boucliers humains pour se protéger de la riposte Israélienne.

De nombreux journalistes et photographes cherchent désespérément la photo parfaite : Celle de la petite poupée d’enfant soigneusement posée sur les débris d’une maison du Hamas bombardée la veille par l’aviation Israélienne.

Les Palestiniens ont choisi la terreur et la guerre, je ne vais pas pleurer pour eux. Il fallait réfléchir avant.

Aux Palestiniens, « Si le Hamas est un vaillant combattant, un vrai résistant, qu’il sorte de ses bunkers planqués sous vos maisons et viennent nous affronter »

Voir aussi:

IDF shows photos of alleged Hamas rocket sites dug into hospital, mosques
By Yaakov Lappin/ Reuters
Jerusalem Post

07/21/2014 16:06
inShare2
The images were taken from the northeastern Gaza City neighborhood of Shejaia, which was the scene of heavy fighting in recent days.

The IDF on Monday released declassified photos showing how Hamas uses hospitals, mosques, and playgrounds as rocket launch sites.

The images were taken from the northeastern Gaza City neighborhood of Shejaia, which was the scene of heavy fighting in recent days.

Israel’s army said it had been targeting militants in the clashes, charging that they had fired rockets from Shejaia and built tunnels and command centers there. The army said it had warned civilians to leave two days earlier.

Sounds of explosions rocked Gaza City through the morning, with residents reporting heavy fighting in Shejaia and the adjacent Zeitoun neighborhood. Locals also said there was heavy shelling in Beit Hanoun, in the northern Gaza Strip.

"It seems we are heading towards a massacre in Beit Hanoun. They drove us out of our houses with their fire. We carried our kids and ran away," said Abu Ahmed, he did not want to give his full name for fear of Israeli reprisals.

The Islamist group Hamas and its allies fired multiple missiles across southern and central Israel, and heavy fighting was reported in the north and east of Gaza.

Non-stop attacks lifted the Palestinian death toll to 496, including almost 100 children, since fighting started on July 8, Gaza health officials said. Israel says 18 of its soldiers have also died along with two civilians.

Despite worldwide calls for a cessation of the worst bout of Palestinian-Israeli violence for more than five years, Israeli ministers ruled out any swift truce.

"This is not the time to talk of a ceasefire," said Gilad Erdan, communications minister and a member of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s inner security cabinet.

Voir enfin:

Tunnels Matter More Than Rockets to Hamas
The terror group wants to infiltrate Israel to grab hostages and stage attacks as in Mumbai in 2008.
Michael B. Mukasey
The Wall Street Journal
July 20, 2014

Early in the current clash between Hamas and Israel, much of the drama was in the air. The Palestinian terrorist group launched hundreds of rockets at Israel, and Israel responded by knocking down rockets in the sky with its Iron Dome defense system and by bombing the rocket-launch sites in Gaza. But the real story has been underground. Hamas’s tunnels into Israel are potentially much more dangerous than its random rocket barrages.

Israel started a ground offensive against Hamas in Gaza on Thursday, intending to destroy Hamas’s tunnel network. The challenge became obvious on Saturday when eight Palestinian fighters wearing Israeli military uniforms emerged from a tunnel 300 yards inside Israel and killed two Israeli soldiers in a firefight. One of the Palestinian fighters was killed before the others fled through the tunnel back to Gaza.

According to Yigal Carmon, who heads the Middle East Media Research Institute, his organization’s monitoring of published material and discussions with Israeli officials indicate that Hamas’s tunnels—and not the well-publicized episode of kidnapping and murder involving young Israelis and a Palestinian teenager—were the spark for the conflict.

Consider: On July 5 Israeli planes damaged a tunnel dug by Hamas that ran for several kilometers from inside the Gaza Strip. The tunnel emerged near an Israeli kibbutz named Kerem Shalom —vineyard of peace.

That Israeli strike presented Hamas with a dilemma, because the tunnel was one of scores that the group had dug at great cost. Were the Israelis specifically aware of the tunnel or had their strike been a random guess? Several members of the Hamas military leadership came to inspect the damage the following day, July 6. A later official Israeli report said that the Hamas inspectors were killed in a "work accident." But what if the Israelis had been waiting for the follow-up and struck again?

Hamas now saw its strategic plan unraveling. The tunnel network gave it the ability to launch a coordinated attack within Israel like the 2008 Islamist rampage in Mumbai that killed 164 people. Recall that in 2011 Israel released more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners, more than 200 of whom were under a life sentence for planning and perpetrating terror attacks. They were exchanged for one Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, who had been taken hostage in a cross-border raid by Hamas. Imagine the leverage that Hamas could have achieved by sneaking fighters through the tunnels and taking hostages throughout Israel; the terrorists intercepted Saturday night were carrying tranquilizers and handcuffs.

If the Israeli strike on the tunnel near the Kerem Shalom kibbutz presaged a drive to destroy the entire network—the jewel of Hamas’s war-planning—the terrorist group must have been thrown into a panic. Because by this summer Hamas was already in desperate political straits.

For years Hamas was receiving weapons and funding from Shiite Iran and Syria, under the banner of militant resistance to Israel. But when Mohammed Morsi became president of Egypt in June 2012, Hamas abandoned its relationship with Iran and Syria and took up instead with Mr. Morsi and the Sunni Muslim Brotherhood. Hamas also took up with Turkey and Qatar, also Sunni states, describing them at one point as the saviors of Hamas. Former benefactors Syria and Iran then called Hamas traitorous for abandoning the resistance-to-Israel camp.

The Hamas romance with Mr. Morsi was especially galling to Shiite-led Iran and Syria. The Shiites are only 10% of the world’s Muslims, and neither Iran nor Syria welcomed the loss of a patron to Sunni Egypt. The coup that removed Mr. Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood regime in June 2013 brought a chill in Egypt’s relationship with Hamas that has kept Egypt’s border with Gaza closed, denying Hamas that route of supply.

But Iran and Syria did not rush to embrace their former beneficiary. When Hamas tried to re-ingratiate itself with Iran this May, its political bureau head, Khaled Mash’al, was denied an audience in Tehran and could only meet a minor diplomat in Qatar. On June 26 the Iranian website Tabnak posted an article titled, "Mr. Mash’al, Answer the Following Questions Before Asking for Help." The questions included: "How can Iran go back to trusting an organization that turned its back on the Syrian regime after it sat in Damascus for years and received all kinds of assistance?" and "How can we trust an organization that enjoyed Iranian support for years and then described Turkey and Qatar as its saviors?"

So on July 6, Hamas stood politically isolated and strategically vulnerable. It had lost the financial support of Egypt and could not get renewed support from Iran in the measure it needed. To some in the organization it appeared that Hamas had only one card to play—and on July 7 it played that card with rockets. As to the tunnels, last Thursday Israeli forces intercepted 13 armed terrorists as they emerged from a tunnel near Kibbutz Sufa in Israel.

There are other messages out there for the Palestinians instead of the violent one sent by Hamas. Writing in the London-based Arabic daily Al Hayat on July 12, Saudi intellectual Abdallah Hamid al-Din, no friend of Israel, urged Palestinians to abandon as unrealistic demands for a right of return, and to forgo as hypocritical calls to boycott Israel:

"The only way to stop Israel is peace. . . . Israel does not want peace, because it does not need it. But the Palestinians do. Therefore it is necessary to persist with efforts to impose peace. No other option exists. True resistance is resistance to illusions and false hopes, and no longer leaning on the past in building the future. Real resistance is to silently endure the handshake of your enemy so as to enable your people to learn and to live."

Plenty of others are sending the same message today. Whether Palestinians will listen is another matter.

Mr. Mukasey served as U.S. attorney general (2007-09) and as a U.S. district judge for the Southern District of New York (1988-2006).


Gaza: Avant, j’étais beaucoup plus critique à l’égard d’Israël (Pat Condell discovers the great Palestinian lie)

9 juillet, 2014

http://www.palinfo.com/site/PIC/images/2014/7/9/-1195040700.jpg?&maxwidth=800&maxheight=800&quality=90

http://www.idfblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/hamas_human_shield.jpg

https://scontent-b-fra.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/t1.0-9/p526x296/10411365_4421794800057_5327364847222839514_n.jpg

http://extremecentre.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Tsahal-armes-Hamas.jpg

Notre journaliste à Gaza confirme que les habitants sont utilisés comme boucliers humains. Richard C. Schneider
Le roi de Moab, voyant qu’il avait le dessous dans le combat, prit avec lui sept cents hommes tirant l’épée pour se frayer un passage jusqu’au roi d’Édom; mais ils ne purent pas. Il prit alors son fils premier-né, qui devait régner à sa place, et il l’offrit en holocauste sur la muraille. Et une grande indignation s’empara d’Israël, qui s’éloigna du roi de Moab et retourna dans son pays. 2 Rois 3: 26-27
J’ai une prémonition qui ne me quittera pas: ce qui adviendra d’Israël sera notre sort à tous. Si Israël devait périr, l’holocauste fondrait sur nous. Eric Hoffer
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Cela prouve le caractère de notre noble peuple, combattant du djihad, qui défend ses droits et ses demeures le torse nu, avec son sang. La politique d’un peuple qui affronte les avions israéliens la poitrine nue, pour protéger ses habitations, s’est révélée efficace contre l’occupation. Cette politique reflète la nature de notre peuple brave et courageux. Nous, au Hamas, appelons notre peuple à adopter cette politique, pour protéger les maisons palestiniennes. Sami Abu Zuhri (porte-parole du Hamas)
L’occupation actuelle de la Cisjordanie par Israël est mal et conduit à une instabilité régionale et à une déshumanisation des Palestiniens (…) Israël fait face à une réalité indéniable : il ne peut pas maintenir un contrôle militaire sur un autre peuple indéfiniment. Faire ainsi est non seulement mal, mais c’est aussi une recette pour créer du ressentiment et une instabilité récurrente, a déclaré Gordon. Cela renforce les extrémistes de deux côtés, cela déchire la tissu démocratique israélien et nourrit une deshumanisation mutuelle. (…) Les Etats-Unis soutiendront toujours Israël. Nous combattons pour Israël tous les jours aux Nations Unies (…) Pourtant, en tant que meilleur ami et plus puissant soutien d’Israël, Washington doit pouvoir poser certaines questions fondamentales(…) Comment Israël restera-t-il démocratique et juif s’il essaie de gouverner les millions d’arabes palestiniens qui vivent en Cisjordanie ? Comment aura-t-il la paix s’il ne veut pas délimiter une frontière, mettre un terme à l’occupation et permettre une souveraineté, une sécurité et une dignité palestinienne ? Comment empêcherons nous d’autres états de soutenir les efforts palestiniens dans la communauté internationale, si Israël n’est pas perçu comme impliqué pour la paix ? (…) nous nous trouvons dans une situation délicate (…)  D’un côté, nous n’avons aucun intérêt à un jeu de critique. La difficile réalité est qu’aucune des parties n’a préparé leurs populations ou s’est montrée prête à prendre les décisions difficiles pour un accord. La confiance s’est effritée des deux côtés. Jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit restaurée, aucune des deux parties ne sera probablement prête à prendre des risques pour la paix, même s’ils vivent avec les terribles conséquences qui résultent de cette absence (…) Les « dernières semaines » montrent que l’incapacité de résoudre le conflit israélo-palestinien « implique inévitablement plus de tensions, plus de ressentiment, plus d’injustice, plus d’insécurité, plus de tragédie et plus de peine (…) La vue de familles en deuil, aussi bien israélienne que palestinienne, nous rappelle que le coût du conflit demeure insupportablement haut. (…)  Israël ne devrait pas prendre pour acquis la possibilité de négocier une telle paix avec Abbas qui a montré a plusieurs reprises qu’il était impliqué pour la non violence, la coexistence et la coopération avec Israël. (…)  Les Etats-Unis condamnent fermement ces attaques. (…) Aucun pays ne devrait vivre sous la menace constante d’une violence hasardeuse contre des civils innocents », a rappelé Gordon, dont l’administration avait été fortement critiquée par le gouvernement israélien pour avoir accepté de travailler rapidement avec le nouveau gouvernement d’unité soutenu par le Hamas qui avait été établi le mois dernier. L’administration soutient le droit d’Israël à se défendre contre ces attaques (…)  En même temps, nous apprécions l’appel du Premier ministre Netanyahu à agir responsablement, et nous appelons à notre tour les deux parties à faire tout ce qu’elles peuvent pour ramener le calme et protéger les civils. Philip Gordon (assistant spécial du président américain Barack Obama et coordinateur de la Maison Blanche pour le Moyen-Orient)
Le peuple palestinien n’existe pas. La création d’un État palestinien n’est qu’un moyen pour continuer la lutte contre l’Etat d’Israël afin de créer l’unité arabe. En réalité, aujourd’hui, il n’y a aucune différence entre les Jordaniens, les Palestiniens, les Syriens et les Libanais. C’est uniquement pour des raisons politiques et tactiques, que nous parlons aujourd’hui de l’existence d’un peuple palestinien, étant donné que les intérêts arabes demandent que nous établissions l’existence d’un peuple palestinien distinct, afin d’opposer le sionisme. Pour des raisons tactiques, la Jordanie qui est un Etat souverain avec des frontières bien définies, ne peut pas présenter de demande sur Haifa et Jaffa, tandis qu’en tant que palestinien, je peux sans aucun doute réclamer Haifa, Jaffa, Beersheba et Jérusalem. Toutefois, le moment où nous réclamerons notre droit sur l’ensemble de la Palestine, nous n’attendrons pas même une minute pour unir la Palestine à la Jordanie.  Zahir Muhsein (membre du comité exécutif de l’OLP, proche de la Syrie, "Trouw", 31.03. 77)
La libération de la Palestine a pour but de “purifier” le pays de toute présence sioniste. (…) Le partage de la Palestine en 1947 et la création de l’État d’Israël sont des événements nuls et non avenus. (…) La Charte ne peut être amendée que par une majorité des deux tiers de tous les membres du Conseil national de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine réunis en session extraordinaire convoquée à cet effet. Charte de l’OLP (articles 15, 19 et 33, 1964)
Je mentirais si je vous disais que je vais l’abroger. Personne ne peut le faire. Yasser Arafat (Harvard, octobre 1995)
Des tonnes d’explosifs, de roquettes, de lance-grenades, de grenades, de fusils d’assaut et des missiles anti-chars (…) ont été stockés dans des maisons de civils, des mosquées, des écoles et même des hôpitaux. (…) le Hamas a utilisé les larges espaces ouverts des mosquées pour stocker des armes, ce qui est interdit par le droit international et a ainsi transformé ces zones urbaines en zones de combat. L’utilisation de femmes, personnes âgées et enfants fait partie intégrante de la stratégie terroriste du Hamas. Des écoles ont été piégées, mettant la vie des enfants en danger. Des écoles et des centres d’éducation ont été transformés en sites de lancement de roquettes et de mortiers. (…) les terroristes du Hamas ont placé des rampes de lancement de roquettes à proximité de bâtiments publics tels que des centres médicaux, terrains de football, les bureaux de l’Association palestinienne pour la réhabilitation des handicapés et des stations d’essence (…) Le Hamas a délibérément construit ses infrastructures terroristes et militaires au coeur des infrastructures civiles. IDF
Les tactiques de combat et l’idéologie du Hamas sont, "par excellence, un cas d’école" de violations systématiques du droit international humanitaire. Il n’y a "presqu’aucun exemple comparable" où que ce soit dans le monde d’aujourd’hui d’un groupe qui viole aussi systématiquement les accords internationaux liés aux conflits armés. Irwin Cotler (ancien Ministre de la Justice du Canada, membre du parlement de ce pays et professeur de droit à l’Université McGill de Montreal)
L’Institut américain Pew a interrogé plus de 14 200 personnes dans 14 pays, dont le Nigeria, en proie aux attaques de Boko Haram. La peur d’un extrémisme islamiste grandit dans les pays majoritairement musulmans du Proche-Orient jusqu’en Asie du Sud, selon un sondage publié mardi aux Etats-Unis. Cette crainte s’est développée depuis un an, du fait de la guerre en Syrie qui continue de faire rage et à laquelle participent des mouvements islamistes, et des attaques meurtrières du mouvement nigérian Boko Haram, relève l’institut américain Pew qui a interrogé plus de 14 200 personnes dans 14 pays musulmans. Les mouvements islamistes comme Al-Qaeda, le Hezbollah, Boko Haram ou le Hamas, perdent aussi des soutiens. Et le nombre de personnes favorables aux attentats suicide contre des civils a considérablement diminué ces dix dernières années. Le sondage a été réalisé du 10 avril au 25 mai, soit avant l’offensive fulgurante lancée le 9 juin de l’Etat islamique en Irak et en Levant (EIIL), qui se fait appeler Etat islamique (EI), dans le nord et le centre de l’Irak. (…) Une majorité de Palestiniens (53%) ont une opinion défavorable du Hamas, qu’Israël tient pour responsable de l’enlèvement et du meurtre de trois adolescents. Ce chiffre atteint 63% dans la bande de Gaza. Seuls 46% des Palestiniens considèrent les attentats suicide comme justifiés contre des civils, contre 70% en 2007. Libération
Au sujet de l’islam (…) D’abord, j’aime bien leur symbole, leur croissant lunaire, je le trouve beaucoup plus beau que la croix, peut-être parce qu’il n’a pas quelqu’un cloué dessus.  Pat Condell (cité par Harold Kroto, prix Nobel de chimie 1996)
Des trois dogmes des enfants d’Abraham, les musulmans, les chrétiens et les juifs, mes préférés sont les juifs. Quand je dis je les aime: je pense que toutes les religions sont une insulte à l’humanité, mais les juifs n’ont pas autant de revendications et de recherche de privilèges que les deux autres dogmes. Et, plus important, tandis que les musulmans et chrétiens veulent vous imposer leurs croyances, les juifs se fichent pas mal de ce que vous croyez tant que vous les laissez tranquilles. (…) Maintenant, étant donné l’histoire des juifs, il est facile de comprendre pourquoi ils voudraient avoir leur Etat autonome. Mais le problème, c’est qu’il est au mauvais endroit. Parce que s’il y avait vraiment une justice dans ce monde, Israël occuperait actuellement la moitié de l’Allemagne. Mais ce qu’il y a derrière Israël, ce n’est pas la justice, c’est Jérusalem, autrement dit la Bible et autrement dit la prophétie, autrement dit, comme on le sait, la folie. What about the Jews?
Avant, j’étais beaucoup plus critique à l’égard d’Israël et je croyais qu’il y avait une solution à deux états assez simple. Parce que je croyais que les Arabes étaient de bonne foi. J’aimerais toujours le croire mais les faits me montrent que je serais un imbécile de le croire. Car j’ai vu que chaque concession faite par Israël ne reçoit en réponse que toujours plus d’exigences et de prétextes pour ne pas négocier. Ils auraient pu avoir la paix dix fois s’ils avaient voulu. Mais ils ne veulent pas la paix, ils veulent la victoire et ne seront pas satisfaits tant qu’Israël ne sera pas rayé de la carte. Un membre du Comité central de l’OLP l’a dit récemment à la télévision récemment, ajoutant qu’ils doivent garder ça pour eux car ils tiennent un autre discours au reste du monde. (…) Malgré ce que vous dit l’Agence de relations publiques palestinienne (cad les médias occidentaux) ce n’est pas une question de territoire et ça n’a absolument rien à voir avec la justice ou les droits de l’homme parce que les sociétés arabes ne connaissent pas la signification de ces mots. C’est une question de haine contre les Juifs, commandée par le Coran, prêchée dans les mosquées et enseignée aux enfants dans les pays arabes jour après jour et qui empoisonne génération après génération. les Arabes ne détestent pas les Juifs à cause d’Israël, ils détestent Israël à cause des Juifs. La situation en Cisjordanie et à Gaza existe parce qu’il y a 45 ans plusieurs pays arabes ont attaqué Israël délibérément, avec un avantage numérique écrasant, parce que c’était un Etat juif. Si ça n’avait pas été un Etat juif, ils ne l’auraient pas attaqué, ils l’ont attaqué avec l’intention de l’effacer de la carte et de commettre un génocide mais ils ont échoué parce que les juifs avaient plus de sang dans les veines que les Arabes pensaient. Et qui pourraient s’en étonner après tout ce par quoi ils sont passés dans l’indifférence du reste du monde ? Beaucoup, de Juifs auraient pu échapper aux nazis s’ils avaient eu un endroit où se réfugier mais les autres pays ne voulaient pas d’eux. Le Moufti de Jérusalem à l’époque était un ami d’Hitler et, en bon musulman, il approuvait la Solution finale et avait des plans pour mettre en oeuvre son propre holocauste au Moyen-Orient après la victoire des Nazis. Aussi qui pourrait reprocher aujourd’hui aux Israéliens de se défendre, en sachant très bien qu’ils ont à faire à des gens à qui ils ne peuvent pas faire confiance et en sachant que ces gens les haïssent au point de vouloir les exterminer comme peuple. N’importe qui d’autre dans la même situation se comporterait de la même manière. Je sais que c’est ce que je ferais et je ne suis pas près de m’en excuser. Israël est entouré d’ennemis et a plus intérêt à la paix que n’importe qui d’autre et c’est pour ça qu’il continue à faire des concessions. mais ce n’est pas l’intérêt des leaders palestiniens. La paix, c’est dernière chose qu’ils veulent. Ils ont besoin de maintenir la situation en ébullition, de maintenir leur peuple en colère dans le ressentiment et la haine des Juifs. La paix gâcherait tout parce qu’ils ne seront pas contents tant qu’Israël ne sera pas effacé de la carte et les Juifs jetés à la mer. Il faut que le monde arrête de faire comme si la question palestinienne était une question de justice et de droits de l’homme. Il faut qu’il ait le courage moral d’appeler les choses par leur nom et de mettre un point d’arrêt à cette comédie, cette danse sans fin autour d’une table de négociation qui n’existe pas. Il nous faut rendre aux Arabes le grand service de leur dire la vérité qu’ils ont si cruellement besoin d’entendre que leur haine est la cause de leur misère, qu’ils en sont devenus prisonniers, elle en est arrivée à définir leur véritable identité. Et tant qu’ils n’auront pas trouvé un moyen de libérer leurs coeurs de cette souillure, ils y resteront enchainés et ni eux ni leurs enfants ne seront jamais libres. Printemps arabe ou pas. (…) Combien de générations habitées par la haine pensez-vous qu’il faudra encore sacrifier ? Pat Condell

A l’heure où, coupé de la plupart de ses soutiens après le désastreux enlèvement et assassinat du mois dernier et ne pouvant même plus payer ses fonctionnaires, un Hamas aux abois a repris une fuite en avant qui pourrait finir un jour par lui être fatale …

Et où, terrés dans leurs abris sous-terrains et cachés derrière les boucliers humains de sa population écoles et mosquées comprises, ses leaders balancent à nouveau leurs roquettes à l’aveugle sur les villes israéliennes …

Pendant qu’aussi indécise que jamais et comme à son habitude, l’Administration Obama continue à souffler le chaud et le froid sur ses alliés y compris au moment même où Israël est la victime desdites roquettes …

Et qu’apparemment inconscients de la menace qui pèse sur leur propre territoire et sans compter nos faussaires patentés à la Enderlin ou Fandio, nos belles âmes et nos habituels idiots utiles du terrorisme ont repris comme à leur habitude leurs sempiternelles geigneries et imprécations contre la prétendue disproportion de la réaction israélienne …

Comment, avec l’humoriste britannique Pat Condell, ne pas s’étonner de cette incroyable conspiration du plus pur cynisme du côté arabe et de la plus atterrante hypocrisie ou naïveté du côté occidental …

Qui, décennie après décennie, continue à soutenir le "grand mensonge palestinien" ?

The Great Palestinian Lie
Pat Condell
Oct 11, 20111

Is it racist to criticize the Palestinians as the world’s most tiresome cry-babies with a bogus cause and a plight that’s entirely self-inflicted? I bet it is. I wouldn’t be surprised if it was against the law in certain European countries but I’m going to do it anyway because somebody has to. And I realize I’ll probably lose a few friends with this video but that’s okay. Friends like that, I can do without.

All any of us can do is tell the truth as we see it. I mean as we actually see it and not as we think we’re supposed to see it. The worst thing you can do is to see the truth and tell a lie and I see the Palestinian cause as a lie. A lie designed to exploit Western liberal guilt; like the lie of Islamophobia and the lie of the mythical religion of peace that nobody has ever seen in action.

I used to be a lot more critical of Israel and I used to believe there was a fairly simple two-state solution because I used to believe the Arabs were acting in good faith. I still want to believe that but the evidence tells me I’d be a fool to believe it. Because I’ve seen that every concession Israel makes is met with more demands and more excuses not to negotiate. They could have had peace ten times over if they wanted it. But they don’t want peace. They want victory. And they won’t be happy ‘til Israel is wiped from the map.

A member of Fatah Central Committee said as much on television recently but, as he said, they keep that to themselves and tell the rest of the world a different story. And as part of that story, the bogus claim for Palestinian statehood is currently passing through the United Nations and we’re all waiting to see what plops out the other end. Not that it really matters, because despite what the Palestinian public relations industry (i.e. the Western media) might tell you, this is not about territory and it certainly isn’t about justice or human rights because Arab societies don’t know the meaning of those words.

It’s about Jew hatred, as mandated by the Quran, and as preached in the mosques and taught to the children in Arab countries, day in and day out, generation after poisonous generation. The Arabs don’t hate Jews because of Israel. They hate Israel because of Jews.

The situation in the West Bank and Gaza exists because, 45 years ago, several Arab countries attacked Israel, unprovoked, with overwhelming odds, because it was a Jewish state. If it hadn’t been a Jewish state, they wouldn’t have attacked it. And they attacked with the intention of wiping it from the map and of committing genocide. But they failed because the Jews had a bit more steel in their blood than the Arabs had bargained for. And who could be surprised after all they had been through and after seeing how the rest of the world had responded to their plight.

Large numbers of Jews could have escaped the Nazis if they had somewhere else to go but other countries wouldn’t let them in. The mufti of Jerusalem at the time was a friend of Hitler’s and, good Muslim that he was, he approved of the Final Solution and had plans for his own holocaust in the Middle East, once the Nazis had won the war.

So who can blame the Israelis today for defending themselves as if they mean it? When they know they’re dealing with people they know they can’t trust and who they know hate them enough to want to exterminate them as a people. Anybody else in their situation would behave the same way. I know I would and I wouldn’t apologize for it.

Israel is surrounded by enemies. Peace is more in their interest than anyone else’s: which is why they keep making concessions. But it’s not in the interest of the Palestinian leadership. Peace is the last thing they want. They need to keep the pot boiling. They need to keep their people angry and resentful and hating Jews. Peace would ruin everything because they won’t be happy until Israel is wiped from the map and the Jews have been driven into the sea. If they really believe that’s going to happen, they’re insane. And if they don’t really believe it, they’re even more insane. Wouldn’t you say?

And all you good-hearted Western liberals who keep banging the drum for the poor Palestinians: I sympathize with you because you’re doing it for the right reason. But you’re being used and exploited just as the people in the West Bank and Gaza are being exploited by people who have no intention of negotiating peace because they’re driven, primarily, by crude, irrational, religious hatred.

When you protest for Palestine, you know you’ll be in the company of people who are calling for Jews to be gassed. Do you think that’s an accident? You’re dealing with something here beyond politics and beyond reason. Something truly ugly that drives a spike through all your cozy left/right assumptions and your naivety is helping to stoke it like bellows to a fire.

The world needs to stop pretending that Palestine is about justice and human rights and have the moral courage to call this thing what it is: to put a stop to this charade, this endless dance around a nonexistent negotiating table. We need to do the Arabs a huge favor and tell them the truth they so badly need to hear: that their hatred is the cause of their misery. They’ve become prisoners of it. It has come to define their very identity and until they can find a way to remove this ugly stain from their hearts, they’ll always be chained to it. And they and their children will never be free: Arab Spring or no Arab Spring.

Peace . . . how many wasted generations of hate do you think it will take?

Voir aussi:

Le Hamas plus isolé que jamais
Décapité en Cisjordanie, après la mort de trois jeunes Israéliens, et aux abois à Gaza, où il a rendu le pouvoir, le mouvement palestinien est en crise.
Le Point
01/07/2014 à 17:11

Décapité en Cisjordanie, après l’enlèvement meurtrier de trois jeunes Israéliens, et aux abois à Gaza, où il a officiellement rendu le pouvoir, le Hamas se retrouve encore plus isolé qu’avant la réconciliation avec le président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas, selon des experts. "Le Hamas est responsable et le Hamas paiera", a affirmé lundi soir le Premier ministre israélien Benyamin Netanyahou, peu après la découverte des corps des trois jeunes Israéliens enlevés dans un bloc de colonies en Cisjordanie occupée le 12 juin. Le Hamas a nié être impliqué dans le rapt mais a salué l’opération, imputée par Israël à deux de ses membres qu’elle recherche toujours à Hébron. Le mouvement palestinien a averti que "si les occupants se lan(çaient) dans une guerre ou une escalade, ils ouvrir(aient) les portes de l’enfer".

Selon Ghazi Hammad, un haut responsable du mouvement, "toutes les options sont envisageables et le Hamas prend au sérieux les menaces d’Israël. Mais il ne cherche pas l’affrontement, la balle est dans le camp d’Israël". "La découverte des corps a été un choc pour Israël et a révélé une faille, c’est pourquoi Israël veut se venger et en faire payer le prix au Hamas, quelle que soit sa responsabilité", a-t-il déclaré. Le chef en exil du Hamas, Khaled Mechaal, a assuré le 23 juin que la direction politique du mouvement n’avait aucune information sur le rapt, mais a dit "soutenir tout acte de résistance contre l’occupation israélienne, qui doit payer pour sa tyrannie". Cette prise de distance avec l’enlèvement permettra au mouvement islamiste d’"atténuer" le choc de la riposte israélienne, estime Walid al-Moudallal, professeur de sciences politiques à l’Université islamique de Gaza. "Mais le Hamas ne restera pas silencieux s’il est visé. Il se battra si sa survie est en jeu", prévient-il.

"Balle dans le pied"

Selon le correspondant militaire du quotidien israélien Yediot Aharonot, la responsabilité du Hamas est engagée, les ravisseurs ayant sans doute agi, sinon sur ordre, conformément à la ligne fixée par la direction du mouvement. Après son "annus horribilis" dû au renversement par l’armée en Égypte du président islamiste Mohamed Morsi en juillet 2013, "le Hamas fondait ses espoirs sur le gouvernement de réconciliation palestinien, sa proximité croissante avec l’Occident et sur le monde arabe, principalement l’Égypte", écrit Alex Fishman, mais avec l’enlèvement "il s’est tiré une balle dans le pied". À la suite de l’enlèvement, l’armée israélienne a arrêté 420 Palestiniens en Cisjordanie, dont 305 membres du Hamas, parmi lesquels de nombreux dirigeants et députés du mouvement.

Depuis la découverte des corps lundi, "le Hamas ne veut pas seulement donner à Israël un prétexte pour attaquer, il l’invite même à attaquer pendant le ramadan", estime le commentateur israélien, afin de "détourner l’attention de ce ramadan morose sur l’ennemi qui a gâché la fête : Israël". Il souligne l’amertume soulevée par la perte d’emploi et de salaire des quelque 40 000 ex-fonctionnaires du Hamas depuis la formation, le 2 juin, d’un gouvernement de consensus composé de personnalités indépendantes, commun à Gaza et à la Cisjordanie. Signe de cette rancoeur, dans la nuit de lundi à mardi, des hommes masqués ont incendié des caméras de surveillance de banques et des distributeurs automatiques de billets à Gaza.

Étranglé par le blocus israélien de la bande de Gaza et la fermeture de la frontière avec l’Égypte, le Hamas a accepté la réconciliation aux conditions de Mahmoud Abbas afin d’assurer sa survie à terme, au prix d’un abandon du pouvoir sur l’enclave palestinienne, d’après les commentateurs. Mais Moussa Abou Marzouk, le responsable du Hamas chargé du dossier de la réconciliation avec le mouvement Fatah du président palestinien, a accusé dimanche Mahmoud Abbas d’avoir abandonné Gaza à son sort, malgré l’accord de réconciliation. "Aujourd’hui, je crains que le Hamas ne soit invité à revenir pour protéger la sécurité de son peuple, la bande de Gaza ne vivra pas dans le vide. Or, elle n’est ni sous la responsabilité du gouvernement précédent ni sous celle du gouvernement d’entente nationale", a écrit Moussa Abou Marzouk sur sa page Facebook.

Voir également:

La peur de l’extrémisme grandit dans les pays musulmans
Libération/AFP
2 juillet 2014

SONDAGE
L’Institut américain Pew a interrogé plus de 14 200 personnes dans 14 pays, dont le Nigeria, en proie aux attaques de Boko Haram.

La peur d’un extrémisme islamiste grandit dans les pays majoritairement musulmans du Proche-Orient jusqu’en Asie du Sud, selon un sondage publié mardi aux Etats-Unis. Cette crainte s’est développée depuis un an, du fait de la guerre en Syrie qui continue de faire rage et à laquelle participent des mouvements islamistes, et des attaques meurtrières du mouvement nigérian Boko Haram, relève l’institut américain Pew qui a interrogé plus de 14 200 personnes dans 14 pays musulmans.

Les mouvements islamistes comme Al-Qaeda, le Hezbollah, Boko Haram ou le Hamas, perdent aussi des soutiens. Et le nombre de personnes favorables aux attentats suicide contre des civils a considérablement diminué ces dix dernières années.

Le sondage a été réalisé du 10 avril au 25 mai, soit avant l’offensive fulgurante lancée le 9 juin de l’Etat islamique en Irak et en Levant (EIIL), qui se fait appeler Etat islamique (EI), dans le nord et le centre de l’Irak.

Au Liban, frontalier de la Syrie, 92% des personnes interrogées disent avoir peur de la montée de l’extrémisme islamiste, un chiffre en hausse de 11 points par rapport à 2013, réparti à quasi égalité entre communautés chiites, sunnites, et chrétiennes du pays.

53% des Palestiniens défavorables au Hamas

L’inquiétude grandit aussi en Jordanie et en Turquie, deux pays également frontaliers de la Syrie, qui accueillent des milliers de réfugiés depuis le début du conflit en mars 2011. Quelque 62% des Jordaniens expriment leur inquiétude à propos de l’extrémisme islamiste, en hausse de 13 points par rapport à 2012. En Turquie, 50% partagent cette crainte, un chiffre en hausse de 18 points par rapport à 2012.

«En Asie, de fortes majorités au Bangladesh (69%), au Pakistan (66%) et en Malaisie (63%) s’inquiètent de l’extrémisme islamiste», selon Pew. Ce chiffre est cependant beaucoup moins élevé en Indonésie, un des pays musulmans les plus peuplés, avec 40% des habitants qui sont inquiets.

Une majorité de Nigérians (79%) disent leur opposition à Boko Haram, qui a enlevé en avril quelque 200 jeunes filles, tandis que 59% des Pakistanais affirment détester les talibans.

Une majorité de Palestiniens (53%) ont une opinion défavorable du Hamas, qu’Israël tient pour responsable de l’enlèvement et du meurtre de trois adolescents. Ce chiffre atteint 63% dans la bande de Gaza. Seuls 46% des Palestiniens considèrent les attentats suicide comme justifiés contre des civils, contre 70% en 2007.
AFP

Voir encore:

ANALYSIS: Stunned by Israel’s fierce response, Hamas sends distress signals
Khaled Abu Toameh
Jerusalem Post
07/09/2014

Hamas apparently expected a limited response to the recent rocket attacks on Israeli cities and towns; The organization is concerned the IDF’s operation could be the end to Hamas’s rule over the Gaza Strip.

Despite fiery statements issued by Hamas spokesmen over the past 48 hours, it was obvious Tuesday night that the Islamist movement was searching for ways to rid itself of the current escalation.

Hamas feels that it has been forced into a confrontation with Israel – one that it did not want at this stage because of its increased isolation and financial crisis.

The massive Israeli air strikes on the Gaza Strip over the past 24 hours have surprised Hamas and other Palestinian groups. Hamas apparently expected a limited response to the recent rocket attacks on Israeli cities and towns. But as the IDF intensified its strikes against Hamas targets – including the homes of some of its top commanders – it became clear to the movement’s leaders that Israel means business.

On Tuesday night, Hamas spokesmen were sending distress signals to various parties. The organization is concerned that if the IDF operation continues for another few days, the movement will pay a very heavy price – one that could even bring about an end to Hamas’s rule over the Gaza Strip.

Hamas accused Israel of “crossing all the redlines” by bombing the homes of its military commanders. This shows that Hamas did not expect Israel to take such a drastic move. Less than 24 hours after the beginning of the IDF offensive, Hamas talked about the need to return to the truce that was reached with Israel in 2012.

A spokesman for Hamas’s armed wing, Izzadin Kassam, listed this demand as part of his movement’s effort to end the current confrontation. The spokesman called for an end to the IDF crackdown on Hamas members in the West Bank, which began after the abduction and murder of three Israeli youths last month.

On Tuesday night, Hamas and other Palestinian groups appealed to Egypt and Arab countries to intervene to stop the IDF operation. Given Hamas’s bad relations with the Egyptian authorities, it’s unlikely that President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi would rush to save the movement that is openly aligned with his enemy, the Muslim Brotherhood.

The Palestinian Authority, which has condemned the Israeli “aggression,” is also unlikely to make a big effort to save Hamas from destruction. In fact, President Mahmoud Abbas and his Fatah faction would be happy to see Hamas severely defeated.

Hamas is beginning to feel the heat and that’s why its leaders, who have gone into hiding, are seeking an “honorable” way out of the confrontation, which, they say, they didn’t want to begin with.

Voir de plus:

Security source: Hamas started this escalation to improve its poor situation
Yaakov Lappin
Jerusalem Post
07/09/2014

After poor results from the kidnapping, Hamas is seeking to achieve an accomplishment.

Hamas initiated the latest round of fighting to try and alleviate the distress it has found itself in recent months, a senior security source said on Tuesday.

In the West Bank, the organization’s position has been damaged by the army’s response to the kidnap and murder of three Israeli youths in June, which resulted in the arrest of hundreds of Hamas members, and raids on weapons caches and against its civilian and economic networks.

In the Gaza Strip, too, the Islamist movement is feeling increased pressure, the source said.

As a result, Hamas is “seeking to achieve an accomplishment,” he said. “Hamas had high expectations two months ago. It had just joined a Palestinian unity government [with Fatah]. Now, it finds itself in a poor situation. It has gotten poor results from the kidnapping, its position in terms of Palestinian security prisoners has worsened [due to the arrest of hundreds of Hamas members last month], and its sovereignty in Gaza has sustained blows,” he continued.

“Hamas is under pressure, and this has caused it to begin shooting [rockets and mortars].

Its status among the public [in the Strip] is also problematic.

In the middle of Ramadan, it has no good news to offer Palestinians recently,” the source said.

Hamas has been directly and indirectly orchestrating the growing rocket salvos from Gaza, which reached a peak on Monday night, when many dozens of rockets were launched within an hour.

“Hamas will always want to be the one that fires the last rocket, and to be able to claim that Israel is deterred. For its part, Israel will gradually increase the scope of its military operation, to obtain deterrence and damage Hamas,” the source said.

Voir aussi:

Faux Fairness at The New York Times
Tamar Sternthal
Times of Israel
July 8, 2014

It’s no wonder then that The Times says it places a premium on fairness, a laudable journalistic value. Its Standards and Ethics guidelines state: “The goal of The New York Times is to cover the news as impartially as possible – ‘without fear or favor,’ in the words of Adolph Ochs, our patriarch.”

Maybe that’s why editors habitually issue a pro-forma condemnation of both Israelis and Palestinians – before it proceeds to single out Israel for real or perceived wrongdoings, while downplaying or ignoring foul play on the other side. Today’s editorial (“Four Horrific Killings”) follows the familiar formula. First, the blanket exhortation to both sides: “It is the responsibility of leaders on both sides to try and calm the volatile emotions that once again threaten both peoples.”

After inserting additional background information (including an egregious factual error about the Israeli prime minister), The Times tackles its real beef. Editors provide a detailed litany of Israeli misdoings, followed by a perfunctory reference to “Hamas’s violence” and unidentified Palestinian “hateful speech”:

After the attack on the Israeli teenagers, some Israelis gave in to their worst prejudices. During funerals for the boys, hundreds of extreme right-wing protesters blocked roads in Jerusalem chanting “Death to Arabs.” A Facebook page named ‘People of Israel Demand Revenge’ gathered 35,000 ‘likes’ before being taken down; a blogger gave prominence to a photo, also on Facebook, that featured a sign saying: “Hating Arabs is not racism, it’s values.” Even Mr. Netanyahu referenced an Israeli poem that reads: “Vengeance for the blood of a small child, Satan has not yet created.” Israelis have long had to cope with Hamas’s violence, including a recent increase in rocket attacks from Gaza. And Palestinians have been fully guilty of hateful speech against Jews.

While readers are treated to a four specific examples of Israelis succumbing to their worst prejudices, The Times does not identify even one single case of recent Palestinian incitement, of which there is no shortage. Palestinians celebrated the kidnapping of Eyal Yifrach, Gil-Ad Shaar and Naphtali Frankel with a social media campaign called “The Three Shalits” which went viral; hateful cartoons in a Palestinian Authority-controlled newspaper and on the Fatah Facebook page; and the distribution of sweets in Gaza. In recent days, Fatah, headed by Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas, warned Israelis to prepare body bags and declared “We wish for the blood to become rivers.”

After the grossly lopsided accounting, in which The Times deems examples of heated rhetoric worthy of specific mention only when uttered by Israelis, the “Paper of Record” reverts to its faux fairness, describing “an atmosphere in which each side dehumanizes the other.” The editorial closes with its formulaic parity: “These deaths should cause the two communities to think again about the need for a permanent peace, but the loss of four young men may not be motivation enough.”

Subtitled “Can Israeli and Palestinian Leaders End the Revenge Attacks?”, the editorial ought to have been particularly precise in reporting the leaders’ respective words and deeds. And, yet, the author/s grossly erred: “On Sunday, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel, after days of near silence, condemned that killing and promised that anyone found guilty would ‘face the full weight of the law.’”

Netanyahu did not remain silent for days concerning the murder of Muhammad Abu Khdeir. The Israeli prime minister spoke out against the killing of Abu Kheir from July 2, the very same day of the murder. As The Times’ own Isabel Kershner reported: “On Wednesday, after the body of the Palestinian teenager was found in the woods, the prime minister called on Israelis to obey the law, and asked investigators to quickly look into what he called ‘the abominable murder.’”

Netanyahu again denounced the murder Thursday, July 3 at the home of American Ambassador Daniel Shapiro during the July 4th celebration. As CNN reported:

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu pledged Thursday to find the perpetrators responsible for the boy’s killing, an act Netanyahu described as “a despicable crime.”

Netanyahu made the comment during a speech at the American Embassy in Tel Aviv where he and Israeli President Shimon Peres attended the annual July 4 Independence Day party.

Given that The Times editorial writer did not accurately report events recorded last week in the paper’s own news pages, it’s unsurprising that s/he trips up on a Hebrew poem written more than a century ago.

Thus, The Times’ cites Netanyahu’s recitation of a line from Chaim Nachman Bialik’s poem “The Slaughter” as an indication that, he, like the crowds chanting “Death to Arabs” also gave in to his “worst prejudices.” In fact, Bialik’s lines, and Netanyahu’s quotation of them, are widely understood as a call for heavenly justice and a rejection of human vengeance for the killing of a small child. The full stanza in question and the preceding stanza (in translation), which Bialik wrote in response to the Kishinev pogrom) are:

And if there is justice – let it show
itself at once! But if justice show itself
after I have been blotted out from
beneath the skies – let its throne be
hurled down forever! Let heaven rot
with eternal evil! And you, the arrogant,
go in this violence of yours, live by
your bloodshed and be cleansed by it.

And cursed be the man who says:
Avenge! No such revenge – revenge for
the blood of a little child – has yet been
devised by Satan. Let the blood pierce
through the abyss! Let the blood seep
down into the depths of darkness, and
eat away there, in the dark, and breach
all the rotting foundations of the earth.

If there is fairness at The New York Times editorial page — let it show itself at once!

Voir de même:

Un haut responsable américain critique Israël
« Comment Israël peut-il avoir la paix s’il ne veut pas délimiter une frontière, arrêter l’occupation ? » a demandé le chef de la Maison Blanche pour le Proche-Orient, Philipp Gordon dans un discours cinglant à Tel Aviv
Raphael Ahren
Times of Israel
9 juillet 2014
Raphael Ahren est le correspondant diplomatique du Times of Israel

« L’occupation actuelle de la Cisjordanie par Israël est mal et conduit à une instabilité régionale et à une déshumanisation des Palestiniens », a déclaré mardi à Tel Aviv un haut responsable du gouvernement américain.

Au cours d’une déclaration de politique étrangère inhabituelle et dure, Philipp Gordon, assistant spécial du président américain Barack Obama et coordinateur de la Maison Blanche pour le Moyen-Orient, a appelé les dirigeants israéliens et palestiniens à faire les compromis nécessaires pour obtenir un accord de paix permanent.

Jérusalem « ne devrait pas prendre pour acquis la possibilité de négocier » un tel traité avec l’Autorité palestinienne du président Mahmoud Abbas, qui s’est révélé être un partenaire fiable, a déclaré Gordon.

« Israël fait face à une réalité indéniable : il ne peut pas maintenir un contrôle militaire sur un autre peuple indéfiniment. Faire ainsi est non seulement mal, mais c’est aussi une recette pour créer du ressentiment et une instabilité récurrente, a déclaré Gordon. Cela renforce les extrémistes de deux côtés, cela déchire la tissu démocratique israélien et nourrit une deshumanisation mutuelle ».

Faisant son discours à la Conférence israélienne pour la Paix du journal Haaretz, Gordon a réitéré la position d’Obama qu’un accord final devrait être basé sur les frontières de 1967 avec des échanges de terre mutuellement acceptés.

L’administration est consciente qu’Israël doit faire face à des menaces sur plusieurs fronts et Obama reste impliqué pour la sécurité d’Israël, a-t-il déclaré, en s’exprimant le jour où Israël a lancé son l’opération Bordure protectrice pour contrer les tirs de roquettes de la bande de Gaza contrôlée par le Hamas. Juste quelques instants plus tard, les participants à la conférence ont dû aller courir se mettre à l’abri après qu’une alerte ait signalé l’approche d’un missile sur Tel Aviv.

« Les Etats-Unis soutiendront toujours Israël. Nous combattons pour Israël tous les jours aux Nations Unies », a-t-il déclaré. Pourtant, en tant que meilleur ami et plus puissant soutien d’Israël, Washington doit pouvoir poser certaines questions fondamentales, a-t-il dit.

Gordon a poursuivi son discours : « Comment Israël restera-t-il démocratique et juif s’il essaie de gouverner les millions d’arabes palestiniens qui vivent en Cisjordanie ? Comment aura-t-il la paix s’il ne veut pas délimiter une frontière, mettre un terme à l’occupation et permettre une souveraineté, une sécurité et une dignité palestinienne ? Comment empêcherons nous d’autres états de soutenir les efforts palestiniens dans la communauté internationale, si Israël n’est pas perçu comme impliqué pour la paix ? »

L’administration a été déçue que les dernières tentatives de négociations de paix organisées par les Etats-Unis aient échoué et qu’actuellement « nous nous trouvons dans une situation délicate », a souligné Gordon.

« D’un côté, nous n’avons aucun intérêt à un jeu de critique. La difficile réalité est qu’aucune des parties n’a préparé leurs populations ou s’est montrée prête à prendre les décisions difficiles pour un accord. La confiance s’est effritée des deux côtés. Jusqu’à ce qu’elle soit restaurée, aucune des deux parties ne sera probablement prête à prendre des risques pour la paix, même s’ils vivent avec les terribles conséquences qui résultent de cette absence ».

Les « dernières semaines » montrent que l’incapacité de résoudre le conflit israélo-palestinien « implique inévitablement plus de tensions, plus de ressentiment, plus d’injustice, plus d’insécurité, plus de tragédie et plus de peine », a-t-il dit. « La vue de familles en deuil, aussi bien israélienne que palestinienne, nous rappelle que le coût du conflit demeure insupportablement haut ».

Dans son discours de 25 minutes, la première intervention d’un haut responsable de la Maison Blanche directement au peuple israélien depuis le discours de mars 2013 d’Obama a Jérusalem, Gordon a rejeté toutes les autres alternatives à la solution de deux états. Il a appelé le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu à rependre les pourparlers de paix avec l’Autorité palestinienne, en suggérant qu’Abbas était le meilleur dirigeant palestinien que Jérusalem pouvait espérer. « Israël ne devrait pas prendre pour acquis la possibilité de négocier une telle paix avec Abbas qui a montré a plusieurs reprises qu’il était impliqué pour la non violence, la coexistence et la coopération avec Israël ».

A un moment de son discours, Gordon semblait contredire directement une déclaration faite par Netanyahu la semaine dernière concernant les besoins de sécurité d’Israël vis-à-vis sa frontière est.

Se référant aux discussions que le général américain à la retraire John Allen avait tenu avec des officiers de l’armée israélienne concernant les moyens de sécuriser la frontière israélienne avec la Jordanie, Gordon a expliqué que les plans d’Allen prennent en compte « une série d’éventualités, y compris des menaces grandissantes que nous percevons au Moyen-Orient ». Allen évoquait probablement les gains territoriaux effectués lors des récentes semaines par le groupe terroriste radical l’Etat Islamique, anciennement connu comme ISIL ou ISIS.

« Les démarches discutées créeraient une des frontières les plus sure du monde de deux côtés du Jourdain, a expliqué Gordon. En développant une couche de défense qui inclut un renforcement significatif des barrières des deux côtés de la frontière, en s’assurant du nombre adéquat de soldats au sol, en déployant la technologie de dernier cri, un programme global de test rigoureux, nous pouvons rendre la frontière sure contre n’importe quel type de menace conventionnelle ou non conventionnelle, des terroristes individuels aux forces armées conventionnelles ».

Le 29 juin, Netanyahu avait déclaré que l’un des défis centraux pour la sécurité d’Israël était de « stabiliser la zone ouest de ligne de sécurité du Jourdain ». Dans cette partie de la Cisjordanie, le Premier ministre a déclaré « aucune autre force que notre armée et nos services de sécurité ne peut garantir la sécurité d’Israël… Qui sait ce qui l’avenir nous réserve ? La vague de l’ISIS pourrait rapidement être redirigée contre la Jordanie », a-t-il déclaré lors d’une conférence à Tel Aviv.

Israël devrait donc maintenir un contrôle sécuritaire à long terme du territoire le long du Jourdain quel que soit l’accord avec les Palestiniens, a déclaré le Premier ministre. « L’évacuation des forces israéliennes mènerait directement à l’effondrement de l’Autorité palestinienne et à la montée en puissance de forces islamiques radicales, comme cela a été le cas à Gaza. Cela mettrait sérieusement Israël en danger ».

Dans son discours à l’hôtel David Intercontinental de Tel Aviv, Gordon a également évoqué la pluie de roquettes qui s’abat sur Israël depuis la bande de Gaza contrôlée par le Hamas. « Les Etats-Unis condamnent fermement ces attaques.

« Aucun pays ne devrait vivre sous la menace constante d’une violence hasardeuse contre des civils innocents », a rappelé Gordon, dont l’administration avait été fortement critiquée par le gouvernement israélien pour avoir accepté de travailler rapidement avec le nouveau gouvernement d’unité soutenu par le Hamas qui avait été établi le mois dernier.

L’administration soutient le droit d’Israël à se défendre contre ces attaques, a-t-il ajouté. « En même temps, nous apprécions l’appel du Premier ministre Netanyahu à agir responsablement, et nous appelons à notre tour les deux parties à faire tout ce qu’elles peuvent pour ramener le calme et protéger les civils ».

Voir enfin:

Les cibles du jihadiste : la tour Eiffel, le Louvre, les festivals…

Élisabeth Fleury

Le Parisien

09.07.2014

Sur le site Islamiste Shoumouk al-Islam, Ali M. s’appelait Abu Naji. Sous ce pseudo, à l’aide d’un logiciel de cryptage et sur une messagerie spécialement dédiée, cet Algérien de 29 ans, marié et père de deux enfants, a élaboré pendant un an des projets d’attentats en France avec l’un des plus hauts responsables d’Al-Qaïda au Maghreb islamique (Aqmi), alias Redouane18.

Découverts à la suite de l’arrestation d’AliM. il y a un an, ces messages ont été décryptés. Leur lecture fait froid dans le dos. Installé dans le Vaucluse où il travaillait dans une boucherie halal, Ali M., qui s’apprêtait à rejoindre un maquis dans le Sud algérien, serait-il passé à l’acte ? « Il a vécu son arrestation comme un soulagement », indique en tout cas son avocate, Me Daphné Pugliesi.

Sélectionner des cibles
Le 1er avril 2013, AbuNaji est prié de faire parvenir « quelques suggestions relatives à l’orientation à donner à l’activité du jihad à l’endroit où [il se] trouve ». Dès le lendemain, dans un long mail, il s’exécute. « L’objectif qui mérite d’être visé s’avère la population française modeste et paupérisée », écrit-il. Ces futures victimes fréquentent les bars, les marchés, « certaines petites localités et les boîtes de nuit », poursuit-il. Soucieux de préserver les musulmans, Abu Naji suggère notamment d’éviter les centres commerciaux. Les patrouilles de police et de gendarmerie, en revanche, peuvent faire l’objet d’embuscades. De même les centrales d’électricité nucléaire ou encore « les avions au moment du décollage » peuvent être ciblés.

Abu Naji évoque les monuments historiques et énumère, à ce titre, « la tour Eiffel et le musée du Louvre ». Sans citer nommément le Festival d’Avignon, il parle des «manifestations culturelles qui ont lieu dans des villes du sud de la France au cours desquelles des milliers de chrétiens se rassemblent pendant un mois ». « Les artères deviennent noires de monde et une simple grenade peut blesser des dizaines de personnes, détaille-t-il. Je vous laisse imaginer si c’est un engin piégé. »

Constituer un réseau dormant
Visiblement satisfait par la réponse d’Abu Naji, Redouane18 veut à présent tester ses capacités de recruteur. « Est-ce que tu peux disposer d’un contact avec des frères qui auraient eux-mêmes des contacts avec nos frères dans le grand Sud saharien ? » demande-t-il le 6 avril ? Dans un message daté du 18 avril, Abu Naji évoque un « frère de Bel Abbes » et plusieurs autres « désireux de rejoindre l’Organisation ». « Combien sont-ils ? Où résident-ils ? Savent-ils manier des armes ? Ont-ils fait l’objet des poursuites de la part des Tyrans », demande aussitôt son interlocuteur.

Réponse prudente d’Abu Naji : « des frères, il y en a légion, mais je ne sais pas si tous veulent faire le jihad. » Une semaine plus tard, Redouane18 invite Abu Naji et son « frère de Bel Abbes » à rejoindre ses troupes sur place, pour une dizaine de jours, « afin de bénéficier auprès des frères d’une formation militaire et d’un entraînement dans les techniques de combat ». Redouane18 précise : « A la suite de cela, vous retournerez dans le pays où vous résidez et vous attendrez les instructions. »

Partir s’entraîner
Redouane18 est clair : il n’attend aucune aide financière de la part de sa nouvelle recrue. « Nous ne sommes pas dans le besoin quand il s’agit de gérer nos activités », écritil à Abu Naji le 18 avril 2013. « Nous attendons de toi que tu mettes en place un réseau dont tu seras le dirigeant sous la bannière de l’Organisation », poursuit-il. La mission assignée à Abu Naji consistera, dans un premier temps, à « faire des repérages d’objectifs et à collecter des renseignements ». Dans un deuxième temps, « il te sera nécessaire de venir nous rencontrer en vue de planifier ensemble le projet ». Ali M. étant dans le collimateur des autorités algériennes, ses interlocuteurs lui suggèrent de passer par la Tunisie.

« Le plus important à retenir est que je vous annonce que, grâce à Dieu, je suis fin prêt et bien paré », écrit Abu Naji le 1er mai, déterminé à venir participer aux entraînements. Le 17 juin, il a son billet. « J’arriverai dans la capitale tunisienne le 22 juillet », se réjouit-il. Huit jours après ce message, il sera arrêté. « Seule l’interpellation d’Ali M. quelques semaines avant la date effective du déplacement a empêché son départ en Algérie », indique, sur PV, un officier de la Direction générale de la sécurité intérieure (DGSI).

COMPLEMENT:

Correction: July 10, 2014

An editorial on Tuesday about the death of a Palestinian teenager in Jerusalem referred incorrectly to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s response to the killing of Muhammad Abu Khdeir. On the day of the killing, Mr. Netanyahu’s office issued a statement saying he had told his minister for internal security to quickly investigate the crime; it is not the case that “days of near silence” passed before he spoke about it.

NYT


Meurtre de Mohammed Abu Khudair: Pourquoi il n’y aura jamais de nom de place pour les tueurs (Why there will never be any public squares named after Mohammed Abu Khudair’s killers)

8 juillet, 2014
https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t1.0-9/s526x395/10389551_4411717148122_237425698760742694_n.jpg http://www.indexoncensorship.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/deathofklinghoffer.jpg
Three-finger- saluting French supporters of Algerian football team promoting Hamas kidnapping or just traditional "un deux trois viva l'Algérie" salute ?(Jul. 2014)
Three-finger-ssaluting pro-Palestinian demonstrator promoting Hamas kidnapping (San Francisco, Jul. 2014)La vilenie que vous m’enseignez, je la pratiquerai et ce sera dur, mais je veux surpasser mes maîtres. Shylock ("Le Marchand de Venise", Shakespeare, III, 67-76)
From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free ! Slogan (manifestants pro-palestiniens, San Francisco, 08.07.14)
I tried to show that the Jewish world at that time was also violent, among other things because it had been hurt by Christian violence. Of course I do not claim that Judaism condones murder. But within Ashkenazi Judaism there were extremist groups that could have committed such an act and justified it. I found there were statements and parts of the testimony that were not part of the Christian culture of the judges, and they could not have been invented or added by them. They were components appearing in prayers known from the [Jewish] prayer book.Over many dozens of pages I proved the centrality of blood on Passover. "Based on many sermons, I concluded that blood was used, especially by Ashkenazi Jews, and that there was a belief in the special curative powers of children’s blood. It turns out that among the remedies of Ashkenazi Jews were powders made of blood. The rabbis permitted it both because the blood was already dried," and because in Ashkenazi communities it was an accepted custom that took on the force of law, Toaff said. There is no proof of acts of murder, Toaff said, but there were curses and hatred of Christians, and prayers inciting to cruel vengeance against Christians. There was always the possibility that some crazy person would do something. In Germany, it became a real craze. Peddlers of medicines would sell human blood, the way you have a transfusion today. The Jews were influenced by this and did the same things. In one of the testimonies in the Trento trial, a peddler of sugar and blood is mentioned, who came to Venice. I went to the archives in Venice and found that there had been a man peddling sugar and blood, which were basic products in pharmacies of the period. A man named Asher of Trento was also mentioned in the trial, who had ostensibly come with a bag and sold dried blood. One of the witnesses said he was tried for alchemy in Venice and arrested there. I took a team to the archives and found documentation of the man’s trial. Thus, I found that it is not easy to discount all the testimony.I am being presented like the new Yigal Amir. But one shouldn’t be afraid to tell the truth. Unfortunately my research has become marginal, and only the real or false implications it might have are being related to. I directed the research at intelligent people, who know that in the Jewish world there are different streams. I believe that academia cannot avoid dealing with issues that have an emotional impact. This is the truth, and if I don’t publish it, someone else will find it and publish it. (…) Extremists in the past brought disaster on us by false accusations. I wanted to show that hatred and incitement of this kind can develop, because there will always be someone who will take advantage of it. Professor Ariel Toaff (Bar-Ilan University)
It had a damaging place in history, it had a murderous place in history. You know, Jews were murdered after such accusations were made, but to cover it up I think is in some ways to forget or deny a painful past. And so to uncover it, to show it publically, is and something that no one believes in anymore. Chief rabbi Michael Schudrich
What kind of society produces such mothers? Whence the women who cheer on their boys to blow themselves up or murder the children of their neighbors? Well-intentioned Western liberals may prefer not to ask, because at least some of the conceivable answers may upset the comforting cliché that all human beings can relate on some level, whatever the cultural differences. Or they may accuse me of picking a few stray anecdotes and treating them as dispositive, as if I’m the only Western journalist to encounter the unsettling reality of a society sunk into a culture of hate. Or they can claim that I am ignoring the suffering of Palestinian women whose innocent children have died at Israeli hands. But I’m not ignoring that suffering. To kill innocent people deliberately is odious, to kill them accidentally or "collaterally" is, at a minimum, tragic. I just have yet to meet the Israeli mother who wants to raise her boys to become kidnappers and murderers—and who isn’t afraid of saying as much to visiting journalists. (…) As for the Palestinians and their inveterate sympathizers in the West, perhaps they should note that a culture that too often openly celebrates martyrdom and murder is not fit for statehood, and that making excuses for that culture only makes it more unfit. Postwar Germany put itself through a process of moral rehabilitation that began with a recognition of what it had done. Palestinians who want a state should do the same, starting with the mothers. Bret Stephens
Bret Stephens claims that he has « yet to meet the Israeli mother who wants to raise her boys to become kidnappers and murderers » (« Where Are the Palestinian Mothers?, » Global View, July 1). Actually, every Israeli mother is legally obligated by the Israeli government to enter her sons and daughters into an institution that systematically kidnaps and murders. It’s called the Israeli Defense Force. Since 1948, the IDF has been creating mourning mothers for the longest occupation of war crimes and human-rights atrocities in human history. Its illegal and immoral actions have been denounced in more U.N. resolutions than any other country in the world. (…) Since the disappearance of the three Israelis on June 12, at least eight Palestinian civilians have been killed in retribution and hundreds more imprisoned with no charges. One of the three Israelis was old enough to have already served in the IDF, and all three of them were on an illegal settlement on Palestinian territory. Israeli settlers have been engaging in some of the worst hate crimes in the conflict, notoriously known for pillaging mosques, attacking and even running over Palestinians, and vandalizing Palestinian property with calls for the death of all Arabs. On July 2, Palestinian teenager Mohammad Hussein Abu Khdeir was kidnapped, murdered and burned by an Israeli mob, and among many Israelis his death was celebrated. All facets of Israeli society, even up to the government, called for this sort of retribution, with Benjamin Netanyahu demanding « revenge » and Michael Ben-Ari calling for « death to the enemy. » While the call for justice is expected of any democratic country, what Israel is calling for is indiscriminate revenge. Amani al-Khatahtbeh (American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee)
Les colons ont utilisé le corps de Muhammad Hussein Abu Khdeir, 17 ans, de Shuafat, au nord de Jérusalem, pour perpétrer leur [acte de] vengeance sacré en le torturant et le brûlant à mort, par un crime qui rappelle leurs saintes matzot, devenues partie intégrante de leur histoire de trahisons et d’assassinats. En effet, la culture de la violence sanguinaire s’est développée chez les juifs au point d’infiltrer leurs rites et prières sacrés. Par « matzot sacrées », je pense à ces matzot mélangées à du sang humain, le sang des gentils, à savoir de l’autre non-juif, [qu’ils cuisent] pour célébrer la fête juive appelée la Pâque. Selon les récits historiques, ils assassinaient des chrétiens, de préférence des enfants de moins de dix ans, recueillaient leur sang, puis le remettaient à un rabbin, pour qu’il le mélange aux matzot de la fête avant de les servir aux croyants, qui les dévoraient pendant leur fête. Ces anciens rites trouvent un écho à l’époque moderne, où [les juifs] sanctifient le sang de [leurs coreligionnaires] juifs, considérés comme des êtres humains de premier ordre, et dénigrent le sang des Palestiniens. Cela oblige [le Palestinien] Mahmoud Abbas à définir et à classer le garçon martyr Abu Khdeir, après que ce même [Abbas] eut exprimé sa rage aux ministres des Affaires étrangères des pays musulmans [le 18 juin 2014, à la conférence de Djeddah] et déclaré que les trois colons qui avaient été enlevés en Cisjordanie étaient des êtres humains comme nous et que nous devions les rechercher et les ramener, répondant ainsi à demande [des Israéliens] d’entourer ces trois colons d’un halo de divinité et de noble humanité et de les qualifier d’« êtres humains exceptionnels »… Ce monde injuste, des États-Unis et de l’Union européenne au président de l’Autorité palestinienne, a largement déploré la mort des trois colons, mais ne se lamente pas de celle de l’enfant palestinien Abu Khdeir, car il appartient au groupe dont le sang n’est pas [considéré] comme sacré, selon la classification de la communauté internationale des groupes humains, ethniques et politiques, qui place Israël en haut de l’échelle et les Palestiniens en bas. Cette différentiation faite par la communauté internationale face au sang israélien et palestinien ressuscite le patrimoine de la théorie nazie. Les juifs, avec leur comportement criminel, adoptent la vision d’Hitler, basée sur la classification des gens en races supérieures, comme la race aryenne, et en races inférieures, comme les noirs, les Arabes et les juifs, [concluant que] la supériorité de la race blanche sur tous les autres peuples lui octroie de nombreux droits absolus, tels que le droit de régner sur les autres peuples. De même, nous voyons qu’Israël estime que la supériorité de la race juive lui confère le droit absolu d’occuper, de construire des colonies, de se venger et de répandre du sang. C’est ainsi qu’ils cuisaient le pain sacré dans le passé, et qu’ils perpètrent leurs rites sacrés vengeurs au présent, dont la victime [cette fois] fut le jeune Abu Khdeir. Wissam Afifa (Al-Risalah, Journal du Hamas, Gaza, 3 juillet 2014)
Je tiens à adresser mes condoléances à la famille Abu Khudair. Je m’engage à ce que les auteurs de ce crime horrible, qui doit être résolument condamné dans les termes les plus énergiques, je m’engage à ce que les auteurs de ce crime horrible subissent tout le poids de la loi. Je sais que dans notre société, la société d’Israël, il n’y a pas de place pour de tels meurtriers. Et c’est la différence entre nous et nos voisins. Ils considèrent que les meurtriers sont des héros. Ils donnent leur nom à des places publiques. Nous ne le faisons pas. Nous les condamnons et nous les jugeons et nous allons les mettre en prison. Et ce n’est pas la seule différence. Tandis que nous traduisons ces meurtriers devant les tribunaux, au sein de l’Autorité palestinienne, l’incitation à détruire l’État d’Israël perdure. Elle constitue la base des médias officiels et du système éducatif. C’est un conflit asymétrique. Nous ne cherchons pas leur destruction ; ils enseignent à une très grande partie de leur société à rechercher notre destruction. Et cela doit cesser. Il y a trop de souffrance. Il y a trop de douleur. Nous ne faisons aucune distinction entre les terroristes et nous répondrons à tous, d’où qu’ils viennent, d’une main ferme. Nous ne laisserons pas des extrémistes, d’où qu’ils viennent enflammer la région et répandre plus de sang. Benjamin Netanyahou
If terrorism — specifically, the commission or advocacy of deliberate acts of deadly violence directed randomly at the innocent — is to be defeated, world public opinion has to be turned decisively against it. The only way to do that is to focus resolutely on the acts rather than their claimed (or conjectured) motivations, and to characterize all such acts, whatever their motivation, as crimes. This means no longer romanticizing terrorists as Robin Hoods and no longer idealizing their deeds as rough poetic justice. If we indulge such notions when we happen to agree or sympathize with the aims, then we have forfeited the moral ground from which any such acts can be convincingly condemned. Does "The Death of Klinghoffer" romanticize the perpetrators of deadly violence toward the innocent? Its creators tacitly acknowledged that it did, when they revised the opera for American consumption after its European premieres in Brussels and Paris. In its original version, the opening "Chorus of Exiled Palestinians" was followed not by a balancing "Chorus of Exiled Jews" but by a scene, now dropped from the score, that showed the Klinghoffers’ suburban neighbors gossiping merrily about their impending cruise ("The dollar’s up. Good news for the Klinghoffers") to an accompaniment of hackneyed pop-style music. That contrast set the vastly unequal terms on which the conflict of Palestinians and Jews would be perceived throughout the opera. The portrayal of suffering Palestinians in the musical language of myth and ritual was immediately juxtaposed with a musically trivial portrayal of contented, materialistic American Jews. The paired characterizations could not help linking up with lines sung later by "Rambo," one of the fictional terrorists, who (right before the murder) wrathfully dismisses Leon Klinghoffer’s protest at his treatment with the accusation that "wherever poor men are gathered you can find Jews getting fat." Is it unfair to discuss a version of the opera that has been withdrawn from publication and remains unrecorded? It would have been, except that Mr. Adams, throwing his own pie at the Boston Symphony in an interview published recently on the Andante.com Web site, saw fit to point out that the opera "has never seemed particularly shocking to audiences in Europe." He was playing the shame game, trying to make the Boston cancellation look provincial. But when one takes into account that the version European audiences saw in 1991 catered to so many of their favorite prejudices — anti-American, anti-Semitic, anti-bourgeois — the shame would seem rather to go the other way. Nor have these prejudices been erased from the opera in its revised form. The libretto commits many notorious breaches of evenhandedness, but the greatest one is to be found in Mr. Adams’s music. In his interview, the composer repeats the oft drawn comparison between the operatic Leon Klinghoffer and the "sacrificial victim" who is "at the heart of the Bach Passions." But his music, precisely insofar as it relies on Bach’s example, undermines the facile analogy. In the "St. Matthew Passion," Bach accompanies the words of Jesus with an aureole of violins and violas that sets him off as numinous, the way a halo would do in a painting. There is a comparable effect in "Klinghoffer": long, quiet, drawn-out tones in the highest violin register (occasionally spelled by electronic synthesizers or high oboe tones). They recall not only the Bach ian aureole but also effects of limitless expanse in time or space, familiar from many Romantic scores. (An example is the beginning of Borodin’s "In the Steppes of Central Asia.") These numinous, "timeless" tones accompany virtually all the utterances of the choral Palestinians or the terrorists, beginning with the opening chorus. They underscore the words spoken by the fictitious terrorist Molqui: "We are not criminals and we are not vandals, but men of ideals." Together with an exotically "Oriental" obbligato bassoon, they accompany the fictitious terrorist Mamoud’s endearing reverie about his favorite love songs. They add resonance to the fictitious terrorist Omar’s impassioned yearnings for a martyr’s afterlife; and they also appear when the ship’s captain tries to mediate between the terrorists and the victims. They do not accompany the victims, except in the allegorical "Aria of the Falling Body," sung by the slain Klinghoffer’s remains as they are tossed overboard by the terrorists. Only after death does the familiar American middle-class Jew join the glamorously exotic Palestinians in mythic timelessness. Only as his body falls lifeless is his music exalted to a comparably romanticized spiritual dimension. Why should we want to hear this music now? Is it an edifying challenge, as Mr. Wiegand and Mr. Tommasini contend? Does it give us answers that we should prefer, with Mr. Swed, to comfort? Or does it express a reprehensible contempt for the real-life victims of its imagined "men of ideals," all too easily transferable to the victims who perished on Sept. 11? Richard Taruskin
Les six suspects sont des fanatiques hystériques du Beitar Jérusalem. Selon un officier de police familier du dossier, qui s’est exprimé anonymement sur Buzzfeed , les membres de cette cabale meurtrière sont tous affiliés à « La Familia », un petit groupe de plusieurs milliers (5.500) de Fans connus pour leurs préjugés anti-arabes et leur penchant plus général pour la voyoucratie. Ces six jeunes hommes se sont rencontrés lors d’un rassemblement lié à une épreuve de football et ont décidé d’étendre la portée de leur hooliganisme aussi loin qu’ils le pourraient, ce qui a débouché sur la mort d’Abu Khdair, peu de temps après. Ce scénario peut paraître incompréhensible. Pourtant si vous comprenez le monde du football et si vous connaissez le Beitar, vous commencez de réaliser qu’un acte d’ultra-violence du style Orange Mécanique est une conséquence dramatique, tout-à-fait possible, et même prévisible, de la sous-culture des fans de cette équipe. Je parle à partir de ma propre expérience : je suis, moi-même un fan se consacrant, sa vie durant, au Beitar de Jerusalem, et au cours des années que j’ai passées à assister à ses matchs, j’ai eu ma part de témoignage de brutalités épouvantables, en temps de crise comme en temps de paix, presque toujours sans la moindre impulsion véritablement raciste ou nationaliste. Pour autant que je puisse le dire, le but poursuivi, c’était simplement le pur, viscéral, écœurant frisson de violence. Parfois, il s’approprie le langage de la politique, s’attachant à un parti ou une idéologie ou à un groupe ethnique. Mais c’est toujours, d’abord et avant tout, à propos de football, à cause de la violence ritualisée qui procure aux jeunes gens sans espoir un sens dans la vie et un sentiment enivrant de bien-être. Malheureusement, La Familia – qui, selon certains rapports est forte de 5.500 – est passée de la barbarie de basse intensité aux agressions de masse enragées. Parfois, ces attaques se saisissent d’un prétexte raciste, comme lorsqu’un groupe de 300 fans, enivrés par une victoire du Beitar, sont entrés dans un centre commercial, en 2012, en chantant « Mahomet est mort ! » et en tentant de passer à tabac tout Arabe qui lui tombait sous la main. On doit aussi insister pour dire que la Direction du Beitar, comme la vaste majorité de ses fans, ont été particulièrement révoltés par le terrorisme de La Familia et ont fait ce qu’ils ont pu pour l’infléchir. La police israélienne a lancé des poursuites, et fait tout ce qu’il fallait pour diffuser des ordres de restriction, interdisant l’accès aux meneurs de La Familia et tâchant d’arrêter quiconque était en lien avec des actes de violence et de vandalisme. La Ministre des Sports et de la Culture était intervenue pour fustiger le racisme et la violence comme n’ayant aucune place dans les stades, après l’incendie de la maison du Club, faisant ainsi écho aux sentiments de beaucoup d’Israéliens. Il y aura ceux qui compareront la rapidité avec laquelle la police a été en mesure de localiser les meurtriers de Muhammed Abu-Khudair, à l’incapacité de traîner en Justice les assassins de Naftali Fraenkel, Gilad Shaar, et Eyal Yifrach. Pourtant, une des raisons pour lesquelles la police a pu les arrêter si vite, c’est tout simplement, parce qu’elle a consacré des ressources considérables, au cours de la dernière décennie, à tenir des rapports sur les hooligans violents se réclamant de l’équipe de la Ville, tout comme la police l’a fait à Munich, à Varsovie, à Bruxelles, Londres, Madrid ou au Paris-St Germain. Abu Khdair est mort à cause des mêmes forces obscures, si lié à ce sport que j’aime, qui a déjà tué Tony Deogan, un jeune supporter suédois de l’IFK Göteborg mort sous les coups acharnés des fans de l’équipe rivale de l’AIK en aout 2002, où le jeune Mariusz B. poignardé dans le dos en 2003, après que des hooligans polonais, armés de couteaux, de barres de fer et de pierres, se soient rassemblés dans une rue près du stade de Wroclaw ; le même élan qui a mené les fans d’Al-Masry à tomber à bras raccourcis sur leurs frères et semblables qui soutenaient Al-Ahly dans le stade de Port-Saïd, en Egypte, en 2012, faisant 79 morts et plus d’un millier de blessés. Liel Leibovitz
Ce sont des colons. Ils vivent là où ils ne devraient pas vivre. Les colons n’ont rien à faire là-bas. Mais ce n’est pas parce que ce sont des colons qu’on doit pour autant les kidnapper. Amos Gitai (cinéaste israélien)
L’usage magique du mot "colon" donne-t-il donc un permis de tuer ? Une justification morale des meurtres ? Une raison de négliger les meurtres d’Israéliens pour sur-représenter et exalter la cause palestinienne et faire silence sur les turpitudes et le racisme de la société palestinienne ? Nul n’a vu sur les écrans que la députée à la Knesset, Hanan Zouabi avait justifié les trois enlèvements, ni les supporters franco-algériens de l’équipe algérienne de football faire le signal de victoire des trois doigts de la main pour fêterle rapt des trois adolescents, ni les célébrations de l’enlèvement dans toute la société palestinienne. Celà, après tout, était "normal" puisque c’étaient des colons…. Ce constat prend encore plus de puissance lorsque l’on sait que les trois victimes israéliennes ne résidaient pas dans les territoires et n’étaient donc pas des "colons". Eyal Yifrach, 19 ans, était originaire d’Elad, situé en territoire israélien internationalement reconnu, Naftali Frenkel, 16 ans, était originaire de Nof Ayalon, situé également en territoire israélien internationalement reconnu. Quant à Gilad Shaer, 16 ans, il était originaire de la localité de Tamon, située en Zone C, reconnue par les Accords d’Oslo comme sous souveraineté israélienne, une souveraineté autant reconnue par l’Autorité palestinienne et par le Hamas pour se dédouaner de toute responsabilité dans l’enlèvement. Cette information est gravissime, car elle signifie quelque chose de très clair : le discours médiatique reprend et assume le discours palestinien aux yeux duquel, rappelons-le, l’Etat d’Israël lui même, sans rapport avec les territoires contestés, est une colonie sous occupation . Finalement aux yeux des journalistes français, tous les Juifs d’Israël (et ceux d’ici ? – qui les soutiennent) ne sont-ils pas des colons ? Sans doute le pensent-ils secrètement à voir la façon dont ils ont exclu les Juifs français de la scène publique. Cette remarque n’est pas une affirmation sans fondement car, dans les compte-rendus médiatiques du profil des assassins de Toulouse et de Bruxelles – qui ont tué au nom de Gaza et de l’islam -, les explications sociologiques et psychologiques de ces mêmes médias – qui, donc, "excusent" les meurtriers – sont la règle pour toutes sortes de "raisons", imputables, ici à la société française (raciste et colonialiste envers les immigrés) et, là bas, à Israël ("colon") … De sorte qu’on "comprenne"… La thématique du "colon" n’est pas l’effet d’un hasard ni d’une maladresse. Ce que nous confirme, vendredi 4 juillet, le site JForum qui s’est enquis auprès de la rédaction de France 2 de la raison pour laquelle ses journalistes employaient le qualificatif de "colon" pour les 3 jeunes assassinés, alors qu’ils ne le sont pas, dans un reportage intitulé « Jeunes colons assassinés : la riposte israélienne ». Le site s’est vu répondre que c’était là un « choix éditorial ». Un choix très conscient, donc, et assumé. « Tous les autres médias en font de même », justifient-ils, ce qui est vrai. Il faudrait donc vérifier si la source n’est pas tout simplement l’Agence France Presse dont on connaît depuis 15 ans l’adhésion aux thèses palestiniennes , une agence semi-étatique, ce qui est encore plus grave et jette le discrédit sur la société dans son ensemble et les pouvoirs publics. Cette manipulation rhétorique est la même que celle qui permet de tenir des discours antisémites en prétendant qu’ils sont "antisionistes". Qu’est l’antisionisme, en effet, si ce n’est le projet de prôner "moralement" (puisque "colon" !) la destruction d’un Etat et donc des six millions de Juifs qui y vivent ? Il y a là un choix idéologique et politique qui, dans sa logique, justifie le meurtre et excuse les meurtriers. C’est prendre une grave responsabilité sur l’incitation à la violence en France même. Ce ne sont pas ici des banlieues en rupture qui sont en question mais le système central de communication de la société française. Il faudra en tirer les conclusions qui s’imposent. Ce que l’opinion veut ignorer – parce que cela la terrorise – c’est l’intention religieuse de ces crimes, avouée par les assassins eux-mêmes. Ainsi, le meurtrier d’un policier israélien tué à la veille de Pâque et identifié à l’occasion de la traque des ravisseurs, a-t-il reconnu, dans ces termes mêmes, le motif de son crime : son père lui avait dit que, dans l’islam, tuer un Juif ouvrait les portes du paradis… La mère palestinienne des 2 ravisseurs, elle même, s’est félicitée de l’acte religieux de ses fils et l’on sait la connotation religieuse attribuée universellement par la société palestinienne aux suicides meurtriers sur motif islamique. Ces vrais crimes rituels sont monnaie courante sous la férule du "califat" proclamé dans une région d’Irak où, en plus des exécutions de masse typiques des régimes totalitaires, sont perpétrées des crucifixions. Oui, des crucifixions au XXI ° siècle. Là bas, il n’y a plus de Juifs, mais il y a des chrétiens et d’autres musulmans, les Chiites. Le silence journalistique quasi total règne sur ces exactions monstrueuses, et notamment les persécutions des chrétiens encore présents dans le monde arabo-musulman. C’est normal, elles ne "cadrent" pas avec la version des médias. A la lumière de tout celà il faut oser un jugement gravissime : n’entrons-nous pas dans une guerre de religion alors que le monde "postmoderne" de l’Occident "postdémocratique" est congénitalement aveugle à un tel phénomène ? Et démissionnaire. Concernant Israël et les Juifs, cette attitude a des dessous psychiques très pervers car la France sait pertinemment qu’elle est aussi menacée par cette guerre de religion sur son sol même, et pas uniquement dans ses cibles juives. En trouvant une "raison" à ces crimes contre les Juifs, elle croit limiter l’incendie à des boucs émissaires. Elle amadoue les meurtriers en montrant de la complaisance pour leurs forfaitures, tout en se persuadant qu’elles ont des "raisons", comme pour conjurer sa peur et dévier, un temps, la menace certaine qui plane sur elle. Post scriptum : la Télévision israélienne annonce ce soir, dimanche, que les responsables du crime abominable contre le jeune Palestinien ont été identifiés et arrétés. Ils seraient un groupe de 6 personnes, non organisées politiquement, quoique proches de l’extrême droite, qui auraient agi par improvisation, après avoir participé à une manifestation violente à Jérusalem et en réaction de vengeance au meurtre des trois adolescents israéliens. La nouvelle semble confirmée. C’est un bon signe de ce que le chaos et l’aventurisme ne l’a pas emporté sur l’Etat de droit dans la société israélienne, ce qui serait une victoire des Palestiniens dans la guerre asymétrique qu’ils mènent contre Israël : rétrograder Israël à la logique tribale. Il est en effet capital que, dans une situation aussi violente, les individus soient empéchés de se faire justice eux mêmes, privilège de l’Etat, et quelle justice, criminelle et barbare. Shmuel Trigano
Some would say that Arab violence against Jews is no villainy at all, but merely an alternate form of national politics. Representatives of the American government seeking peace in the Middle East have been shuttling between Israeli and Palestinian leaders as though dealing with equivalent societies with an equal investment in territorial compromise. In the arts, the Metropolitan Opera in New York this season plans to present a work that gives sympathetic voice to Palestinian terrorists who in 1985 shoved a disabled American off a cruise ship and into the ocean because he was a Jew. Reflecting the abjuration of evil, the opera is called "The Death of Klinghoffer" instead of "The Murder of Klinghoffer." Now that Jewish suspects have been apprehended in the Jerusalem murder of 16-year-old Arab Mohammed Abu Khudair, there are those who would cite the parallel between this heinous crime and the recent murders of Gilad Shaar, Eyal Yifrach, and Naftali Frenkel as proof of moral and political equivalence between the two societies. One anticipates that in the coming days the standard outlets for such views will offer standard justifications for Arab rioting and condemnations of Jewish extremism as part of the same alleged cycle of violence. But are the situations comparable? Arab rioters did not wait for the identification or apprehension of suspects in the killing of Mohammed Abu Khudair to begin destroying Jewish life and property. One of their first targets was Jerusalem’s new light-rail system that connects Jewish and Arab sectors of the city. In their own communities, murderers of Israelis enjoy support, encouragement, adulation. News of the abduction of three Israeli boys had no sooner hit the Internet on June 13 than Arab celebrants were handing out candies and posting three-fingered salutes, called Gilad Shalits, for the Israeli soldier seized by Hamas and held for five years until "swapped" in 2011 for 1,027 Arab prisoners whose crimes had included the killing of 569 Israelis. The celebrants of mid-June were mocking the value that Jews place on individual life, one that contrasts so sharply with the value they place on taking Jewish life. Three Shalits would have given them three times the bargaining power had the abduction not ended with the boys being shot instead. Almost a month after the murder of the Jewish boys, the Arab perpetrators are still on the loose. In startling contrast, Israeli police instantly distinguished among several false leads to track down the Arab victim’s suspected killers. Some Israelis had already denounced the presumed Jewish seekers of vengeance, with neither side waiting for formal indictment much less due process before engaging in self-recrimination on one hand and accusation on the other. The identification of Jewish suspects by the Jerusalem police triggered instantaneous condemnations: Rabbi Elyakim Levanon, who heads the Yeshiva at Elon Moreh, said Jewish law calls for capital punishment for crimes of murder, citing first the crime against the Israeli Arab and then the crime against the Jewish students. Speaking at the funeral of the three Jewish boys on July 1, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said, "A deep and wide moral abyss separates us from our enemies. They sanctify death while we sanctify life. They sanctify cruelty while we sanctify compassion." He made the same allusion to political and moral asymmetry four days later in his message of condolence to the Abu Khudair family, pledging that the crime against their son would be punished because "[that is] the difference between us and our neighbors. They consider murderers to be heroes. They name public squares after them. We don’t. We condemn them and we put them on trial and we’ll put them in prison." It is one of the ironies of Israel that Jewish parents whose children are murdered by Arabs are not guaranteed justice as surely as Arabs whose children are murdered by Jews. The problem of evil may be universal, but Jews have faced evil in an existential and political form to a degree that makes it different in kind. In reclaiming their land, Jews acquired the ability to defend what they create, and perhaps by their example to inspire others to resist criminal forces. In 1957, Golda Meir, who was later to become Israel’s prime minister, told an American audience that peace would come "when the Arabs love their children more than they hate us." To pretend otherwise is to fail those Arab children no less than the Israeli schoolboys who looked forward to a long and useful life. Ruth Wisse

Attention: des supporters peuvent en cacher d’autres !

En ces temps où, pendant qu’on crucifie des chrétiens en Syrie, du côté arabe réémergent des accusations de crime rituel contre les Juifs tout droit sorties du Moyen-Age …

Et où du côté occidental on écrit et joue des opéras en l’honneur des pires terroristes …

Mais où, se décidant enfin à faire face à la réalité historique, une église polonaise ressort une toile antisémite du XVIIIe siècle  …

Et où,malgré l’ostracisme dont il est victime, un chercheur israélien rappelle courageusement que les communautés juives médiévales n’étaient elles pas non plus à l’occasion à l’abri de la violence …

Comment après l’arrestation et les aveux partiels des membres apparemment du "gang des barbares" d’un club de football israélien qui ont sauvagement assassiné le jeune adolescent palestinien Mohammed Abu Khudair …

Suite à l’enlèvement et à l’assassinat, il y a près d’un mois, de trois adolescents juifs  par de probables terroristes du Hamas toujours en fuite …

Ne pas voir à l’avance, avec l’historienne Ruth Wisse, les mines réjouies de tous nos maitres es équivalence morale …

Trop contents, entre leur quasi-absolution des premiers crimes sous prétexte que les victimes étaient des "colons" et leur refus de voir, du côté palestinien comme du côté même peut-être de certains supporters franco-algériens, les démonstrations de joie auxquels ceux-ci avaient donné lieu …

Et se gardant bien de rappeler, comme vient de le faire le premier ministre israélien, que  la société israélienne, elle, ne "nommait pas des places publiques et des écoles en l’honneur d’assassins" mais les "mettait en prison" …

D’avoir enfin la preuve tangible d’une prétendue barbarie de l’Etat hébreu tout entier ?

The Abyss Between Two Heinous Episodes
Now will come assertions of equivalence between Israeli and Palestinian societies. But are the situations comparable?
Ruth R. Wisse
WSJ
July 6, 2014

As America approached its national holiday this year, Israel and world Jewry were plunged into mourning for three students who were abducted and murdered by members of the Palestinian terror group Hamas. Thirty-eight years ago, on July 4, 1976, jubilation greeted the news that an Israeli commando raid had freed 102 fellow citizens held hostage by Palestinian terrorists at an airport in Entebbe, Uganda. These different outcomes for the same kind of villainy directed at Jewish targets prompts us to ask which side is winning this unilateral war.

Some would say that Arab violence against Jews is no villainy at all, but merely an alternate form of national politics. Representatives of the American government seeking peace in the Middle East have been shuttling between Israeli and Palestinian leaders as though dealing with equivalent societies with an equal investment in territorial compromise. In the arts, the Metropolitan Opera in New York this season plans to present a work that gives sympathetic voice to Palestinian terrorists who in 1985 shoved a disabled American off a cruise ship and into the ocean because he was a Jew. Reflecting the abjuration of evil, the opera is called "The Death of Klinghoffer" instead of "The Murder of Klinghoffer."

Now that Jewish suspects have been apprehended in the Jerusalem murder of 16-year-old Arab Mohammed Abu Khudair, there are those who would cite the parallel between this heinous crime and the recent murders of Gilad Shaar, Eyal Yifrach, and Naftali Frenkel as proof of moral and political equivalence between the two societies. One anticipates that in the coming days the standard outlets for such views will offer standard justifications for Arab rioting and condemnations of Jewish extremism as part of the same alleged cycle of violence.

But are the situations comparable?

Arab rioters did not wait for the identification or apprehension of suspects in the killing of Mohammed Abu Khudair to begin destroying Jewish life and property. One of their first targets was Jerusalem’s new light-rail system that connects Jewish and Arab sectors of the city. In their own communities, murderers of Israelis enjoy support, encouragement, adulation. News of the abduction of three Israeli boys had no sooner hit the Internet on June 13 than Arab celebrants were handing out candies and posting three-fingered salutes, called Gilad Shalits, for the Israeli soldier seized by Hamas and held for five years until "swapped" in 2011 for 1,027 Arab prisoners whose crimes had included the killing of 569 Israelis. The celebrants of mid-June were mocking the value that Jews place on individual life, one that contrasts so sharply with the value they place on taking Jewish life. Three Shalits would have given them three times the bargaining power had the abduction not ended with the boys being shot instead. Almost a month after the murder of the Jewish boys, the Arab perpetrators are still on the loose.

In startling contrast, Israeli police instantly distinguished among several false leads to track down the Arab victim’s suspected killers. Some Israelis had already denounced the presumed Jewish seekers of vengeance, with neither side waiting for formal indictment much less due process before engaging in self-recrimination on one hand and accusation on the other. The identification of Jewish suspects by the Jerusalem police triggered instantaneous condemnations: Rabbi Elyakim Levanon, who heads the Yeshiva at Elon Moreh, said Jewish law calls for capital punishment for crimes of murder, citing first the crime against the Israeli Arab and then the crime against the Jewish students.

Speaking at the funeral of the three Jewish boys on July 1, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said, "A deep and wide moral abyss separates us from our enemies. They sanctify death while we sanctify life. They sanctify cruelty while we sanctify compassion." He made the same allusion to political and moral asymmetry four days later in his message of condolence to the Abu Khudair family, pledging that the crime against their son would be punished because "[that is] the difference between us and our neighbors. They consider murderers to be heroes. They name public squares after them. We don’t. We condemn them and we put them on trial and we’ll put them in prison." It is one of the ironies of Israel that Jewish parents whose children are murdered by Arabs are not guaranteed justice as surely as Arabs whose children are murdered by Jews.

The problem of evil may be universal, but Jews have faced evil in an existential and political form to a degree that makes it different in kind. In reclaiming their land, Jews acquired the ability to defend what they create, and perhaps by their example to inspire others to resist criminal forces. In 1957, Golda Meir, who was later to become Israel’s prime minister, told an American audience that peace would come "when the Arabs love their children more than they hate us." To pretend otherwise is to fail those Arab children no less than the Israeli schoolboys who looked forward to a long and useful life.

Ms. Wisse, research professor of Yiddish literature and comparative literature at Harvard University, is the author, most recently, of "No Joke: Making Jewish Humor" (Princeton, 2013).

Voir aussi:

Les médias français délivrent-ils un permis de tuer ?
Shmuel Trigano * A partir d’une tribune sur Radio J le vendredi 4 juillet 2014.
6 juillet 2014

On remarquera la différence sidérale de traitement dans la façon dont les médias français ont rendu compte du meurtre des trois jeunes adolescents israéliens et des émeutes qui ont suivi le meurtre, pour l’instant non élucidé, du jeune Palestinien. Sur les chaines françaises, à ce propos, c’est l’habituel grand spectacle qui a été relancé : hémoglobine, scènes de violence comme si vous y étiez et version exclusivement palestinienne des faits. Sur BFM, un titre annonçait que le jeune Palestinien avait été assassiné "en représailles", de sorte qu’on pouvait penser qu’il s’agissait d’un acte d’Etat.

Par contre, on n’a nulle part entendu l’échange pathétique, par portable, d’une des trois victimes israéliennes qui a pu appeler au secours la police dans la voiture des meurtriers. L’enregistrement donne à entendre le meurtre en direct et les chants de joie des assassins, une fois leur forfait commis.

Doit-on estimer, à la lumière de ce constat, que les "médias" et la classe journalistique "comprennent" pourquoi on assassine des Juifs (des "colons" !), de sorte qu’elle n’en parle que du bout des lèvres ? Cela rappelle Hubert Védrines qui, en 2001, "comprenait" que des musulmans français attaquent des Juifs français du fait de ce qui se passait au Moyen Orient.

"Comprennent-ils" aussi, au fond, le pourquoi des assassinats collectifs de Toulouse et de Bruxelles, certes en les déplorant et en les condamnant mais du bout des lèvres ?

L’usage magique du mot "colon" donne-t-il donc un permis de tuer ? Une justification morale des meurtres ? Une raison de négliger les meurtres d’Israéliens pour sur-représenter et exalter la cause palestinienne et faire silence sur les turpitudes et le racisme de la société palestinienne ? Nul n’a vu sur les écrans que la députée à la Knesset, Hanan Zouabi avait justifié les trois enlèvements, ni les supporters franco-algériens de l’équipe algérienne de football faire le signal de victoire des trois doigts de la main pour fêterle rapt des trois adolescents, ni les célébrations de l’enlèvement dans toute la société palestinienne. Celà, après tout, était "normal" puisque c’étaient des colons….

Les trois victimes n’étaient pas des "colons"

Ce constat prend encore plus de puissance lorsque l’on sait que les trois victimes israéliennes ne résidaient pas dans les territoires et n’étaient donc pas des "colons". Eyal Yifrach, 19 ans, était originaire d’Elad, situé en territoire israélien internationalement reconnu, Naftali Frenkel, 16 ans, était originaire de Nof Ayalon, situé également en territoire israélien internationalement reconnu. Quant à Gilad Shaer, 16 ans, il était originaire de la localité de Tamon, située en Zone C, reconnue par les Accords d’Oslo comme sous souveraineté israélienne, une souveraineté autant reconnue par l’Autorité palestinienne et par le Hamas pour se dédouaner de toute responsabilité dans l’enlèvement.

Cette information est gravissime, car elle signifie quelque chose de très clair : le discours médiatique reprend et assume le discours palestinien aux yeux duquel, rappelons-le, l’Etat d’Israël lui même, sans rapport avec les territoires contestés, est une colonie sous occupation . Finalement aux yeux des journalistes français, tous les Juifs d’Israël (et ceux d’ici ? – qui les soutiennent) ne sont-ils pas des colons ? Sans doute le pensent-ils secrétement à voir la façon dont ils ont exclu les Juifs français de la scène publique.

Cette remarque n’est pas une affirmation sans fondement car, dans les compte-rendus médiatiques du profil des assassins de Toulouse et de Bruxelles – qui ont tué au nom de Gaza et de l’islam -, les explications sociologiques et psychologiques de ces mêmes médias – qui, donc, "excusent" les meurtriers – sont la règle pour toutes sortes de "raisons", imputables, ici à la société française (raciste et colonialiste envers les immigrés) et, là bas, à Israël ("colon") … De sorte qu’on "comprenne"…

La thématique du "colon" n’est pas l’effet d’un hasard ni d’une maladresse. Ce que nous confirme, vendredi 4 juillet, le site JForum qui s’est enquis auprès de la rédaction de France 2 de la raison pour laquelle ses journalistes employaient le qualificatif de "colon" pour les 3 jeunes assassinés, alors qu’ils ne le sont pas, dans un reportage intitulé « Jeunes colons assassinés : la riposte israélienne ». Le site s’est vu répondre que c’était là un « choix éditorial ». Un choix très conscient, donc, et assumé. « Tous les autres médias en font de même », justifient-ils, ce qui est vrai. Il faudrait donc vérifier si la source n’est pas tout simplement l’Agence France Presse dont on connaît depuis 15 ans l’adhésion aux thèses palestiniennes , une agence semi-étatique, ce qui est encore plus grave et jette le discrédit sur la société dans son ensemble et les pouvoirs publics.

Cette manipulation rhétorique est la même que celle qui permet de tenir des discours antisémites en prétendant qu’ils sont "antisionistes". Qu’est l’antisionisme, en effet, si ce n’est le projet de prôner "moralement" (puisque "colon" !) la destruction d’un Etat et donc des six millions de Juifs qui y vivent ?

Il y a là un choix idéologique et politique qui, dans sa logique, justifie le meurtre et excuse les meurtriers. C’est prendre une grave responsabilité sur l’incitation à la violence en France même. Ce ne sont pas ici des banlieues en rupture qui sont en question mais le système central de communication de la société française. Il faudra en tirer les conclusions qui s’imposent.
Des crimes rituels

Ce que l’opinion veut ignorer – parce que cela la terrorise – c’est l’intention religieuse de ces crimes, avouée par les assassins eux-mêmes. Ainsi, le meurtrier d’un policier israélien tué à la veille de Pâque et identifié à l’occasion de la traque des ravisseurs, a-t-il reconnu, dans ces termes mêmes, le motif de son crime : son père lui avait dit que, dans l’islam, tuer un Juif ouvrait les portes du paradis… La mère palestinienne des 2 ravisseurs, elle même, s’est félicitée de l’acte religieux de ses fils et l’on sait la connotation religieuse attribuée universellement par la société palestinienne aux suicides meurtriers sur motif islamique. Ces vrais crimes rituels sont monnaie courante sous la férule du "califat" proclamé dans une région d’Irak où, en plus des exécutions de masse typiques des régimes totalitaires, sont perpétrées des crucifixions. Oui, des crucifixions au XXI ° siècle. Là bas, il n’y a plus de Juifs, mais il y a des chrétiens et d’autres musulmans, les Chiites. Le silence journalistique quasi total règne sur ces exactions monstrueuses, et notamment les persécutions des chrétiens encore présents dans le monde arabo-musulman. C’est normal, elles ne "cadrent" pas avec la version des médias.

A la lumière de tout celà il faut oser un jugement gravissime : n’entrons-nous pas dans une guerre de religion alors que le monde "postmoderne" de l’Occident "postdémocratique" est congénitalement aveugle à un tel phénomène ? Et démissionnaire.

Concernant Israël et les Juifs, cette attitude a des dessous psychiques très pervers car la France sait pertinemment qu’elle est aussi menacée par cette guerre de religion sur son sol même, et pas uniquement dans ses cibles juives. En trouvant une "raison" à ces crimes contre les Juifs, elle croit limiter l’incendie à des boucs émissaires. Elle amadoue les meurtriers en montrant de la complaisance pour leurs forfaitures, tout en se persuadant qu’elles ont des "raisons", comme pour conjurer sa peur et dévier, un temps, la menace certaine qui plane sur elle.

Post scriptum : la Télévision israélienne annonce ce soir, dimanche, que les responsables du crime abominable contre le jeune Palestinien ont été identifiés et arrétés. Ils seraient un groupe de 6 personnes, non organisées politiquement, quoique proches de l’extrême droite, qui auraient agi par improvisation, après avoir participé à une manifestation violente à Jérusalem et en réaction de vengeance au meurtre des trois adolescents israéliens. La nouvelle semble confirmée. C’est un bon signe de ce que le chaos et l’aventurisme ne l’a pas emporté sur l’Etat de droit dans la société israélienne, ce qui serait une victoire des Palestiniens dans la guerre asymétrique qu’ils mènent contre Israël : rétrograder Israël à la logique tribale. Il est en effet capital que, dans une situation aussi violente, les individus soient empéchés de se faire justice eux mêmes, privilège de l’Etat, et quelle justice, criminelle et barbare.

Voir également:

BELGIQUE-ALGERIE- Coupe du monde : des supporters algériens fêtent à Paris l’enlèvement des 3 otages israéliens
Monde juif
18 juin 2014

En marge d’un rassemblement improvisé dans le quartier de Barbès, à Paris, à l’occasion du match de Coupe du monde entre la Belgique et l’Algérie, des supporters de l’équipe d’Algérie ont fêté mardi l’enlèvement des trois adolescents israéliens.

Posant tout sourire devant des drapeaux algériens et palestiniens, une dizaine de supporters ont effectué le geste provocateur des trois doigts de la victoire, très en vogue dans les territoires palestiniens depuis l’enlèvement, marquant la capture des trois adolescents israéliens.

Ce geste provocateur des trois doigts, intitulé les « trois Shalit », est au cœur d’une campagne de propagande dans les médias palestiniens et dans les pays arabes, en référence à l’ex otage franco-israélien Gilad Shalit, capturé en 2006 par l’organisation terroriste du Hamas et libéré en 2011 contre la libération de 1027 criminels et terroristes palestiniens détenus en Israël.

Voir encore:

Journaliste du Hamas : L’assassinat de l’adolescent palestinien rappelle la coutume juive consistant à cuire le pain azyme avec du sang non-juif
MEMRI
7 juillet 2014

Dans un article antisémite, le rédacteur en chef du journal du Hamas Al-Risalah, Wissam Afifa, associe la mort de Muhammad Abu Khdeir, l’adolescent palestinien dont le cadavre a été retrouvé le 2 juillet 2014, à Jérusalem, à l’accusation de crime rituel selon lequel les juifs se serviraient de sang pour cuire leur pain azyme .

Si l’identité et la motivation des meurtriers d’Abu Khdeir restent inconnues à ce jour, tout porte à croire qu’il s’agit d’un crime haineux perpétré par des juifs pour se venger de l’assassinat récent des trois adolescents israéliens. Afifa commente que, tout comme les juifs tuaient des non-juifs et utilisaient leur sang pour confectionner leur pain azyme, aujourd’hui ils se livrent encore à « des rites sacrés » de vengeance. Et d’ajouter qu’Israël a adopté l’idéologie nazie, qui distingue les races supérieures et inférieures.

Ci-dessous des extraits de l’article : [1]

Les colons ont utilisé le corps de Muhammad Hussein Abu Khdeir, 17 ans, de Shuafat, au nord de Jérusalem, pour perpétrer leur [acte de] vengeance sacré en le torturant et le brûlant à mort, par un crime qui rappelle leurs saintes matzot, devenues partie intégrante de leur histoire de trahisons et d’assassinats. En effet, la culture de la violence sanguinaire s’est développée chez les juifs au point d’infiltrer leurs rites et prières sacrés.

Par « matzot sacrées », je pense à ces matzot mélangées à du sang humain, le sang des gentils, à savoir de l’autre non-juif, [qu’ils cuisent] pour célébrer la fête juive appelée la Pâque. Selon les récits historiques, ils assassinaient des chrétiens, de préférence des enfants de moins de dix ans, recueillaient leur sang, puis le remettaient à un rabbin, pour qu’il le mélange aux matzot de la fête avant de les servir aux croyants, qui les dévoraient pendant leur fête.

Ces anciens rites trouvent un écho à l’époque moderne, où [les juifs] sanctifient le sang de [leurs coreligionnaires] juifs, considérés comme des êtres humains de premier ordre, et dénigrent le sang des Palestiniens. Cela oblige [le Palestinien] Mahmoud Abbas à définir et à classer le garçon martyr Abu Khdeir, après que ce même [Abbas] eut exprimé sa rage aux ministres des Affaires étrangères des pays musulmans [le 18 juin 2014, à la conférence de Djeddah] et déclaré que les trois colons qui avaient été enlevés en Cisjordanie étaient des êtres humains comme nous et que nous devions les rechercher et les ramener, répondant ainsi à demande [des Israéliens] d’entourer ces trois colons d’un halo de divinité et de noble humanité et de les qualifier d’« êtres humains exceptionnels »…

Ce monde injuste, des États-Unis et de l’Union européenne au président de l’Autorité palestinienne, a largement déploré la mort des trois colons, mais ne se lamente pas de celle de l’enfant palestinien Abu Khdeir, car il appartient au groupe dont le sang n’est pas [considéré] comme sacré, selon la classification de la communauté internationale des groupes humains, ethniques et politiques, qui place Israël en haut de l’échelle et les Palestiniens en bas. Cette différentiation faite par la communauté internationale face au sang israélien et palestinien ressuscite le patrimoine de la théorie nazie. Les juifs, avec leur comportement criminel, adoptent la vision d’Hitler, basée sur la classification des gens en races supérieures, comme la race aryenne, et en races inférieures, comme les noirs, les Arabes et les juifs, [concluant que] la supériorité de la race blanche sur tous les autres peuples lui octroie de nombreux droits absolus, tels que le droit de régner sur les autres peuples.

De même, nous voyons qu’Israël estime que la supériorité de la race juive lui confère le droit absolu d’occuper, de construire des colonies, de se venger et de répandre du sang. C’est ainsi qu’ils cuisaient le pain sacré dans le passé, et qu’ils perpètrent leurs rites sacrés vengeurs au présent, dont la victime [cette fois] fut le jeune Abu Khdeir.

Notes :

[1] Al-Risalah (Gaza), le 3 juillet 2014.

Voir par ailleurs:

La complicité de l’Europe et des États-Unis dans les enlèvements et la violence
Richard Kemp

France-Israel Marseille

7 Juillet 2014

Le colonel britannique Richard Kemp pose un regard d’expérience sur le terrible rapt des trois jeunes israéliens et il met et cause le comportement inqualifiable des Occidentaux. [NdT]

Résumé:

Quelques jours avant le rapt des trois jeunes garçons, Catherine Ashton, la responsable de la politique étrangère de l’Union européenne, souhaitait la bienvenue au Hamas au sein du gouvernement de l’Autorité palestinienne. Elle venait d’étriller Israël, accusé de maintenir des terroristes sous les verrous et de prendre des mesures les empêcher d’opérer à partir de Gaza et de la Rive ouest du Jourdain. Ashton, si diligente quand il s’agit de condamner Israël, a mis cinq jours pour dénoncer ces enlèvements. Ses paroles et ses actes ont plutôt légitimé et encouragé le Hamas.

Les États-Unis et l’Union européenne paient les salaires des terroristes palestiniens en tant que donateurs de l’Autorité palestinienne ; ils financent aussi ses activités de propagande et d’incitation à la haine.

Comme tout gouvernement, Israël a le devoir absolu de protéger ses citoyens et conjurer toute menace terroriste est un aspect essentiel de cette obligation.
*****************************************
Cette semaine, le monde a éprouvé un terrible sentiment de répulsion devant des vidéos montrant des rangées de jeunes irakiens à genoux, abattus par des terroristes endurcis d’al Qaïda à Mossoul. Mais pour sa part, dans la Bande de Gaza et sur la Rive ouest du Jourdain, le Hamas a montré qu’il était tout à fait capable lui aussi de commettre des meurtres de sang-froid. C’est ce péril qui a provoqué la chasse désespérée d’Israël aux auteurs des enlèvements des jeunes Naftali Frenkel, Gilad Shaar et Eyal Yifrach. Ils faisaient du stop pour rentrer chez eux après la sortie de l’école dans le Gush Etzion, quand ils ont été kidnappés il y a une semaine.
En tant que membre de Cobra, la Commission nationale britannique de gestion des crises, j’ai été impliqué dans des opérations visant à sauver des citoyens enlevés par des terroristes islamistes en Irak et en Afghanistan. Il n’y a pas d’action militaire de l’époque moderne qui soit aussi stressante : les probabilités jouent contre les captifs, l’avantage est du côté des ravisseurs, c’est une course contre la montre, et elle devient une affaire extrêmement personnelle.
Les victimes nous regardent à travers leurs photos et nous les regardons dans les yeux. Nous ressentons leurs espoirs, leurs familles, leurs amis, et leur vie quotidienne. Rien – rien – ne doit faire obstacle à nos efforts pour les ramener chez eux. Bien que nous espérions le meilleur, nous nous préparions pour le pire.

De l’extérieur, il est difficile de comprendre la réalité d’un enlèvement. Ceux qui ont la responsabilité de sauver ces vies sont forcés de jouer au chat et à la souris, un jeu où ils doivent à la fois rassurer l’opinion et semer des graines de désinformation chez les ravisseurs. Jusqu’ici, pour Naftali, Gilad et Eyal, les signes ne sont pas encourageants. Pour ce que nous en savons, une semaine plus tard, il n’y a ni preuve de vie, ni revendication, ni négociation.

Hier, le 19 juin, le chef Hamas Salah Bardawil aurait affirmé selon l’agence d’information palestinienne Ma’an, que la "résistance palestinienne" (Hamas est l’acronyme de "mouvement de la résistance islamique") est bien l’auteur des enlèvements.

La première priorité est toujours d’établir l’identité et les motifs des ravisseurs. Dès le début, le premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahou a affirmé que le Hamas était coupable. Le secrétaire d’État américain Kerry a été d’accord, et il semble que ce soit l’opinion dominante à Gaza et dans la Rive ouest du Jourdain.

De son côté, un autre leader du Hamas, Muhammad Nazzal, a présenté l’enlèvement des trois jeunes civils comme "une capture héroïque," et "un événement clé" pour le peuple palestinien. Il a dit que chaque jour qui passait sans que les Israéliens parviennent à trouver les jeunes garçons était "un formidable succès."

Les commentaires de Nazzal illustrent la vision traditionnelle de la direction du Hamas sur les rapts et les meurtres d’Israéliens. Le groupe terroriste, que la communauté internationale a mis à l’index, est responsable des tirs "dans le tas" de milliers de roquettes mortelles sur la population civile d’Israël depuis la Bande de Gaza, les dernières salves datant de cette semaine.

C’est ce même groupe terroriste que les Nations unies, les États-Unis et l’Union européenne – dans une démonstration magistrale de banqueroute morale et de trahison – ont reconnu d’une même voix comme le partenaire légitime d’un gouvernement unifié de l’Autorité palestinienne [AP]. Le jour qui a précédé le rapt des trois jeunes garçons, la responsable de la politique étrangère de l’Union européenne, Catherine Ashton, a souhaité la bienvenue au Hamas au sein du gouvernement de l’AP. Elle venait d’étriller Israël accusé de maintenir des terroristes sous les verrous et de les empêcher d’agir à partir de Gaza et de la Rive ouest du Jourdain.

Ashton, si diligente quand il s’agit de condamner Israël, a mis cinq jours pour dénoncer ces rapts. Ses paroles et ses actes ont plutôt légitimé et encouragé le Hamas. Sa passivité face à la répétition des opérations terroristes a renforcé la conviction du groupe terroriste qu’il est sur la bonne voie.
Le kidnapping recevra un bon accueil chez les nouveaux amis intimes de Ashton en Iran. Prêt à tout lui aussi pour apaiser les ayatollahs, le Secrétaire aux Affaires étrangères britanniques, William Hague, a annoncé cette semaine la réouverture de l’ambassade de son pays à Téhéran, fermée en 2011 après son saccage sur les ordres du gouvernement iranien. On annonce même une collaboration des Renseignements militaires américains avec l’Iran sur la crise actuelle en Irak, où il y a seulement quelques années un grand nombre de soldats US et britanniques ont été massacrés. Ils utiliseraient des fournitures de munitions iraniennes, opérées par des terroristes entraînés, dirigés et équipés par Téhéran et l’un de ses groupes terroristes affiliés, le Hezbollah libanais.

Au moment où l’Occident se rapproche des ayatollahs, les ayatollahs se rapprochent à nouveau du Hamas. Il a une semaine, Hassan Nasrallah, le chef du Hezbollah, a rencontré les dirigeants du Hamas pour réduire les divergences surgies entre eux et l’Iran à propos du conflit en Syrie. Le Hamas, isolé par l’Égypte suite à l’effondrement du régime des Frères musulmans, semble prêt à tout pour restaurer des relations de pleine confiance avec la tyrannie iranienne. L’Iran est également tout à fait enthousiaste à l’idée de ramener le Hamas dans son giron : les ayatollahs le considèrent toujours comme un important instrument pour réaliser leur objectif primordial de destruction de l’État d’Israël.

Dans ces circonstances, il n’est pas impossible que l’enlèvement des trois jeunes garçons ait été un geste du Hamas pour retrouver la grâce des ayatollahs.

Il est difficile de ne pas être glacé jusqu’aux os à la pensée que trois jeunes garçons, qui pourrait facilement être nos enfants ou nos frères, passent nuit après nuit entre les mains de terroristes impitoyables… ou pire encore. L’angoisse des parents de ces enfants doit être inimaginable.
Dans la population arabe palestinienne de la Rive ouest du Jourdain et de Gaza, y compris les enfants, un nouveau symbole est apparu, un salut avec trois doigts, signe de la joie provoquée par l’enlèvement de trois jeunes innocents. Parmi les nombreuses les images déplorables concoctées par les ordinateurs et les imprimantes palestiniennes la plus répugnante est probablement le dessein de trois rats, affublés de l’étoile de David, pendouillant sur le fil d’une canne à pêche, publié sur la page Facebook officielle du Fatah.

On voir désormais partout ces expressions de joie, suivies de la distribution de douceurs. Le président de l’AP, Mahmoud Abbas, a condamné les enlèvements, et son appareil de sécurité a fourni une assistance à l’opération de sauvetage israélienne. Mais en introduisant les terroristes du Hamas dans son gouvernement, Abbas est aussi responsable des manifestations de joie obscènes d’une si grande partie de son peuple. Son Autorité palestinienne répand infatigablement dans les écoles, les programmes de télévision, dans les livres et dans les magazines, une propagande anti-israélienne et antisémite mensongère et cruelle, illustrée par une imagerie inspirée des nazis. Les Américains et l’Union européenne paient les salaires des terroristes palestiniens par le canal de dons à l’AP ; ils financent aussi sa propagande et son incitation à la haine, dont on a une échantillon dans l’imagerie qui célèbre l’enlèvement des enfants.

L’opération de sécurité israélienne est focalisée à ce jour sur la recherche des trois enfants. Plus de 330 suspects appartenant au Hamas ont été arrêtés, des armes et des munitions illégales ont été saisies. En écho au nom de code de l’opération de sauvetage, "Gardiens de nos frères," le chef d’état-major de l’armée israélienne, Benny Gantz, a invité ses soldats à mettre dans leur prospection la même vigueur que s’il était en train de chercher leur propre frère ou des membres de leur unité. Il leur a aussi rappelé que la plupart des gens qui vivent dans la région où se déroulent les recherches ne sont pas impliquées dans les enlèvements, et qu’ils doivent les traiter avec attention et humanité.

Simultanément, l’armée a pris des mesures pour affaiblir et démanteler le Hamas dans la Rive ouest du Jourdain. Dans certains milieux ces mesures ont été critiquées: elle seraient purement opportunistes, élargissant l’opération sans nécessité. Or il n’en est rien. Avec ces derniers kidnappings, le Hamas a confirmé qu’il a toujours pour but d’enlever, d’attaquer, et de tuer les civils Israéliens dans la Rive ouest du Jourdain. Comme tout gouvernement, Israël a le devoir absolu de protéger ses citoyens, et prévenir la menace terroriste est un aspect essentiel de cette obligation.

Il y a beaucoup d’imprévu dans toute opération militaire ; il est possible que l’opération "Gardiens de nos frères" conduise à une escalade de la violence. Des incidents se sont déjà produits. Probablement, Israël n’étendra pas l’opération actuelle à Gaza, à moins d’une sérieuse montée de la violence, ou si un lien entre les terroristes de Gaza et les rapts est mis en lumière.

Quelle que soit la direction que prendra cette opération, la communauté internationale doit éviter de donner la même réponse à l’action défensive actuelle que celle qu’elle a si souvent affiché chaque fois qu’Israël cherche à se défendre des attaques de missiles en provenance de Gaza. La communauté internationale fait généralement silence sur les vagues de roquettes tirées sur les civils israéliens, et elle condamne ensuite Israël pour ses actions défensives destinées à empêcher les attaques suivantes. Ce sont ces réponses de la communauté internationale qui ont encouragé le Hamas, et qui ne représentent rien de moins qu’un soutien au terrorisme. Ce sont ces réponses, en même temps que son accord pour que le Hamas participe à un gouvernement d’unité palestinienne, qui ont conduit à l’enlèvement des enfants dans la Rive ouest du Jourdain.

Le colonel Richard Kemp, membre distingué de Gatestone Institute, a fait carrière pendant 30 ans dans l’armée britannique où il a combattu le terrorisme et les soulèvements. Il a été sur la ligne de front dans les zones de guerre les plus dures du monde, en Irak, dans les Balkans, en Asie du Sud-est, et en Irlande du Nord. En 2003, il était commandant dans les forces britanniques en Afghanistan.

Titre original : Europe’s and U.S. Complicity in Kidnapping and Violence
par Richard Kemp, Gatestone Institute, le 20 juin 2014
Traduction : Jean-Pierre Bensimon

Voir encore:

Where are the Palestinian Mothers?
A culture that celebrates kidnapping is not fit for statehood.
Bret Stephens
WSJ

July 1, 2014

In March 2004 a Palestinian teenager named Hussam Abdo was spotted by Israeli soldiers behaving suspiciously as he approached the Hawara checkpoint in the West Bank. Ordered at gunpoint to raise his sweater, the startled boy exposed a suicide vest loaded with nearly 20 pounds of explosives and metal scraps, constructed to maximize carnage. A video taken by a journalist at the checkpoint captured the scene as Abdo was given scissors to cut himself free of the vest, which had been strapped tight to his body in the expectation that it wouldn’t have to come off. He’s been in an Israeli prison ever since.

Abdo provided a portrait of a suicide bomber as a young man. He had an intellectual disability. He was bullied by classmates who called him "the ugly dwarf." He came from a comparatively well-off family. He had been lured into the bombing only the night before, with the promise of sex in the afterlife. His family was outraged that he had been recruited for martyrdom.

"I blame those who gave him the explosive belt," his mother, Tamam, told the Jerusalem Post, of which I was then the editor. "He’s a small child who can’t even look after himself."

Yet asked how she would have felt if her son had been a bit older, she added this: "If he was over 18, that would have been possible, and I might have even encouraged him to do it." In the West, most mothers would be relieved if their children merely refrained from getting a bad tattoo before turning 18.

***

I’ve often thought about Mrs. Abdo, and I’m thinking about her today on the news that the bodies of three Jewish teenagers, kidnapped on June 12, have been found near the city of Hebron "under a pile of rocks in an open field," as an Israeli military spokesman put it. Eyal Yifrach, 19, Gilad Shaar, 16, and Naftali Fraenkel, 16, had their whole lives ahead of them. The lives of their families will forever be wounded, or crippled, by heartbreak.

What about their killers? The Israeli government has identified two prime suspects, Amer Abu Aysha, 33, and Marwan Qawasmeh, 29, both of them Hamas activists. They are entitled to a presumption of innocence. Less innocent was the view offered by Mr. Abu Aysha’s mother.

"They’re throwing the guilt on him by accusing him of kidnapping," she told Israel’s Channel 10 news. "If he did the kidnapping, I’ll be proud of him."

It’s the same sentiment I heard expressed in 2005 in the Jabalya refugee camp near Gaza City by a woman named Umm Iyad. A week earlier, her son, Fadi Abu Qamar, had been killed in an attack on the Erez border crossing to Israel. She was dressed in mourning but her mood was joyful as she celebrated her son’s "martyrdom operation." He was just 21.

Here’s my question: What kind of society produces such mothers? Whence the women who cheer on their boys to blow themselves up or murder the children of their neighbors?

Well-intentioned Western liberals may prefer not to ask, because at least some of the conceivable answers may upset the comforting cliché that all human beings can relate on some level, whatever the cultural differences. Or they may accuse me of picking a few stray anecdotes and treating them as dispositive, as if I’m the only Western journalist to encounter the unsettling reality of a society sunk into a culture of hate. Or they can claim that I am ignoring the suffering of Palestinian women whose innocent children have died at Israeli hands.

But I’m not ignoring that suffering. To kill innocent people deliberately is odious, to kill them accidentally or "collaterally" is, at a minimum, tragic. I just have yet to meet the Israeli mother who wants to raise her boys to become kidnappers and murderers—and who isn’t afraid of saying as much to visiting journalists.

***

Because everything that happens in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is bound to be the subject of political speculation and news analysis, it’s easy to lose sight of the raw human dimension. So it is with the murder of the boys: How far will Israel go in its retaliation? What does it mean for the future of the Fatah-Hamas coalition? What about the peace process, such as it is?

These questions are a distraction from what ought to be the main point. Three boys went missing one night, and now we know they are gone. If nothing else, their families will have a sense of finality and a place to mourn. And Israelis will know they are a nation that leaves no stone unturned to find its missing children.

As for the Palestinians and their inveterate sympathizers in the West, perhaps they should note that a culture that too often openly celebrates martyrdom and murder is not fit for statehood, and that making excuses for that culture only makes it more unfit. Postwar Germany put itself through a process of moral rehabilitation that began with a recognition of what it had done. Palestinians who want a state should do the same, starting with the mothers.

Voir enfin:

Journée du Judaïsme : l’Eglise polonaise dévoile un tableau longtemps caché

La Voix de la Russie | L’Eglise catholique de Pologne a célébré jeudi la Journée annuelle du Judaïsme en dévoilant un tableau longtemps caché, car présentant un meurtre rituel choquant, annonce l’AFP.

La grande toile du peintre du XVIIIe siècle Charles de Prévôt, ayant pour thème le meurtre rituel d’enfants chrétiens perpétré par des Juifs, est longtemps restée cachée par un rideau rouge dans la cathédrale de Sandomierz (sud de la Pologne), à la suite des protestations émanant aussi bien des Juifs que des catholiques.

Mais cette année, l’Eglise a décidé, avec le soutien de la communauté juive de Pologne, de montrer au public ce tableau, accompagné d’une plaque expliquant que la peinture était historiquement incorrecte : les Juifs ne pouvaient en réalité commettre de meurtres rituels, car leur religion l’interdisait.

Le grand rabbin de Pologne Michael Schudrich s’est réjoui de l’initiative de présenter au public le tableau de Prévôt Meurtre rituel, caché depuis 2006.

Ce tableau « a joué un rôle sanglant dans l’histoire. Vous savez que des Juifs ont été assassinés après de telles accusations. Mais je pense que le cacher, c’est en quelque sorte oublier ou nier un passé douloureux », a déclaré le rabbin à l’AFP.

La décision de dévoiler le tableau a été prise par la Commission de l’épiscopat chargée du dialogue avec le judaïsme, et le texte de la plaque explicative a été rédigé avec le concours de la communauté juive de Pologne.

Il y a actuellement, selon diverses estimations, entre 8.000 et 40.000 juifs dans ce pays comptant 38 millions d’habitants. La vie juive y renaît avec diverses manifestations culturelles et religieuse mais l’antisémitisme n’a pas complètement disparu, alimenté par des groupes ultranationalistes et ultracatholiques.

Voir par ailleurs:

FOOTBALL La dérive raciste des supporters du Beitar Jérusalem
Ce club israélien a subi ces dernières semaines des actes de violence de la part de ses supporters, en colère contre le recrutement de deux joueurs musulmans dans l’équipe. Une affaire qui choque le pays.
Paul Grisot
Courrier international
19 février 2013

Des supporters du Beitar Jerusalem avec une bannière "Votre haîne a brulé notre amour" pendant le match contre Bnei Sakhnin, en réaction aux actes violents des supporters racistes du club – AFP Des supporters du Beitar Jerusalem avec une bannière "Votre haîne a brulé notre amour" pendant le match contre Bnei Sakhnin, en réaction aux actes violents des supporters racistes du club – AFP
Quand Gabriel Kadiev, jeune joueur musulman de 20 ans originaire de Tchétchénie, est entré sur la pelouse à la 79e minute, les supporters extrémistes du Beitar lui ont réservé un accueil des plus détestables. "A chaque fois qu’il a touché la balle, le nouveau joueur a reçu des salves de sifflets et d’insultes au cours du match contre l’équipe de la ville israélo-arabe de Sakhnin qui s’est terminé sur un résultat nul [2-2]", raconte The Washington Post. Ce 10 février, c’était la première entrée en jeu de Kadiev au Teddy Stadium. Il est l’un des deux joueurs musulmans de Tchétchénie recrutés il y a peu par le Beitar Jérusalem.

C’est la première fois que des joueurs musulmans intègrent l’équipe du Beitar, seul club israélien à ne compter jusqu’ici que des joueurs juifs dans son effectif. Un recrutement "qui a plongé le club dans un scandale national et international, et suscité de nombreux appels à contrer le racisme manifeste d’un noyau dur de supporters", note The Guardian. Cette frange extrême, dont le slogan favori est "Mort aux Arabes !" et qui a l’habitude d’étendre dans les tribunes une bannière avec l’inscription "Beitar pur pour toujours", a violemment réagi à l’arrivée des deux joueurs musulmans. Un accès de violence raciste sans précédent dans l’histoire du club. "Depuis leur arrivée à Jérusalem, [les deux joueurs] subissent railleries et harcèlement, note The World. Quatre supporters du Beitar ont été accusés d’actes de violence à caractère raciste. Et le vendredi 8 février, un incendie d’origine criminelle a visé les locaux du club de Jérusalem", poursuit le site d’information.

"Beitar était la surprise de la saison jusqu’à la mi-janvier. Mais depuis que les deux joueurs sont arrivés, l’équipe a perdu trois matchs d’affilée", explique Ha’Aretz. Les supporters les plus extrémistes – regroupés au sein du gang La Familia – ont alors cherché à "convaincre tout le monde que l’arrivée des deux musulmans [était] responsable du blocage mental qui empêche l’équipe de jouer", poursuit le quotidien israélien. Et ce dernier ajoute : "La vérité, c’est que le Beitar est devenu moins bon récemment. Le club avait désespérément besoin de l’arrivée de nouveaux joueurs pour élever le niveau de l’équipe, malgré des finances en piteux état."

Dans ce contexte, les autorités redoutaient le match contre Sakhnin, et un dispositif de sécurité exceptionnel a été déployé autour du Teddy Stadium : 700 policiers ont interdit l’accès au stade à toute personne portant des symboles d’appartenance à La Familia. Ces mesures ont semblé fonctionner au début du match, mais l’atmosphère s’est tendue lorsque les visiteurs ont ouvert le score, doublant même la mise avant la mi-temps (0-2 à la pause). Ce n’est qu’avec l’égalisation du Beitar en seconde période que les supporters se sont calmés – plusieurs d’entre eux ayant été expulsés par les forces de sécurité.

Le journal Ha’Aretz tient toutefois à nuancer le bilan, soulignant que de nombreux spectateurs ont applaudi l’entrée de Gabriel Kadiev, pour s’opposer aux hooligans. "Sur l’ensemble du match, [les membres de La Familia] ont perdu face aux supporters raisonnables de Beitar – largement majoritaires –, qui les ont tout simplement fait taire à chaque fois qu’ils tentaient d’empoisonner la partie", se réjouit Ha’Aretz.

Cependant, l’affaire a profondément choqué le pays, et les condamnations ont été unanimes. Le président Shimon Pérès a vivement condamné ces actes de violence, et le Premier ministre Benyamin Nétanyahou les a qualifiés de "honteux", ajoutant que "le peuple juif, [qui a] souffert de boycotts et de persécutions, devrait montrer la lumière aux autres nations", rapporte le Guardian. L’ancien Premier ministre Ehoud Olmert, fan du Beitar depuis quarante ans, a indiqué qu’il ne se rendrait plus aux matchs à cause du comportement des supporters : "Cette affaire nous concerne tous. Soit on bannit ce groupe raciste de nos terrains, soit on est tous comme eux. Tant que cela ne sera pas fait, je ne suivrai plus l’équipe."

Voir aussi:

D’où vient le «One, two, three, viva l’Algérie!»?

Mathieu Grégoire

Slate.fr

Mondial 2014
23.06.2014

Ou comment un slogan né dans les rangs des combattants pour l’indépendance algérienne a «colonisé» le foot, voire a inspiré le «Et 1, et 2, et 3 zéro» français.

On joue la 40e minute de jeu ce dimanche soir, lors d’un Corée du Sud-Algérie étincelant, le petit Abdelmoumene Djabou, mi-Messi, mi-Sammaritano, vient de marquer, les Fennecs mènent 3 buts à 0, et le slogan résonne de manière parfaite dans une bonne partie des rues:

«One, two, three, viva l’Algérie!»

A Paris, dans un bar bondé de la Butte aux Cailles, un plaisantin monte sur une table et livre un audacieux remix:

«One, two, three, et ce n’est pas fini!»

Même si vous ne connaissez aucun joueur de l’équipe d’Algérie, vous avez probablement déjà entendu cette punchline festive. Ses origines sont lointaines, bien plus anciennes que le «Et un, et deux, et trois zéro» de l’été 1998, peut-être vaguement inspiré, qui sait?

Il est sûr, en revanche, que l’expression prend ses racines au milieu des années 1950, à l’époque de la décolonisation. Les partisans de l’indépendance algérienne décident d’internationaliser leur message et se mettent à l’anglais: «Nous voulons être libres» est traduit en «We want to be free». Avec une petite contraction, cela donne «Want to free, Viva l’Algérie» et cela fait fureur dans de nombreuses manifestations.

Le 3 mai 1974, au stade Bouakeul d’Oran, l’équipe d’Algérie affronte le club anglais de Sheffield United. Belkedrouci, Lalmas et Belbahri inscrivent les trois buts de la sélection. En tribunes, les supporters des Verts transforment le slogan politique en:

«One, two, three, viva l’Algérie!»

Les fans de foot se l’accaparent pour la première fois, ils ne le lâcheront plus. Le chant commence à vraiment se répandre après la victoire de l’Algérie contre la France en finale des Jeux méditerranéens de 1975, puis aura un écho international en 1982, avec le brillant parcours des Fennecs au Mondial espagnol.

L’équipe d’Algérie enchaînant les résultats quelconques dans les années 1990 puis 2000, il retombera dans un relatif anonymat, avant de reverdir de façon spectaculaire en 2009, avec la qualification pour la Coupe du monde en Afrique du Sud, face à l’éternel rival égyptien.

Plusieurs chanteurs l’ont ensuite utilisé à toutes les sauces. Et notamment le band Groupe Torino & Milano, spécialisé dans les tubes footballisco-discos:

ou le duo Cheb Mahfoud-Cheba Sonia …


Hommage: Fouad Ajami ou l’anti-Edward Saïd (Edward Said accused him of having “unmistakably racist prescriptions")

24 juin, 2014
http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/kXV199fIWjw/0.jpgEdward Said, the Palestinian cultural critic who died in 2003, accused him of having “unmistakably racist prescriptions. The NYT
Après la chute des Twin Towers, des universitaires américains renommés, Bernard Lewis et Fouad Ajami en tête, ont avalisé cet orientalisme de stéréotypes, et fourni ainsi une caution intellectuelle au discours ambiant, néoconservateur et belliciste, affirmant que la démocratie était étrangère aux Arabes, qu’il fallait la leur imposer par la contrainte. Jean-Pierre Filiu
What makes self-examination for Arabs and Muslims, and particularly criticism of Islam in the West very difficult is the totally pernicious influence of Edward Said’s Orientalism. The latter work taught an entire generation of Arabs the art of self-pity – “ were it not for the wicked imperialists , racists and Zionists , we would be great once more ”- encouraged the Islamic fundamentalist generation of the 1980s , and bludgeoned into silence any criticism of Islam , and even stopped dead the research of eminent Islamologists who felt their findings might offend Muslims sensibilities , and who dared not risk being labelled “orientalist ”. The aggressive tone of Orientalism is what I have called “ intellectual terrorism ” , since it does not seek to convince by arguments or historical analysis but by spraying charges of racism, imperialism , Eurocentrism ,from a moral highground ; anyone who disagrees with Said has insult heaped upon him. The moral high ground is an essential element in Said’s tactics ; since he believes his position is morally unimpeachable , Said obviously thinks it justifies him in using any means possible to defend it , including the distortion of the views of eminent scholars , interpreting intellectual and political history in a highly tendentious way , in short twisting the truth. But in any case , he does not believe in the “truth”. (…) In order to achieve his goal of painting the West in general , and the discipline of Orientalism in particular , in as negative a way as possible , Said has recourse to several tactics . One of his preferred moves is to depict the Orient as a perpetual victim of Western imperialism ,dominance,and aggression. The Orient is never seen as an actor , an agent with free-will , or designs or ideas of its own . It is to this propensity that we owe that immature and unattractive quality of much contemporary Middle Eastern culture , self-pity , and the belief that all its ills are the result of Western -Zionist conspiracies. Here is an example of Said’s own belief in the usual conspiracies taken from “ The Question of Palestine ”: It was perfectly apparent to Western supporters of Zionism like Balfour that the colonization of Palestine was made a goal for the Western powers from the very beginning of Zionist planning : Herzl used the idea , Weizmann used it , every leading Israeli since has used it . Israel was a device for holding Islam – later the Soviet Union , or communism – at bay ”. So Israel was created to hold Islam at bay !
For a number of years now , Islamologists have been aware of the disastrous effect of Said’s Orientalism on their discipline. Professor Berg has complained that the latter’s influence has resulted in “ a fear of asking and answering potentially embarrassing questions – ones which might upset Muslim sensibilities ….”. Professor Montgomery Watt , now in his nineties , and one of the most respected Western Islamologists alive , takes Said to task for asserting that Sir Hamilton Gibb was wrong in saying that the master science of Islam was law and not theology .This , says Watt , “ shows Said’s ignorance of Islam ” . But Watt , rather unfairly ,adds , “ since he is from a Christian Arab background ”. Said is indeed ignorant of Islam , but surely not because he is a Christian since Watt and Gibb themselves were devout Christians . Watt also decries Said’s tendency to ascribe dubious motives to various writers , scholars and stateman such as Gibb and Lane , with Said committing doctrinal blunders such as not realising that non-Muslims could not marry Muslim women. R.Stephen Humphreys found Said’s book important in some ways because it showed how some Orientalists were indeed “ trapped within a vision that portrayed Islam and the Middle East as in some way essentially different from ‘the West ’ ” . Nonetheless , “Edward Said’s analysis of Orientalism is overdrawn and misleading in many ways , and purely as [a] piece of intellectual history , Orientalism is a seriously flawed book .” Even more damning , Said’s book actually discouraged , argues Humphreys , the very idea of modernization of Middle Eastern societies . “In an ironic way , it also emboldened the Islamic activists and militants who were then just beginning to enter the political arena . These could use Said to attack their opponents in the Middle East as slavish ‘Westernists’, who were out of touch with the authentic culture and values of their own countries . Said’s book has had less impact on the study of medieval Islamic history – partly because medievalists know how distorted his account of classical Western Orientalism really is ….”.  Even scholars praised by Said in Orientalism do not particularly like his analysis , arguments or conclusions .Maxime Rodinson thinks “ as usual , [ Said’s ] militant stand leads him repeatedly to make excessive statements ” , due , no doubt , to the fact that Said was “ inadequately versed in the practical work of the Orientalists ”. Rodinson also calls Said’s polemic and style “ Stalinist ”. While P.J.Vatikiotis wrote , “ Said introduced McCarthyism into Middle Eastern Studies ”. Jacques Berque , also praised by Said , wrote that the latter had “ done quite a disservice to his countrymen in allowing them to believe in a Western intelligence coalition against them ”. For Clive Dewey , Said’s book “ was , technically ,so bad ; in every respect , in its use of sources , in its deductions , it lacked rigour and balance .The outcome was a caricature of Western knowledge of the Orient , driven by an overtly political agenda .Yet it clearly touched a deep vein of vulgar prejudice running through American academe ”. The most famous modern scholar who not only replied to but who mopped the floor with Said was ,of course,Bernard Lewis .Lewis points to many serious errors of history ,interpretation , analysis and omission . Lewis has never been answered let alone refuted . Lewis points out that even among British and French scholars on whom Said concentrates , he does not mention at all Claude Cahen , Lévi-Provençal , Henri Corbin ,Marius Canard , Charles Pellat , William and George Marçais , William Wright , or only mentioned in passing ,usually in a long list of names , scholars like R.A.Nicholson , Guy Le Strange , Sir Thomas Arnold , and E.G.Browne. “ Even for those whom he does cite , Mr.Said makes a remarkably arbitrary choice of works . His common practice indeed is to omit their major contributions to scholarship and instead fasten on minor or occasional writings ”. Said even fabricates lies about eminent scholars : “ Thus in speaking of the late –eighteenth early-nineteenth-century French Orientalist Silvestre de Sacy , Mr.Said remarks that ‘he ransacked the Oriental archives ….What texts he isolated , he then brought back ; he doctored them …” If these words bear any meaning at all it is that Sacy was somehow at fault in his access to these documents and then committed the crime of tampering with them .This outrageous libel on a great scholar is without a shred of truth ”. Another false accusation that Said flings out is that Orientalists never properly discussed the Oriental’s economic activities until Rodinson’s Islam and Capitalism (1966) .This shows Said’s total ignorance of the works of Adam Mez , J.H.Kramers , W.Björkman , V.Barthold , Thomas Armold , all of whom dealt with the economic activities of Muslims . As Rodinson himself points out elsewhere , one of the three scholars who was a pioneer in this field was Bernard Lewis . Said also talks of Islamic Orientalism being cut off from developments in other fields in the humanities , particularly the economic and social. But this again only reveals Said’s ignorance of the works of real Orientalists rather than those of his imagination . As Rodinson says the sociology of Islam is an ancient subject , citing the work of R.Lévy . Rodinson then points out that Durkheim’s celebrated journal L’Année sociologique listed every year starting from the first decades of the XX century a certain number of works on Islam .
It must have been particularly galling for Said to see the hostile reviews of his Orientalism from Arab , Iranian or Asian intellectuals , some of whom he admired and singled out for praise in many of his works . For example , Nikki Keddie , praised in Covering Islam , talked of the disastrous influence of Orientalism , even though she herself admired parts of it : “ I think that there has been a tendency in the Middle East field to adopt the word “ orientalism” as a generalized swear-word essentially referring to people who take the “wrong” position on the Arab-Israeli dispute or to people who are judged too “conservative ”. It has nothing to do with whether they are good or not good in their disciplines .So “orientalism” for may people is a word that substitutes for thought and enables people to dismiss certain scholars and their works .I think that is too bad .It may not have been what Edward Said meant at all , but the term has become a kind of slogan ”.  Nikki Keddie also noted that the book “ could also be used in a dangerous way because it can encourage people to say , ‘You Westerners , you can’t do our history right , you can’t study it right , you really shouldn’t be studying it , we are the only ones who can study our own history properly ”. Albert Hourani , who is much admired by Said , made a similar point , “ I think all this talk after Edward’s book also has a certain danger .There is a certain counter-attack of Muslims , who say nobody understands Islam except themselves ”. Hourani went further in his criticism of Said’s Orientalism : “ Orientalism has now become a dirty word .Nevertheless it should be used for a perfectly respected discipline ….I think [ Said] carries it too far when he says that the orientalists delivered the Orient bound to the imperial powers ….Edward totally ignores the German tradition and philosophy of history which was the central tradition of the orientalists ….I think Edward’s other books are admirable ….”. Similarly , Aijaz Ahmed thought Orientalism was a “deeply flawed book” , and would be forgotten when the dust settled , whereas Said’s books on Palestine would be remembered. Kanan Makiya , the eminent Iraqi scholar , chronicled Said’s disastrous influence particularly in the Arab world : “ Orientalism as an intellectual project influenced a whole generation of young Arab scholars , and it shaped the discipline of modern Middle East studies in the 1980s .The original book was never intended as a critique of contemporary Arab politics , yet it fed into a deeply rooted populist politics of resentment against the West .The distortions it analyzed came from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries , but these were marshaled by young Arab and “ pro-Arab ” scholars into an intellectual-political agenda that was out of kilter with the real needs of Arabs who were living in a world characterized by rapidly escalating cruelty , not ever-increasing imperial domination .The trajectory from Said’s Orientalism to his Covering Islam …is premised on the morally wrong idea that the West is to be blamed in the here-and-now for its long nefarious history of association with the Middle East .Thus it unwittingly deflected from the real problems of the Middle East at the same time as it contributed more bitterness to the armory of young impressionable Arabs when there was already far too much of that around .” Orientalism , continues , Makiya , “ makes Arabs feel contented with the way they are , instead of making them rethink fundamental assumptions which so clearly haven’t worked ….They desperately need to unlearn ideas such as that “ every European ” in what he or she has to say about the world is or was a “racist” ….The ironical fact is that the book was given the attention it received in the “almost totally ethnocentric ” West was largely because its author was a Palestinian ….”. Though he finds much to admire in Said’s Orientalism , the Syrian philosopher Sadiq al- ‘Azm finds that “the stylist and polemicist in Edward Said very often runs away with the systematic thinker ”. Al-‘Azm also finds Said guilty of the very essentialism that Said ostensibly sets out to criticise , perpetuating the distinction between East and West .Said further renders a great disservice to those who wish to examine the difficult question of how one can study other cultures from a libertarian perspective .Al-‘Azm recognizes Said anti-scientific bent , and defends certain Orientalist theses from Said’s criticism ; for example , al-‘Azm says : “ I cannot agree with Said that their “ Orientalist mentality ”blinded them to the realities of Muslim societies and definitively distorted their views of the East in general .For instance : isn’t it true , on the whole , that the inhabitants of Damascus and Cairo today feel the presence of the transcendental in their lives more palpably and more actively than Parisians and Londoners ? Isn’t it tue that religion means everything to the contemporary Moroccan , Algerian and Iranian peasant in amnner it cannot mean for the American farmer or the member of a Russian kolkhoz ? And isn’t it a fact that the belief in the laws of nature is more deeply rooted in the minds of university students in Moscow and New York than among the students of al-Azhar and of Teheran University ”. Ibn Warraq
Fouad Ajami would have been amused, but not surprised, to read his own obituary in the New York Times. "Edward Said, the Palestinian cultural critic who died in 2003, accused [Ajami] of having ‘unmistakably racist prescriptions,’" quoted obituarist Douglas Martin. Thus was Said, the most mendacious, self-infatuated and profitably self-pitying of Arab-American intellectuals—a man whose account of his own childhood cannot be trusted—raised from the grave to defame, for one last time, the most honest and honorable and generous of American intellectuals, no hyphenation necessary. Ajami (…) first made his political mark as an advocate for Palestinian nationalism. For those who knew Ajami mainly as a consistent advocate of Saddam Hussein’s ouster, it’s worth watching a YouTube snippet of his 1978 debate with Benjamin Netanyahu, in which Ajami makes the now-standard case against Israeli iniquity. Today Mr. Netanyahu sounds very much like his 28-year-old self. But Ajami changed. He was, to borrow a phrase, mugged by reality. By the 1980s, he wrote, "Arab society had run through most of its myths, and what remained in the wake of the word, of the many proud statements people had made about themselves and their history, was a new world of cruelty, waste, and confusion." What Ajami did was to see that world plain, without the usual evasions and obfuscations and shifting of blame to Israel and the U.S. Like Sidney Hook or Eric Hoffer, the great ex-communists of a previous generation, his honesty, courage and intelligence got the better of his ideology; he understood his former beliefs with the hard-won wisdom of the disillusioned. (…) Ajami understood the Arab world as only an insider could—intimately, sympathetically, without self-pity. And he loved America as only an immigrant could—with a depth of appreciation and absence of cynicism rarely given to the native-born. If there was ever an error in his judgment, it’s that he believed in people—Arabs and Americans alike—perhaps more than they believed in themselves. It was the kind of mistake only a generous spirit could make. Bret Stephens
Ce qui caractérise pour l’essentiel Ajami n’est pas sa foi religieuse (s’il en a une au sens traditionnel) mais son appréciation sans égal de l’ironie historique – l’ironie , par exemple, dans le fait qu’en éliminant la simple figure de Saddam Hussein nous ayons brutalement contraint un Monde arabe qui ne s’y attendait pas à un règlement de comptes général; l’ironie que la véhémence même de l’insurrection irakienne puisse au bout du compte la vaincre et l’humilier sur son propre terrain et pourrait déjà avoir commencé à le faire; l’ironie que l’Iran chiite pourrait bien maudire le jour où ses cousins chiites en Irak ont été libérés par les Américains. Et ironie pour ironie, Ajami est clairement épaté qu’un membre de l’establishment pétrolier américain, lui-même fils d’un président qui en 1991 avait appelé les Chiites irakiens à l’insurrection contre un Saddam Hussein blessé pour finalement les laisser se faire massacrer, ait été amené à s’exclamer en septembre 2003: Comme dictature, l’Irak avait un fort pouvoir de déstabilisation du Moyen-Orient. Comme démocratie, il aura un fort pouvoir d’inspiration pour le Moyen-Orient. Victor Davis Hanson
The relations between Islam and Christianity, both Orthodox and Western, have often been stormy. Each has been the other’s Other. The 20th-century conflict between liberal democracy and Marxist-Leninism is only a fleeting and superficial historical phenomenon compared to the continuing and deeply conflictual relation between Islam and Christianity. Samuel Huntington
Nearly 15 years on, Huntington’s thesis about a civilizational clash seems more compelling to me than the critique I provided at that time. In recent years, for example, the edifice of Kemalism has come under assault, and Turkey has now elected an Islamist to the presidency in open defiance of the military-bureaucratic elite. There has come that “redefinition” that Huntington prophesied. To be sure, the verdict may not be quite as straightforward as he foresaw. The Islamists have prevailed, but their desired destination, or so they tell us, is still Brussels: in that European shelter, the Islamists shrewdly hope they can find protection against the power of the military. (…) Huntington had the integrity and the foresight to see the falseness of a borderless world, a world without differences. (He is one of two great intellectual figures who peered into the heart of things and were not taken in by globalism’s conceit, Bernard Lewis being the other.) I still harbor doubts about whether the radical Islamists knocking at the gates of Europe, or assaulting it from within, are the bearers of a whole civilization. They flee the burning grounds of Islam, but carry the fire with them. They are “nowhere men,” children of the frontier between Islam and the West, belonging to neither. If anything, they are a testament to the failure of modern Islam to provide for its own and to hold the fidelities of the young. More ominously perhaps, there ran through Huntington’s pages an anxiety about the will and the coherence of the West — openly stated at times, made by allusions throughout. The ramparts of the West are not carefully monitored and defended, Huntington feared. Islam will remain Islam, he worried, but it is “dubious” whether the West will remain true to itself and its mission. Clearly, commerce has not delivered us out of history’s passions, the World Wide Web has not cast aside blood and kin and faith. It is no fault of Samuel Huntington’s that we have not heeded his darker, and possibly truer, vision. Fouad Ajami
There should be no illusions about the sort of Arab landscape that America is destined to find if, or when, it embarks on a war against the Iraqi regime. There would be no "hearts and minds" to be won in the Arab world, no public diplomacy that would convince the overwhelming majority of Arabs that this war would be a just war. An American expedition in the wake of thwarted UN inspections would be seen by the vast majority of Arabs as an imperial reach into their world, a favor to Israel, or a way for the United States to secure control over Iraq’s oil. No hearing would be given to the great foreign power. (…) America ought to be able to live with this distrust and discount a good deal of this anti-Americanism as the "road rage" of a thwarted Arab world – the congenital condition of a culture yet to take full responsibility for its self-inflicted wounds. There is no need to pay excessive deference to the political pieties and givens of the region. Indeed, this is one of those settings where a reforming foreign power’s simpler guidelines offer a better way than the region’s age-old prohibitions and defects. Fouad Ajami
The current troubles of the Obama presidency can be read back into its beginnings. Rule by personal charisma has met its proper fate. The spell has been broken, and the magician stands exposed. We need no pollsters to tell us of the loss of faith in Mr. Obama’s policies—and, more significantly, in the man himself. Charisma is like that. Crowds come together and they project their needs onto an imagined redeemer. The redeemer leaves the crowd to its imagination: For as long as the charismatic moment lasts—a year, an era—the redeemer is above and beyond judgment. Fouad Ajami
[Bush] can definitely claim paternity…One despot fell in 2003. We decapitated him. Two despots, in Tunisia and Egypt, fell, and there is absolutely a direct connection between what happened in Iraq in 2003 and what’s happening today throughout the rest of the Arab world. (…) It wasn’t American tanks [that brought about this moment]…It was a homegrown enterprise. It was Egyptians, Tunisians, Libyans conquering their fear – people went out and conquered fear and did something amazing. Fouad Ajami
The United States will have to be prepared for and accept the losses and adversity that are an integral part of staying on, rightly, in so tangled and difficult a setting. Fouad Ajami
The mask of the Assad regime finally falls.. Fouad Ajami
The Iraqis needn’t trumpet the obvious fact in broad daylight, but the balance of power in the Persian Gulf would be altered for the better by a security arrangement between the United States and the government in Baghdad. (…) There remains, of course, the pledge given by presidential candidate Barack Obama that a President Obama would liquidate the American military role in Iraq by the end of 2011. That pledge was one of the defining themes of his bid for the presidency, and it endeared him to the “progressives” within his own party, who had been so agitated and mobilized against the Iraq war. But Barack Obama is now the standard-bearer of America’s power. He has broken with the “progressives” over Afghanistan, the use of drones in Pakistan, Guantánamo, military tribunals, and a whole host of national security policies that have (nearly) blurred the line between his policies and those of his predecessor. The left has grumbled, but, in the main, it has bowed to political necessity. At any rate, the fury on the left that once surrounded the Iraq war has been spent; a residual American presence in Iraq would fly under the radar of the purists within the ranks of the Democratic Party. (…) The enemy will have a say on how things will play out for American forces in Iraq. Iran and its Iraqi proxies can be expected to do all they can to make the American presence as bloody and costly as possible. A long, leaky border separates Iran from Iraq; movement across it is quite easy for Iranian agents and saboteurs. They can come in as “pilgrims,” and there might be shades of Lebanon in the 1980s, big deeds of terror that target the American forces.  (…) Even in the best of worlds, an American residual presence in Iraq will have its costs and heartbreak. But the United States will have to be prepared for and accept the losses and adversity that are an integral part of staying on, rightly, in so tangled and difficult a setting. Fouad Ajami
L’argument selon lequel la liberté ne peut venir que de l’intérieur et ne peut être offerte à des peuples lointains est bien plus fausse que l’on croit. Dans toute l’histoire moderne, la fortune de la liberté a toujours dépendu de la volonté de la ou des puissances dominantes du moment. Le tout récemment disparu professeur Samuel P. Huntington avait développé ce point de la manière la plus détaillée. Dans 15 des 29 pays démocratiques en 1970, les régimes démocratiques avaient été soit initiés par une puissance étrangère soit étaient le produit de l’indépendance contre une occupation étrangère. (…) Tout au long du flux et du reflux de la liberté, la puissance est toujours restée importante et la liberté a toujours eu besoin de la protection de grandes puissances. Le pouvoir d’attraction des pamphlets de Mill, Locke et Paine était fondé sur les canons de la Pax Britannica, et sur la force de l’Amérique quand la puissance britannique a flanché.  (…) L’ironie est maintenant évidente: George W. Bush comme force pour l’émancipation des terres musulmanes et Barack Hussein Obama en messager des bonnes vieilles habitudes. Ainsi c’est le plouc qui porte au monde le message que les musulmans et les Arabes n’ont pas la tyrannie dans leur ADN et l’homme aux fragments musulmans, kenyans et indonésiens dans sa propre vie et son identité qui annonce son acceptation de l’ordre établi. Mr. Obama pourrait encore reconnaître l’impact révolutionnaire de la diplomatie de son prédecesseur mais jusqu’à présent il s’est refusé à le faire. (…) Son soutien au " processus de paix" est un retour à la diplomatie stérile des années Clinton, avec sa croyance que le terrorisme prend sa source dans les revendications des Palestiniens. M. Obama et ses conseillers se sont gardés d’affirmer que le terrorisme a disparu, mais il y a un message indubitable donné par eux que nous pouvons retourner à nos propres affaires, que Wall Street est plus mortel et dangereux que la fameuse " rue Arabo-Musulmane".  Fouad Ajami
Two men bear direct responsibility for the mayhem engulfing Iraq: Barack Obama and Nouri al-Maliki. (…) This sad state of affairs was in no way preordained. In December 2011, Mr. Obama stood with Mr. Maliki and boasted that "in the coming years, it’s estimated that Iraq’s economy will grow even faster than China’s or India’s." But the negligence of these two men—most notably in their failure to successfully negotiate a Status of Forces Agreement that would have maintained an adequate U.S. military presence in Iraq—has resulted in the current descent into sectarian civil war. (…) With ISIS now reigning triumphant in Fallujah, in the oil-refinery town of Baiji, and, catastrophically, in Mosul, the Obama administration cannot plead innocence. Mosul is particularly explosive. It sits astride the world between Syria and Iraq and is economically and culturally intertwined with the Syrian territories. This has always been Mosul’s reality. There was no chance that a war would rage on either side of Mosul without it spreading next door. The Obama administration’s vanishing "red lines" and utter abdication in Syria were bound to compound Iraq’s troubles. Grant Mr. Maliki the harvest of his sectarian bigotry. He has ridden that sectarianism to nearly a decade in power. Mr. Obama’s follies are of a different kind. They’re sins born of ignorance. He was eager to give up the gains the U.S. military and the Bush administration had secured in Iraq. Nor did he possess the generosity of spirit to give his predecessors the credit they deserved for what they had done in that treacherous landscape. Fouad Ajami

Descente en règle dans le NYT et the Nation, silence radio dans les médias comme d’ailleurs dans l’édition en France, notice wikipedia en français de quatre lignes …

Quel meilleur hommage, pour un spécialiste du Monde arabe, que d’être accusé  de racisme par Edward Saïd ?

Et quel silence plus éloquent, au lendemain de sa mort et au moment même de la perte de l’Irak contre laquelle il avait tant averti l’Administration américaine, que celui de la presse française pour l’un des plus respectés spécialistes du Moyen-Orient ?

Qui, si l’on suit les médias qui prennent la peine de parler de lui, avait commis l’impardonnable péché d’appeler de ses voeux l’intervention alliée en Irak …

Et surtout, vis à vis de l’Illusioniste en chef de la Maison Blanche et coqueluche de nos médias, de ne jamais mâcher ses mots ?

Fouad Ajami, Commentator and Expert in Arab History, Dies at 68
Douglas Martin
The New York Times
June 22, 2014

Fouad Ajami, an academic, author and broadcast commentator on Middle East affairs who helped rally support for the United States invasion of Iraq in 2003 — partly by personally advising top policy makers — died on Sunday. He was 68.

The cause was cancer, the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, where Mr. Ajami was a senior fellow, said in a statement

An Arab, Mr. Ajami despaired of autocratic Arab governments finding their own way to democracy, and believed that the United States must confront what he called a “culture of terrorism” after the 2001 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. He likened the Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein to Hitler.

Mr. Ajami strove to put Arab history into a larger perspective. He often referred to Muslim rage over losing power to the West in 1683, when a Turkish siege of Vienna failed. He said this memory had led to Arab self-pity and self-delusion as they blamed the rest of the world for their troubles. Terrorism, he said, was one result.

It was a view that had been propounded by Bernard Lewis, the eminent Middle East historian at Princeton and public intellectual, who also urged the United States to invade Iraq and advised President George W. Bush.

Most Americans became familiar with Mr. Ajami’s views on CBS News, CNN and the PBS programs “Charlie Rose” and “NewsHour,” where his distinctive beard and polished manner lent force to his opinions. He wrote more than 400 articles for magazines and newspapers, including The New York Times, as well as a half-dozen books on the Middle East, some of which included his own experiences as a Shiite Muslim in majority Sunni societies.

Condoleezza Rice summoned him to the Bush White House when she was national security adviser, and he advised Paul Wolfowitz, then the deputy secretary of defense. In a speech in 2002, Vice President Dick Cheney invoked Mr. Ajami as predicting that Iraqis would greet liberation by the American military with joy.

In the years following the Iraqi invasion, Mr. Ajami continued to support the action as stabilizing. But he said this month that Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki had squandered an opportunity to unify the country after American intervention and become a dictator. More recently, he favored more aggressive policies toward Iran and Syria. Mr. Ajami’s harshest criticism was leveled at Arab autocrats, who by definition lacked popular support. But his use of words like “tribal,” “atavistic” and “clannish” to describe Arab peoples rankled some. So did his belief that Western nations should intervene in the region to correct wrongs. Edward Said, the Palestinian cultural critic who died in 2003, accused him of having “unmistakably racist prescriptions.”

Others praised him for balance. Daniel Pipes, a scholar who specializes in the Middle East, said in Commentary magazine in 2006 that Mr. Ajami had avoided “the common Arab fixation on the perfidy of Israel.”

Fouad Ajami was born on Sept. 19, 1945, at the foot of a castle built by Crusaders in Arnoun, a dusty village in southern Lebanon. His family came from Iran (the name Ajami means “Persian” in Arabic) and were prosperous tobacco farmers. When he was 4, the family moved to Beirut.

As a boy he was taunted by Sunni Muslim children for being Shiite and short, he wrote in “The Dream Palace of the Arabs: A Generation’s Odyssey” (1998), an examination of Arab intellectuals of the last two generations. As a teenager, he was enthusiastic about Arab nationalism, a cause he would later criticize. He also fell in love with American culture, particularly Hollywood movies, and especially Westerns. In 1963, a day or two before his 18th birthday, his family moved to the United States.

He attended Eastern Oregon College (now University), then earned a Ph.D. at the University of Washington after writing a thesis on international relations and world government. He next taught political science at Princeton. In 1980, the School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University named him director of Middle East studies. He joined the Hoover Institution in 2011.

Mr. Ajami’s first book, “The Arab Predicament: Arab Political Thought and Practice Since 1967” (1981), explored the panic and sense of vulnerability in the Arab world after Israel’s victory in the 1967 war. His next book, “The Vanishing Imam: Musa al Sadr and the Shia of Lebanon” (1986), profiled an Iranian cleric who helped transform Lebanese Shia from “a despised minority” to effective successful political actors. For the 1988 book “Beirut: City of Regrets,” Mr. Ajami provided a long introduction and some text to accompany a photographic essay by Eli Reed.

“The Dream Palace of the Arabs” told of how a generation of Arab intellectuals tried to renew their homelands’ culture through the forces of modernism and secularism. The Christian Science Monitor called it “a cleareyed look at the lost hopes of the Arabs.”

Partly because of that tone, some condemned the book as too negative. The scholar Andrew N. Rubin, writing in The Nation, said it “echoes the kind of anti-Arabism that both Washington and the pro-Israeli lobby have come to embrace.”

Mr. Ajami received many awards, including a MacArthur Fellowship in 1982 and a National Humanities Medal in 2006. He is survived by his wife, Michelle. In a profile in The Nation in 2003, Adam Shatz described Mr. Ajami’s distinctive appearance, characterized by a “dramatic beard, stylish clothes and a charming, almost flirtatious manner.”

He continued: “On television, he radiates above-the-frayness, speaking with the wry, jaded authority that men in power admire, especially in men who have risen from humble roots. Unlike the other Arabs, he appears to have no ax to grind. He is one of us; he is the good Arab.”

Voir aussi:

The Native Informant
Fouad Ajami is the Pentagon’s favorite Arab.
Adam Shatz
April 10, 2003 | This article appeared in the April 28, 2003 edition of The Nation.

Late last August, at a reunion of Korean War veterans in San Antonio, Texas, Dick Cheney tried to assuage concerns that a unilateral, pre-emptive war against Iraq might "cause even greater troubles in that part of the world." He cited a well-known Arab authority: "As for the reaction of the Arab street, the Middle East expert Professor Fouad Ajami predicts that after liberation in Basra and Baghdad, the streets are sure to erupt in joy." As the bombs fell over Baghdad, just before American troops began to encounter fierce Iraqi resistance, Ajami could scarcely conceal his glee. "We are now coming into acquisition of Iraq," he announced on CBS News the morning of March 22. "It’s an amazing performance."

If Hollywood ever makes a film about Gulf War II, a supporting role should be reserved for Ajami, the director of Middle East Studies at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University. His is a classic American success story. Born in 1945 to Shiite parents in the remote southern Lebanese village of Arnoun and now a proud naturalized American, Ajami has become the most politically influential Arab intellectual of his generation in the United States. Condoleezza Rice often summons him to the White House for advice, and Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz, a friend and former colleague, has paid tribute to him in several recent speeches on Iraq. Although he has produced little scholarly work of value, Ajami is a regular guest on CBS News, Charlie Rose and the NewsHour With Jim Lehrer, and a frequent contributor to the editorial pages of the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. His ideas are also widely recycled by acolytes like Thomas Friedman and Judith Miller of the Times.

Ajami’s unique role in American political life has been to unpack the unfathomable mysteries of the Arab and Muslim world and to help sell America’s wars in the region. A diminutive, balding man with a dramatic beard, stylish clothes and a charming, almost flirtatious manner, he has played his part brilliantly. On television, he radiates above-the-frayness, speaking with the wry, jaded authority that men in power admire, especially in men who have risen from humble roots. Unlike the other Arabs, he appears to have no ax to grind. He is one of us; he is the good Arab.

Ajami’s admirers paint him as a courageous gadfly who has risen above the tribal hatreds of the Arabs, a Middle Eastern Spinoza whose honesty has earned him the scorn of his brethren. Commentary editor-at-large Norman Podhoretz, one of his many right-wing American Jewish fans, writes that Ajami "has been virtually alone in telling the truth about the attitude toward Israel of the people from whom he stems." The people from whom Ajami "stems" are, of course, the Arabs, and Ajami’s ethnicity is not incidental to his celebrity. It lends him an air of authority not enjoyed by non-Arab polemicists like Martin Kramer and Daniel Pipes.

But Ajami is no gadfly. He is, in fact, entirely a creature of the American establishment. His once-luminous writing, increasingly a blend of Naipaulean clichés about Muslim pathologies and Churchillian rhetoric about the burdens of empire, is saturated with hostility toward Sunni Arabs in general (save for pro-Western Gulf Arabs, toward whom he is notably indulgent), and to Palestinians in particular. He invites comparison with Henry Kissinger, another émigré intellectual to achieve extraordinary prominence as a champion of American empire. Like Kissinger, Ajami has a suave television demeanor, a gravitas-lending accent, an instinctive solicitude for the imperatives of power and a cool disdain for the weak. And just as Kissinger cozied up to Nelson Rockefeller and Nixon, so has Ajami attached himself to such powerful patrons as Laurence Tisch, former chairman of CBS; Mort Zuckerman, the owner of US News & World Report; Martin Peretz, a co-owner of The New Republic; and Leslie Gelb, head of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Despite his training in political science, Ajami often sounds like a pop psychologist in his writing about the Arab world or, as he variously calls it, "the world of Araby," "that Arab world" and "those Arab lands." According to Ajami, that world is "gripped in a poisonous rage" and "wedded to a worldview of victimology," bad habits reinforced by its leaders, "megalomaniacs who never tell their people what can and cannot be had in the world of nations." There is, to be sure, a grain of truth in Ajami’s grim assessment. Progressive Arab thinkers from Sadeq al-Azm to Adonis have issued equally bleak indictments of Arab political culture, lambasting the dearth of self-criticism and the constant search for external scapegoats. Unlike these writers, however, Ajami has little sympathy for the people of the region, unless they happen to live within the borders of "rogue states" like Iraq, in which case they must be "liberated" by American force. The corrupt regimes that rule the Arab world, he has suggested, are more or less faithful reflections of the "Arab psyche": "Despots always work with a culture’s yearnings…. After all, a hadith, a saying attributed to the Prophet Muhammad, maintains ‘You will get the rulers you deserve.’" His own taste in regimes runs to monarchies like Kuwait. The Jews of Israel, it seems, are not just the only people in the region who enjoy the fruits of democracy; they are the only ones who deserve them.

Once upon a time, Ajami was an articulate and judicious critic both of Arab society and of the West, a defender of Palestinian rights and an advocate of decent government in the Arab world. Though he remains a shrewd guide to the hypocrisies of Arab leaders, his views on foreign policy now scarcely diverge from those of pro-Israel hawks in the Bush Administration. "Since the Gulf War, Fouad has taken leave of his analytic perspective to play to his elite constituency," said Augustus Richard Norton, a Middle East scholar at Boston University. "It’s very unfortunate because he could have made an astonishingly important contribution."

Seeking to understand the causes of Ajami’s transformation, I spoke to more than two dozen of his friends and acquaintances over the past several months. (Ajami did not return my phone calls or e-mails.) These men and women depicted a man at once ambitious and insecure, torn between his irascible intellectual independence and his even stronger desire to belong to something larger than himself. On the one hand, he is an intellectual dandy who, as Sayres Rudy, a former student, puts it, "doesn’t like groups and thinks people who join them are mediocre." On the other, as a Shiite among Sunnis, and as an émigré in America, he has always felt the outsider’s anxiety to please, and has adjusted his convictions to fit his surroundings. As a young man eager to assimilate into the urbane Sunni world of Muslim Beirut, he embraced pan-Arabism. Received with open arms by the American Jewish establishment in New York and Washington, he became an ardent Zionist. An informal adviser to both Bush administrations, he is now a cheerleader for the American empire.

The man from Arnoun appears to be living the American dream. He has a prestigious job and the ear of the President. Yet the price of power has been higher in his case than in Kissinger’s. Kissinger, after all, is a figure of renown among the self-appointed leaders of "the people from whom he stems" and a frequent speaker at Jewish charity galas, whereas Ajami is a man almost entirely deserted by his people, a pariah at what should be his hour of triumph. In Arnoun, a family friend told me, "Fouad is a black sheep because of his staunch support for the Israelis." Although he frequently travels to Tel Aviv and the Persian Gulf, he almost never goes to Lebanon. In becoming an American, he has become, as he himself has confessed, "a stranger in the Arab world."

Up From Lebanon

This is an immigrant’s tale.

It begins in Arnoun, a rocky hamlet in the south of Lebanon where Fouad al-Ajami was born on September 19, 1945. A prosperous tobacco-growing Shiite family, the Ajamis had come to Arnoun from Iran in the 1850s. (Their name, Arabic for "Persian," gave away their origins.)

When Ajami was 4, he moved with his family to Beirut, settling in the largely Armenian northeastern quarter, a neighborhood thick with orange orchards, pine trees and strawberry fields. As members of the rural Shiite minority, the country’s "hewers of wood and drawers of water," the Ajamis stood apart from the city’s dominant groups, the Sunni Muslims and the Maronite Christians. "We were strangers to Beirut," he has written. "We wanted to pass undetected in the modern world of Beirut, to partake of its ways." For the young "Shia assimilé," as he has described himself, "anything Persian, anything Shia, was anathema…. speaking Persianized Arabic was a threat to something unresolved in my identity." He tried desperately, but with little success, to pass among his Sunni peers. In the predominantly Sunni schools he attended, "Fouad was taunted for being a Shiite, and for being short," one friend told me. "That left him with a lasting sense of bitterness toward the Sunnis."

In the 1950s, Arab nationalism appeared to hold out the promise of transcending the schisms between Sunnis and Shiites, and the confessional divisions separating Muslims and Christians. Like his classmates, Ajami fell under the spell of Arab nationalism’s charismatic spokesman, the Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser. At the same time, he was falling under the spell of American culture, which offered relief from the "ancestral prohibitions and phobias" of his "cramped land." Watching John Wayne films, he "picked up American slang and a romance for the distant power casting its shadow across us." On July 15, 1958, the day after the bloody overthrow of the Iraqi monarchy by nationalist army officers, Ajami’s two loves had their first of many clashes, when President Eisenhower sent the US Marines to Beirut to contain the spread of radical Arab nationalism. In their initial confrontation, Ajami chose Egypt’s leader, defying his parents and hopping on a Damascus-bound bus for one of Nasser’s mass rallies.

Ajami arrived in the United States in the fall of 1963, just before he turned 18. He did his graduate work at the University of Washington, where he wrote his dissertation on international relations and world government. At the University of Washington, Ajami gravitated toward progressive Arab circles. Like his Arab peers, he was shaken by the humiliating defeat of the Arab countries in the 1967 war with Israel, and he was heartened by the emergence of the PLO. While steering clear of radicalism, he often expressed horror at Israel’s brutal reprisal attacks against southern Lebanese villages in response to PLO raids.

apartment in New York. He made a name for himself there as a vocal supporter of Palestinian self-determination. One friend remembers him as "a fairly typical advocate of Third World positions." Yet he was also acutely aware of the failings of Third World states, which he unsparingly diagnosed in "The Fate of Nonalignment," a brilliant 1980/81 essay in Foreign Affairs. In 1980, when Johns Hopkins offered him a position as director of Middle East Studies at SAIS, a Washington-based graduate program, he took it.

Ajami’s Predicament

A year after arriving at SAIS, Ajami published his first and still best book, The Arab Predicament. An anatomy of the intellectual and political crisis that swept the Arab world following its defeat by Israel in the 1967 war, it is one of the most probing and subtle books ever written in English on the region. Ranging gracefully across political theory, literature and poetry, Ajami draws an elegant, often moving portrait of Arab intellectuals in their anguished efforts to put together a world that had come apart at the seams. The book did not offer a bold or original argument; like Isaiah Berlin’s Russian Thinkers, it provided an interpretive survey–respectful even when critical–of other people’s ideas. It was the book of a man who had grown disillusioned with Nasser, whose millenarian dream of restoring the "Arab nation" had run up against the hard fact that the "divisions of the Arab world were real, not contrived points on a map or a colonial trick." But pan-Arabism was not the only temptation to which the intellectuals had succumbed. There was radical socialism, and the Guevarist fantasies of the Palestinian revolution. There was Islamic fundamentalism, with its romance of authenticity and its embittered rejection of the West. And then there was the search for Western patronage, the way of Nasser’s successor, Anwar Sadat, who forgot his own world and ended up being devoured by it.

Ajami’s ambivalent chapter on Sadat makes for especially fascinating reading today. He praised Sadat for breaking with Nasserism and making peace with Israel, and perhaps saw something of himself in the "self-defined peasant from the dusty small village" who had "traveled far beyond the bounds of his world." But he also saw in Sadat’s story the tragic parable of a man who had become more comfortable with Western admirers than with his own people. When Sadat spoke nostalgically of his village–as Ajami now speaks of Arnoun–he was pandering to the West. Arabs, a people of the cities, would not be "taken in by the myth of the village." Sadat’s "American connection," Ajami suggested, gave him "a sense of psychological mobility," lifting some of the burdens imposed by his cramped world. And as his dependence on his American patrons deepened, "he became indifferent to the sensibilities of his own world."

Sadat was one example of the trap of seeking the West’s approval, and losing touch with one’s roots; V.S. Naipaul was another. Naipaul, Ajami suggested in an incisive 1981 New York Times review of Among the Believers, exemplified the "dilemma of a gifted author led by his obsessive feelings regarding the people he is writing about to a difficult intellectual and moral bind." Third World exiles like Naipaul, Ajami wrote, "have a tendency to…look at their own countries and similar ones with a critical eye," yet "these same men usually approach the civilization of the West with awe and leave it unexamined." Ajami preferred the humane, nonjudgmental work of Polish travel writer Ryszard Kapucinski: "His eye for human folly is as sharp as V.S. Naipaul. His sympathy and sorrow, however, are far deeper."

The Arab Predicament was infused with sympathy and sorrow, but these qualities were ignored by the book’s Arab critics in the West, who–displaying the ideological rigidity that is an unfortunate hallmark of exile politics–accused him of papering over the injustices of imperialism and "blaming the victim." To an extent, this was a fair criticism. Ajami paid little attention to imperialism, and even less to Israel’s provocative role in the region. What is more, his argument that "the wounds that mattered were self-inflicted" endeared him to those who wanted to distract attention from Palestine. Doors flew open. On the recommendation of Bernard Lewis, the distinguished British Orientalist at Princeton and a strong supporter of Israel, Ajami became the first Arab to win the MacArthur "genius" prize in 1982, and in 1983 he became a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. The New Republic began to publish lengthy essays by Ajami, models of the form that offer a tantalizing glimpse of the career he might have had in a less polarized intellectual climate. Pro-Israel intellectual circles groomed him as a rival to Edward Said, holding up his book as a corrective to Orientalism, Said’s classic study of how the West imagined the East in the age of empire.

In fact, Ajami shared some of Said’s anger about the Middle East. The Israelis, he wrote in an eloquent New York Times op-ed after the 1982 invasion of Lebanon, "came with a great delusion: that if you could pound men and women hard enough, if you could bring them to their knees, you could make peace with them." He urged the United States to withdraw from Lebanon in 1984, and he advised it to open talks with the Iranian government. Throughout the 1980s, Ajami maintained a critical attitude toward America’s interventions in the Middle East, stressing the limits of America’s ability to influence or shape a "tormented world" it scarcely understood. "Our arguments dovetailed," says Said. "There was an unspoken assumption that we shared the same kind of politics."

But just below the surface there were profound differences of opinion. Hisham Milhem, a Lebanese journalist who knows both men well, explained their differences to me by contrasting their views on Joseph Conrad. "Edward and Fouad are both crazy about Conrad, but they see in him very different things. Edward sees the critic of empire, especially in Heart of Darkness. Fouad, on the other hand, admires the Polish exile in Western Europe who made a conscious break with the old country."

Yet the old world had as much of a grip on Ajami as it did on Said. In southern Lebanon, Palestinian guerrillas had set up a state within a state. They often behaved thuggishly toward the Shiites, alienating their natural allies and recklessly exposing them to Israel’s merciless reprisals. By the time Israeli tanks rolled into Lebanon in 1982, relations between the two communities had so deteriorated that some Shiites greeted the invaders with rice and flowers. Like many Shiites, Ajami was fed up with the Palestinians, whose revolution had brought ruin to Lebanon. Arnoun itself had not been unscathed: A nearby Crusader castle, the majestic Beaufort, was now the scene of intense fighting.

In late May 1985, Ajami–now identifying himself as a Shiite from southern Lebanon–sparred with Said on the MacNeil Lehrer Report over the war between the PLO and Shiite Amal militia, then raging in Beirut’s refugee camps. A few months later, they came to verbal blows again, when Ajami was invited to speak at a Harvard conference on Islam and Muslim politics organized by Israeli-American academic Nadav Safran. After the Harvard Crimson revealed that the conference had been partly funded by the CIA, Ajami, at the urging of Said and the late Pakistani writer Eqbal Ahmad, joined a wave of speakers who were withdrawing from the conference. But Ajami, who was a protégé and friend of Safran, immediately regretted his decision. He wrote a blistering letter to Said and Ahmad a few weeks later, accusing them of "bringing the conflicts of the Middle East to this country" while "I have tried to go beyond them…. Therefore, my friends, this is the parting of ways. I hope never to encounter you again, and we must cease communication. Yours sincerely, Fouad Ajami."

The Tribal Turn

By now, the "Shia assimilé" had fervently embraced his Shiite identity. Like Sadat, he began to rhapsodize about his "dusty village" in wistful tones. The Vanished Imam, his 1986 encomium to Musa al-Sadr, the Iranian cleric who led the Amal militia before mysteriously disappearing on a 1978 visit to Libya, offers important clues into Ajami’s thinking of the time. A work of lyrical nationalist mythology, The Vanished Imam also provides a thinly veiled political memoir, recounting Ajami’s disillusionment with Palestinians, Arabs and the left, and his conversion to old-fashioned tribal politics.

The marginalized Shiites had found a home in Amal, and a spiritual leader in Sadr, a "big man" who is explicitly compared to Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim and credited with a far larger role than he actually played in Shiite politics. Writing of Sadr, Ajami might have been describing himself. Sadr is an Ajam–a Persian–with "an outsider’s eagerness to please." He is "suspicious of grand schemes," blessed with "a strong sense of pragmatism, of things that can and cannot be," thanks to which virtue he "came to be seen as an enemy of everything ‘progressive.’" "Tired of the polemics," he alone is courageous enough to stand up to the Palestinians, warning them not to "seek a ‘substitute homeland,’ watan badil, in Lebanon." Unlike the Palestinians, Ajami tells us repeatedly, the Shiites are realists, not dreamers; reformers, not revolutionaries. Throughout the book, a stark dichotomy is also drawn between Shiite and Arab nationalism, although, as one of his Shiite critics pointed out in a caustic review in the International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, "allegiance to Arab nationalist ideals…was paramount" in Sadr’s circles. The Shiites of Ajami’s imagination seem fundamentally different from other Arabs: a community that shares America’s aversion to the Palestinians, a "model minority" worthy of the West’s sympathy.

The Shiite critic of the Palestinians cut an especially attractive profile in the eyes of the American media. Most American viewers of CBS News, which made him a high-paid consultant in 1985, had no idea that he was almost completely out of step with the community for which he claimed to speak. By the time The Vanished Imam appeared, the Shiites, under the leadership of a new group, Hezbollah, had launched a battle to liberate Lebanon from Israeli control. Israeli soldiers were now greeted with grenades and explosives, rather than rice and flowers, and Arnoun became a hotbed of Hezbollah support. Yet Ajami displayed little enthusiasm for this Shiite struggle. He was also oddly silent about the behavior of the Israelis, who, from the 1982 invasion onward, had killed far more Shiites than either Arafat ("the Flying Dutchman of the Palestinian movement") or Hafez al-Assad (Syria’s "cruel enforcer"). The Shiites, he suggested, were "beneficiaries of Israel’s Lebanon war."

In the Promised Land

By the mid-1980s, the Middle Eastern country closest to Ajami’s heart was not Lebanon but Israel. He returned from his trips to the Jewish state boasting of traveling to the occupied territories under the guard of the Israel Defense Forces and of being received at the home of Teddy Kollek, then Jerusalem’s mayor. The Israelis earned his admiration because they had something the Palestinians notably lacked: power. They were also tough-minded realists, who understood "what can and cannot be had in the world of nations." The Palestinians, by contrast, were romantics who imagined themselves to be "exempt from the historical laws of gravity."

n 1986, Ajami had praised Musa al-Sadr as a realist for telling the Palestinians to fight Israel in the occupied territories, rather than in Lebanon. But when the Palestinians did exactly that, in the first intifada of 1987-93, it no longer seemed realistic to Ajami, who then advised them to swallow the bitter pill of defeat and pay for their bad choices. While Israeli troops shot down children armed only with stones, Ajami told the Palestinians they should give up on the idea of a sovereign state ("a phantom"), even in the West Bank and Gaza. When the PLO announced its support for a two-state solution at a 1988 conference in Algiers, Ajami called the declaration "hollow," its concessions to Israel inadequate. On the eve of the Madrid talks in the fall of 1991 he wrote, "It is far too late to introduce a new nation between Israel and Jordan." Nor should the American government embark on the "fool’s errand" of pressuring Israel to make peace. Under Ajami’s direction, the Middle East program of SAIS became a bastion of pro-Israel opinion. An increasing number of Israeli and pro-Israel academics, many of them New Republic contributors, were invited as guest lecturers. "Rabbi Ajami," as many people around SAIS referred to him, was also receiving significant support from a Jewish family foundation in Baltimore, which picked up the tab for the trips his students took to the Middle East every summer. Back in Lebanon, Ajami’s growing reputation as an apologist for Israel reportedly placed considerable strains on family members in Arnoun.

‘The Saudi Way’

Ajami also developed close ties during the 1980s to Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, which made him–as he often and proudly pointed out–the only Arab who traveled both to the Persian Gulf countries and to Israel. In 1985 he became an external examiner in the political science department at Kuwait University; he said "the place seemed vibrant and open to me." His major patrons, however, were Saudi. He has traveled to Riyadh many times to raise money for his program, sometimes taking along friends like Martin Peretz; he has also vacationed in Prince Bandar’s home in Aspen. Saudi hospitality–and Saudi Arabia’s lavish support for SAIS–bred gratitude. At one meeting of the Council on Foreign Relations, Ajami told a group that, as one participant recalls, "the Saudi system was a lot stronger than we thought, that it was a system worth defending, and that it had nothing to apologize for." Throughout the 1980s and ’90s, he faithfully echoed the Saudi line. "Rage against the West does not come naturally to the gulf Arabs," he wrote in 1990. "No great tales of betrayal are told by the Arabs of the desert. These are Palestinian, Lebanese and North African tales."

This may explain why Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990 aroused greater outrage in Ajami than any act of aggression in the recent history of the Middle East. Neither Israel’s invasion of Lebanon nor the 1982 Sabra and Shatila massacre had caused him comparable consternation. Nor, for that matter, had Saddam’s slaughter of the Kurds in Halabja in 1988. This is understandable, of course; we all react more emotionally when the victims are friends. But we don’t all become publicists for war, as Ajami did that fateful summer, consummating his conversion to Pax Americana. What was remarkable was not only his fervent advocacy; it was his cavalier disregard for truth, his lurid rhetoric and his religious embrace of American power. In Foreign Affairs, Ajami, who knew better, described Iraq, the cradle of Mesopotamian civilization, a major publisher of Arabic literature and a center of the plastic arts, as "a brittle land…with little claim to culture and books and grand ideas." It was, in other words, a wasteland, led by a man who "conjures up Adolf Hitler."

Months before the war began, the Shiite from Arnoun, now writing as an American, in the royal "we," declared that US troops "will have to stay in the Gulf and on a much larger scale," since "we have tangible interests in that land. We stand sentry there in blazing clear daylight." After the Gulf War, Ajami’s cachet soared. In the early 1990s Harvard offered him a chair ("he turned it down because we expected him to be around and to work very hard," a professor told me), and the Council on Foreign Relations added him to its prestigious board of advisers last year. "The Gulf War was the crucible of change," says Augustus Richard Norton. "This immigrant from Arnoun, this man nobody had heard of from a place no one had heard of, had reached the peak of power. This was a true immigrant success story, one of those moments that make an immigrant grateful for America. And I think it implanted a deep sense of patriotism that wasn’t present before."

And, as Ajami once wrote of Sadat, "outside approval gave him the courage to defy" the Arabs, especially when it came to Israel. On June 3, 1992, hardly a year after Gulf War I, Ajami spoke at a pro-Israel fundraiser. Kissinger, the keynote speaker, described Arabs as congenital liars. Ajami chimed in, expressing his doubts that democracy would ever work in the Arab world, and recounting a visit to a Bedouin village where he "insisted on only one thing: that I be spared the ceremony of eating with a Bedouin."

Since the signing of the Oslo Accords in 1993, Ajami has been a consistent critic of the peace process–from the right. He sang the praises of each of Israel’s leaders, from the Likud’s Benjamin Netanyahu, with his "filial devotion [to] the land he had agreed to relinquish," to Labor leader Ehud Barak, "an exemplary soldier." The Palestinians, he wrote, should be grateful to such men for "rescuing" them from defeat, and to Zionism for generously offering them "the possibility of their own national political revival." (True to form, the Palestinians showed "no gratitude.") A year before the destruction of Jenin, he proclaimed that "Israel is existentially through with the siege that had defined its history." Ajami’s Likudnik conversion was sealed by telling revisions of arguments he had made earlier in his career. Where he had once argued that the 1982 invasion of Lebanon aimed to "undermine those in the Arab world who want some form of compromise," he now called it a response to "the challenge of Palestinian terror."

Did Ajami really believe all this? In a stray but revealing comment on Sadat in The New Republic, he left room for doubt. Sadat, he said, was "a son of the soil, who had the fellah’s ability to look into the soul of powerful outsiders, to divine how he could get around them even as he gave them what they desired." Writing on politics, the man from Arnoun gave them what they desired. Writing on literature and poetry, he gave expression to the aesthete, the soulful elegist, even, at times, to the Arab. In his 1998 book, The Dream Palace of the Arabs, one senses, for the first time in years, Ajami’s sympathy for the world he left behind, although there is something furtive, something ghostly about his affection, as if he were writing about a lover he has taught himself to spurn. On rare occasions, Ajami revealed this side of himself to his students, whisking them into his office. Once the door was firmly shut, he would recite the poetry of Nizar Qabbani and Adonis in Arabic, caressing each and every line. As he read, Sayres Rudy told me, "I could swear his heart was breaking."

Ajami’s Solitude

September 11 exposed a major intelligence failure on Ajami’s part. With his obsessive focus on the menace of Saddam and the treachery of Arafat, he had missed the big story. Fifteen of the nineteen hijackers hailed from what he had repeatedly called the "benign political order" of Saudi Arabia; the "Saudi way" he had praised had come undone. Yet the few criticisms that Ajami directed at his patrons in the weeks and months after September 11 were curiously muted, particularly in contrast to the rage of most American commentators. Ajami’s venues in the American media, however, were willing to forgive his softness toward the Saudis. America was going to war with Muslims, and a trusted native informant was needed.

Other forces were working in Ajami’s favor. For George W. Bush and the hawks in his entourage, Afghanistan was merely a prelude to the war they really wanted to fight–the war against Saddam that Ajami had been spoiling for since the end of Gulf War I. As a publicist for Gulf War II, Ajami has abandoned his longstanding emphasis on the limits of American influence in that "tormented region." The war is being sold as the first step in an American plan to effect democratic regime change across the region, and Ajami has stayed on message. We now find him writing in Foreign Affairs that "the driving motivation of a new American endeavor in Iraq and in neighboring Arab lands should be modernizing the Arab world." The opinion of the Arab street, where Iraq is recruiting thousands of new jihadists, is of no concern to him. "We have to live with this anti-Americanism," he sighed recently on CBS. "It’s the congenital condition of the Arab world, and we have to discount a good deal of it as we press on with the task of liberating the Iraqis."

In fairness, Ajami has not completely discarded his wariness about American intervention. For there remains one country where American pressure will come to naught, and that is Israel, where it would "be hubris" to ask anything more of the Israelis, victims of "Arafat’s war." To those who suggest that the Iraq campaign is doomed without an Israeli-Palestinian peace settlement, he says, "We can’t hold our war hostage to Arafat’s campaign of terror."

Fortunately, George W. Bush understands this. Ajami has commended Bush for staking out the "high moral ground" and for "putting Iran on notice" in his Axis of Evil speech. Above all, the President should not allow himself to be deterred by multilateralists like Secretary of State Colin Powell, "an unhappy, reluctant soldier, at heart a pessimist about American power." Unilateralism, Ajami says, is nothing to be ashamed of. It may make us hated in the "hostile landscape" of the Arab world, but, as he recently explained on the NewsHour, "it’s the fate of a great power to stand sentry in that kind of a world."

It is no accident that the "sentry’s solitude" has become the idée fixe of Ajami’s writing in recent years. For it is a theme that resonates powerfully in his own life. Like the empire he serves, Ajami is more influential, and more isolated, than he has ever been. In recent years he has felt a need to defend this choice in heroic terms. "All a man can betray is his conscience," he solemnly writes in The Dream Palace of the Arabs, citing a passage from Conrad. "The solitude Conrad chose is loathed by politicized men and women."

It is a breathtakingly disingenuous remark. Ajami may be "a stranger in the Arab world," but he can hardly claim to be a stranger to its politics. That is why he is quoted, and courted, by Dick Cheney and Paul Wolfowitz. What Ajami abhors in "politicized men and women" is conviction itself. A leftist in the 1970s, a Shiite nationalist in the 1980s, an apologist for the Saudis in the 1990s, a critic-turned-lover of Israel, a skeptic-turned-enthusiast of American empire, he has observed no consistent principle in his career other than deference to power. His vaunted intellectual independence is a clever fiction. The only thing that makes him worth reading is his prose style, and even that has suffered of late. As Ajami observed of Naipaul more than twenty years ago, "he has become more and more predictable, too, with serious cost to his great gift as a writer," blinded by the "assumption that only men who live in remote, dark places are ‘denied a clear vision of the world.’" Like Naipaul, Ajami has forgotten that "darkness is not only there but here as well."

Voir également:

Middle East expert Fouad Ajami, supporter of U.S. war in Iraq, dies at 68
Ajami was known for his criticism of the Arab world’s despotic rulers, among them Hosni Mubarak, Muammar Gadhafi, and Hafez and Bashar Assad.
Ofer Aderet
Haaretz
Jun. 23, 2014

American-Lebanese intellectual and Middle East scholar Prof. Fouad Ajami has died of cancer, aged 68. He passed away Sunday in the United States.

Ajami, who was an expert on the Middle East, is remembered chiefly for his support of the American invasion of Iraq in 2003. He advised the Bush administration during that period. He was strongly opposed to the dictatorial regimes in the Arab countries, believed that the United States must confront “the culture of terror,” as he called it, and supported an assertive policy in regard to Iran and Syria.

Ajami immigrated to the United States from Lebanon with his family in 1963, when he was 18. At Princeton University, he stood out as a supporter of the Palestinians’ right to self-rule. He later went on to Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, where he was in charge of the Middle East studies program.

He became well-known for his appearances on current affairs programs on American television, the hundreds of articles he wrote in journals and newspapers, and the six books he published.

Ajami was very close to the administration of George W. Bush and served as an adviser to Condoleezza Rice while she was national security adviser, and to Paul Wolfowitz, who was deputy secretary of defense at the time. In a speech delivered in 2002, Vice President Dick Cheney claimed Ajami had said the Iraqis would greet their liberation by the Americans with rejoicing.

His support for the war in Iraq elicited harsh criticism. He reiterated this support in an interview with Haaretz in 2011, in which he said: “I still support that war, and I think that the liberals who attacked Bush in America and elsewhere, who attacked him mercilessly, need to reexamine their assumptions.”

Ajami was known for his criticism of the Arab world’s despotic rulers, among them Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, Muammar Gadhafi in Libya, and Hafez and Bashar Assad in Syria. He expressed optimism at the time of the Arab Spring, and had recently supported an assertive policy against Iran and Syria.

Fouad Ajami, Great American
His genius lay in the breadth of his scholarship and the quality of his human understanding.
Bret Stephens
The Wall Street Journal
June 23, 2014

Fouad Ajami would have been amused, but not surprised, to read his own obituary in the New York Times. "Edward Said, the Palestinian cultural critic who died in 2003, accused [Ajami] of having ‘unmistakably racist prescriptions,’" quoted obituarist Douglas Martin.

Thus was Said, the most mendacious, self-infatuated and profitably self-pitying of Arab-American intellectuals—a man whose account of his own childhood cannot be trusted—raised from the grave to defame, for one last time, the most honest and honorable and generous of American intellectuals, no hyphenation necessary.

Ajami, who died of prostate cancer Sunday in his summer home in Maine, was often described as among the foremost scholars of the modern Arab and Islamic worlds, and so he was. He was born in 1945 to a family of farmers in a Shiite village in southern Lebanon and was raised in Beirut in the politics of the age.

"I was formed by an amorphous Arab nationalist sensibility," he wrote in his 1998 masterpiece, "The Dream Palace of the Arabs." He came to the U.S. for college and graduate school, became a U.S. citizen, and first made his political mark as an advocate for Palestinian nationalism. For those who knew Ajami mainly as a consistent advocate of Saddam Hussein’s ouster, it’s worth watching a YouTube snippet of his 1978 debate with Benjamin Netanyahu, in which Ajami makes the now-standard case against Israeli iniquity.

Today Mr. Netanyahu sounds very much like his 28-year-old self. But Ajami changed. He was, to borrow a phrase, mugged by reality. By the 1980s, he wrote, "Arab society had run through most of its myths, and what remained in the wake of the word, of the many proud statements people had made about themselves and their history, was a new world of cruelty, waste, and confusion."

What Ajami did was to see that world plain, without the usual evasions and obfuscations and shifting of blame to Israel and the U.S. Like Sidney Hook or Eric Hoffer, the great ex-communists of a previous generation, his honesty, courage and intelligence got the better of his ideology; he understood his former beliefs with the hard-won wisdom of the disillusioned.

He also understood with empathy and without rancor. Converts tend to be fanatics. But Ajami was too interested in people—in their motives and aspirations, their deceits and self-deceits, their pride, shame and unexpected nobility—to hate anyone except the truly despicable, namely tyrants and their apologists. To read Ajami is to see that his genius lay not only in the breadth of the scholarship or the sharpness of political insight but also in the quality of human understanding. If Joseph Conrad had been reborn as a modern-day academic, he would have been Fouad Ajami.

Consider a typical example, from an op-ed he wrote for these pages in February 2013 on the second anniversary of the fall of Hosni Mubarak’s regime:

"Throughout [Mubarak's] reign, a toxic brew poisoned the life of Egypt—a mix of anti-modernism, anti-Americanism and anti-Zionism. That trinity ran rampant in the universities and the professional syndicates and the official media. As pillage had become the obsession of the ruling family and its retainers, the underclass was left to the rule of darkness and to a culture of conspiracy."

Or here he is on Barack Obama’s fading political appeal, from a piece from last November:

"The current troubles of the Obama presidency can be read back into its beginnings. Rule by personal charisma has met its proper fate. The spell has been broken, and the magician stands exposed. We need no pollsters to tell us of the loss of faith in Mr. Obama’s policies—and, more significantly, in the man himself. Charisma is like that. Crowds come together and they project their needs onto an imagined redeemer. The redeemer leaves the crowd to its imagination: For as long as the charismatic moment lasts—a year, an era—the redeemer is above and beyond judgment."

A publisher ought to collect these pieces. Who else could write so profoundly and so well? Ajami understood the Arab world as only an insider could—intimately, sympathetically, without self-pity. And he loved America as only an immigrant could—with a depth of appreciation and absence of cynicism rarely given to the native-born. If there was ever an error in his judgment, it’s that he believed in people—Arabs and Americans alike—perhaps more than they believed in themselves. It was the kind of mistake only a generous spirit could make.

Over the years Ajami mentored many people—the mentorship often turning to friendship—who went on to great things. One of them, Samuel Tadros, a native of Egypt and now a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, wrote me Monday with an apt valediction:

"Fouad is remarkable because he became a full American, loved this country as anyone could love it, but that did not lessen his passion for what he left behind. He cared deeply about the region, he was always an optimist. He knew well the region’s ills, the pains it gave those who cherished it. God knows it gave him nothing but pain, but he always believed that the peoples of the region deserved better."

Free at Last
Victor Davis Hanson
Commentary Magazine
September 6, 2006

A review of The Foreigner’s Gift: The Americans, the Arabs, and the Iraqis in Iraq by Fouad Ajami (Free Press, 400 pp)

The last year or so has seen several insider histories of the American experience in Iraq. Written by generals (Bernard Trainor’s Cobra II, with Michael Wood), reporters (George Packer’s The Assassins’ Gate), or bureaucrats (Paul Bremer’s My Year in Iraq), each undertakes to explain how our enterprise in that country has, allegedly, gone astray; who is to blame for the failure; and why the author is right to have withdrawn, or at least to question, his earlier support for the project.

Fouad Ajami’s The Foreigner’s Gift is a notably welcome exception—and not only because of Ajami’s guarded optimism about the eventual outcome in Iraq. A Lebanese-born scholar of the Middle East, Ajami, now at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, lacks entirely the condescension of the typical in-the-know Western expert who blithely assures his American readers, often on the authority of little or no learning, of the irreducible alienness of Arab culture. Instead, the world that Ajami describes, once stripped of its veneer of religious pretense, is defined by many of the same impulses—honor, greed, selfinterest—that guide dueling Mafia families, rival Christian televangelists, and (for that matter) many ordinary people hungry for power. As an Arabic-speaker and native Middle Easterner, Ajami has enjoyed singular access to both Sunni and Shiite grandees, and makes effective use here of what they tell him. He also draws on a variety of contemporary written texts, mostly unknown by or inaccessible to Western authors, to explicate why many of the most backward forces in the Arab world are not in the least unhappy at the havoc wrought by the Sunni insurgency in Iraq.

The result, based on six extended visits to Iraq and a lifetime of travel and experience, is the best and certainly the most idiosyncratic recent treatment of the American presence there. Ajami’s thesis is straightforward. What brought George W. Bush to Iraq, he writes, was a belief in the ability of America to do something about a longstanding evil, along with a post-9/11 determination to stop appeasing terror-sponsoring regimes. That the United States knew very little about the bloodthirsty undercurrents of Shiite, Sunni, and Kurdish sectarianism, for years cloaked by Saddam’s barbaric rule—the dictator “had given the Arabs a cruel view of history,” one saturated in “iron and fire and bigotry”—did not necessarily doom the effort to failure. The idealism and skill of American soldiers, and the enormous power and capital that stood behind them, counted, and still count, for a great deal. More importantly, the threats and cries for vengeance issued by various Arab spokesmen have often been disingenuous, serving to obfuscate the genuine desire of Arab peoples for consensual government (albeit on their own terms). In short, Ajami assures us, the war has been a “noble” effort, and will remain so whether in the end it “proves to be a noble success or a noble failure.”

Aside from the obvious reasons he adduces for this judgment—we have taken no oil, we have stayed to birth democracy, and we are now fighting terrorist enemies of civilization—there is also the fact that we have stumbled into, and are now critically influencing, the great political struggle of the modern Middle East. The real problem in that region, Ajami stresses, remains Sunni extremism, which is bent on undermining the very idea of consensual government—the “foreigner’s gift” of his title. Having introduced the concept of one person/one vote in a federated Iraq, America has not only empowered the perennially maltreated Kurds but given the once despised Iraqi Shiites a historic chance at equality. Hence the “rage against this American war, in Iraq itself and in the wider Arab world.”

No wonder, Ajami comments, that a “proud sense of violation [has] stretched from the embittered towns of the Sunni Triangle in western Iraq to the chat rooms of Arabia and to jihadists as far away from Iraq as North Africa and the Muslim enclaves of Western Europe.” Sunni, often Wahhabi, terrorists have murdered many moderate Shiite clerics, taken a terrible toll of Shiites on the street, and, with the clandestine aid of the rich Gulf sheikdoms, hope to prevail through the growing American weariness at the loss in blood and treasure. The worst part of the story, in Ajami’s estimation, is that the intensity of the Sunni resistance has fooled some Americans into thinking that we cannot work with the Shiites—or that our continuing to do so will result in empowering the Khomeinists in nearby Iran or its Hizballah ganglia in Lebanon. Ajami has little use for this notion. He dismisses the view that, within Iraq, a single volatile figure like Moqtadar al-Sadr is capable of sabotaging the new democracy (“a Shia community groping for a way out would not give itself over to this kind of radicalism”). Much less does he see Iraq’s Shiites as the religious henchmen of Iran, or consider Iraqi holy men like Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani or Sheikh Humam Hamoudi to be intent on establishing a theocracy. In common with the now demonized Ahmad Chalabi, Ajami is convinced that Iraqi Shiites will not slavishly follow their Khomeinist brethren but instead may actually subvert them by creating a loud democracy on their doorstep.

In general,according to Ajami, the pathologies of today’s Middle East originate with the mostly Sunni autocracies that threaten, cajole, and flatter Western governments even as they exploit terrorists to deflect popular discontent away from their own failures onto the United States and Israel. Precisely because we have ushered in a long-overdue correction that threatens not only the old order of Saddam’s clique but surrounding governments from Jordan to Saudi Arabia, we can expect more violence in Iraq.

What then to do? Ajami counsels us to ignore the cries of victimhood from yesterday’s victimizers, always to keep in mind the ghosts of Saddam’s genocidal regime, to be sensitive to the loss of native pride entailed in accepting our “foreigner’s gift,” and to let the Iraqis follow their own path as we eventually recede into the shadows. Along with this advice, he offers a series of first-hand portraits, often brilliantly subtle, of some fascinating players in contemporary Iraq. His meeting in Najaf with Ali al-Sistani discloses a Gandhi-like figure who urges: “Do everything you can to bring our Sunni Arab brothers into the fold.” General David Petraeus, the man charged with rebuilding Iraq’s security forces, lives up to his reputation as part diplomat, part drillmaster, and part sage as he conducts Ajami on one of his dangerous tours of the city of Mosul. On a C-130 transport plane, Ajami is so impressed by the bookish earnestness of a nineteen-year-old American soldier that he hands over his personal copy of Graham Greene’s The Quiet American (“I had always loved a passage in it about American innocence roaming the world like a leper without a bell, meaning no harm”).

There are plenty of tragic stories in this book. Ajami recounts the bleak genesis of the Baath party in Iraq and Syria, the brainchild of Sorbonne-educated intellectuals like Michel Aflaq and Salah al-Din Bitar who thought they might unite the old tribal orders under some radical antiWestern secular doctrine. Other satellite figures include Taleb Shabib, a Shiite Baathist who, like legions of other Arab intellectuals, drifted from Communism, Baathism, and panArabism into oblivion, his hopes for a Western-style solution dashed by dictatorship, theocracy, or both. Ajami bumps into dozens of these sorry men, whose fate has been to end up murdered or exiled by the very people they once sought to champion. There are much worse types in Ajami’s gallery. He provides a vividly repugnant glimpse of the awful alGhamdi tribe of Saudi Arabia. One of their number, Ahmad, crashed into the south tower of the World Trade Center on 9/11; another, Hamza, helped to take down Flight 93. A second Ahmad was the suicide bomber who in December 2004 blew up eighteen Americans in Mosul. And then there is Sheik Yusuf alQaradawi, the native Egyptian and resident of Qatar who in August 2004 issued a fatwa ordering Muslims to kill American civilians in Iraq. Why not kill them in Westernized Qatar, where they were far more plentiful? Perhaps because they were profitable to, and protected by, the same government that protected Qaradawi himself. Apparently, like virtue, evil too needs to be buttressed by hypocrisy.

The Foreigner’s Gift is not an organized work of analysis, its arguments leading in logical progression to a solidly reasoned conclusion. Instead, it is a series of highly readable vignettes drawn from Ajami’s serial travels and reflections. Which is hardly to say that it lacks a point, or that its point is uncontroversial—far from it. Critics will surely cite Ajami’s own Shiite background as the catalyst for his professed confidence in the emergence of Iraq’s Shiites as the stewards of Iraqi democracy. But any such suggestion of a hidden agenda, or alternatively of naiveté, would be very wide of the mark. What most characterizes Ajami is not his religious faith (if he has any in the traditional sense) but his unequalled appreciation of historical irony—the irony entailed, for example, in the fact that by taking out the single figure of Saddam Hussein we unleashed an unforeseen moral reckoning among the Arabs at large; the irony that the very vehemence of Iraq’s insurgency may in the end undo and humiliate it on its own turf, and might already have begun to do so; the irony that Shiite Iran may rue the day when its Shiite cousins in Iraq were freed by the Americans. When it comes to ironies, Ajami is clearly bemused that an American oilman, himself the son of a President who in 1991 called for the Iraqi Shiites to rise up and overthrow a wounded Saddam Hussein, only to stand by as they were slaughtered, should have been brought to exclaim in September 2003: “Iraq as a dictatorship had great power to destabilize the Middle East. Iraq as a democracy will have great power to inspire the Middle East.” Ajami himself is not yet prepared to say that Iraq will do so—only that, with our help, it just might. He needs to be listened to very closely.

The Clash
Fouad Ajami
The New York Times
January 6, 2008

It would have been unlike Samuel P. Huntington to say “I told you so” after 9/11. He is too austere and serious a man, with a legendary career as arguably the most influential and original political scientist of the last half century — always swimming against the current of prevailing opinion.

In the 1990s, first in an article in the magazine Foreign Affairs, then in a book published in 1996 under the title “The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order,” he had come forth with a thesis that ran counter to the zeitgeist of the era and its euphoria about globalization and a “borderless” world. After the cold war, he wrote, there would be a “clash of civilizations.” Soil and blood and cultural loyalties would claim, and define, the world of states.

Huntington’s cartography was drawn with a sharp pencil. It was “The West and the Rest”: the West standing alone, and eight civilizations dividing the rest — Latin American, African, Islamic, Sinic, Hindu, Orthodox, Buddhist and Japanese. And in this post-cold-war world, Islamic civilization would re-emerge as a nemesis to the West. Huntington put the matter in stark terms: “The relations between Islam and Christianity, both Orthodox and Western, have often been stormy. Each has been the other’s Other. The 20th-century conflict between liberal democracy and Marxist-Leninism is only a fleeting and superficial historical phenomenon compared to the continuing and deeply conflictual relation between Islam and Christianity.”

Those 19 young Arabs who struck America on 9/11 were to give Huntington more of history’s compliance than he could ever have imagined. He had written of a “youth bulge” unsettling Muslim societies, and young Arabs and Muslims were now the shock-troops of a new radicalism. Their rise had overwhelmed the order in their homelands and had spilled into non-Muslim societies along the borders between Muslims and other peoples. Islam had grown assertive and belligerent; the ideologies of Westernization that had dominated the histories of Turkey, Iran and the Arab world, as well as South Asia, had faded; “indigenization” had become the order of the day in societies whose nationalisms once sought to emulate the ways of the West.

Rather than Westernizing their societies, Islamic lands had developed a powerful consensus in favor of Islamizing modernity. There was no “universal civilization,” Huntington had observed; this was only the pretense of what he called “Davos culture,” consisting of a thin layer of technocrats and academics and businessmen who gather annually at that watering hole of the global elite in Switzerland.

In Huntington’s unsparing view, culture is underpinned and defined by power. The West had once been pre-eminent and militarily dominant, and the first generation of third-world nationalists had sought to fashion their world in the image of the West. But Western dominion had cracked, Huntington said. Demography best told the story: where more than 40 percent of the world population was “under the political control” of Western civilization in the year 1900, that share had declined to about 15 percent in 1990, and is set to come down to 10 percent by the year 2025. Conversely, Islam’s share had risen from 4 percent in 1900 to 13 percent in 1990, and could be as high as 19 percent by 2025.

It is not pretty at the frontiers between societies with dwindling populations — Western Europe being one example, Russia another — and those with young people making claims on the world. Huntington saw this gathering storm. Those young people of the densely populated North African states who have been risking all for a journey across the Strait of Gibraltar walk right out of his pages.

Shortly after the appearance of the article that seeded the book, Foreign Affairs magazine called upon a group of writers to respond to Huntington’s thesis. I was assigned the lead critique. I wrote my response with appreciation, but I wagered on modernization, on the system the West had put in place. “The things and ways that the West took to ‘the rest,’” I wrote, “have become the ways of the world. The secular idea, the state system and the balance of power, pop culture jumping tariff walls and barriers, the state as an instrument of welfare, all these have been internalized in the remotest places. We have stirred up the very storms into which we now ride.” I had questioned Huntington’s suggestion that civilizations could be found “whole and intact, watertight under an eternal sky.” Furrows, I observed, run across civilizations, and the modernist consensus would hold in places like India, Egypt and Turkey.

Huntington had written that the Turks — rejecting Mecca, and rejected by Brussels — would head toward Tashkent, choosing a pan-Turkic world. My faith was invested in the official Westernizing creed of Kemalism that Mustafa Kemal Ataturk had bequeathed his country. “What, however, if Turkey redefined itself?” Huntington asked. “At some point, Turkey could be ready to give up its frustrating and humiliating role as a beggar pleading for membership in the West and to resume its much more impressive and elevated historical role as the principal Islamic interlocutor and antagonist of the West.”

Nearly 15 years on, Huntington’s thesis about a civilizational clash seems more compelling to me than the critique I provided at that time. In recent years, for example, the edifice of Kemalism has come under assault, and Turkey has now elected an Islamist to the presidency in open defiance of the military-bureaucratic elite. There has come that “redefinition” that Huntington prophesied. To be sure, the verdict may not be quite as straightforward as he foresaw. The Islamists have prevailed, but their desired destination, or so they tell us, is still Brussels: in that European shelter, the Islamists shrewdly hope they can find protection against the power of the military.

“I’ll teach you differences,” Kent says to Lear’s servant. And Huntington had the integrity and the foresight to see the falseness of a borderless world, a world without differences. (He is one of two great intellectual figures who peered into the heart of things and were not taken in by globalism’s conceit, Bernard Lewis being the other.)

I still harbor doubts about whether the radical Islamists knocking at the gates of Europe, or assaulting it from within, are the bearers of a whole civilization. They flee the burning grounds of Islam, but carry the fire with them. They are “nowhere men,” children of the frontier between Islam and the West, belonging to neither. If anything, they are a testament to the failure of modern Islam to provide for its own and to hold the fidelities of the young.

More ominously perhaps, there ran through Huntington’s pages an anxiety about the will and the coherence of the West — openly stated at times, made by allusions throughout. The ramparts of the West are not carefully monitored and defended, Huntington feared. Islam will remain Islam, he worried, but it is “dubious” whether the West will remain true to itself and its mission. Clearly, commerce has not delivered us out of history’s passions, the World Wide Web has not cast aside blood and kin and faith. It is no fault of Samuel Huntington’s that we have not heeded his darker, and possibly truer, vision.

Fouad Ajami is a professor of Middle Eastern studies at the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, and the author, most recently, of “The Foreigner’s Gift.”

Samuel Huntington’s Warning
He predicted a ‘clash of civilizations,’ not the illusion of Davos Man.
Fouad Ajami
The WSJ
Dec. 30, 2008

The last of Samuel Huntington’s books — "Who Are We? The Challenges to America’s National Identity," published four years ago — may have been his most passionate work. It was like that with the celebrated Harvard political scientist, who died last week at 81. He was a man of diffidence and reserve, yet he was always caught up in the political storms of recent decades.

"This book is shaped by my own identities as a patriot and a scholar," he wrote. "As a patriot I am deeply concerned about the unity and strength of my country as a society based on liberty, equality, law and individual rights." Huntington lived the life of his choice, neither seeking controversies, nor ducking them. "Who Are We?" had the signature of this great scholar — the bold, sweeping assertions sustained by exacting details, and the engagement with the issues of the time.

He wrote in that book of the "American Creed," and of its erosion among the elites. Its key elements — the English language, Christianity, religious commitment, English concepts of the rule of law, the responsibility of rulers, and the rights of individuals — he said are derived from the "distinct Anglo-Protestant culture of the founding settlers of America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries."

Critics who branded the book as a work of undisguised nativism missed an essential point. Huntington observed that his was an "argument for the importance of Anglo-Protestant culture, not for the importance of Anglo-Protestant people." The success of this great republic, he said, had hitherto depended on the willingness of generations of Americans to honor the creed of the founding settlers and to shed their old affinities. But that willingness was being battered by globalization and multiculturalism, and by new waves of immigrants with no deep attachments to America’s national identity. "The Stars and Stripes were at half-mast," he wrote in "Who Are We?", "and other flags flew higher on the flagpole of American identities."

Three possible American futures beckoned, Huntington said: cosmopolitan, imperial and national. In the first, the world remakes America, and globalization and multiculturalism trump national identity. In the second, America remakes the world: Unchallenged by a rival superpower, America would attempt to reshape the world according to its values, taking to other shores its democratic norms and aspirations. In the third, America remains America: It resists the blandishments — and falseness — of cosmopolitanism, and reins in the imperial impulse.

Huntington made no secret of his own preference: an American nationalism "devoted to the preservation and enhancement of those qualities that have defined America since its founding." His stark sense of realism had no patience for the globalism of the Clinton era. The culture of "Davos Man" — named for the watering hole of the global elite — was disconnected from the call of home and hearth and national soil.

But he looked with a skeptical eye on the American expedition to Iraq, uneasy with those American conservatives who had come to believe in an "imperial" American mission. He foresaw frustration for this drive to democratize other lands. The American people would not sustain this project, he observed, and there was the "paradox of democracy": Democratic experiments often bring in their wake nationalistic populist movements (Latin America) or fundamentalist movements (Muslim countries). The world tempts power, and denies it. It is the Huntingtonian world; no false hopes and no redemption.

In the 1990s, when the Davos crowd and other believers in a borderless world reigned supreme, Huntington crossed over from the academy into global renown, with his "clash of civilizations" thesis. In an article first published in Foreign Affairs in 1993 (then expanded into a book), Huntington foresaw the shape of the post-Cold War world. The war of ideologies would yield to a civilizational struggle of soil and blood. It would be the West versus the eight civilizations dividing the rest — Latin American, African, Islamic, Sinic, Hindu, Orthodox, Buddhist and Japanese.

In this civilizational struggle, Islam would emerge as the principal challenge to the West. "The relations between Islam and Christianity, both orthodox and Western, have often been stormy. Each has been the other’s Other. The 20th-century conflict between liberal democracy and Marxist-Leninism is only a fleeting and superficial historical phenomenon compared to the continuing and deeply conflictual relation between Islam and Christianity."

He had assaulted the zeitgeist of the era. The world took notice, and his book was translated into 39 languages. Critics insisted that men want Sony, not soil. But on 9/11, young Arabs — 19 of them — would weigh in. They punctured the illusions of an era, and gave evidence of the truth of Huntington’s vision. With his typical precision, he had written of a "youth bulge" unsettling Muslim societies, and young, radicalized Arabs, unhinged by modernity and unable to master it, emerging as the children of this radical age.

If I may be permitted a personal narrative: In 1993, I had written the lead critique in Foreign Affairs of his thesis. I admired his work but was unconvinced. My faith was invested in the order of states that the West itself built. The ways of the West had become the ways of the world, I argued, and the modernist consensus would hold in key Third-World countries like Egypt, India and Turkey. Fifteen years later, I was given a chance in the pages of The New York Times Book Review to acknowledge that I had erred and that Huntington had been correct all along.

A gracious letter came to me from Nancy Arkelyan Huntington, his wife of 51 years (her Armenian descent an irony lost on those who dubbed him a defender of nativism). He was in ill-health, suffering the aftermath of a small stroke. They were spending the winter at their summer house on Martha’s Vineyard. She had read him my essay as he lay in bed. He was pleased with it: "He will be writing you himself shortly." Of course, he did not write, and knowing of his frail state I did not expect him to do so. He had been a source of great wisdom, an exemplar, and it had been an honor to write of him, and to know him in the regrettably small way I did.

We don’t have his likes in the academy today. Political science, the field he devoted his working life to, has been in the main commandeered by a new generation. They are "rational choice" people who work with models and numbers and write arid, impenetrable jargon.

More importantly, nowadays in the academy and beyond, the patriotism that marked Samuel Huntington’s life and work is derided, and the American Creed he upheld is thought to be the ideology of rubes and simpletons, the affliction of people clinging to old ways. The Davos men have perhaps won. No wonder the sorrow and the concern that ran through the work of Huntington’s final years.

Mr. Ajami is professor of Middle East Studies at The Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies. He is also an adjunct research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.

Robert Gates Is Right About Iraq
Fouad Ajami
The New Republic
June 3, 2011

The U.S. war in Iraq has just been given an unexpected seal of approval. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, in what he billed as his “last major policy speech in Washington,” has owned up to the gains in Iraq, to the surprise that Iraq has emerged as “the most advanced Arab democracy in the region.” It was messy, this Iraqi democratic experience, but Iraqis “weren’t in the streets shooting each other, the government wasn’t in the streets shooting its people,” Gates observed. The Americans and the Iraqis had not labored in vain; the upheaval of the Arab Spring has only underlined that a decent polity had emerged in the heart of the Arab world.

Robert Gates has not always been a friend of the Iraq war. He was a member in good standing, it should be recalled, of the Iraq Study Group, a panel of sages and foreign policy luminaries, co-chaired by James Baker and Lee Hamilton, who had taken a jaundiced view of the entire undertaking in Iraq. Their report endorsed a staged retreat from the Iraq war and an accommodation with Syria and Iran. When Gates later joined the cabinet of George W. Bush, after the “thumping” meted out to the Republicans in the congressional elections of 2006, his appointment was taken as a sharp break with the legacy of his predecessor, Donald Rumsfeld. It was an open secret that the outlook of the new taciturn man at the Department of Defense had no place in it for the spread of democracy in Arab lands. Over a long career, Secretary Gates had shared the philosophical approach of Zbigniew Brzezinski and Brent Scowcroft, peers of his and foreign policy “realists” who took the world as it is. They had styled themselves as unillusioned men who had thought that the Iraq war, and George W. Bush’s entire diplomacy of freedom, were projects of folly—romantic, self deluding undertakings in the Arab world.

To the extent that these men thought of the Greater Middle East, they entered it through the gateway of the Israeli-Palestinian struggle. The key to the American security dilemma in the region, they maintained, was an Arab-Israeli settlement that would drain the swamps of anti-Americanism and reconcile the Arab “moderates” to the Pax Americana. This was a central plank of the Iraq Study Group—the centrality of the Israeli-Palestinian issue to the peace of the region, and to the American position in the lands of Islam.

Nor had Robert Gates made much of a secret of his reading of Iran. He and Zbigniew Brzezinski had been advocates of “engaging” the regime in Tehran—this was part of the creed of the “realists.” It was thus remarkable that, in his last policy speech, Gates acknowledged a potentially big payoff of the American labor in Iraq: a residual U.S. military presence in that country as a way of monitoring the Iranian regime next door.

Is Gates right about both the progress in Iraq and the U.S. future in the country? In short, yes. The Iraqis needn’t trumpet the obvious fact in broad daylight, but the balance of power in the Persian Gulf would be altered for the better by a security arrangement between the United States and the government in Baghdad. The Sadrists have already labeled a potential accord with the Americans as a deal with the devil, but the Sadrists have no veto over the big national decisions in Baghdad. If the past is any guide, Prime Minister Nuri Al Maliki has fought and won a major battle with the Sadrists; he crushed them on the battlefield but made room for them in his coalition government, giving them access to spoils and patronage, but on his terms.

Democracy, it turns out, has its saving graces: Nuri Al Maliki need not shoulder alone the burden of sustaining a security accord with the Americans. He has already made it known that the decision to keep American forces in Iraq would depend on the approval of the major political blocs in the country, and that the Sadrists would have no choice but to accept the majority’s decision. The Sadrists would be left with the dubious honor of “resistance” to the Americans—but they would hold onto the privileges granted them by their access to state treasury and resources. Muqtada Al Sadr and the political functionaries around him know that life bereft of government patronage and the oil income of a centralized state is a journey into the wilderness.

There remains, of course, the pledge given by presidential candidate Barack Obama that a President Obama would liquidate the American military role in Iraq by the end of 2011. That pledge was one of the defining themes of his bid for the presidency, and it endeared him to the “progressives” within his own party, who had been so agitated and mobilized against the Iraq war. But Barack Obama is now the standard-bearer of America’s power. He has broken with the “progressives” over Afghanistan, the use of drones in Pakistan, Guantánamo, military tribunals, and a whole host of national security policies that have (nearly) blurred the line between his policies and those of his predecessor. The left has grumbled, but, in the main, it has bowed to political necessity. At any rate, the fury on the left that once surrounded the Iraq war has been spent; a residual American presence in Iraq would fly under the radar of the purists within the ranks of the Democratic Party. They will be under no obligation to give it their blessing. That burden would instead be left to the centrists—and to the Republicans.

It is perhaps safe to assume that Robert Gates is carrying water for the Obama administration—an outgoing official putting out some necessary if slightly unpalatable political truths. Gates is an intensely disciplined man; he has not been a free-lancer, but instead has forged a tight personal and political relationship with President Obama. His swan song in Washington is most likely his gift to those left with maintaining and defending the American position in Iraq and in the Persian Gulf.

It is a peculiarity of the American-Iraq relationship that it could yet be nurtured and upheld without fanfare or poetry. The Iraqis could make room for that residual American presence while still maintaining the fiction of their political purity and sovereignty. For their part, American officials could be discreet and measured; they needn’t heap praise on Iraq nor take back what they had once said about the war—and its costs and follies. Iraq’s neighbors would of course know what would come to pass. In Tehran, and in Arab capitals that once worried about an American security relationship with a Shia-led government in Baghdad, powers would have to make room for this American-Iraqi relationship. The Iranians in particular will know that their long border with Iraq is, for all practical purposes, a military frontier with American forces. It will be no consolation for them that this new reality so close to them is the work of their Shia kinsmen, who come to unexpected power in Baghdad.

The enemy will have a say on how things will play out for American forces in Iraq. Iran and its Iraqi proxies can be expected to do all they can to make the American presence as bloody and costly as possible. A long, leaky border separates Iran from Iraq; movement across it is quite easy for Iranian agents and saboteurs. They can come in as “pilgrims,” and there might be shades of Lebanon in the 1980s, big deeds of terror that target the American forces. The Iraqi government will be called upon to do a decent job of tracking and hunting down saboteurs and terrorists, as this kind of intelligence is not a task for American soldiers. This will take will and political courage on the part of Iraq’s rulers. They will have to speak well of the Americans and own up to the role that American forces are playing in the protection and defense of Iraq. They can’t wink at anti-Americanism or give it succor.

Even in the best of worlds, an American residual presence in Iraq will have its costs and heartbreak. But the United States will have to be prepared for and accept the losses and adversity that are an integral part of staying on, rightly, in so tangled and difficult a setting.

Fouad Ajami teaches at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He is also a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

The Men Who Sealed Iraq’s Fate
Fouad Ajami
The Wall Street Journal
June 15, 2014

Two men bear direct responsibility for the mayhem engulfing Iraq: Barack Obama and Nouri al-Maliki. The U.S. president and Iraqi prime minister stood shoulder to shoulder in a White House ceremony in December 2011 proclaiming victory. Mr. Obama was fulfilling a campaign pledge to end the Iraq war. There was a utopian tone to his pronouncement, suggesting that the conflicts that had been endemic to that region would be brought to an end. As for Mr. Maliki, there was the heady satisfaction, in his estimation, that Iraq would be sovereign and intact under his dominion.

In truth, Iraq’s new Shiite prime minister was trading American tutelage for Iranian hegemony. Thus the claim that Iraq was a fully sovereign country was an idle boast. Around the Maliki regime swirled mightier, more sinister players. In addition to Iran’s penetration of Iraqi strategic and political life, there was Baghdad’s unholy alliance with the brutal Assad regime in Syria, whose members belong to an Alawite Shiite sect and were taking on a largely Sunni rebellion. If Bashar Assad were to fall, Mr. Maliki feared, the Sunnis of Iraq would rise up next.

Now, even as Assad clings to power in Damascus, Iraq’s Sunnis have risen up and joined forces with the murderous, al Qaeda-affiliated Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), which controls much of northern Syria and the Iraqi cities of Fallujah, Mosul and Tikrit. ISIS marauders are now marching on the Shiite holy cities of Najaf and Karbala, and Baghdad itself has become a target.

In a dire sectarian development on Friday, Iraq’s leading Shiite cleric, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, called on his followers to take up arms against ISIS and other Sunni insurgents in defense of the Baghdad government. This is no ordinary cleric playing with fire. For a decade, Ayatollah Sistani stayed on the side of order and social peace. Indeed, at the height of Iraq’s sectarian troubles in 2006-07, President George W. Bush gave the ayatollah credit for keeping the lid on that volcano. Now even that barrier to sectarian violence has been lifted.

This sad state of affairs was in no way preordained. In December 2011, Mr. Obama stood with Mr. Maliki and boasted that "in the coming years, it’s estimated that Iraq’s economy will grow even faster than China’s or India’s." But the negligence of these two men—most notably in their failure to successfully negotiate a Status of Forces Agreement that would have maintained an adequate U.S. military presence in Iraq—has resulted in the current descent into sectarian civil war.

There was, not so long ago, a way for Mr. Maliki to avoid all this: the creation of a genuine political coalition, making good on his promise that the Kurds in the north and the Sunnis throughout the country would be full partners in the Baghdad government. Instead, the Shiite prime minister set out to subjugate the Sunnis and to marginalize the Kurds. There was, from the start, no chance that this would succeed. For their part, the Sunni Arabs of Iraq were possessed of a sense of political mastery of their own. After all, this was a community that had ruled Baghdad for a millennium. Why should a community that had known such great power accept sudden marginality?

As for the Kurds, they had conquered a history of defeat and persecution and built a political enterprise of their own—a viable military institution, a thriving economy and a sense of genuine national pride. The Kurds were willing to accept the federalism promised them in the New Iraq. But that promise rested, above all else, on the willingness on the part of Baghdad to honor a revenue-sharing system that had decreed a fair allocation of the country’s oil income. This, Baghdad would not do. The Kurds were made to feel like beggars at the Maliki table.

Sadly, the Obama administration accepted this false federalism and its façade. Instead of aiding the cause of a reasonable Kurdistan, the administration sided with Baghdad at every turn. In the oil game involving Baghdad, Irbil, the Turks and the international oil companies, the Obama White House and State Department could always be found standing with the Maliki government.

With ISIS now reigning triumphant in Fallujah, in the oil-refinery town of Baiji, and, catastrophically, in Mosul, the Obama administration cannot plead innocence. Mosul is particularly explosive. It sits astride the world between Syria and Iraq and is economically and culturally intertwined with the Syrian territories. This has always been Mosul’s reality. There was no chance that a war would rage on either side of Mosul without it spreading next door. The Obama administration’s vanishing "red lines" and utter abdication in Syria were bound to compound Iraq’s troubles.

Grant Mr. Maliki the harvest of his sectarian bigotry. He has ridden that sectarianism to nearly a decade in power. Mr. Obama’s follies are of a different kind. They’re sins born of ignorance. He was eager to give up the gains the U.S. military and the Bush administration had secured in Iraq. Nor did he possess the generosity of spirit to give his predecessors the credit they deserved for what they had done in that treacherous landscape.

As he headed for the exits in December 2011, Mr. Obama described Mr. Maliki as "the elected leader of a sovereign, self-reliant and democratic Iraq." One suspects that Mr. Obama knew better. The Iraqi prime minister had already shown marked authoritarian tendencies, and there were many anxieties about him among the Sunnis and Kurds. Those communities knew their man, while Mr. Obama chose to look the other way.

Today, with his unwillingness to use U.S. military force to save Syrian children or even to pull Iraq back from the brink of civil war, the erstwhile leader of the Free World is choosing, yet again, to look the other way.

Mr. Ajami, a senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, is the author, most recently, of "The Syrian Rebellion" (Hoover Press, 2012).

Voir aussi:

Fouad Ajami on America and the Arabs
Excerpts from the Middle Eastern scholar’s work in the Journal over nearly 30 years.
The Wall Street Journal

June 22, 2014

Editor’s note: Fouad Ajami, the Middle Eastern scholar and a contributor to these pages for 27 years, died Sunday at age 68. Excerpts from his writing in the Journal are below, and a related editorial appears nearby:

"A Tangled History," a review of Bernard Lewis’s book, "Islam and the West," June 24, 1993:

The book’s most engaging essay is a passionate defense of Orientalism that foreshadows today’s debate about multiculturalism and the study of non-Western history. Mr. Lewis takes on the trendy new cult led by Palestinian-American Edward Said, whose many followers advocate a radical form of Arab nationalism and deride traditional scholarship of the Arab world as a cover for Western hegemony. The history of that world, these critics insist, must be reclaimed and written from within. With Mr. Lewis’s rebuttal the debate is joined, as a great historian defends the meaning of scholarship and takes on those who would bully its practitioners in pursuit of some partisan truths.

" Barak’s Gamble," May 25, 2000:

It was bound to end this way: One day Israel was destined to vacate the strip of Lebanon it had occupied when it swept into that country in the summer of 1982. Liberal societies are not good at the kind of work military occupation entails.

"Show Trial: Egypt: The Next Rogue Regime?" May 30, 2001:

If there is a foreign land where U.S. power and influence should be felt, Egypt should be reckoned a reasonable bet. A quarter century of American solicitude and American treasure have been invested in the Egyptian regime. Here was a place in the Arab world—humane and tempered—where Pax Americana had decent expectations: support for Arab-Israeli peace, a modicum of civility at home.
Enlarge Image

Fouad Ajami Getty Images

It has not worked out that way: The regime of Hosni Mubarak has been a runaway ally. In the latest display of that ruler’s heavy handedness, Saad Eddin Ibrahim, a prominent Egyptian-American sociologist, has recently been sentenced to seven years’ imprisonment on charges of defaming the state. It was a summary judgment, and a farce: The State Security Court took a mere 90 minutes to deliberate over the case.

"Arabs Have Nobody to Blame But Themselves," Oct. 16, 2001:

A darkness, a long winter, has descended on the Arabs. Nothing grows in the middle between an authoritarian political order and populations given to perennial flings with dictators, abandoned to their most malignant hatreds. Something is amiss in an Arab world that besieges American embassies for visas and at the same time celebrates America’s calamities. Something has gone terribly wrong in a world where young men strap themselves with explosives, only to be hailed as "martyrs" and avengers.

"Beirut, Baghdad," Aug. 25, 2003:

A battle broader than the country itself, then, plays out in Iraq. We needn’t apologize to the other Arabs about our presence there, and our aims for it. The custodians of Arab power, and the vast majority of the Arab political class, never saw or named the terrible cruelties of Saddam. A political culture that averts its gaze from mass graves and works itself into self-righteous hysteria over a foreign presence in an Arab country is a culture that has turned its back on political reason.
Opinion Video

Editorial Page Editor Paul Gigot pays tribute to Middle East scholar Fouad Ajami. Photo credit: hoover.org

Yet this summer has tested the resolve of those of us who supported the war, and saw in it a chance to give Iraq and its neighbors a shot at political reform. There was a leap of faith, it must be conceded, in the argument that a land as brutalized as Iraq would manage to find its way out of its cruel past and, in the process, give other Arabs proof that a modicum of liberty could flourish in their midst.

"The Curse of Pan-Arabia," May 12, 2004:

Consider a tale of three cities: In Fallujah, there are the beginnings of wisdom, a recognition, after the bravado, that the insurgents cannot win in the face of a great military power. In Najaf, the clerical establishment and the shopkeepers have called on the Mahdi Army of Muqtada al-Sadr to quit their city, and to "pursue another way." It is in Washington where the lines are breaking, and where the faith in the gains that coalition soldiers have secured in Iraq at such a terrible price appears to have cracked. We have been doing Iraq by improvisation, we are now "dumping stock," just as our fortunes in that hard land may be taking a turn for the better. We pledged to give Iraqis a chance at a new political life. We now appear to be consigning them yet again to the same Arab malignancies that drove us to Iraq in the first place.

" Bush of Arabia," Jan. 8, 2008:

Suffice it for them that George W. Bush was at the helm of the dominant imperial power when the world of Islam and of the Arabs was in the wind, played upon by ruinous temptations, and when the regimes in the saddle were ducking for cover, and the broad middle classes in the Arab world were in the grip of historical denial of what their radical children had wrought. His was the gift of moral and political clarity. . . .

We scoffed, in polite, jaded company when George W. Bush spoke of the "axis of evil" several years back. The people he now journeys amidst didn’t: It is precisely through those categories of good and evil that they describe their world, and their condition. Mr. Bush could not redeem the modern culture of the Arabs, and of Islam, but he held the line when it truly mattered. He gave them a chance to reclaim their world from zealots and enemies of order who would have otherwise run away with it.

" Obama’s Afghan Struggle," March 20, 2009:

[President Obama] can’t build on the Iraq victory, because he has never really embraced it. The occasional statement that we can win over the reconcilables and the tribes in Afghanistan the way we did in the Anbar is lame and unconvincing. The Anbar turned only when the Sunni insurgents had grown convinced that the Americans were there to stay, and that the alternative to accommodation with the Americans, and with the Baghdad government, is a sure and widespread Sunni defeat. The Taliban are nowhere near this reckoning. If anything, the uncertain mood in Washington counsels patience on their part, with the promise of waiting out the American presence.

"Pax Americana and the New Iraq," Oct. 6, 2010:

The question posed in the phase to come will be about the willingness of Pax Americana to craft a workable order in the Persian Gulf, and to make room for this new Iraq. It is a peculiarity of the American presence in the Arab-Islamic world, as contrasted to our work in East Asia, that we have always harbored deep reservations about democracy’s viability there and have cast our lot with the autocracies. For a fleeting moment, George W. Bush broke with that history. But that older history, the resigned acceptance of autocracies, is the order of the day in Washington again.

It isn’t perfect, this Iraqi polity midwifed by American power. But were we to acknowledge and accept that Iraqis and Americans have prevailed in that difficult land, in the face of such forbidding odds, we and the Iraqis shall be better for it. We have not labored in vain.


Irak: Avec Assad, on voit bien ce qui arrive quand on laisse un dictateur en place (Blair: The problems don’t go away)

15 juin, 2014
https://scontent-a-fra.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfa1/v/t1.0-9/p526x296/10251955_4331484382353_3709743704406357175_n.jpg?oh=bf66b56099fe1878d3887fba6fb45110&oe=5428A333
L’Irak (…) pourrait être l’un des grands succès de cette administration. Joe Biden (10.02.10)
To begin withdrawing before our commanders tell us we are ready … would mean surrendering the future of Iraq to al Qaeda. It would mean that we’d be risking mass killings on a horrific scale. It would mean we’d allow the terrorists to establish a safe haven in Iraq to replace the one they lost in Afghanistan. It would mean increasing the probability that American troops would have to return at some later date to confront an enemy that is even more dangerous. George Bush (2007)
A number of scholars and former government officials take strong issue with the administration’s warning about a new caliphate, and compare it to the fear of communism spread during the Cold War. They say that although Al Qaeda’s statements do indeed describe a caliphate as a goal, the administration is exaggerating the magnitude of the threat as it seeks to gain support for its policies in Iraq. NYT (2005)
More than 600,000 Iraqi children have died due to lack of food and medicine and as a result of the unjustifiable aggression (sanction) imposed on Iraq and its nation. The children of Iraq are our children. You, the USA, together with the Saudi regime are responsible for the shedding of the blood of these innocent children.  (…) The latest and the greatest of these aggressions, incurred by the Muslims since the death of the Prophet (ALLAH’S BLESSING AND SALUTATIONS ON HIM) is the occupation of the land of the two Holy Places -the foundation of the house of Islam, the place of the revelation, the source of the message and the place of the noble Ka’ba, the Qiblah of all Muslims- by the armies of the American Crusaders and their allies.   (…) there is no more important duty than pushing the American enemy out of the holy land. Osama Bin Laden (1996)
Le peuple comprend maintenant les discours des oulémas dans les mosquées, selon lesquels notre pays est devenu une colonie de l’empire américain. Il agit avec détermination pour chasser les Américains d’Arabie saoudite. [...] La solution à cette crise est le retrait des troupes américaines. Leur présence militaire est une insulte au peuple saoudien. Ben Laden
Tuer les Américains et leurs alliés, qu’ils soient civils ou militaires, est un devoir qui s’impose à tout musulman qui le pourra, dans tout pays où il se trouvera. Ben Laden (février 1998)
27 août 1992 : les Etats-Unis, la Grande-Bretagne et la France mettent en place une autre zone d’exclusion aérienne, au sud du 32eme parallèle, avec l’objectif d’observer les violations de droits de l’homme à l’encontre de la population chiite.
3 septembre 1996 : en représailles à un déploiement de troupes irakiennes dans la zone nord, les Etats-Unis et la Grande-Bretagne ripostent militairement dans le sud et étendent la zone d’exclusion aérienne sud, qui passe du 32eme au 33eme parallèle. La France refuse cette extension, mais continue à effectuer des missions de surveillance aérienne au sud du 32ème parallèle..
27 décembre 1996 : Jacques Chirac décide de retirer la France du contrôle de la zone d’exclusion aérienne nord. Il justifie cette décision par le fait que le dispositif a changé de nature avec les bombardements de septembre, et que le volet humanitaire initialement prévu n’y est plus inclus. La France proteste par ailleurs contre la décision unilatérale des Etats-Unis et de la Turquie (avec l’acceptation de la Grande-Bretagne) d’augmenter la zone d’exclusion aérienne sud.
Michel Wéry
Les Etats-Unis n’ont pas envahi l’Irak mais sont intervenus dans un conflit déjà en cours.  Kiron Skinner (conseillère à la sécurité du président Bush)
Since a wounded Saddam could not be left unattended and an oil-rich Saudi Arabia could not be left unprotected, U.S. troops took up long-term residence in the Saudi kingdom, a fateful decision that started the clock ticking toward 9/11. As bin Laden himself explained in his oft-quoted 1996 fatwa, his central aim was “to expel the occupying enemy from the country of the two Holy places.”… Put another way, bin Laden’s casus belli was an unintended and unforeseen byproduct of what Saddam Hussein had done in 1990. The presence of U.S. troops in the land of Mecca and Medina had galvanized al-Qaeda, which carried out the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, which triggered America’s global war on terror, which inevitably led back to Iraq, which is where America finds itself today. In a sense, occupation was inevitable after Desert Storm; perhaps the United States ended up occupying the wrong country. … If the U.S. presence in Saudi Arabia sparked bin Laden’s global guerrilla war, America’s low threshold for casualties would serve as the fuel to keep it raging. … From bin Laden’s vantage point, America’s retreats from Beirut in the 1980s, Mogadishu in the 1990s and Yemen in 2000 were evidence of weakness. “When tens of your soldiers were killed in minor battles and one American pilot was dragged in the streets of Mogadishu, you left the area carrying disappointment, humiliation, defeat and your dead with you,” he recalled. “The extent of your impotence and weaknesses became very clear. It was a pleasure for the heart of every Muslim and a remedy to the chests of believing nations to see you defeated in the three Islamic cities of Beirut, Aden and Mogadishu.” … Hence, quitting Iraq could have dramatic and disastrous consequences – something like the fall of Saigon, Desert One, and the Beirut and Mogadishu pullouts all rolled into one giant propaganda victory for the enemy. Not only would it leave a nascent democracy unprotected from bin Laden’s henchmen, it would serve to confirm their perception that America is a paper tiger lacking the will to fight or to stand with those who are willing to fight. Who would count on America the next time? For that matter, on whom would America be able to count as the wars of 9/11 continue? … Finally, retreat also would re-energize the enemy and pave the way toward his ultimate goal. Imagine Iraq spawning a Balkan-style ethno-religious war while serving as a Taliban-style springboard for terror. Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, al-Qaeda’s top terrorist in Iraq, already has said, “We fight today in Iraq, and tomorrow in the land of the two Holy Places, and after there the West.” Alan W. Dowd
De même que les progressistes européens et américains doutaient des menaces de Hitler et de Staline, les Occidentaux éclairés sont aujourd’hui en danger de manquer l’urgence des idéologies violentes issues du monde musulman. Les socialistes français des années 30 (…) ont voulu éviter un retour de la première guerre mondiale; ils ont refusé de croire que les millions de personnes en Allemagne avaient perdu la tête et avaient soutenu le mouvement nazi. Ils n’ont pas voulu croire qu’un mouvement pathologique de masse avait pris le pouvoir en Allemagne, ils ont voulu rester ouverts à ce que les Allemands disaient et aux revendiquations allemandes de la première guerre mondiale. Et les socialistes français, dans leur effort pour être ouverts et chaleureux afin d’éviter à tout prix le retour d’une guerre comme la première guerre mondiale, ont fait tout leur possible pour essayer de trouver ce qui était raisonnable et plausible dans les arguments d’Hitler. Ils ont vraiment fini par croire que le plus grand danger pour la paix du monde n’était pas posé par Hitler mais par les faucons de leur propre société, en France. Ces gesn-là étaient les socialistes pacifistes de la France, c’était des gens biens. Pourtant, de fil en aiguille, ils se sont opposés à l’armée française contre Hitler, et bon nombre d’entre eux ont fini par soutenir le régime de Vichy et elles ont fini comme fascistes! Ils ont même dérapé vers l’anti-sémitisme pur, et personne ne peut douter qu’une partie de cela s’est reproduit récemment dans le mouvement pacifiste aux Etats-Unis et surtout en Europe. Un des scandales est que nous avons eu des millions de personnes dans la rue protestant contre la guerre en Irak, mais pas pour réclamer la liberté en Irak. Personne n’a marché dans les rues au nom des libertés kurdes. Les intérêts des dissidents libéraux de l’Irak et les démocrates kurdes sont en fait également nos intérêts. Plus ces personnes prospèrent, plus grande sera notre sécurité. C’est un moment où ce qui devrait être nos idéaux — les idéaux de la démocratie libérale et de la solidarité sociale — sont également objectivement notre intérêt. Bush n’a pas réussi à l’expliquer clairement, et une grande partie de la gauche ne l’a même pas perçu. Paul Berman
Ce n’est pas parce qu’une équipe de juniors porte le maillot des Lakers que cela en fait des Kobe Bryant. Je pense qu’il y a une différence entre les moyens et la portée d’un Ben Laden, d’un réseau qui planifie activement des attaques terroristes de grande envergure contre notre territoire, et ceux de jihadistes impliqués dans des luttes de pouvoir locales, souvent de nature ethnique. Barack Obama (janvier 2014)
Who Lost Iraq? You know who. (…) The military recommended nearly 20,000 troops, considerably fewer than our 28,500 in Korea, 40,000 in Japan, and 54,000 in Germany. The president rejected those proposals, choosing instead a level of 3,000 to 5,000 troops. A deployment so risibly small would have to expend all its energies simply protecting itself — the fate of our tragic, missionless 1982 Lebanon deployment — with no real capability to train the Iraqis, build their U.S.-equipped air force, mediate ethnic disputes (as we have successfully done, for example, between local Arabs and Kurds), operate surveillance and special-ops bases, and establish the kind of close military-to-military relations that undergird our strongest alliances. The Obama proposal was an unmistakable signal of unseriousness. It became clear that he simply wanted out, leaving any Iraqi foolish enough to maintain a pro-American orientation exposed to Iranian influence, now unopposed and potentially lethal. (…) The excuse is Iraqi refusal to grant legal immunity to U.S. forces. But the Bush administration encountered the same problem, and overcame it. Obama had little desire to. Indeed, he portrays the evacuation as a success, the fulfillment of a campaign promise. Charles Krauthammer
The prospect of Iraq’s disintegration is already being spun by the Administration and its media friends as the fault of George W. Bush and Mr. Maliki. So it’s worth understanding how we got here. Iraq was largely at peace when Mr. Obama came to office in 2009. Reporters who had known Baghdad during the worst days of the insurgency in 2006 marveled at how peaceful the city had become thanks to the U.S. military surge and counterinsurgency. In 2012 Anthony Blinken, then Mr. Biden’s top security adviser, boasted that, "What’s beyond debate" is that "Iraq today is less violent, more democratic, and more prosperous. And the United States is more deeply engaged there than at any time in recent history." Mr. Obama employed the same breezy confidence in a speech last year at the National Defense University, saying that "the core of al Qaeda" was on a "path to defeat," and that the "future of terrorism" came from "less capable" terrorist groups that mainly threatened "diplomatic facilities and businesses abroad." Mr. Obama concluded his remarks by calling on Congress to repeal its 2001 Authorization to Use Military Force against al Qaeda. If the war on terror was over, ISIS didn’t get the message. The group, known as Tawhid al-Jihad when it was led a decade ago by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, was all but defeated by 2009 but revived as U.S. troops withdrew and especially after the uprising in Syria spiraled into chaos. It now controls territory from the outskirts of Aleppo in northwestern Syria to Fallujah in central Iraq. The possibility that a long civil war in Syria would become an incubator for terrorism and destabilize the region was predictable, and we predicted it. "Now the jihadists have descended by the thousands on Syria," we noted last May. "They are also moving men and weapons to and from Iraq, which is increasingly sinking back into Sunni-Shiite civil war. . . . If Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki feels threatened by al Qaeda and a Sunni rebellion, he will increasingly look to Iran to help him stay in power." We don’t quote ourselves to boast of prescience but to wonder why the Administration did nothing to avert the clearly looming disaster. Contrary to what Mr. Blinken claimed in 2012, the "diplomatic surge" the Administration promised for Iraq never arrived, nor did U.S. weapons. "The Americans have really deeply disappointed us by not supplying the Iraqi army with the weapons and support it needs to fight terrorism," the Journal quoted one Iraqi general based in Kirkuk. That might strike some readers as rich coming from the commander of a collapsing army, but it’s a reminder of the price Iraqis and Americans are now paying for Mr. Obama’s failure to successfully negotiate a Status of Forces Agreement with Baghdad that would have maintained a meaningful U.S. military presence. A squadron of Apache attack helicopters, Predator drones and A-10 attack planes based in Iraq might be able to turn back ISIS’s march on Baghdad. WSJ
The president is in fact implementing the policy he promised. It was retrenchment by one word, retreat by another.[Obama’s policy is also what the American public showed in polls that it wants right now] ”It wants it, at least until it gets queasy by looking at the pictures they’ve been seeing tonight. George Will
 Affirmer, au bout de onze ans, que ce à quoi on assiste actuellement est le résultat de ce qui s’est produit à l’époque est aussi simpliste qu’insultant. Dans ce qui s’assimile à une perspective néocolonialiste postmoderne, ceci revient à suggérer que les Irakiens ne sont toujours pas en mesure d’assumer la responsabilité de leur propre pays. Abstraction faite de toutes les autres conséquences, l’invasion de 2003 n’en a pas moins donné aux Irakiens une possibilité d’autodétermination démocratique qu’ils n’auraient jamais eue sous Saddam Hussein. C’est cette démocratie imparfaite qui est menacée ; il faut à présent la conserver et l’améliorer. The Observer
Mosul’s fall matters for what it reveals about a terrorism whose threat Mr. Obama claims he has minimized. For starters, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) isn’t a bunch of bug-eyed "Mad Max" guys running around firing Kalashnikovs. ISIS is now a trained and organized army. The seizures of Mosul and Tikrit this week revealed high-level operational skills. ISIS is using vehicles and equipment seized from Iraqi military bases. Normally an army on the move would slow down to establish protective garrisons in towns it takes, but ISIS is doing the opposite, by replenishing itself with fighters from liberated prisons. An astonishing read about this group is on the website of the Washington-based Institute for the Study of War. It is an analysis of a 400-page report, "al-Naba," published by ISIS in March. This is literally a terrorist organization’s annual report for 2013. It even includes "metrics," detailed graphs of its operations in Iraq as well as in Syria. One might ask: Didn’t U.S. intelligence know something like Mosul could happen? They did. The February 2014 "Threat Assessment" by the Pentagon’s Defense Intelligence Agency virtually predicted it: "AQI/ISIL [aka ISIS] probably will attempt to take territory in Iraq and Syria . . . as demonstrated recently in Ramadi and Fallujah." AQI (al Qaeda in Iraq), the report says, is exploiting the weak security environment "since the departure of U.S. forces at the end of 2011." But to have suggested any mitigating steps to this White House would have been pointless. It won’t listen. In March, Gen. James Mattis, then head of the U.S. Central Command, told Congress he recommended the U.S. keep 13,600 support troops in Afghanistan; he was known not to want an announced final withdrawal date. On May 27, President Obama said it would be 9,800 troops—for just one year. Which guarantees that the taking of Mosul will be replayed in Afghanistan. Let us repeat the most quoted passage in former Defense Secretary Robert Gates’s memoir, "Duty." It describes the March 2011 meeting with Mr. Obama about Afghanistan in the situation room. "As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his," Mr. Gates wrote. "For him, it’s all about getting out." Daniel Henninger
Avec Assad, on voit justement ce qui arrive quand on laisse un dictateur en place. Les problèmes ne disparaissent pas tout seuls. Tony Blair
L’un des arguments des adversaires de l’intervention de 2003 est de dire que, puisque Saddam Hussein ne possédait aucune arme de destruction massive, l’invasion de l’Irak était injustifiée. D’après les rapports des inspecteurs internationaux, nous savons que, même si Saddam s’était débarrassé de ses armes chimiques, il avait conservé l’expertise et les capacités d’en produire. En 2011, si nous avions laissé Saddam au pouvoir, l’Irak aurait été lui aussi emporté par la vague des révolutions arabes. En tant que sunnite, Saddam aurait tout fait pour préserver son régime face à la révolte de la majorité chiite du pays. Pendant ce temps, de l’autre côté de la frontière, en Syrie, une minorité bénéficiant de l’appui des chiites s’accrocherait au pouvoir et tenterait de résister à la révolte de la majorité sunnite. Le risque aurait donc été grand de voir la région sombrer dans une conflagration confessionnelle généralisée dans laquelle les Etats ne se seraient pas affrontés par procuration, mais directement, avec leurs armées nationales. Tout le Moyen-Orient est en réalité engagé dans une longue et douloureuse transition. Nous devons nous débarrasser de l’idée que " nous " avons provoqué cette situation. Ce n’est pas vrai. (…) Nous avons aujourd’hui trois exemples de politique occidentale en matière de changement de régime dans la région. En Irak, nous avons appelé à un changement de régime, renversé la dictature et déployé des troupes pour aider à la reconstruction du pays. Mais l’intervention s’est révélée extrêmement ardue, et aujourd’hui le pays est à nouveau en danger. En Libye, nous avons appelé au changement de régime, chassé Kadhafi grâce à des frappes aériennes mais refusé d’envoyer des troupes au sol. Aujourd’hui, la Libye, ravagée par la violence, a exporté le désordre et de vastes quantités d’armes à travers l’Afrique du Nord et jusqu’en Afrique subsaharienne. En Syrie, nous avons appelé au changement de régime mais n’avons rien fait, et c’est le pays qui se trouve dans la situation la pire. (…) Il n’est pas raisonnable pour l’Occident d’adopter une politique d’indifférence. Car il s’agit, que nous le voulions ou pas, d’un problème qui nous concerne. Les agences de sécurité européennes estiment que la principale menace pour l’avenir proviendra des combattants revenant de Syrie. Le danger est réel de voir le pays devenir pour les terroristes un sanctuaire plus redoutable encore que ne l’était l’Afghanistan dans les années 1990. Mais n’oublions pas non plus les risques que fait peser la guerre civile syrienne sur le Liban et la Jordanie. Il était impossible que cet embrasement reste confiné à l’intérieur des frontières syriennes .Je comprends les raisons pour lesquelles, après l’Afghanistan et l’Irak, l’opinion publique est si hostile à une intervention militaire. Mais une intervention en Syrie n’était pas et n’est pas nécessairement obligée de prendre les formes qu’elle a prises dans ces deux pays. Et, chaque fois que nous renonçons à agir, les mesures que nous serons fatalement amenés à prendre par la suite devront être plus violente. (…) Nous devons prendre conscience que le défi s’étend bien au-delà du Moyen-Orient. L’Afrique, comme le montrent les tragiques événements au Nigeria, y est elle aussi confrontée. L’Extrême-Orient et l’Asie centrale également.L’Irak n’est qu’une facette d’une situation plus générale. Tous les choix qui s’offrent à nous sont inquiétants. Mais, depuis trois ans, nous regardons la Syrie s’enfoncer dans l’abîme et, pendant qu’elle sombre, elle nous enserre lentement et sûrement dans ses rets et nous entraîne avec elle. C’est pourquoi nous devons oublier les différends du passé et agir maintenant pour préserver l’avenir. Tony Blair

Attention: une débâcle peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où, suite au refus du premier ministre Maliki de tenir ses engagements pour l’intégration des Sunnites à la gestion du pays comme à la précipitation du président Obama d’évacuer les troupes américaines,  l’Irak est sur le point de rebasculer dans la plus violente des guerres civiles voire de passer sous la coupe de djihadistes qui, pour plus de 400 millions de dollars, viennent de se faire les banques de la deuxième ville du pays …

Et où, dans la logique de racisme caché qui leur est habituelle (certains peuples, on le sait, n’ont pas droit à la démocratie), nos belles âmes et stratèges en fauteuil ont bien sûr pour l’occasion ressorti leurs arguments contre l’option changement de régime qu’avaient il y a 11 ans choisie le président Bush et ses alliés britanniques ainsi qu’une coalition d’une  quarantaine de pays …

Pendant que de l’Afghanistan à l’Iran et à l’Ukraine, le Munichois en chef de la Maison Blanche multiplie les gestes d’apaisement …

Et que les différents pays occidentaux commencent à recevoir les premières fournées de diplômés du bourbier syrien

Remise des pendules à l’heure avec Tony Blair …

Qui rappelant à juste titre tant l’impéritie irakienne qu’américaine …

Mais ni la situation irakienne d’avant 2003 (les mêmes Alliés contraints d’assurer seuls de leurs bases en Arabie saoudite un embargo que personne, France comprise, ne respectait et fournissant de ce fait le prétexte aux attentats du 11/9) …

Ni hélas, de la Syrie au Nigéria ou ailleurs, les efforts habituels en coulisse de nos amis qataris ou syriens dans le financement des djihadistes …

A le mérite de mettre le doigt sur le noeud du problème …

A savoir, outre l’évident raté libyen, la Syrie qui justement avec Assad montre parfaitement ce qui arrive quand on laisse un dictateur en place …

 

Iraq, Syria and the Middle East
Tony Blair
Office of Tony Blair
Jun 14, 2014

The civil war in Syria with its attendant disintegration is having its predictable and malign effect. Iraq is now in mortal danger. The whole of the Middle East is under threat.

We will have to re-think our strategy towards Syria; support the Iraqi Government in beating back the insurgency; whilst making it clear that Iraq’s politics will have to change for any resolution of the current crisis to be sustained. Then we need a comprehensive plan for the Middle East that correctly learns the lessons of the past decade. In doing so, we should listen to and work closely with our allies across the region, whose understanding of these issues is crucial and who are prepared to work with us in fighting the root causes of this extremism which goes far beyond the crisis in Iraq or Syria.

It is inevitable that events in Mosul have led to a re-run of the arguments over the decision to remove Saddam Hussein in 2003. The key question obviously is what to do now. But because some of the commentary has gone immediately to claim that but for that decision, Iraq would not be facing this challenge; or even more extraordinary, implying that but for the decision, the Middle East would be at peace right now; it is necessary that certain points are made forcefully before putting forward a solution to what is happening now.

3/4 years ago Al Qaida in Iraq was a beaten force. The country had massive challenges but had a prospect, at least, of overcoming them. It did not pose a threat to its neighbours. Indeed, since the removal of Saddam, and despite the bloodshed, Iraq had contained its own instability mostly within its own borders.

Though the challenge of terrorism was and is very real, the sectarianism of the Maliki Government snuffed out what was a genuine opportunity to build a cohesive Iraq. This, combined with the failure to use the oil money to re-build the country, and the inadequacy of the Iraqi forces have led to the alienation of the Sunni community and the inability of the Iraqi army to repulse the attack on Mosul and the earlier loss of Fallujah. And there will be debate about whether the withdrawal of US forces happened too soon.

However there is also no doubt that a major proximate cause of the takeover of Mosul by ISIS is the situation in Syria. To argue otherwise is wilful. The operation in Mosul was planned and organised from Raqqa across the Syria border. The fighters were trained and battle-hardened in the Syrian war. It is true that they originate in Iraq and have shifted focus to Iraq over the past months. But, Islamist extremism in all its different manifestations as a group, rebuilt refinanced and re-armed mainly as a result of its ability to grow and gain experience through the war in Syria.

As for how these events reflect on the original decision to remove Saddam, if we want to have this debate, we have to do something that is rarely done: put the counterfactual i.e. suppose in 2003, Saddam had been left running Iraq. Now take each of the arguments against the decision in turn.

The first is there was no WMD risk from Saddam and therefore the casus belli was wrong. What we now know from Syria is that Assad, without any detection from the West, was manufacturing chemical weapons. We only discovered this when he used them. We also know, from the final weapons inspectors reports, that though it is true that Saddam got rid of the physical weapons, he retained the expertise and capability to manufacture them. Is it likely that, knowing what we now know about Assad, Saddam, who had used chemical weapons against both the Iranians in the 1980s war that resulted in over 1m casualties and against his own people, would have refrained from returning to his old ways? Surely it is at least as likely that he would have gone back to them.

The second argument is that but for the invasion of 2003, Iraq would be a stable country today. Leave aside the treatment Saddam meted out to the majority of his people whether Kurds, Shia or marsh Arabs, whose position of ‘stability’ was that of appalling oppression. Consider the post 2011 Arab uprisings. Put into the equation the counterfactual – that Saddam and his two sons would be running Iraq in 2011 when the uprisings began. Is it seriously being said that the revolution sweeping the Arab world would have hit Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, Syria, to say nothing of the smaller upheavals all over the region, but miraculously Iraq, under the most brutal and tyrannical of all the regimes, would have been an oasis of calm?

Easily the most likely scenario is that Iraq would have been engulfed by precisely the same convulsion. Take the hypothesis further. The most likely response of Saddam would have been to fight to stay in power. Here we would have a Sunni leader trying to retain power in the face of a Shia revolt. Imagine the consequences. Next door in Syria a Shia backed minority would be clinging to power trying to stop a Sunni majority insurgency. In Iraq the opposite would be the case. The risk would have been of a full blown sectarian war across the region, with States not fighting by proxy, but with national armies.

So it is a bizarre reading of the cauldron that is the Middle East today, to claim that but for the removal of Saddam, we would not have a crisis.

And it is here that if we want the right policy for the future, we have to learn properly the lessons not just of Iraq in 2003 but of the Arab uprisings from 2011 onwards.

The reality is that the whole of the Middle East and beyond is going through a huge, agonising and protracted transition. We have to liberate ourselves from the notion that ‘we’ have caused this. We haven’t. We can argue as to whether our policies at points have helped or not; and whether action or inaction is the best policy and there is a lot to be said on both sides. But the fundamental cause of the crisis lies within the region not outside it.

The problems of the Middle East are the product of bad systems of politics mixed with a bad abuse of religion going back over a long time. Poor governance, weak institutions, oppressive rule and a failure within parts of Islam to work out a sensible relationship between religion and Government have combined to create countries which are simply unprepared for the modern world. Put into that mix, young populations with no effective job opportunities and education systems that do not correspond to the requirements of the future economy, and you have a toxic, inherently unstable matrix of factors that was always – repeat always – going to lead to a revolution.

But because of the way these factors interrelate, the revolution was never going to be straightforward. This is the true lesson of Iraq. But it is also the lesson from the whole of the so-called Arab Spring. The fact is that as a result of the way these societies have developed and because Islamism of various descriptions became the focal point of opposition to oppression, the removal of the dictatorship is only the beginning not the end of the challenge. Once the regime changes, then out come pouring all the tensions – tribal, ethnic and of course above all religious; and the rebuilding of the country, with functioning institutions and systems of Government, becomes incredibly hard. The extremism de-stabilises the country, hinders the attempts at development, the sectarian divisions become even more acute and the result is the mess we see all over the region. And beyond it. Look at Pakistan or Afghanistan and the same elements are present.

Understanding this and analysing properly what has happened, is absolutely vital to the severe challenge of working out what we can do about it. So rather than continuing to re-run the debate over Iraq from over 11 years ago, realise that whatever we had done or not done, we would be facing a big challenge today.

Indeed we now have three examples of Western policy towards regime change in the region. In Iraq, we called for the regime to change, removed it and put in troops to try to rebuild the country. But intervention proved very tough and today the country is at risk again. In Libya, we called for the regime to change, we removed it by airpower, but refused to put in troops and now Libya is racked by instability, violence and has exported vast amounts of trouble and weapons across North Africa and down into sub- Saharan Africa. In Syria we called for the regime to change, took no action and it is in the worst state of all.

And when we do act, it is often difficult to discern the governing principles of action. Gaddafi, who in 2003 had given up his WMD and cooperated with us in the fight against terrorism, is removed by us on the basis he threatens to kill his people but Assad, who actually kills his people on a vast scale including with chemical weapons, is left in power.

So what does all this mean? How do we make sense of it? I speak with humility on this issue because I went through the post 9/11 world and know how tough the decisions are in respect of it. But I have also, since leaving office, spent a great deal of time in the region and have studied its dynamics carefully.

The beginning of understanding is to appreciate that resolving this situation is immensely complex. This is a generation long struggle. It is not a ‘war’ which you win or lose in some clear and clean-cut way. There is no easy or painless solution. Intervention is hard. Partial intervention is hard. Non-intervention is hard.

Ok, so if it is that hard, why not stay out of it all, the current default position of the West? The answer is because the outcome of this long transition impacts us profoundly. At its simplest, the jihadist groups are never going to leave us alone. 9/11 happened for a reason. That reason and the ideology behind it have not disappeared.

However more than that, in this struggle will be decided many things: the fate of individual countries, the future of the Middle East, and the direction of the relationship between politics and the religion of Islam. This last point will affect us in a large number of ways. It will affect the radicalism within our own societies which now have significant Muslim populations. And it will affect how Islam develops across the world. If the extremism is defeated in the Middle East it will eventually be defeated the world over, because this region is its spiritual home and from this region has been spread the extremist message.

There is no sensible policy for the West based on indifference. This is, in part, our struggle, whether we like it or not.

Already the security agencies of Europe believe our biggest future threat will come from returning fighters from Syria. There is a real risk that Syria becomes a haven for terrorism worse than Afghanistan in the 1990s. But think also of the effect that Syria is having on the Lebanon and Jordan. There is no way this conflagration was ever going to stay confined to Syria. I understand all the reasons following Afghanistan and Iraq why public opinion was so hostile to involvement. Action in Syria did not and need not be as in those military engagements. But every time we put off action, the action we will be forced to take will ultimately be greater.

On the immediate challenge President Obama is right to put all options on the table in respect of Iraq, including military strikes on the extremists; and right also to insist on a change in the way the Iraqi Government takes responsibility for the politics of the country.

The moderate and sensible elements of the Syria Opposition should be given the support they need; Assad should know he cannot win an outright victory; and the extremist groups, whether in Syria or Iraq, should be targeted, in coordination and with the agreement of the Arab countries. However unpalatable this may seem, the alternative is worse.

But acting in Syria alone or Iraq, will not solve the challenge across the region or the wider world. We need a plan for the Middle East and for dealing with the extremism world-wide that comes out of it.

The starting point is to identify the nature of the battle. It is against Islamist extremism. That is the fight. People shy away from the starkness of that statement. But it is because we are constantly looking for ways of avoiding facing up to this issue, that we can’t make progress in the battle.

Of course in every case, there are reasons of history and tribe and territory which add layers of complexity. Of course, too, as I said at the outset, bad governance has played a baleful role in exacerbating the challenges. But all those problems become infinitely tougher to resolve, when religious extremism overlays everything. Then unity in a nation is impossible. Stability is impossible. Therefore progress is impossible. Government ceases to build for the future and manages each day as it can. Division tears apart cohesion. Hatred replaces hope.

We have to unite with those in the Muslim world, who agree with this analysis to fight the extremism. Parts of the Western media are missing a critical new element in the Middle East today. There are people – many of them – in the region who now understand this is the battle and are prepared to wage it. We have to stand with them.

Repressive systems of Government have played their part in the breeding of the extremism. A return to the past for the Middle East is neither right nor feasible. On the contrary there has to be change and there will be. However, we have to have a more graduated approach, which tries to help change happen without the chaos.

We were naïve about the Arab uprisings which began in 2011. Evolution is preferable to revolution. I said this at the time, precisely because of what we learnt from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Sometimes evolution is not possible. But where we can, we should be helping countries make steady progress towards change. We should be actively trying to encourage and help the reform process and using the full weight of the international community to do so.

Where there has been revolution, we have to be clear we will not support systems or Governments based on sectarian religious politics.

Where the extremists are fighting, they have to be countered hard, with force. This does not mean Western troops as in Iraq. There are masses of responses we can make short of that. But they need to know that wherever they’re engaged in terror, we will be hitting them.

Longer term, we have to make a concerted effort to reform the education systems, formal and informal which are giving rise to the extremism. It should be part of our dialogue and partnership with all nations that we expect education to be open-minded and respectful of difference whether of faith culture or race. We should make sure our systems reflect these values; they should do the same. This is the very reason why, after I left office I established a Foundation now active in the education systems of over 20 different countries, including in the Middle East, promoting a programme of religious and cultural co-existence.

We should make this a focal point of cooperation between East and West. China, Russia, Europe and the USA all have the same challenge of extremism. For the avoidance of doubt, I am neither minimising our differences especially over issues like Ukraine, nor suggesting a weakening of our position there; simply that on this issue of extremism, we can and should work together.

We should acknowledge that the challenge goes far further afield than the Middle East. Africa faces it as the ghastly events in Nigeria show. The Far East faces it. Central Asia too.

The point is that we won’t win the fight until we accept the nature of it.

Iraq is part of a much bigger picture. By all means argue about the wisdom of earlier decisions. But it is the decisions now that will matter. The choices are all pretty ugly, it is true. But for 3 years we have watched Syria descend into the abyss and as it is going down, it is slowly but surely wrapping its cords around us pulling us down with it. We have to put aside the differences of the past and act now to save the future.

 Voir aussi:

Tony Blair: ‘We didn’t cause Iraq crisis’

The 2003 invasion of Iraq is not to blame for the violent insurgency now gripping the country, former UK prime minister Tony Blair has said.
BBC
15 June 2014

Speaking to the BBC’s Andrew Marr, he said there would still be a "major problem" in the country even without the toppling of Saddam Hussein in 2003.

Mr Blair said the current crisis was a "regional" issue that "affects us all".

And he warned against believing that if we "wash our hands of it and walk away, then the problems will be solved".

"Even if you’d left Saddam in place in 2003, then when 2011 happened – and you had the Arab revolutions going through Tunisia and Libya and Yemen and Bahrain and Egypt and Syria – you would have still had a major problem in Iraq," Mr Blair said.

"Indeed, you can see what happens when you leave the dictator in place, as has happened with Assad now. The problems don’t go away.

"So, one of the things I’m trying to say is – you know, we can rerun the debates about 2003 – and there are perfectly legitimate points on either side – but where we are now in 2014, we have to understand this is a regional problem, but it’s a problem that will affect us."

Syria is three years into a civil war in which tens of thousands of people have died and millions more have been displaced.

In August last year, a chemical attack near the capital Damascus killed hundreds of people.

In August, UK MPs rejected the idea of air strikes against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s government to deter the use of chemical weapons.

Writing on his website, the former prime minister warned that every time the UK puts off action, "the action we will be forced to take will be ultimately greater".
‘Hitting them’

He said the current violence in Iraq was the "predictable and malign effect" of inaction in Syria.

"We have to liberate ourselves from the notion that ‘we’ have caused this," he wrote. "We haven’t."

He said the takeover of Mosul by Sunni insurgents was planned across the Syrian border.

"Where the extremists are fighting, they have to be countered hard, with force," Mr Blair said.

The Sunni insurgents, from the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS), regard Iraq’s Shia majority as "infidels".

After taking Mosul late on Monday, and then Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit, the Sunni militants have pressed south into the ethnically divided Diyala province.

On Friday, they battled against Shia fighters near Muqdadiya – just 50 miles (80km) from Baghdad’s city limits.

Reinforcements from both the Iraqi army and Shia militias have arrived in the city of Samarra, where fighters loyal to ISIS are trying to enter from the north.

US deploys warship amid Iraq crisis

Mr Blair also told the BBC that the UK and its allies had to "engage" and try to "shape" the situation in Iraq and Syria.

"If you talk to security services in France and Germany and the UK, they will tell you their single biggest worry today are returning Jihadist fighters, our own citizens, by the way, from Syria," he said.

"So, we have to look at Syria and Iraq and the region in context. We have to understand what’s going on there and we have to engage".
‘Battle-hardened’

Civil war in Syria was "having its predictable and malign effect" and there was "no doubt that a major proximate cause of the takeover of Mosul by ISIS" was the situation in the country, Mr Blair said.

He said the operation in Mosul was planned and organised from Raqqa across the Syria border.

"The fighters were trained and battle-hardened in the Syrian war," he said.
Members of Iraqi security forces and tribal fighters take part in an intensive security deployment on the outskirts of Diyala province June 13, 2014. Thousands of Shias are reported to have volunteered to help halt the advance of ISIS
Iraqi policemen stand guard at a railway station in the capital Baghdad on June 14, 2014 The capital Baghdad is a tense place following the reverses for Iraqi government forces

The 2003 invasion of Iraq by British and US forces, on the basis that it had "weapons of mass destruction", has come back into focus as a result of the insurgency in the country.

The Iraq War has been the subject of several inquiries, including the Chilcot inquiry – which began in 2009 – into the UK’s participation in military action against Saddam Hussein and its aftermath.

Last month, the inquiry said details of the "gist" of talks between Tony Blair and former US president George Bush before the Iraq war are to be published.

Mr Blair has said he wants the Chilcot report to be published and he "resented" claims he was to blame for its slow progress.

Voir également:

Blair: Don’t blame me for meltdown in Iraq: Astonishing ‘essay’ by ex-PM: he says Obama quit too soon… and the UK should launch attacks
Former PM claims bungling Iraqi government has allowed Al Qaeda return
Blair said the alternative to not intervening in Iraq was a far worse option
Blair said West was wrong to topple Gadaffi instead of Bashar al-Assad
Mail On Sunday Reporter
14 June 2014

Tony Blair last night attacked ‘bizarre’ claims that his decision to go to war with Iraq in 2003 caused the current wave of violence in the country – and blamed everyone but himself for the crisis.

The former Prime Minister insisted he was right to topple Saddam Hussein with the US and said things would have been worse if the dictator had not been ousted from power a decade ago.

Mr Blair ended a week-long silence after mounting claims by diplomats and Labour MPs that his and Mr Bush’s handling of the Iraq War sowed the seeds of the attempt by the Al Qaeda-backed ISIS terror group to conquer Iraq. In a 2,800-word ‘essay’ on the new Middle East conflagration, Mr Blair refused to apologise and argued:

Barack Obama ordered US troops to leave Iraq too soon.
Britain and America must launch renewed military attacks in Iraq and Syria.
Al Qaeda was ‘beaten’ in Iraq thanks to the Blair-Bush war, but the bungling Iraqi government let them back in.

‘But every time we put off action, the action we will be forced to take will ultimately be greater. Instead of re-running the debate over Iraq from 11 years ago, we have to realise that whatever we had done or not done, we would be facing a big challenge today.

‘It is bizarre to claim that, but for the removal of Saddam, we would not have a crisis. We have to re-think our strategy towards Syria and support the Iraqi government in beating back the insurgency.

‘Extremist groups, whether in Syria or Iraq, should be targeted. However unpalatable this may seem, the alternative is worse.’

Mr Blair hit back at critics who say false claims that Saddam had deadly chemical weapons fatally undermined the Blair-Bush justification for the Iraq War. Turning the argument on its head, he said it was essential to picture Iraq with Saddam still in power: he had used chemical weapons before and would have done so again.

And, confronted by the ‘Arab Spring’ of 2011, Saddam would have provoked ‘a full-blown sectarian war across the region with national armies’. ‘We have to liberate ourselves from the notion that “we” have caused this – we haven’t,’ said Mr Blair.

And he pointed the finger of blame at Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki – and more pointedly at Mr Obama – for leaving Iraq defenceless.

‘Three or four years ago, Al Qaeda in Iraq was a beaten force. The sectarianism of the Maliki government snuffed out a genuine opportunity to build a cohesive Iraq. And there will be debate about whether the withdrawal of US forces happened too soon.’

Mr Blair poured scorned on the West’s decision to topple Libya’s Colonel Gaddafi who ‘gave up WMDs and co-operated in the fight against terrorism’ while letting Syria’s President Assad, who ‘kills his people on a vast scale including with chemical weapons’, off the hook.

‘There is no easy or painless solution. The Jihadist groups are never going to leave us alone. 9/11 happened for a reason.

‘This is, in part, our struggle, whether we like it or not.’

Obama was ‘right to put all options on the table in Iraq, including military strikes. The choices are all pretty ugly, but Syria is slowly but surely wrapping its cords around us, pulling us down with it. We have to act now to save the future.’

Reg Keys, whose ‘Red Cap’ soldier son Tom was killed in the Iraq War, told The Mail on Sunday last night: ‘I wondered when Blair would surface to try to justify himself. Before he and Bush kicked down the door on Iraq, Sunnis and Shias lived side by side. Now there is a power vacuum, which allows terrorists to walk into the country.

‘Saddam may have been an evil dictator, but Iraq needs a strong leader to keep the tensions in check. Blair installed a weak puppet government. When Tom was killed, the Iraqi police meant to be protecting the Red Caps’ position dropped their guns and ran. That is what the Iraqi forces did this week.’

Mr Keys added: ‘It is lamentable that Blair is still banging the WMD drum. He and Bush must take ultimate responsibility.’

Voir encore:

No Mr Blair. Your naive war WAS a trigger for this savage violence, writes CHRISTOPHER MEYER, Ambassador to the US during Iraq War

Christopher Meyer, Former British Ambassador To Washington
14 June 2014

Last year, on the 10th anniversary of the invasion of Iraq by American and British forces, Tony Blair sought to justify his decision to go to war by arguing that Iraq was a far better place for the removal of Saddam Hussein. ‘Think,’ he said ‘of the consequences of leaving that regime in power.’

In an echo of his former master’s voice, Alastair Campbell added for good measure: ‘Britain… should be really proud of the role we played in changing Iraq from what it was to what it is becoming.’

Today, neither Mr Blair nor Mr Campbell could utter such things without arousing the world’s bemusement and incredulity. Iraq is descending into such violence and disorder that its very existence as a sovereign country is under threat.

A savage, battle-hardened group of Sunni fundamentalists called ISIS (the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) have seized great swathes of territory in northern and central Iraq and are threatening Baghdad itself. By the time you read this, they may be inside the city walls. They have driven through the Iraqi army – trained and equipped by the US at vast expense – like a knife through butter.

At Friday prayers last week, the most senior Shia cleric in Iraq issued a call to arms. The scene is therefore set for outright civil war. Meanwhile, the Kurdish people of the north have exploited the chaos to seize the oil-producing city of Kirkuk and take another step forward in their ambition to become an independent nation.

There are many reasons for this disastrous state of affairs. Perhaps the most significant is the decision taken more than ten years ago by President George W Bush and Prime Minister Tony Blair to unseat Saddam Hussein without thinking through the consequences for Iraq of the dictator’s removal.

Like the entire Islamic world, Iraq is divided between two historic branches of the Muslim faith, the Sunni and the Shia. Though there have been periods of relative harmony, today the two denominations are in brutal competition with each other around the world, especially in the neighbouring Syria, where civil war has been raging for the past three years. The Syrian dictator, Bashar Al Assad, is Shia. The Syrian rebels are Sunni. In Iraq the government is Shia-dominated.

Underwriting the violence in both countries is the intense struggle for advantage between the two Middle Eastern superpowers, Saudi Arabia (Sunni) and Iran (Shia).

The situation is not unlike the violent rivalry of the 17th Century between Catholics and Protestants, which led to the ravaging of central Europe in the bloody 30 Years’ War.

ISIS have emerged from the cauldron of civil war in Syria where they control much of the east of the country. Their declared aim is to create from this territory and the neighbouring Sunni areas of northern and central Iraq a single fundamentalist state or ‘caliphate’, lying athwart the frontier between Iraq and Syria.

ISIS have proved so violent that they have been disowned even by Al Qaeda, the Sunni terrorist group from which they have sprung. But it is not through fanaticism and violence alone that they have been able to scatter the Iraqi army with such ease. ISIS have been operating in fertile territory.

For years, the Sunni provinces of Iraq have become increasingly disaffected from the Shia-controlled central government in Baghdad. The authoritarian Prime Minister al-Maliki has trampled on Sunni sensitivities and denied them the spoils of government. This has gone down very badly, given that under Saddam and the old Ottoman empire it was the Sunni who were on top.

Without the world really noticing, ISIS and its Sunni allies had already seized the town of Fallujah (scene of epic battles between the US Marines and insurgents ten years ago).

ISIS have benefited also from something that takes us back to the earliest days of the US/UK occupation – and to one of its greatest blunders. It appears that ISIS are fighting alongside, or even partly comprise, former members of Saddam Hussein’s army.

In the summer of 2003, the American Paul Bremer, who ran Iraq as President Bush’s representative and head of the Coalition Provisional Authority, issued two orders: The first sacked 50,000 members of Saddam’s ruling Ba’ath Party from their jobs as civil servants, teachers and administrators.

This made Iraq well-nigh ungovernable since it had been impossible under Saddam to hold a job of any responsibility without being a member of the Ba’ath party. Bremer’s order went further than de-Nazification in Germany after World War II.

The second order disbanded the Iraqi army, throwing 400,000 angry men on to the streets with their weapons. The order directly fuelled the eight-year insurgency against American and allied troops.

Some of the former Iraqi soldiers were recruited by the Iraqi branch of Al Qaeda, have been fighting in Syria and have now returned to Iraq with ISIS.

As the ISIS army marches south towards Baghdad, young men from the city scramble aboard a military truck to enlist in the army to help defend their homes

So, we are reaping what we sowed in 2003. This is not hindsight. We knew in the run-up to war that the overthrow of Saddam Hussein would seriously destabilise Iraq after 24 years of his iron rule.

For all his evil, he kept a lid on sectarian violence. Bush and Blair were repeatedly warned by their advisers and diplomats to make dispositions accordingly.

But, as we now know, very little was done until the last minute; and what was done, as in the case of Bremer’s edicts, simply made things far worse.

The White House and Downing Street were suffused with the naïve view that the introduction of parliamentary democracy would solve all Iraq’s problems. But you can’t introduce democracy like a fast-growing shrub. It takes generations to embed. Because political parties in Iraq have tended to form along ethnic and religious lines, democracy has, if anything, deepened the sectarianism.

The situation is full of ironies. The UK went along with the neocon claim after 9/11 that Saddam and Al Qaeda were collaborating, though there was not a shred of proof. Now an offshoot of Al Qaeda controls perhaps a third of the country and may yet enter Baghdad.

The unintended consequence of our invasion was to give Iran, a member of Bush’s ‘Axis of Evil’, dominant influence in Baghdad. Yet, on the principle that my enemy’s enemy is my friend, we in the West should welcome any efforts by Iran to halt the advance of ISIS.

None of this is nostalgia for Saddam Hussein (though women and religious minorities like Christians might take a different view). But, if the past 13 years have taught us anything, it is that we mess in other countries’ internal affairs at our peril.

Even with meticulous preparation, deep local knowledge and proper articulation between political goals and military means – all absent in Iraq and Afghanistan – military intervention will usually make things worse and create hatreds which are then played out in our own streets.

In 1999, in a speech in Chicago, Blair proclaimed his doctrine of intervention abroad in the name of liberal values. It became the philosophical underpinning for Britain’s invasion of Iraq.

The time has surely come to consign the Blair doctrine to the dustbin of history.

Voir de plus:

Iraq: Isis can be beaten and democracy restored
The Maliki government must win back the trust of its Sunni population to see off the threat of Islamic militants
The Observer
15 June 2014

The security situation in the northern half of Iraq is grave and worrying, but its wider dangers should not be exaggerated. Last week’s rapid advance of Sunni Muslim fighters of the hardline Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Isis) jihadist militia took Iraq’s army, politicians and western governments by surprise. In this fragile neighbourhood, surprises are always unnerving. The fall of Mosul, Iraq’s second city, undoubtedly dealt a body blow to the authority of the Baghdad government. The ensuing humanitarian problems are alarming, as are UN reports of atrocities committed by the Islamists. US weapons supplied to the Iraqi army have been seized by the militants, more cities and towns closer to the capital are under threat, and Kurdish forces are exploiting the turmoil to extend their territorial control around Kirkuk. The spectre of renewed sectarian warfare has been raised as Iraq’s majority Shia Muslim population is urged to take up arms. Beyond Iraq’s borders, national leaders from Tehran to Washington have begun to talk of direct military intervention, spurred by fears that Iraq may disintegrate – and by a sharp rise in the international oil price.

All serious stuff, for sure. Yet this is a moment to pause and think, not rush blindly in. On the ground, the Isis forces have made significant gains. But in total they are said to number no more than 7,000 men. They have no heavy weapons, no fighter aircraft, no attack helicopters. The further south they advance, the stiffer the resistance and the more stretched their lines of supply. They do not enjoy unanimous support among Sunnis, let alone Iraq’s other minorities. The city of Samarra, well to the north of Baghdad and a holy place for Shia Muslims, has become a first rallying point for government forces and volunteers. Iraq’s army, humiliated last week, nevertheless numbers more than 250,000 active service personnel. Once they recover from their Mosul funk, they should be more than a match for Isis. Despite what Isis says, Iraq is not Syria. With determination and the right kind of leadership, its always delicate balance of power may be restored in time.

In terms of the bigger picture, the suggestion that Iraq is about to implode as a unified nation state appears similarly overcooked. After the usual 48-hour delay while America caught up with events, Barack Obama signalled strong, albeit conditional, support for embattled Baghdad. So, too, did Iran, briefly raising the quixotic fantasy of a Tehran-Washington axis. Iran has its own interests to protect, of course, including its close alliance with the Shia-led government of prime minister Nouri al-Maliki. But like the US, it views the prospect of an unchecked Sunni insurgency raging through Iraq and Syria with alarm. China, often absent from the stage during international crises, also swiftly voiced its backing. As the biggest investor in Iraq’s oil industry, Beijing knows instability is bad for business. Even Saudi Arabia, Iran’s regional rival and foremost supporter of Syria’s armed Sunni opposition, could not abide the chaos that would follow an Iraqi implosion.

All these powers have a stake in holding Iraq together. In all probability, they will succeed. Efforts to keep events in Iraq in perspective have been further handicapped by overheated attempts in newsdesks far removed from the frontlines of Samarra and Tikrit to settle old scores. With barely disguised glee, some who opposed the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq now claim to see in the Isis phenomenon the final, cast-iron proof that George W Bush and Tony Blair were both reckless and wrong. Many who supported the war at the time have since changed their minds about the wisdom of that decision, including this newspaper.

But to claim, 11 years on, that what is happening now can be attributed to what was done then is both facile and insulting. It suggests, in a sort of inverted, postmodern neo-colonialism, that Iraqis remain incapable of assuming responsibility for their own country. The invasion, whatever else it did, gave Iraq the chance of democratic self-governance that it would never have experienced under Saddam Hussein. It is this imperfect democracy that is now under threat – and which must now be improved, even as it is preserved.

Iraq faces three immediate challenges. The first is how to win back the trust of Iraq’s Sunni population, largely alienated by the divisive, sectarian politics of the Maliki government. Isis did not succeed in Mosul and elsewhere by military superiority alone. It succeeded because it had the approval, or at least the temporary acquiescence, of Sunni tribal leaders and communities marginalised by Baghdad. In many cases, these are the same people who switched sides in 2007 to help the US defeat al-Qaida in Anbar province, during General David Petraeus’s "surge". Now they have switched back. But generally speaking, they do not support the extreme forms of Islamist rule advocated by Isis. To beat the jihadists, Baghdad’s Shia bosses must regain the Sunnis’ confidence.

A second challenge is to prevent Iraq’s Kurds discarding the post-Saddam agreements that facilitated the creation of the semi-autonomous Kurdish regional government in the north. Their bloodless takeover of Kirkuk, a city and oil-rich territory disputed through the ages by various ethnic and religious groups, represents a giant if unpremeditated step towards full independence for Kurdistan. That may or may not be a desirable long-term goal. But the way to achieve it is through negotiation and the ballot box, not via backdoor landgrabs. Third, as Obama made brutally clear, Iraq’s government can no longer rely upon an American or western security umbrella. Help may be forthcoming but, first, Iraq’s political leaders must help themselves.

A traumatic week has thus presented Iraq with an opportunity. It must defuse the time-bomb Isis has placed under the Iraqi state. This wholly attainable task should be undertaken primarily by Iraq’s armed forces. International security assistance should be offered, as well as humanitarian help – but immediate, direct western military intervention would be unwise. Iraq is also entitled to demand support from its regional neighbours, including improved co-operation in tackling the terrorist threat they all face. Most of all, however, Iraqis must seize this opportunity to renew, strengthen and broaden the country’s political leadership in order to end further destructive sectarian schisms. In this process, Maliki, as prime minister, has a key role to play. If he cannot do so, he should stand aside.

Voir par ailleurs:

Who’s to blame for Iraq crisis
Derek Harvey and Michael Pregent
CNN
June 12, 2014

Editor’s note: Derek Harvey is a former senior intelligence official who worked on Iraq from 2003-2009, including numerous assignments in Baghdad. Michael Pregent is a former U.S. Army officer and former senior intelligence analyst who worked on Iraq from 2003-2011, including in Mosul 2005-2006 and Baghdad in 2007-2010. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the authors.

(CNN) — Observers around the world are stunned by the speed and scope of this week’s assaults on every major city in the upper Tigris River Valley — including Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city — by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS. But they shouldn’t be. The collapse of the Iraqi government’s troops in Mosul and other northern cities in the face of Sunni militant resistance has been the predictable culmination of a long deterioration, brought on by the government’s politicization of its security forces.

The politicization of the Iraqi military

For more than five years, Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki and his ministers have presided over the packing of the Iraqi military and police with Shiite loyalists — in both the general officer ranks and the rank and file — while sidelining many effective commanders who led Iraqi troops in the battlefield gains of 2007-2010, a period during which al Qaeda in Iraq (the forerunner of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) was brought to the brink of extinction.

Al-Maliki’s "Shiafication" of the Iraqi security forces has been less about the security of Iraq than the security of Baghdad and his regime. Even before the end of the U.S.-led "surge" in 2008, al-Maliki began a concerted effort to replace effective Sunni and Kurdish commanders and intelligence officers in the key mixed-sect areas of Baghdad, Diyala and Salaheddin provinces to ensure that Iraqi units focused on fighting Sunni insurgents while leaving loyal Shiite militias alone — and to alleviate al-Maliki’s irrational fears of a military coup against his government.

In 2008, al-Maliki began replacing effective Kurdish commanders and soldiers in Mosul and Tal Afar with Shiite loyalists from Baghdad and the Prime Minister’s Dawa Party, and even Shiite militia members from the south. A number of nonloyalist commanders were forced to resign in the face of trumped up charges or reassigned to desk jobs and replaced with al-Maliki loyalists. The moves were made to marginalize Sunnis and Kurds in the north and entrench al-Maliki’s regime and the Dawa Party ahead of provincial and national elections in 2009, 2010 and 2013.

The dismantling of the ‘Awakening’

It’s no accident that there exists today virtually no Sunni popular resistance to ISIS, but rather the result of a conscious al-Maliki government policy to marginalize the Sunni tribal "Awakening" that deployed more than 90,000 Sunni fighters against al Qaeda in 2007-2008.

These 90,000 "Sons of Iraq" made a significant contribution to the reported 90% drop in sectarian violence in 2007-2008, assisting the Iraqi security forces and the United States in securing territory from Mosul to the Sunni enclaves of Baghdad and the surrounding Baghdad "belts." As the situation stabilized, the Iraqi government agreed to a plan to integrate vetted Sunni members of the Sons of Iraq into the Iraqi army and police to make those forces more representative of the overall Iraqi population.

But this integration never happened. Al-Maliki was comfortable touting his support for the Sons of Iraq in non-Shiite areas such as Anbar and Nineveh provinces, but he refused to absorb Sunnis into the ranks of the security forces along Shiite-Sunni fault lines in central Iraq.

In areas with (or near) Shiite populations, al-Maliki saw the U.S.-backed Sons of Iraq as a threat, and he systematically set out to dismantle the program over the next four years. As this process played out, we saw its effects firsthand in our interactions with Iraqi government officials and tribal leaders in Baghdad, where it was clear the Sons of Iraq were under increasing pressure from both the government and al Qaeda. By 2013, the Sons of Iraq were virtually nonexistent, with thousands of their sidelined former members either neutral or aligned with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in its war against the Iraqi government.

The disappearance of the Sons of Iraq meant that few Sunnis in western and northern Iraq had a stake in the defense of their own communities. The vast system of security forces and Sunni tribal auxiliaries that had made the Sunni provinces of Iraq hostile territory for al Qaeda was dismantled.

The militant gains in Mosul and other cities of the north and Anbar are the direct result of the removal of the Iraqi security forces commanders and local Sons of Iraq leaders who had turned the tide against al Qaeda in 2007-2008. Those commanders who had a reason to secure and hold territory in the north were replaced with al-Maliki loyalists from Baghdad who, when the bullets began to fly, had no interest in dying for Sunni and Kurdish territory. And when the commanders left the battlefield this week, their troops melted away as well.

What can be done?

The problem will only get worse in the coming months. Now that the Iraqi government’s weakness in Sunni territories has been exposed, other Sunni extremist groups are joining forces with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria to exploit the opening. The Baathist-affiliated Naqshbandi Army and the Salafist Ansar al-Sunna Army are reportedly taking part in the offensive as well, and they are drawing support from a Sunni population that believes itself persecuted and disenfranchised by al-Maliki’s government and threatened by Shiite militias that are his political allies.

For six months, Shiite militants have been allowed or encouraged by the government to conduct sectarian cleansing in mixed areas around Baghdad, particularly in Diyala province between Baghdad and the Iranian border. These events contributed to the motivation of Sunnis who have taken up arms or acquiesced in the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s offensive.

Even as the ISIS tide rolls southward down the Tigris, there is probably little danger of Baghdad and other Shiite areas falling into Sunni insurgent hands. The Shiite troops unwilling to fight to hold onto Mosul will be far more motivated to fight to protect Shiite territories in central and southern Iraq and to defend the sectarian fault line. This is their home territory, where they have the advantage of local knowledge, and where they have successfully fought the Sunni insurgency for years.

In the north, however, al-Maliki now has two military options. He can reconsolidate his shattered forces along sectarian fault lines to defend Shiite territories in central Iraq, ceding Sunni areas to the insurgency, or he can regroup his security forces at their bases north of Baghdad and mount expeditions to conduct "cordon and search" operations in Sunni areas lost to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

If al-Maliki chooses to regroup and move on Sunni population centers controlled by the ISIS, we are likely to see Shiite troops unfamiliar with Sunni neighborhoods employing heavy-handed tactics, bluntly targeting Sunni military-age males (12-60) not affiliated with the insurgency and further inflaming sectarian tensions as they do so — reminiscent of the situation in many parts of Iraq in 2005-2006.

The problem at its core is not just a matter of security, but politics. The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and its allies would not have had the opportunity to seize ground in the Sunni Arab-dominated provinces of Salaheddin, Nineveh and Anbar if there had been more inclusive and sincere political outreach to the mainstream Sunni Arab community.

In the end, the solution to the ISIS threat is a fundamental change in Iraq’s political discourse, which has become dominated by one sect and one man, and the inclusion of mainstream Sunni Arabs and Kurds as full partners in the state.

If al-Maliki truly wishes to restore government control to the Sunni provinces, he must reach out to Sunni and Kurdish leaders and ask for their help, and he must re-enlist former Sons of Iraq leaders, purged military commanders and Kurdish Peshmerga to help regain the territory they once helped the Iraqi government defend.

But these are steps a-Maliki has shown himself unwilling and unlikely to take. At this point, al-Maliki does not have what it takes to address Iraq’s problem — because he is the problem.

Voir encore:

While Obama Fiddles
The fall of Mosul is as big as Russia’s seizure of Crimea.
Daniel Henninger
WSJ

June 11, 2014

The fall of Mosul, Iraq, to al Qaeda terrorists this week is as big in its implications as Russia’s annexation of Crimea. But from the Obama presidency, barely a peep.

Barack Obama is fiddling while the world burns. Iraq, Pakistan, Ukraine, Russia, Nigeria, Kenya, Syria. These foreign wildfires, with more surely to come, will burn unabated for two years until the United States has a new president. The one we’ve got can barely notice or doesn’t care.

Last month this is what Barack Obama said to the 1,064 graduating cadets at the U.S. Military Academy: "Four and a half years later, as you graduate, the landscape has changed. We have removed our troops from Iraq. We are winding down our war in Afghanistan. Al Qaeda’s leadership on the border region between Pakistan and Afghanistan has been decimated."

That let-the-sunshine-in line must have come back to the cadets, when news came Sunday that the Pakistani Taliban, who operate in that border region between Pakistan and Afghanistan, had carried out a deadly assault on the main airport in Karachi, population 9.4 million. To clarify, the five Taliban Mr. Obama exchanged for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl are Afghan Taliban who operate on the other side of the border.

Within 24 hours of the Taliban attack in Pakistan, Boko Haram’s terrorists in Nigeria kidnapped 20 more girls, adding to the 270 still-missing—"our girls," as they were once known.

Then Mosul fell. The al Qaeda affiliate known as ISIS stormed and occupied the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, population 1.8 million and not far from Turkey, Syria and Iran. It took control of the airport, government buildings, and reportedly looted some $430 million from Mosul’s banks. ISIS owns Mosul.

Iraq’s army in tatters, ISIS rolled south Wednesday and took the city of Tikrit. It is plausible that this Islamic wave will next take Samarra and then move on to Baghdad, about 125 miles south of Tikrit. They will surely stop outside Baghdad, but that would be enough. Iraq will be lost.

Now if you want to vent about " George Bush’s war," be my guest. But George Bush isn’t president anymore. Barack Obama is because he wanted the job and the responsibilities that come with the American presidency. Up to now, burying those responsibilities in the sand has never been in the job description.

Mosul’s fall matters for what it reveals about a terrorism whose threat Mr. Obama claims he has minimized. For starters, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) isn’t a bunch of bug-eyed "Mad Max" guys running around firing Kalashnikovs. ISIS is now a trained and organized army.

The seizures of Mosul and Tikrit this week revealed high-level operational skills. ISIS is using vehicles and equipment seized from Iraqi military bases. Normally an army on the move would slow down to establish protective garrisons in towns it takes, but ISIS is doing the opposite, by replenishing itself with fighters from liberated prisons.

An astonishing read about this group is on the website of the Washington-based Institute for the Study of War. It is an analysis of a 400-page report, "al-Naba," published by ISIS in March. This is literally a terrorist organization’s annual report for 2013. It even includes "metrics," detailed graphs of its operations in Iraq as well as in Syria.

One might ask: Didn’t U.S. intelligence know something like Mosul could happen? They did. The February 2014 "Threat Assessment" by the Pentagon’s Defense Intelligence Agency virtually predicted it: "AQI/ISIL [aka ISIS] probably will attempt to take territory in Iraq and Syria . . . as demonstrated recently in Ramadi and Fallujah." AQI (al Qaeda in Iraq), the report says, is exploiting the weak security environment "since the departure of U.S. forces at the end of 2011." But to have suggested any mitigating steps to this White House would have been pointless. It won’t listen.

In March, Gen. James Mattis, then head of the U.S. Central Command, told Congress he recommended the U.S. keep 13,600 support troops in Afghanistan; he was known not to want an announced final withdrawal date. On May 27, President Obama said it would be 9,800 troops—for just one year. Which guarantees that the taking of Mosul will be replayed in Afghanistan.

Let us repeat the most quoted passage in former Defense Secretary Robert Gates’s memoir, "Duty." It describes the March 2011 meeting with Mr. Obama about Afghanistan in the situation room. "As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his," Mr. Gates wrote. "For him, it’s all about getting out."

The big Obama bet is that Americans’ opinion-polled "fatigue" with the world (if not his leadership) frees him to create a progressive domestic legacy. This Friday Mr. Obama is giving a speech to the Sioux Indians in Cannon Ball, N.D., about "jobs and education."

Meanwhile, Iraq may be transforming into (a) a second Syria or (b) a restored caliphate. Past some point, the world’s wildfires are going to consume the Obama legacy. And leave his successor a nightmare.

Voir enfin:

Iraq: Fall of Mosul Spells Disaster for U.S. Counterterrorism Policy

James Phillips

The Daily signal

June 11, 2014

James Phillips is the senior research fellow for Middle Eastern affairs at the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign Policy Studies at The Heritage Foundation. He has written extensively on Middle Eastern issues and international terrorism since 1978.

The sudden rout of Iraqi security forces in Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city, is a humiliating defeat for the Iraqi government, a severe blow to U.S. policy in Iraq, and a strategic disaster that will amplify the threat posed by al-Qaeda-linked terrorists to the United States and its allies.

The swift victory of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), formerly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq, demonstrates the growing threat posed by Islamist militants in the region and the risks inherent in the Obama Administration’s failure to maintain a residual U.S. military training and counterterrorism presence after the withdrawal of U.S. troops in 2011.

Iraqi security forces collapsed and retreated from Mosul in the face of ISIS militants recruited from Iraq, Syria, and foreign Sunni extremist movements. The defeat underscored the weakness of Iraq’s armed forces, which was apparent long before the U.S. withdrawal.

The insurgents not only captured significant amounts of arms and equipment abandoned by the demoralized security forces; they also seized about 500 billion Iraqi dinars (approximately $429 million) from Mosul’s central bank. This will make ISIS the richest terrorist group ever and enable it to further expand its power by buying the support of Sunni Iraqis disenchanted with the sectarian policies of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s Shia-dominated government.

Although the resurgence of ISIS has been enabled by Maliki’s heavy-handed rule and the spillover of the increasingly sectarian civil war in Syria, the Obama Administration also played a counterproductive role in downplaying the prospects for an al-Qaeda comeback in Iraq.

The Administration early on made it clear to Iraqis that it was more interested in “ending” rather than winning the war against al-Qaeda in Iraq. As Heritage Foundation analysts repeatedly warned, the abrupt U.S. troop withdrawal in 2011 deprived the Iraqi government of important counterterrorism, intelligence, and training capabilities that were needed to keep the pressure on al-Qaeda and allowed it to regain strength in a much more permissive environment.

Now ISIS, whose leader in 2012 threatened to attack the “heart” of America, poses a rising threat to U.S. security. The bottom line is that the Obama Administration’s rush to “end” the war in Iraq has helped create the conditions for losing the war against al-Qaeda.


Islam: Un universitaire égyptien prédit l’effondrement du monde musulman (The collapse of a house is a dangerous matter – and not just for its residents, warns Egyptian-German scholar)

31 mai, 2014
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/infocus/syria040513/s02_RTR3DAR3.jpg
http://www.jihadwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Muslims-in-Sweden.jpgMontre-moi que Mahomet ait rien institué de neuf : tu ne trouverais rien que de mauvais et d’inhumain, tel ce qu’il statue en décrétant de faire progresser par l’épée la croyance qu’il prêchait. Manuel II Paléologue (empereur byzantin, 1391)
Dans le septième entretien (dialexis — controverse) édité par le professeur Khoury, l’empereur aborde le thème du djihad, de la guerre sainte. Assurément l’empereur savait que dans la sourate 2, 256 on peut lire : « Nulle contrainte en religion ! ». C’est l’une des sourates de la période initiale, disent les spécialistes, lorsque Mahomet lui-même n’avait encore aucun pouvoir et était menacé. Mais naturellement l’empereur connaissait aussi les dispositions, développées par la suite et fixées dans le Coran, à propos de la guerre sainte. Sans s’arrêter sur les détails, tels que la différence de traitement entre ceux qui possèdent le « Livre » et les « incrédules », l’empereur, avec une rudesse assez surprenante qui nous étonne, s’adresse à son interlocuteur simplement avec la question centrale sur la relation entre religion et violence en général, en disant : « Montre-moi donc ce que Mahomet a apporté de nouveau, et tu y trouveras seulement des choses mauvaises et inhumaines, comme son mandat de diffuser par l’épée la foi qu’il prêchait ». L’empereur, après s’être prononcé de manière si peu amène, explique ensuite minutieusement les raisons pour lesquelles la diffusion de la foi à travers la violence est une chose déraisonnable. La violence est en opposition avec la nature de Dieu et la nature de l’âme. « Dieu n’apprécie pas le sang — dit-il —, ne pas agir selon la raison, sun logô, est contraire à la nature de Dieu. La foi est le fruit de l’âme, non du corps. Celui, par conséquent, qui veut conduire quelqu’un à la foi a besoin de la capacité de bien parler et de raisonner correctement, et non de la violence et de la menace… Pour convaincre une âme raisonnable, il n’est pas besoin de disposer ni de son bras, ni d’instrument pour frapper ni de quelque autre moyen que ce soit avec lequel on pourrait menacer une personne de mort… L’affirmation décisive dans cette argumentation contre la conversion au moyen de la violence est : ne pas agir selon la raison est contraire à la nature de Dieu. Benoit XVI (université de Ratisbonne, 1é septembre 2006)
La condition préalable à tout dialogue est que chacun soit honnête avec sa tradition. (…) les chrétiens ont repris tel quel le corpus de la Bible hébraïque. Saint Paul parle de " greffe" du christianisme sur le judaïsme, ce qui est une façon de ne pas nier celui-ci . (…) Dans l’islam, le corpus biblique est, au contraire, totalement remanié pour lui faire dire tout autre chose que son sens initial (…) La récupération sous forme de torsion ne respecte pas le texte originel sur lequel, malgré tout, le Coran s’appuie. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard
Quand les phénomènes s’exaspèrent, c’est qu’ils vont disparaitre. René Girard
Dire que l’islamisme n’est pas l’islam, qu’il n’a rien à voir avec l’islam, est faux. Pour le musulman d’hier et d’aujourd’hui il n’y a qu’un seul Coran comme il n’y a qu’un seul prophète. L’islamiste est autant musulman que le mystique car il s’appuie sur ces deux fondements. Et dans ces deux fondements il y a l’appel au combat. Ici-bas la guerre pour la victoire de l’islam doit être poursuivie tant que l’islam n’est pas entièrement victorieux. La paix n’est envisageable que si la victoire paraît, pour le moment, impossible ou douteuse (sourate 47, verset 35/37). Mais la paix sera plutôt une récompense du paradis, quand toute la terre aura été pacifiée. Comment passer sous silence que pour les musulmans le monde se partage entre le territoire de l’islam (dâr al-Islam) et le territoire non musulman, qualifié de territoire de la guerre (dâr al-harb). (…) Entre l’islam et l’islamisme, il n’y a pas de différence de nature mais de degré. L’islamisme est présent dans l’islam comme le poussin l’est dans l’oeuf. Il n’y a pas de bon ou mauvais islam, pas plus qu’il n’y a d’islam modéré. En revanche il y a des musulmans modérés, ceux qui n’appliquent que partiellement l’islam. (…) Pour accepter l’islam, l’Europe a forgé le mythe de l’Andalousie tolérante qui aurait constitué un âge d’or pour les trois religions. Tout ce qui concerne les combats, le statut humiliant du non musulman a été soigneusement gommé. Il s’agit d’une véritable falsification de l’histoire réelle. (…) Là où l’islam est particulièrement dangereux, c’est qu’il englobe toute la vie du croyant, du berceau jusqu’à la tombe, dans tous les domaines et qu’il n’y a pas de séparation entre le public et le privé, pas plus qu’il n’y a de séparation entre le politique et le religieux. L’islam est total, global, il englobe la totalité car tout comportement obéit à une règle. Mais en même temps chaque règle est une règle de comportement religieux, que cette règle soit dans le domaine juridique, politique ou intime. C’est le religieux qui recouvre tout. Le système pleinement réalisé devrait s’appeler théocratie et jamais «démocratie». On nous ment quand on nous affirme que l’islam serait une foi qui se pratique dans la sphère privée, comme le christianisme. L’islam est à la fois une foi, une loi, un droit (fiqh), lequel est l’application de la Loi qu’est la charî’a. Et cette charî’a a prescrit de combattre l’infidèle (jihâd ou qitâl), de lui réserver un traitement inégalitaire (dhimmî), d’appliquer aux musulmans des peines fixes (hudûd) pour des crimes bien définis (adultère (zinâ), apostasie (ridda), blasphème(tajdîf), vol (sariqah), brigandage (qat’ al-tarîq), meurtre (qatl) et bien sûr consommation d’alcool. (…) Pour expliquer les attentats, il suffit de se reporter à la vie du prophète, lequel a justifié l’assassinat politique pour le bien de l’islam. De même, faire peur, inspirer la terreur (rahbat) -dont on a tiré le mot moderne “terrorisme” (irhâb)- était la méthode que le noble modèle préconisait pour semer la panique chez les ennemis de l’islam. Anne-Marie Delcambre
L’idée selon laquelle la diffusion de la culture de masse et des biens de consommation dans le monde entier représente le triomphe de la civilisation occidentale repose sur une vision affadie de la culture occidentale. L’essence de la culture occidentale, c’est le droit, pas le MacDo. Le fait que les non-Occidentaux puissent opter pour le second n’implique pas qu’ils acceptent le premier. Samuel Huntington
Le titre m’est venu de la lecture de l’Apocalypse, du chapitre 20, qui annonce qu’au terme de mille ans, des nations innombrables venues des quatre coins de la Terre envahiront « le camp des saints et la Ville bien-aimée. Jean Raspail
Le 17 février 2001, un cargo vétuste s’échouait volontairement sur les rochers côtiers, non loin de Saint-Raphaël. À son bord, un millier d’immigrants kurdes, dont près de la moitié étaient des enfants. « Cette pointe rocheuse faisait partie de mon paysage. Certes, ils n’étaient pas un million, ainsi que je les avais imaginés, à bord d’une armada hors d’âge, mais ils n’en avaient pas moins débarqué chez moi, en plein décor du Camp des saints, pour y jouer l’acte I. Le rapport radio de l’hélicoptère de la gendarmerie diffusé par l’AFP semble extrait, mot pour mot, des trois premiers paragraphes du livre. La presse souligna la coïncidence, laquelle apparut, à certains, et à moi, comme ne relevant pas du seul hasard. Jean Raspail
Ce qui m’a frappé, c’est le contraste entre les opinions exprimées à titre privé et celles tenues publiquement. Double langage et double conscience… À mes yeux, il n’y a pire lâcheté que celle devant la faiblesse, que la peur d’opposer la légitimité de la force à l’illégitimité de la violence. Jean Raspail
Les pays arabes enregistrent un retard par rapport aux autres régions en matière de gouvernance et de participation aux processus de décision. La vague de démocratisation, qui a transformé la gouvernance dans la plupart des pays d’Amérique latine et d’Asie orientale dans les années quatre-vingts, en Europe centrale et dans une bonne partie de l’Asie centrale à la fin des années quatre-vingt et au début des années quatre-vingt-dix, a à peine effleuré les États arabes. Ce déficit de liberté va à l’encontre du développement humain et constitue l’une des manifestations les plus douloureuses du retard enregistré en terme de développement politique. La démocratie et les droits de l’homme sont reconnus de droit, inscrits dans les constitutions, les codes et les déclarations gouvernementales, mais leur application est en réalité bien souvent négligée, voire délibérément ignorée. Le plus souvent, le mode de gouvernance dans le monde arabe se caractérise par un exécutif puissant exerçant un contrôle ferme sur toutes les branches de l’État, en l’absence parfois de garde-fous institutionnels. La démocratie représentative n’est pas toujours véritable, et fait même parfois défaut. Les libertés d’expression et d’association sont bien souvent limitées. Des modèles dépassés de légitimité prédominent.(…) La participation politique dans les pays arabes reste faible, ainsi qu’en témoignent l’absence de véritable démocratie représentative et les restrictions imposées aux libertés. Dans le même temps, les aspirations de la population à davantage de liberté et à une plus grande participation à la prise de décisions se font sentir, engendrées par l’augmentation des revenus, l’éducation et les flux d’information. La dichotomie entre les attentes et leur réalisation a parfois conduit à l’aliénation et à ses corollaires, l’apathie et le mécontentement. (…) Deux mécanismes parallèles sont en jeu. La position de l’État tutélaire va en s’amenuisant, en partie du fait de la réduction des avantages qu’il est en mesure d’offrir aujourd’hui sous forme de garantie de l’emploi, de subventions et autres mesures incitatives. Par contre, les citoyens se trouvent de plus en plus en position de force étant donné que l’État dépend d’eux de manière croissante pour se procurer des recettes fiscales, assurer l’investissement du secteur privé et couvrir d’autres besoins essentiels. Par ailleurs, les progrès du développement humain, en dotant les citoyens, en particulier ceux des classes moyennes, d’un nouvel éventail de ressources, les ont placés en meilleure position pour contester les politiques et négocier avec l’État. Rapport arabe sur le développement humain 2002
C’est une expérience profondément émouvante d’être à Jérusalem, la capitale d’Israël. Nos deux nations sont séparées par plus de 5 000 miles. Mais pour un Américain à l’étranger, il n’est pas possible de ressentir un plus grande proximité avec les idéaux et les convictions de son propre pays qu’ici, en Israël. Nous faisons partie de la grande fraternité des démocraties. Nous parlons la même langue de liberté et de justice, et nous incarnons le droit de toute personne à vivre en paix. Nous servons la même cause et provoquons les mêmes haines chez les mêmes ennemis de la civilisation. C’est ma ferme conviction que la sécurité d’Israël est un intérêt vital de la sécurité nationale des États-Unis. Et notre alliance est une alliance fondée non seulement sur des intérêts communs, mais aussi sur des valeurs partagées. (…) Quand on vient ici en Israël et qu’on voit que le PIB par habitant est d’environ 21.000 dollars, alors qu’il est de l’ordre de 10.000 dollars tout juste de l’autre côté dans les secteurs gérés par l’Autorité palestinienne, on constate une différence énorme et dramatique de vitalité économique. (…) C’est la culture qui fait toute la différence. Et lorsque je regarde cette ville (Jérusalem) et tout ce que le peuple de cette nation (Israël) a accompli, je reconnais pour le moins la puissance de la culture et de quelques autres choses. Mitt Romney
Le discours de Mitt Romney à Jérusalem, et les déclarations à la presse qui l’ont accompagné n’en finissent décidément pas de faire des vagues. Mitt Romney a parlé du fait que le développement économique et la liberté qui règnent en Israël étaient dues à la culture, et que les handicaps qui marquent le monde musulman et qui touchent les « Palestiniens » auraient aussi une dimension culturelle. Des accusations de racisme ont aussitôt commencé à fuser. (…) Oui, certaines cultures sont plus propices que d’autres au développement économique et à la liberté sous toutes ses formes, et, n’en déplaise aux relativistes, la culture juive est une culture particulièrement propice. La culture du christianisme protestant est plus propice au développement économique et à la liberté que la culture du christianisme catholique, et lorsque des substrats culturels viennent s’ajouter, tels le caudillisme en Amérique latine, les handicaps peuvent devenir écrasants. Oui, les cultures marquées par le confucianisme peuvent susciter le développement économique, mais se trouver confrontées à des obstacles lorsqu’il s’agit de liberté, et cela explique les difficultés de sociétés asiatiques à passer à un fonctionnement post-industriel et post-asiatique. Et oui, hélas, le monde musulman, et en lui tout particulièrement le monde arabe, sont dans une situation de blocage culturel qui ne cesse de s’aggraver et prennent des allures cataclysmiques. Le monde arabe est aujourd’hui dans une phase d’effondrement économique qui s’accompagne d’un effondrement de ses structures politiques et d’une destruction de ses repères culturels. Il ne reste au milieu des décombres qu’une infime minorité de gens ouverts à l’esprit de civilisation et aux sociétés ouvertes, et une immense déferlante islamiste où se mêlent dans le ressentiment, le sectarisme et le tribalisme des gens désireux de revenir à une lecture littéraliste du Coran, des radicaux mélangeant Coran et texte de Marx, Lénine ou Franz Fanon, d’autres qui relisent leurs textes sacrés à la lumière noire de Hitler. Cet effondrement ne fait que commencer. Il va se poursuivre. La situation qui prévaut en Syrie n’en est qu’un fragment. D’autres fragments sont visibles en Libye, dans le Nord du Mali, au Nigeria où agissent les Boko Haram, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Yemen. Il est criminel de ne pas le comprendre. C’est suicidaire aussi. La Russie et la Chine essaient cyniquement de voir quels avantages elles peuvent tirer de l’effondrement et en quoi il peut leur permettre de parasiter le monde occidental. Les dirigeants européens s’essaient à rafistoler une zone euro et une Union Européenne qui sont elles-mêmes au bord de l’effondrement, et font semblant de croire encore aux « promesses du printemps arabe ». Manuel Valls, qui sortait sans doute d’un hôpital où il venait de subir une lobotomie, a parlé le 6 juillet en inaugurant de manière très laïque une mosquée à Cergy Pontoise de l’islam contemporain comme de l’hériter de celui de Cordoue où foisonnait la connaissance. Les dirigeants européens entendent aussi flatter les « Palestiniens » : s’ils ouvraient les yeux (c’est impossible, je sais), et s’ils actionnaient leurs neurones (ce qui est plus impossible encore, je ne l’ignore pas), ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » est en train de mourir et ne survit que grâce aux injections financières européennes et, pour partie, américaines. Ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » s’est développé dans les années mille neuf cent soixante quand le nationalisme arabe était soutenu par l’Union Soviétique. L’Union Soviétique n’existe plus. Le nationalisme arabe agonise dans les décombres de Damas. Guy Millière
La Scandinavie est un ensemble qui a connu une très forte émigration au XIXe siècle, contribuant notamment à peupler les Etats-Unis. Mais il n’y avait jamais eu de vrai phénomène d’immigration. Il est très amusant de comparer la diversité des noms de famille en France, où elle est infinie, et en Scandinavie, où il y a très peu de souches. Là-bas, l’immigration débute, même pas dans les années 50 comme au Royaume-Uni, mais seulement dans les années 70. Au début, ces social-démocraties qui n’ont pas eu de colonies ont accueilli à bras ouverts les immigrés avec des conditions très avantageuses. A ceci près que la masse d’arrivants s’est concentrée dans des zones déjà très peuplées : à l’échelle d’un pays, c’est peu, mais à celle de certains quartiers d’Oslo ou de Copenhague, l’équilibre s’est rompu. Par ailleurs, dans une société très ouverte et très égalitaire, la question du statut des femmes a vite posé problème. Les habitants n’ont pas supporté de voir ces femmes avec le voile noir intégral. Même si ces immigrés ne font rien de mal et vont faire leurs courses chez Ikea, la situation est devenue explosive. (…) [aux élections européennes] …Attendons de voir ces résultats pour en tirer des conclusions, mais on peut s’attendre à une poussée. Le suffrage se fait à la proportionnelle. Beaucoup de partis d’extrême droite sous-représentés en raison d’un scrutin majoritaire national vont donc se révéler. La France n’a que deux députés frontistes pour représenter 16% de la population. Le phénomène est le même en Grande-Bretagne, qui a connu une immigration record ces dernières années. Entre 1991 et 2011, la proportion de la population née à l’étranger est passée de 5,8 à 12,5%. Cela risque d’avoir des répercussions dans les urnes fin mai pour le British National Party [BNP] et le Parti pour l’indépendance du Royaume-Uni [Ukip]. Le vote Front national concerne seulement la partie ouest du Nord-Pas-de-Calais, c’est-à-dire, paradoxalement, la zone la plus développée, la mieux réaménagée, la plus agréable. Les centres-villes de Béthune ou de Lens sont devenus des endroits presque riants, alors qu’ils étaient plutôt déprimants. Tout a bougé, on a cassé des corons, et on a également beaucoup redistribué d’aides sociales. En revanche, la partie nord-est de la région est restée en l’état, fidèle au vote communiste. Cette stagnation n’a pas généré de frustrations. Car si personne n’évolue socialement, il n’y a pas non plus, contrairement à la partie ouest, de sentiment de déclassement. Béatrice Giblin
Les Français ont redit hier que la crise économique et sociale n’était rien à côté de la crise identitaire, liée à l’immigration massive et à la déculturation organisée. Les socialistes corsetés n’ont pas de réponse: Manuel Valls a répété qu’il ne changerait pas sa "feuille de route" et qu’il "demandait du temps". L’UMP, pour sa part,  avait un temps touché du doigt la bonne stratégie avec la "ligne Buisson", qui consistait à se dégager des interdits de penser. C’est elle qui s’avère plus nécessaire que jamais si la droite veut regagner la confiance. Pour l’UMP, c’est désormais une question de survie. Il n’est en tout cas pas pensable de répondre par l’immobilisme à cette crise de régime. Ceux qui dénoncent dans le FN le "rejet de l’autre" ne peuvent rejeter ce parti devenu majoritaire, à moins d’ostraciser "La France FN" (titre de Libération, ce lundi). D’autant que le procès en antisémitisme qui est fait par certains au mouvement de Marine Le Pen masque la réalité de la haine antijuive  qui s’observe dans des cités (deux jeunes frères portant la kippa ont été agressés samedi soir devant la synagogue de Créteil). Le "populisme" ne menace aucunement la démocratie, comme l’assurent les oligarques contestés par le peuple et qui s’accrochent, eux, à leur pouvoir. Le vrai danger est l’obscurantisme qui, à Bruxelles samedi, a assassiné quatre personnes, dont deux israéliens, au Musée Juif de la ville; or cette menace-là mobilise beaucoup moins les belles âmes. La diabolisation du mouvement de Marine Le Pen est une paresse intellectuelle des politiques et des médias. Ceux-là ont été ses meilleurs alliés, en instituant son parti comme unique formation à l’écoute des gens. L’échec confirmé de cette méthode oblige à y renoncer. Il est devenu, par la volonté des citoyens, un parti comme un autre. Il doit être jugé sur son programme. L’UMP devra s’en inspirer quand le FN parle de la France. Ivan Rioufol
Si les tendances à la fragmentation perdurent, le mouvement islamiste sera condamné, comme le fascisme et le communisme, à n’être rien de plus qu’une menace pour la civilisation, capable de causer des dommages considérables mais sans jamais pouvoir triompher. Ce frein potentiel au pouvoir islamiste, devenu manifeste seulement en 2013, ouvre la voie à l’optimisme mais pas à la complaisance. Même si les choses semblent meilleures qu’il y a un an, la tendance peut à nouveau s’inverser rapidement. La tâche ardue qui consiste à vaincre l’islamisme demeure une priorité. Daniel Pipes
Abdel-Samad avait prédit, avant le déclenchement des révolutions arabes, l’effondrement du monde musulman sous le poids d’un islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, et l’immigration massive vers l’Occident qui s’en suivrait. L’Occident a intérêt à soutenir les forces laïques et démocratiques dans le monde musulman. Et chez nous, il faut encourager la critique de l’islam au lieu de la réprimer sous prétexte de discours de haine. En apaisant les islamistes et en accommodant leurs demandes obscurantistes dans nos institutions, on ne fait que retarder un processus qui serait salutaire pour les musulmans eux-mêmes, et pour l’humanité. Al Masrd
In the western world, an astounding number of people believe that Islam is overpowering and on the rise. Demographic trends, along with bloody attacks and shrill tones of Islamist fundamentalists, seem to confirm that notion. In reality, however, it is the Islamic world which feels on the defensive and determined to protest vehemently against what it perceives as a western, aggressive style of power politics, including in the economic sphere. In short, a stunning pattern of asymmetric communication and mutual paranoia determines the relationship between (Muslim) East and (Christian) West — and has done so for generations. Regarding Islam, I think that in its present condition it may be many things, except for one — that it is powerful. Indeed, I view today’s Islam as seriously ill — and, both culturally and socially, as in retreat. It can offer few, if any, constructive answers to the questions of the 21st century and instead barricades itself behind a wall of anger and protest. The religiously motivated violence, the growing Islamization of public space and the insistence on the visibility of Muslim symbols are merely nervous reactions to this retreat. The rise of Islamism reflects little more than the profound lack of self-awareness and constructive real-life options for many young Muslims. For all the supposed glory and dynamism in the eyes of its acolytes, it is little more than the desperate act to paint a house in seemingly resplendent colors, while the house itself is about to topple onto itself. But no doubt about it, the collapse of a house is a dangerous matter — and not just for its residents. (…)  As far as I can tell, the “clash of civilizations” seized upon by the late Samuel Huntington has long become reality. But it is important to realize that it takes place not only between Islam and the West, as many suspected it, but also within the Islamic world itself. It is an inner-Islamic clash between individualism and conformity pressure, between continuity and innovation, modernity and the past. (…) Perversely, but predictably, the directly related lack of economic productivity and the growing popular discontent over the inability to tap into a gainful economic life help the radical Islamists to advance their cause. (…) When it comes to the future of Islam, I fear that the road to transformation and modernization will only be reached following a period of collapse. This is especially true in the Arab world, where the prospects for both regional and global advancement appear rather daunting, if not — for now — illusory. A rapidly growing, poor and oppressed population, a lagging educational sector, shrinking oil reserves and drastic climate change undermine any prospects for economic progress. In addition, these factors further intensify the existing regional and religious conflicts. The net effect of this could well be an increasing loss of relevance and authority of the state itself, which could lead to a significant spread of violence. The civil wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Algeria, Pakistan, Somalia and Sudan are just the beginning of it — although already a most ominous one. The present form of spiritual and material calcification leads me to make a prediction: Many Islamic countries will tumble, and Islam will have a hard time surviving as a political and social idea, and as a culture. What this does to the world community is difficult to assess. However, it is quite clear that this disintegration will result in one of the largest migrations in history. (And this is precisely where the circle of fear is getting closed again — from New York to Germany.) The downfall of the Islamic world would automatically mean that the waves of migration to Europe would increase significantly. For young Muslim immigrants, fleeing poverty and terrorism, Europe does indeed represent a hope for them, as does the United States. Still, they will not manage to shed themselves of their friend-foe thinking. They will migrate into a continent that they by and large despise — and that they hold responsible for their plight. Worse, neither the recipient country’s government institutions nor the long-established Muslim immigrants there can help them to integrate themselves. The spreading violence that came to the fore in the wake of the downfall of their home countries will simply be outsourced, mainly to Europe, because of its non-shielded immigrant situation. Saying so has nothing to do with scaremongering, but is an act of recognizing what’s real. In the ultimate analysis, it is the natural result of the imbalance in the world in which we live. The many sins of the West and the corresponding failures of the Islamic world itself, which are already the stuff of history for centuries, will become very visible again. This is the downside of the globalization process. Hard times await us on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea. Meanwhile, we are all running out of time. Hamed Abdel-Samad
Les musulmans ne cessent de se vanter d’avoir transmis la civilisation grecque et romaine aux Occidentaux, mais s’ils étaient vraiment porteurs de cette civilisation pourquoi ne l’ont-ils pas préservée, valorisée et enrichie afin d’en tirer le meilleur profit ? (…)  les diverses cultures contemporaines se fécondent mutuellement et s’épanouissent tout en se faisant concurrence, alors que la culture islamique demeure pétrifiée et hermétiquement fermée à la culture occidentale qu’elle qualifie et accuse d’être infidèle? (…) le caractère infidèle de la civilisation occidentale n’empêche pas les musulmans de jouir de ses réalisations et de ses produits, particulièrement dans les domaines scientifiques, technologiques et médicaux. Ils en jouissent sans réaliser qu’ils ont raté le train de la modernité lequel est opéré et conduit par les infidèles sans contribution aucune des musulmans, au point que ces derniers sont devenus un poids mort pour l’Occident et pour l’humanité entière. (…) comment l’élite éclairée dans le monde islamique et arabe saura-t-elle affronter cette réalité ? Hamed Abdel-Samad

Islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, absence de structures économiques assurant un réel développement, absence d’un système éducatif efficace, limitation sévère de la créativité intellectuelle  …

Alors qu’avance chaque jour un peu plus dans les marges de nos villes la contre-colonisation islamique …

Et qu’alimentées, de la Syrie à l’Afrique, par les pires conflits de la planète, les vagues d’immigration sauvages et massives prophétisées par Jean Raspail ont déjà commencé à atteindre nos rivages …

Pendant qu’entre Mohamed Merah en France et son possible émule il y  a une semaine à Bruxelles, les "soldats perdus du jihad" ont peut-être déjà commencé eux aussi à rapatrier leur violence dans nos centre-villes …

Et qu’après le discours de vérité de Benoit XVI sur l’islam et face à l’inquiétude qui monte de nos populations de souche, le Pape François comme nos belles âmes et nos médias nous ramènent à l’apaisement le plus servile …

Petite remise des pendules à l’heure avec l’universitaire égypto-allemand Hamed Abd el Samad

Qui, bien solitaire et au péril de sa vie, rappelait il y a trois ans  le caractère illusoire de l’apparente résurgence du monde islamique ..

Et confirmant, après le fameux rapport des Nations Unies d’il y a douze ans, les analyses tant critiquées de Huntington sur le choc des civilisations comme le lien décrit par René Girard entre l’exaspération et la disparition prochaine d’un phénomène …

Montrait que ledit conflit se joue aussi à l’intérieur du monde musulman lui-même et prédisait un effondrement dans les décennies à venir de la Maison-islam …

Aussi nécessaire et salutaire qu’hélas hautement risqué et dangereux …

Et ce pas seulement pour ses résidents …

Un universitaire égyptien prédit l’effondrement du monde musulman
Un article paru le 1er décembre 2010 dans le journal Al Marsd au sujet d’un livre du politologue allemand d’origine égyptienne, Abdel-Samad.

Abdel-Samad avait prédit, avant le déclenchement des révolutions arabes, l’effondrement du monde musulman sous le poids d’un islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, et l’immigration massive vers l’Occident qui s’en suivrait.L’Occident a intérêt à soutenir les forces laïques et démocratiques dans le monde musulman. Et chez nous, il faut encourager la critique de l’islam au lieu de la réprimer sous prétexte de discours de haine. En apaisant les islamistes et en accommodant leurs demandes obscurantistes dans nos institutions, on ne fait que retarder un processus qui serait salutaire pour les musulmans eux-mêmes, et pour l’humanité.

Hamed Abd el Samad, chercheur et professeur d’université résidant en Allemagne, a publié en décembre 2010 un ouvrage qu’il a intitulé «la chute du monde islamique». Dans son livre il pose un diagnostic sans concessions sur l’ampleur de la catastrophe qui frappera le monde islamique au cours des trente prochaines années. L’auteur s’attend à ce que cet évènement coïncide avec le tarissement prévisible des puits de pétrole au Moyen-Orient. La désertification progressive contribuerait également au marasme économique tandis qu’on assistera à une exacerbation des nombreux conflits ethniques, religieux et économiques qui ont actuellement cours. Ces désordres s’accompagneront de mouvements massifs de population avec une recrudescence des mouvements migratoires vers l’Occident, particulièrement en direction de l’Europe.

Fort de sa connaissance de la réalité du monde islamique, le professeur Abd el Samad en est venu à cette vision pessimiste. L’arriération intellectuelle, l’immobilisme économique et social, le blocage sur les plans religieux et politiques sont d’après lui les causes principales de la catastrophe appréhendée. Ses origines remontent à un millénaire et elle est en lien avec l’incapacité de l’islam d’offrir des réponses nouvelles ou créatives pour le bénéfice de l’humanité en général et pour ses adeptes en particulier.

À moins d’un miracle ou d’un changement de cap aussi radical que salutaire, Abd el Samad croit que l’effondrement du monde islamique connaîtra son point culminant durant les deux prochaines décennies. L’auteur égyptien a relevé plusieurs éléments lui permettant d’émettre un tel pronostic :

Absence de structures économiques assurant un réel développement
Absence d’un système éducatif efficace
Limitation sévère de la créativité intellectuelle

Ces déficiences ont fragilisé à l’extrême l’édifice du monde islamique, le prédisposant par conséquent à l’effondrement. Le processus de désintégration comme on l’a vu plus haut a débuté depuis longtemps et on serait rendu actuellement à la phase terminale.

L’auteur ne ménage pas ses critiques à l’égard des musulmans : «Ils ne cessent de se vanter d’avoir transmis la civilisation grecque et romaine aux Occidentaux, mais s’ils étaient vraiment porteurs de cette civilisation pourquoi ne l’ont-ils pas préservée, valorisée et enrichie afin d’en tirer le meilleur profit ?» Et il pousse le questionnement d’un cran : «Pourquoi les diverses cultures contemporaines se fécondent mutuellement et s’épanouissent tout en se faisant concurrence, alors que la culture islamique demeure pétrifiée et hermétiquement fermée à la culture occidentale qu’elle qualifie et accuse d’être infidèle?» Et il ajoute : «le caractère infidèle de la civilisation occidentale n’empêche pas les musulmans de jouir de ses réalisations et de ses produits, particulièrement dans les domaines scientifiques, technologiques et médicaux. Ils en jouissent sans réaliser qu’ils ont raté le train de la modernité lequel est opéré et conduit par les infidèles sans contribution aucune des musulmans, au point que ces derniers sont devenus un poids mort pour l’Occident et pour l’humanité entière.»

L’auteur constate l’impossibilité de réformer l’islam tant que la critique du coran, de ses concepts, de ses principes et de son enseignement demeure taboue ; cet état de fait empêche tout progrès, stérilise la pensée et paralyse toute initiative. S’attaquant indirectement au coran. l’auteur se demande quels changements profonds peut-on s’attendre de la part de populations qui sacralisent des textes figés et stériles et qui continuent de croire qu’ils sont valables pour tous les temps et tous les lieux. Ce blocage n’empêche pas les leaders religieux de répéter avec vantardise et arrogance que les musulmans sont le meilleur de l’humanité, que les non-musulmans sont méprisables et ne méritent pas de vivre ! L’ampleur de la schizophrénie qui affecte l’oumma islamique est remarquable.

L’auteur s’interroge : «comment l’élite éclairée dans le monde islamique et arabe saura-t-elle affronter cette réalité ? Malgré le pessimisme qui sévit parmi les penseurs musulmans libéraux, ceux-ci conservent une lueur d’espoir qui les autorise à réclamer qu’une autocritique se fasse dans un premier temps avec franchise, loin du mensonge, de l’hypocrisie, de la dissimulation et de l’orgueil mal placé. Cet effort doit être accompagné de la volonté de se réconcilier avec les autres en reconnaissant et respectant leur supériorité sur le plan civilisationnel et leurs contributions sur les plans scientifiques et technologiques. Le monde islamique doit prendre conscience de sa faiblesse et doit rechercher les causes de son arriération, de son échec et de sa misère en toute franchise afin de trouver un remède à ses maux.

Le professeur Abd el Samad ne perçoit aucune solution magique à la situation de l’oumma islamique tant que celle-ci restera attachée à la charia qui asservit, stérilise les esprits, divise le monde entre croyants musulmans et infidèles non-musulmans ; entre dar el islam et dar el harb (les pays islamiques et les pays à conquérir). L’auteur croit qu’il est impossible pour l’oumma islamique de progresser et d’innover avant qu’elle ne se libère de ses démons, de ses complexes, de ses interdits et avant qu’elle ne transforme l’islam en religion purement spirituelle invitant ses adeptes à une relation personnelle avec le créateur sans interférence de la part de quiconque fusse un prophète, un individu, une institution ou une mafia religieuse dans sa pratique de la religion ou dans sa vie quotidienne.

Source : أستاذ جامعي مصري يتنبأ بسقوط العالم الإسلامي خلال 30 سنة, Al-Masrd, 1 décembre 2010. Traduction de l’arabe par Hélios d’Alexandrie

Voir aussi:

Globalization and the Pending Collapse of the Islamic World

With which tools can Islam, in the eyes of the Islamists, actually conquer the world of today? Or can it?
Hamed Abdel-Samad

The Globalist

September 15, 2010

In the western world, an astounding number of people believe that Islam is overpowering and on the rise. Demographic trends, along with bloody attacks and shrill tones of Islamist fundamentalists, seem to confirm that notion.

In reality, however, it is the Islamic world which feels on the defensive and determined to protest vehemently against what it perceives as a western, aggressive style of power politics, including in the economic sphere.

In short, a stunning pattern of asymmetric communication and mutual paranoia determines the relationship between (Muslim) East and (Christian) West — and has done so for generations.

Regarding Islam, I think that in its present condition it may be many things, except for one — that it is powerful. Indeed, I view today’s Islam as seriously ill — and, both culturally and socially, as in retreat.

It can offer few, if any, constructive answers to the questions of the 21st century and instead barricades itself behind a wall of anger and protest.

The religiously motivated violence, the growing Islamization of public space and the insistence on the visibility of Muslim symbols are merely nervous reactions to this retreat.

The rise of Islamism reflects little more than the profound lack of self-awareness and constructive real-life options for many young Muslims.

For all the supposed glory and dynamism in the eyes of its acolytes, it is little more than the desperate act to paint a house in seemingly resplendent colors, while the house itself is about to topple onto itself.

But no doubt about it, the collapse of a house is a dangerous matter — and not just for its residents.

The key question is this: With which tools can Islam, in the eyes of the Islamists, actually conquer the world of today? After all, in the era of nanotechnology, demographics alone is no longer sufficient to determine the fate of the world.

To the contrary, the rise of half-educated masses without any real prospects for economic and social advancement in too many Muslim countries, in my view, is more of a burden on Islam than on the West.

True, there is a widespread trend which has much of the Islamic world disassociate itself from secular and scientific knowledge in a drastic manner — and which chooses to adopt a profoundly irreconcilable attitude to the spirit of modernity.

At the same time, for all their presumed backwardness and lack of perspective, young Muslims in many countries undergo a distinct individualization process.

True, that development primarily concerns those who are quite intense users of the Internet and who, depending on their personal financial situation, also tend to be devoted to buying modern consumer goods.

Either way, the outcome is a profound shift from the pre-Internet past: They no longer trust the old traditional structures.

These trends can ultimately bring about one of two possible outcomes — a move toward democratization or a step back toward mass fanaticism and violence.

Which outcome it will be depends first and foremost on the frameworks in which these young individuals find themselves.

What is as perplexing as it is remarkable is that, in key countries such as Iran and Egypt, the trend toward radicalization and the opposite outcome of young people managing to free themselves from outdated structures occur simultaneously.

Meanwhile, the battle lines between these two opposing outcomes have hardened more than ever before — and a bitter confrontation has become inevitable.

As far as I can tell, the “clash of civilizations” seized upon by the late Samuel Huntington has long become reality. But it is important to realize that it takes place not only between Islam and the West, as many suspected it, but also within the Islamic world itself.

It is an inner-Islamic clash between individualism and conformity pressure, between continuity and innovation, modernity and the past.

It would be naïve to assume that real political reform — and, along with it, a modernizing reform of Islam — are anything but in the rather distant future.

That will be the case as long as the education systems still favor pure loyalty over freer forms of thinking.

Perversely, but predictably, the directly related lack of economic productivity and the growing popular discontent over the inability to tap into a gainful economic life help the radical Islamists to advance their cause.

Even in the socially and politically better-off Gulf countries, the process of opening up is primarily undertaken by "virtue" of introducing modern consumer culture — rather than as a dynamic renewal of thought. (Hello China.)

The so-called reformers of Islam still dare not approach the fundamental problems of culture and religion. Reform debates are triggered frequently, but never completed.

Hardly anyone asks, “Is there possibly a fundamental shortcoming of our faith?” Hardly anyone dares to attack the sanctity of the Koran.

The Muslim World and the Titanic

Does Islam share the same fate as the Titanic?
Hamed Abdel-Samad

The Globalist

September 16, 2010

Comparing the Muslim world of today with the Titanic just before its sinking, some powerful parallels come to mind — sadly so.

That ship was all alone in the ocean, was considered invincible by its proud makers and yet suddenly became irredeemably tarnished in its oversized ambitions. Within a few seconds, it moved in its self-perception from world dominator to sailing helplessly in the icy ocean of modernity, without any concept of where a rescue crew could come from.

The passengers in the third-class cabins remained asleep, effectively imprisoned, clueless about the looming catastrophe. The rich, meanwhile, managed to rescue themselves in the few lifeboats that were available, while the traveling clergy excelled with heartfelt but empty appeals to those caught in between not to give up fighting.

The so-called Islamic reformers remind me of the salon orchestra, which — in a heroic display of giving the passengers the illusion of normalcy — continued to play on the deck of the Titanic until it went down. Likewise, the reformers are playing an alluring melody, but know full well that no one is listening anyway.

All around the world, we live in times of significant global transformation. The disorienting pressures stemming from that need find a real-life expression in such events as the fight in New York City over the location of a mosque, the abandoned burning of Korans in Florida, or German debates about the presumed economic inferiority of Muslim immigrants (advanced by a central banker, who has since resigned from office).

When it comes to the future of Islam, I fear that the road to transformation and modernization will only be reached following a period of collapse.

This is especially true in the Arab world, where the prospects for both regional and global advancement appear rather daunting, if not — for now — illusory.

A rapidly growing, poor and oppressed population, a lagging educational sector, shrinking oil reserves and drastic climate change undermine any prospects for economic progress. In addition, these factors further intensify the existing regional and religious conflicts.

The net effect of this could well be an increasing loss of relevance and authority of the state itself, which could lead to a significant spread of violence.

The civil wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Algeria, Pakistan, Somalia and Sudan are just the beginning of it — although already a most ominous one.

The present form of spiritual and material calcification leads me to make a prediction: Many Islamic countries will tumble, and Islam will have a hard time surviving as a political and social idea, and as a culture.

What this does to the world community is difficult to assess. However, it is quite clear that this disintegration will result in one of the largest migrations in history. (And this is precisely where the circle of fear is getting closed again — from New York to Germany.)

The downfall of the Islamic world would automatically mean that the waves of migration to Europe would increase significantly. For young Muslim immigrants, fleeing poverty and terrorism, Europe does indeed represent a hope for them, as does the United States.

Still, they will not manage to shed themselves of their friend-foe thinking. They will migrate into a continent that they by and large despise — and that they hold responsible for their plight.

Worse, neither the recipient country’s government institutions nor the long-established Muslim immigrants there can help them to integrate themselves.

The spreading violence that came to the fore in the wake of the downfall of their home countries will simply be outsourced, mainly to Europe, because of its non-shielded immigrant situation.

Saying so has nothing to do with scaremongering, but is an act of recognizing what’s real. In the ultimate analysis, it is the natural result of the imbalance in the world in which we live.

The many sins of the West and the corresponding failures of the Islamic world itself, which are already the stuff of history for centuries, will become very visible again.

This is the downside of the globalization process. Hard times await us on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea. Meanwhile, we are all running out of time.

Voir également:

L’islamisme probablement condamné à disparaître
Daniel Pipes
The Washington Times
22 juillet 2013

Version originale anglaise: Islamism’s Likely Doom
Adaptation française: Johan Bourlard

Pas plus tard qu’en 2012, les islamistes semblaient pouvoir coopérer en surmontant leurs nombreuses dissensions internes – religieuses (sunnites et chiites), politiques (monarchistes et républicains), tactiques (politiques et violentes), ou encore sur l’attitude face à la modernité (salafistes et Frères musulmans). En Tunisie, par exemple, les salafistes et les Frères musulmans (FM) ont trouvé un terrain d’entente. Les différences entre tous ces groupes étaient réelles mais secondaires car, comme je le disais alors, « tous les islamistes poussent dans la même direction, vers l’application pleine et sévère de la loi islamique (la charia) ».

Ce genre de coopération se poursuit à un niveau relativement modeste, comme on a pu le voir lors de la rencontre entre un membre du parti au pouvoir en Turquie et le chef d’une organisation salafiste en Allemagne. Mais ces derniers mois, les islamistes sont entrés subitement et massivement en conflit les uns avec les autres. Même s’ils constituent toujours un mouvement à part entière caractérisé par des objectifs hégémoniques et utopistes, les islamistes diffèrent entre eux quant à leurs troupes, leurs appartenances ethniques, leurs méthodes et leurs philosophies.

Les luttes intestines que se livrent les islamistes ont éclaté dans plusieurs autres pays à majorité musulmane. Ainsi, on peut observer des tensions entre sunnites et chiites dans l’opposition entre la Turquie et l’Iran due aussi à des approches différentes de l’islamisme. Au Liban, on assiste à une double lutte, d’une part entre sunnites et islamistes chiites et d’autre part entre islamistes sunnites et l’armée. En Syrie c’est la lutte des sunnites contre les islamistes chiites, comme en Irak. En Égypte, on voit les islamistes sunnites contre les chiites alors qu’au Yémen ce sont les houthistes qui s’opposent aux salafistes.

La plupart du temps, toutefois, ce sont les membres d’une même secte qui s’affrontent : Khamenei contre Ahmadinejad en Iran, l’AKP contre les Gülenistes en Turquie, Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq contre Moqtada al-Sadr en Irak, la monarchie contre les Frères musulmans en Arabie Saoudite, le Front islamique de libération contre le Front al-Nosra en Syrie, les Frères musulmans égyptiens contre le Hamas au sujet des hostilités avec Israël, les Frères musulmans contre les salafistes en Égypte, ou encore le choc entre deux idéologues et hommes politiques de premier plan, Omar el-Béchir contre Hassan al-Tourabi au Soudan. En Tunisie, les salafistes (dénommés Ansar al-charia) combattent l’organisation de type Frères musulmans (dénommée Ennahda).

Des différences apparemment mineures peuvent revêtir un caractère complexe. À titre d’exemple, essayons de suivre le récit énigmatique d’un journal de Beyrouth à propos des hostilités à Tripoli, ville du nord du Liban :

Des heurts entre les différents groupes islamistes à Tripoli, divisés entre les mouvements politiques du 8 Mars et du 14 Mars, sont en recrudescence. … Depuis l’assassinat, en octobre, du Général de Brigade Wissam al-Hassan, figure de proue du mouvement du 14 Mars et chef du service des renseignements, des différends entre groupes islamistes à Tripoli ont abouti à une confrontation majeure, surtout après le meurtre du cheikh Abdel-Razzak al-Asmar, un représentant du Mouvement d’unification islamique, quelques heures seulement après la mort d’al-Hassan. Le cheikh a été tué par balles… pendant un échange de tirs survenu lorsque des partisans de Kanaan Naji, islamiste indépendant associé à la Rencontre nationale islamique, ont tenté de s’emparer du quartier général du Mouvement d’unification islamique.

Cet état de fragmentation rappelle les divisions que connaissaient, dans les années 1950, les nationalistes panarabes. Ces derniers aspiraient à l’unification de tous les peuples arabophones « du Golfe [Persique] à l’Océan [Atlantique] » pour reprendre l’expression d’alors. Malgré la grandeur de ce rêve, ses leaders se sont brouillés au moment où le mouvement grandissait, condamnant un nationalisme panarabe qui a fini par s’effondrer sous le poids d’affrontements entre factions toujours plus morcelées. Parmi ces conflits, on note :

Gamal Abdel Nasser en Égypte contre les partis Baas (ou Ba’ath) au pouvoir en Syrie et en Irak.
Le parti Baas syrien contre le parti Baas irakien.
Les baasistes syriens sunnites contre les baasistes syriens alaouites.
Les baasistes syriens alaouites jadidistes contre les baasistes syriens alaouites assadistes.

Et ainsi de suite. En réalité tous les efforts en vue de former une union arabe ont échoué – en particulier la République arabe unie rassemblant l’Égypte et la Syrie (1958-1961) mais également des tentatives plus modestes comme la Fédération arabe (1958), les États arabes unis (1958-1961), la Fédération des Républiques arabes (1972-1977), la domination syrienne du Liban (1976-2005) et l’annexion du Koweït par l’Irak (1990-1991).

Reflet de modèles bien ancrés au Moyen-Orient, les dissensions qui surgissent parmi les islamistes les empêchent en outre de travailler ensemble. Une fois que le mouvement émerge, que ses membres accèdent au pouvoir et l’exercent réellement, les divisions deviennent de plus en plus profondes. Les rivalités, masquées quand les islamistes languissent dans l’opposition, se dévoilent quand ils conquièrent le pouvoir.

Si les tendances à la fragmentation perdurent, le mouvement islamiste sera condamné, comme le fascisme et le communisme, à n’être rien de plus qu’une menace pour la civilisation, capable de causer des dommages considérables mais sans jamais pouvoir triompher. Ce frein potentiel au pouvoir islamiste, devenu manifeste seulement en 2013, ouvre la voie à l’optimisme mais pas à la complaisance. Même si les choses semblent meilleures qu’il y a un an, la tendance peut à nouveau s’inverser rapidement. La tâche ardue qui consiste à vaincre l’islamisme demeure une priorité.

Addendum, 22 juillet 2013. Les subdivisions parmi les nationalistes panarabes des années 1950 me rappellent une parodie du comédien américain Emo Philips (légèrement adaptée pour la lecture) :

Un jour, j’ai vu un type sur un pont, prêt à sauter.

Je lui ai dit. « Ne fais pas ça ! ». Il a répondu : « Personne ne m’aime. »

« Dieu t’aime. Crois-tu en Dieu ? ». Il a répondu : « Oui. »

« Moi aussi ! Es-tu juif ou chrétien ? » Il a répondu : « Chrétien. »

« Moi aussi ! Protestant ou catholique ? » Il a répondu : « Protestant. »

« Moi aussi ! Quelle dénomination ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord ou du Sud? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur ou libéral ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs ou de l’Est ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs du Conseil de 1879 ou du Conseil de 1912 ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs du Conseil de 1912. »

J’ai répondu : « Meurs, hérétique ! » Et je l’ai poussé en bas du pont.

Voir encore:

Le monde arabe est en phase d’effondrement total
Guy Millière
Dreuz.info
02 août 2012

Le discours de Mitt Romney à Jérusalem, et les déclarations à la presse qui l’ont accompagné n’en finissent décidément pas de faire des vagues. Mitt Romney a parlé du fait que le développement économique et la liberté qui règnent en Israël étaient dues à la culture, et que les handicaps qui marquent le monde musulman et qui touchent les « Palestiniens » auraient aussi une dimension culturelle. Des accusations de racisme ont aussitôt commencé à fuser.

Les gens qui profèrent ces accusations sont-ils si idiots qu’ils confondent race et culture ? Pensent-ils vraiment qu’un Africain noir né chrétien et qui se convertit à l’islam change de race, ou qu’un Suédois blond devenu musulman va soudain devenir un Arabe du Proche-Orient ? Je ne peux imaginer que ces gens sont des idiots, je les pense plutôt pervers et imprégnés de haine envers la réussite. Et je les considère animés d’une aversion envers ce qui peut permettre au genre humain de s’émanciper et de s’accomplir.

L’une des notions économiques essentielles développées ces dernières années par des économistes qui vont de David Landes, auteur de « La richesse et la pauvreté des nations », un livre fondamental, à Thomas Sowell auteur de Migrations and Cultures, Race and Cultures, et Conquests and Cultures, de Lawrence Harrison, auteur de Underdevelopment Is A State of Mind à Samuel Huntington, auteur avec Harrison de Culture Matters, est celle de « capital culturel ». J’ai moi-même introduit et exposé l’importance de cette notion dans La Septième dimension.

Ignorer cette notion est ne rien comprendre au monde contemporain et, dans un contexte de guerre, de famines et de fanatisme, il est criminel de ne rien comprendre au monde contemporain.

Oui, certaines cultures sont plus propices que d’autres au développement économique et à la liberté sous toutes ses formes, et, n’en déplaise aux relativistes, la culture juive est une culture particulièrement propice.

La culture du christianisme protestant est plus propice au développement économique et à la liberté que la culture du christianisme catholique, et lorsque des substrats culturels viennent s’ajouter, tels le caudillisme en Amérique latine, les handicaps peuvent devenir écrasants.

Oui, les cultures marquées par le confucianisme peuvent susciter le développement économique, mais se trouver confrontées à des obstacles lorsqu’il s’agit de liberté, et cela explique les difficultés de sociétés asiatiques à passer à un fonctionnement post-industriel et post-asiatique.

Et oui, hélas, le monde musulman, et en lui tout particulièrement le monde arabe, sont dans une situation de blocage culturel qui ne cesse de s’aggraver et prennent des allures cataclysmiques.

Le monde arabe est aujourd’hui dans une phase d’effondrement économique qui s’accompagne d’un effondrement de ses structures politiques et d’une destruction de ses repères culturels. Il ne reste au milieu des décombres qu’une infime minorité de gens ouverts à l’esprit de civilisation et aux sociétés ouvertes, et une immense déferlante islamiste où se mêlent dans le ressentiment, le sectarisme et le tribalisme des gens désireux de revenir à une lecture littéraliste du Coran, des radicaux mélangeant Coran et texte de Marx, Lénine ou Franz Fanon, d’autres qui relisent leurs textes sacrés à la lumière noire de Hitler.

Cet effondrement ne fait que commencer. Il va se poursuivre. La situation qui prévaut en Syrie n’en est qu’un fragment. D’autres fragments sont visibles en Libye, dans le Nord du Mali, au Nigeria où agissent les Boko Haram, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Yemen.

Il est criminel de ne pas le comprendre. C’est suicidaire aussi.

La Russie et la Chine essaient cyniquement de voir quels avantages elles peuvent tirer de l’effondrement et en quoi il peut leur permettre de parasiter le monde occidental.

Les dirigeants européens s’essaient à rafistoler une zone euro et une Union Européenne qui sont elles-mêmes au bord de l’effondrement, et font semblant de croire encore aux « promesses du printemps arabe ». Manuel Valls, qui sortait sans doute d’un hôpital où il venait de subir une lobotomie, a parlé le 6 juillet en inaugurant de manière très laïque une mosquée à Cergy Pontoise de l’islam contemporain comme de l’hériter de celui de Cordoue où foisonnait la connaissance.

Les dirigeants européens entendent aussi flatter les « Palestiniens » : s’ils ouvraient les yeux (c’est impossible, je sais), et s’ils actionnaient leurs neurones (ce qui est plus impossible encore, je ne l’ignore pas), ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » est en train de mourir et ne survit que grâce aux injections financières européennes et, pour partie, américaines. Ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » s’est développé dans les années mille neuf cent soixante quand le nationalisme arabe était soutenu par l’Union Soviétique. L’Union Soviétique n’existe plus. Le nationalisme arabe agonise dans les décombres de Damas.

Les membres de l’administration Obama font preuve d’autant de stupidité que les dirigeants européens. C’est pour cela qu’on les aime bien en Europe.

C’est ainsi en tout cas : les dirigeants de l’Autorité Palestinienne ne représentent plus rien que leur propre imposture et le rôle que les Européens et l’administration Obama veulent bien leur accorder par pur crétinisme.

Le Hamas régit la bande de Gaza qui va peu à peu se fondre dans l’Egypte islamiste et délabrée. Et le Hamas est prêt à s’emparer de l’Autorité Palestinienne. Or, le Hamas n’en a que faire d’un « Etat palestinien » : il rêve de califat. Il raisonne en termes de dar el islam et de dar el harb. Il n’en a rien à faire de la Judée-Samarie que ses larbins appellent Cisjordanie. Il fait partie intégrante de la déferlante islamiste présente.

Au terme de la tempête qui prend forme, le monde musulman sera en ruines, décomposé, chaotique. Une recomposition s’enclenchera peut-être. Il n’y aura pas de place dans cette reconstruction pour l’Autorité Palestinienne. Il n’y en aura pas pour le nationalisme arabe.

Il y aura une place pour Israël, le seul pays qui a les moyens de surnager au milieu de ce grand océan de tourbe.

Je ne sais s’il y aura une place pour l’Europe. Je dois dire que j’en doute.

Je veux espérer qu’il y aura une place pour les Etats-Unis. Ce sera l’un des enjeux de l’élection de novembre prochain. Dois-je dire que j’espère très vivement que Mitt Romney sera élu. Les Etats-Unis ont besoin d’un Président à la Maison Blanche. Et si ce Président comprend non seulement les vertus du libre marché, mais aussi l’importance du capital culturel, c’est un atout supplémentaire.

Voir encore:

L’effondrement de la Civilisation arabe?

Thérèse Zrihen-Dvir

Le 14 Février, 2011

(Inspiré de l’étude de Michael Fraley),

Il y a cinq ans environ, le lieutenant colonel James G. Lacey, publiait un article dans le journal : Marine Institute: Démarches: "L’effondrement Imminent de la Civilisation Arabe". " Il y contestait les conclusions de deux livres qui avaient particulièrement influencé la récente politique étrangère et la grande stratégie : La Crise de L’Islam : Guerre Sainte et Terreur Impie, par Bernard Lewis – et "Le Choc des Civilisations et restructuration de l’ordre Mondial, par Samuel P. Huntington.

Il déclarait dans son article : Une compréhension plus perspicace des événements nous dirige vers la conclusion que la civilisation arabe (pas les musulmans) tend à s’effondrer, et par coïncidence la majorité arabe est musulmane. Tout comme la chute de l’empire romain entraina l’effondrement de l’Europe occidentale, sans pour cela effriter le Christianisme.

Sa thèse souligne que, tandis que l’Islam lui-même continue de s’accroître et de prospérer autour du monde (en effet, il poursuit assidûment des percées intelligentes au sein des états occidentaux), comme il fut le cas spécialement dans le monde arabe, là où l’ont notait des troubles de décomposition de civilisation.

Mais Lacey n’est pas le seul – Azmi Bashara écrivait en 2003, dans le journal Al-Ahram, du Caire : Les arabes … sont dans un état double de délabrement qui défie l’esprit même de ceux qui espéraient un été chaud de décadence poste-guerre… La nation (Arabe) sera divisée entre ceux qui dansent à chaque battement de scandale et défaite, et ceux qui se font exploser pour devenir le gong assourdissant et rebondissant des rites religieux.

Écrivant sur le journal Wall Street, Fouad Ajami entamait son article "Autocratie et le déclin des Arabes", par cette étrange vision : "Je me suis senti si jaloux," disait Abdulmonem Ibrahim, un jeune activiste politicien, sur les récentes émeutes en Iran. "Nous sommes confondus par l’organisation et la diligence par laquelle le mouvement iranien opère. En Égypte, chacun peut compter le nombre d’activistes sur une main." Ce degré d’"envier l’Iran" nous cite l’état de stagnation des politiques arabes. La révolution iranienne n’est guère plaisante, mais elle rend son dû aux iraniens : ils ont foncé dans les rues pour contester le mandat des théocrates.

Maintenant que Moubarak a été déposé, la question que nous nous posons tous : était-ce en effet la victoire du peuple de l’Égypte, ou une victoire des islamistes radicaux?"

L’effondrement d’une civilisation ?

Les troubles récents dans le monde arabe, révèlent l’insatisfaction des peuples qui se sont érigés depuis plusieurs dizaines d’années. Mais est-ce bien plus profond et plus ample qu’une série d’insurrections? Maintenant que le siège historique de la puissante culture arabe a été basculé, est-ce l’indication d’un renouvellement ou d’une décomposition de la civilisation dans son ensemble? Colonel Lacey avait prédit les soulèvements actuels traitant le cas de ces événements comme les signes précurseurs de la fin de l’ère arabe. Il reste toutefois une revendication monumentale et Lacey reconnait le scepticisme que cette revendication rencontrera.

La question qui suit est : comment se fait-il que le monde libre n’ait pas identifié et prévu l’effondrement d’une civilisation entière? La réponse est simple, aucune personne vivante n’a jamais assisté à un phénomène pareil. L’effondrement d’une civilisation n’a réellement tenu place que durant l’époque de l’obscurantisme. L’effondrement d’une civilisation s’étend sur de nombreuses années et s’effectue presque imperceptiblement dans la mare des événements quotidiens.

Les graines d’un tel effondrement, si c’est bien ce que nous voyons, pourraient avoir été ensemencées il y 600 ans, selon Lacey, avec l’aube de la Renaissance dans toute l’Europe Occidentale. Toutefois, il est fort possible que le sort de la civilisation arabe ait été fixé deux siècles plus tôt, avec l’exil de Ibn Rushd (plus connu en Occident sous Averroes).

Voies différentes

À un temps lorsque les philosophes occidentaux se mesuraient à des questions d’ontologie (la nature d’être) et d’épistémologie (théorie de la connaissance), les califes des états arabes et leurs universitaires choisis manipulaient les débats philosophiques différemment, comme ils n’ont jamais cessé de le faire d’ailleurs: par des accusations d’infidélité aux écritures, des peines d’incarcération, l’exil, et peine de mort. Ibn Rushd contestait la pensée dominante d’Al Ghazali (1059-1111) adoptant plutôt la tradition d’Ibn Sina, philosophe islamique persan du 11ème siècle.

Yousif Fajr Raslan écrivait : Endigué par la résistance aveugle des académiciens du calife, Ibn Rushd tourna vers la philosophie grecque, où il trouva son idéal chez Aristote… Il appliqua le raisonnement rational de la théologie, approche qui souleva ses collègues contre lui et contre la philosophie dans son ensemble, pour ne pas mentionner leur haine particulière envers les philosophes grecques. Ibn Rushd fut banni, mettant fin à tout espoir de renouveau philosophique et introduction de rationalité historique dans la culture arabe.

Les philosophes occidentaux avaient traversé la Renaissance et les périodes d’empirisme, développant la "méthode scientifique". Les grands penseurs occidentaux, depuis Thomas Aquinas avaient débattu le thème des relations entre la métaphysique et le physique, de concert avec les issues autoritaires et la recherche de la vérité. Les académiciens éclairés chrétiens et séculiers ensemble présentaient des idées de "loi naturelle", droits de propriété, et "contrat social".

Les érudits arabes, en revanche, soutenaient Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) né dans ce qui est couramment connu aujourd’hui, la Tunisie moderne, le considérant comme l’un des plus grands penseurs politiques. Sa définition du gouvernement en tant "qu’une institution qui empêche l’injustice autre qu’elle ne la garantie" domine encore la pensée politique arabe.

Choix politiques

Si Lacey disait vrai, et nous sommes réellement les témoins de l’effondrement de la civilisation arabe dans son ensemble, cela n’augure rien de bon pour l’Occident. Les pouvoirs capables et prêts à combler le vide ne sont ni disposés, ni passifs dans leur attitude envers les pays de l’Occident. Ce qui se développe en Égypte pourrait bien présager ce qui se passera dans le reste du monde arabe. La question clef est la suivant : est-ce que l’influence occidentale a été suffisamment instillée chez les égyptiens, au point de les converger vers une démocratie légitime et durable? Sinon, nous verrons probablement une répétition du scénario iranien des années 1970, pas seulement en Egypte, mais dans le monde arabe entier.

Le Colonel Lacey nous a présenté le cas du déclin de la civilisation arabe selon le modèle de la guerre froide: plus précisément, par la tactique de la restriction. Jusqu’à présent, les USA ont largement abusé de cette grande stratégie. Malheureusement, les maladresses de l’administration américaine et ses réactions tempérées face aux événements de l’Égypte, risque de leur faire perdre l’allié le plus important de la région, et conséquemment leur capacité d’inverser le pouvoir d’une vague énorme du radicalisme islamique.

Leurs options uniques pour renforcer leurs relations avec les puissances amies de la région, résident dans leur soutien de ceux qui cherchent la liberté et la démocratie, et leur support des états véritablement libres. Il devient encore plus impératif d’assurer la croissance continuelle de l’Iraq et sa réussite, mais encore plus critique est de restreindre l’Iran et minimiser son ingérence dans les affaires des nations arabes.

Rien dans tout ce programme n’est aisé. Une bonne compréhension de la nature véritable des troubles dans les états arabes devrait produire des mesures plus préventives. Elle doit donner plus de clarté dans la stratégie américaine future de la région. Sinon, nous risquons de voir tantôt l’ascension d’un Islam radical et la déchéance de la civilisation arabe.

Voir enfin:

"Beaucoup de partis d’extrême droite vont se révéler aux européennes"
Catherine CALVET et Jonathan BOUCHET-PETERSEN
Libération
2 mai 2014

INTERVIEW
Entre la crise économique, le rejet des minorités et les blessures historiques, la géographe Béatrice Giblin s’attend à une poussée du Front national et consorts lors du scrutin du 25 mai.

Avec l’émergence électorale du Front national au tournant des années 80, la France a longtemps fait figure d’«exception en Europe», rappelle la géographe Béatrice Giblin, qui a dirigé l’ouvrage collectif l’Extrême droite en Europe. Mais à quelques semaines des élections européennes du 25 mai, la situation est bien différente : l’Autriche, les Pays-Bas et la Belgique, puis l’Europe du Nord ont à leur tour «connu la percée de partis d’extrême droite revendiquant la préférence nationale, dénonçant le cosmopolitisme, le multiculturalisme et, plus directement encore, la présence des étrangers». Même phénomène, dans une moindre mesure, en Grande-Bretagne ou en Espagne. Quant à la Grèce, avec Aube dorée, et surtout la Hongrie, avec la dérive du Premier ministre Viktor Orbán sur fond de montée du Jobbik, elles inquiètent au plus haut point Béatrice Giblin.

Au-delà des particularismes régionaux ou nationaux, souvent liés à des raisons historiques, le rejet des musulmans semble se généraliser dans le discours des extrêmes droites en Europe…

C’est leur principal carburant commun, même si la Hongrie fait exception car il n’y a pas eu l’équivalent d’une arrivée rapide de musulmans dans ce pays. L’antisémitisme y reste dominant, même s’il existe des exemples où islamophobie et antisémitisme cohabitent : au Front national, Jean-Marie Le Pen était pro-irakien par antisémitisme et Marine Le Pen est pro-israélienne car son créneau consiste d’abord à stigmatiser les musulmans. Mais revenons à la Hongrie, qui est un cas très intéressant et très inquiétant. Viktor Orbán a de nouveau presque obtenu la majorité absolue lors du dernier scrutin [deux tiers des sièges aux législatives du 6 avril, ndlr], tandis que la montée du Jobbik se poursuit et, vu ce que véhicule cette formation, il y a de quoi avoir peur. A la manière de Marine Le Pen, les responsables du Jobbik présentent mieux et ont fait le ménage en virant notamment ceux qui osaient s’habiller comme sous la dictature Horthy, mais le fond du discours reste le même. Et parmi les parlementaires du Jobbik exclus, certains ont créé l’Aube hongroise, à l’instar de l’Aube dorée grecque.

En quoi le contexte hongrois est-il à part ?

Un pays qui a perdu deux tiers de son territoire et une grande partie de sa population ne s’en remet pas. Il a ensuite fait la grande erreur de choisir les nazis, précisément pour retrouver la grande Hongrie. Il a payé une deuxième fois, si j’ose dire. Tout ça laisse des traces. Quand j’y suis allée, j’ai été frappée par le fait qu’on voyait partout les cartes de la grande Hongrie : sur les sets de table, des autocollants collés aux vitres des voitures et même dans une pharmacie. Dans des parcs publics, il y a des plates-bandes où le pays actuel est représenté avec des fleurs rouges, autour desquelles il y a la grande Hongrie en blanc, et même du bleu pour montrer qu’à l’époque, elle avait accès à la mer. Cela va jusque-là. C’est sans comparaison avec ce que la France a connu en Alsace-Lorraine : cela nous a pourtant suffisamment marqués pour partir la fleur au fusil en 1914.

Vous évoquez là une époque très lointaine, non ?

En effet, à la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, cela faisait presque soixante-dix ans que la Hongrie tentait de récupérer sa grandeur perdue. A l’échelle de l’histoire, ce n’est pas grand-chose. Et il faudrait d’ailleurs aller voir comment les manuels scolaires hongrois relatent désormais ce fait. Viktor Orbán entretient à dessein cette mythologie. D’une manière générale, l’extrême droite surfe sur ces blessures historiques.

On voit dans votre livre que toutes les extrêmes droites ne sont pas antieuropéennes. Certains régionalistes sont proeuropéens, manière pour eux de passer au-dessus de leur Etat…

C’est notamment vrai en Flandre ou en Espagne avec Plataforma per Catalunya, même si on ne peut pas dire de manière générale que le régionalisme catalan est d’extrême droite. Plataforma, dont on parle assez peu en France mais avec qui Marine Le Pen entretient des liens, développe clairement un discours anti-immigrés et plus particulièrement antimusulmans. Plataforma mélange cela avec un nationalisme régional sur fond d’ultralibéralisme, ce qui en fait un cocktail étonnant.

En Scandinavie, où cohabitent des pays qui appartiennent à l’Union européenne et d’autres pas, des pays prospères et des pays en crise, l’extrême droite est pourtant chaque fois présente…

La Scandinavie est un ensemble qui a connu une très forte émigration au XIXe siècle, contribuant notamment à peupler les Etats-Unis. Mais il n’y avait jamais eu de vrai phénomène d’immigration. Il est très amusant de comparer la diversité des noms de famille en France, où elle est infinie, et en Scandinavie, où il y a très peu de souches. Là-bas, l’immigration débute, même pas dans les années 50 comme au Royaume-Uni, mais seulement dans les années 70. Au début, ces social-démocraties qui n’ont pas eu de colonies ont accueilli à bras ouverts les immigrés avec des conditions très avantageuses. A ceci près que la masse d’arrivants s’est concentrée dans des zones déjà très peuplées : à l’échelle d’un pays, c’est peu, mais à celle de certains quartiers d’Oslo ou de Copenhague, l’équilibre s’est rompu. Par ailleurs, dans une société très ouverte et très égalitaire, la question du statut des femmes a vite posé problème. Les habitants n’ont pas supporté de voir ces femmes avec le voile noir intégral. Même si ces immigrés ne font rien de mal et vont faire leurs courses chez Ikea, la situation est devenue explosive.

A l’instar des sondages flatteurs pour le Front national, on annonce des scores élevés pour l’extrême droite aux élections européennes…

Attendons de voir ces résultats pour en tirer des conclusions, mais on peut s’attendre à une poussée. Le suffrage se fait à la proportionnelle. Beaucoup de partis d’extrême droite sous-représentés en raison d’un scrutin majoritaire national vont donc se révéler. La France n’a que deux députés frontistes pour représenter 16% de la population. Le phénomène est le même en Grande-Bretagne, qui a connu une immigration record ces dernières années. Entre 1991 et 2011, la proportion de la population née à l’étranger est passée de 5,8 à 12,5%. Cela risque d’avoir des répercussions dans les urnes fin mai pour le British National Party [BNP] et le Parti pour l’indépendance du Royaume-Uni [Ukip].

Ces partis d’extrême droite peuvent-ils avoir une stratégie commune au Parlement européen ?

S’ils sont assez nombreux pour peser, ils se rapprocheront : ça ne posera aucun problème au Jobbik de faire cause commune avec le FN, avec le BNP ou avec les Démocrates suédois. Même si l’Ukip, dirigé par l’eurosceptique Nigel Farage qui compte 13 députés européens, préfère s’allier avec Debout la République du souverainiste Nicolas Dupont-Aignan plutôt qu’avec le Front national, et que le FN juge le BNP infréquentable, les contacts sont déjà nombreux. Cela passe beaucoup par Internet, un outil que toutes les extrêmes droites d’Europe maîtrisent très bien. Au Parlement, leur ferment sera en premier lieu un discours très antieuropéen. Et tant que la Banque centrale ne desserrera pas l’étau en faisant marcher la planche à billets pour retrouver de la croissance et des emplois, l’europhobie comme le repli national seront porteurs. Et on continuera à aller dans le mur.

Aux élections municipales, la victoire du Front national à Hénin-Beaumont vous a-t-elle surprise ?

Avec toute la couverture médiatique, les journalistes auraient presque été déçus si Steeve Briois, militant d’Hénin depuis très longtemps, n’avait pas gagné ! Mais il ne l’a emporté que de 32 voix dans une ville de plus de 20 000 habitants : il reste donc une bonne partie de gens structurés à gauche. Je suis très prudente avec le concept à la mode de gaucho-lepénisme, ne serait-ce que parce que je le trouve méprisant. Il faut être prudent dans la façon dont on parle de ces électeurs, qui sont souvent désespérés au moment de choisir un bulletin FN. Il est vrai toutefois que le discours antimondialisation et anti-élites de Marine Le Pen rencontre un écho.

Vous avez étudié précisément le vote FN dans le bassin minier de Hénin-Beaumont. Vous en avez une lecture géographique…

Le vote Front national concerne seulement la partie ouest du Nord-Pas-de-Calais, c’est-à-dire, paradoxalement, la zone la plus développée, la mieux réaménagée, la plus agréable. Les centres-villes de Béthune ou de Lens sont devenus des endroits presque riants, alors qu’ils étaient plutôt déprimants. Tout a bougé, on a cassé des corons, et on a également beaucoup redistribué d’aides sociales. En revanche, la partie nord-est de la région est restée en l’état, fidèle au vote communiste. Cette stagnation n’a pas généré de frustrations. Car si personne n’évolue socialement, il n’y a pas non plus, contrairement à la partie ouest, de sentiment de déclassement.


Visite du Pape François en Israël: Attention un mur peut en cacher bien d’autres (Irshad Manji: Before the barrier, wasn’t there the bomber ?)

29 mai, 2014
popeMais pourquoi n’appelle-t-on pas ce mur, qui sépare les Gazaouites de leurs frères égyptiens "mur de la honte" ou "de l’apartheid"? Liliane Messika (Primo-Europe)
After all, this barrier, although built by Mr. Sharon, was birthed by "shaheeds," suicide bombers whom Palestinian leaders have glorified as martyrs. Qassam missiles can kill two or three people at a time. Suicide bombers lay waste to many more. Since the barrier went up, suicide attacks have plunged, which means innocent Arab lives have been spared along with Jewish ones. Does a concrete effort to save civilian lives justify the hardship posed by this structure? The humanitarian in me bristles, but ultimately answers yes. (…) I reflected on this question as I observed an Israeli Army jeep patrol the gap in Abu Dis. The vehicle was crammed with soldiers who, in turn, observed me filming the anti-Israel graffiti scrawled by Western activists — "Scotland hates the blood-sucking Zionists!" I turned my video camera on the soldiers. Nobody ordered me to shut it off or show the tape. My Arab taxi driver stood by, unprotected by a diplomatic license plate or press banner. Like all Muslims, I look forward to the day when neither the jeep nor the wall is in Abu Dis. So will we tell the self-appointed martyrs of Islam that the people — not just Arabs, but Arabs and Jews — "are one"? That before the barrier, there was the bomber? And that the barrier can be dismantled, but the bomber’s victims are gone forever? Irshad Manji
The leaders of Yemen and Saudi Arabia are due to meet today in an effort to settle a dispute over a security barrier the Saudis are building along their shared frontier. Saudi Arabia, which is battling against insurgents sympathetic to Osama bin Laden, says the barrier will stem the flow of militants and weapons from its southern neighbour. Yemeni opposition newspapers have likened it to the barrier that Israel is constructing in the West Bank – though in fact it is a simpler and even odder structure: a pipeline three metres (10ft) high, supported on posts and filled with concrete. The Guardian
What is being constructed inside our borders with Yemen is a sort of screen … which aims to prevent infiltration and smuggling, It does not resemble a wall in any way. Talal Anqawi (head of Saudi Arabia’s border guard)
Le pape …  ne dit bien-sûr pas que la barrière est effectivement une barrière de sécurité érigée parce que ses amis terroristes islamistes sont allés se faire sauter pour tuer des enfants et des adultes juifs ou pour les égorger, et, on n’en est plus à un mensonge près, les communiqués parlent de « barrière de séparation », comme si Israël voulait une barriėre juste pour se séparer des Arabes, alors qu’il y a vingt pour cent d’Arabes en Israël, ce que le pape ne dira pas. Guy Millière

Corée, Irlande du nord, Espagne, Chypre, Maroc, Inde/Bengladesh, Inde/Pakistan, Koweit, Etats-Unis/Mexique, Botswana/Zimbabwe, Arabie saoudite/Yemen, Egypte/Gaza …

Attention: un mur peut en cacher bien d’autres !

Alors que, fidèle à sa réputation, un nouveau pape François surprend à nouveau tout le monde…

En arrêtant sa soi-disant papamobile de sécurité pour toucher le soi-disant mur de sécurité séparant Israël et la Palestine …

Et, nouveau tour de passe passe, nous transforme le mur de sécurité israélien en mur des lamentations palestinien …

Pendant que,  de l’Espagne à l’Arabie saoudite et en passant par l’Egypte, le reste du monde construit tranquillement ses murs de séparation (pardon: "barrière de sécurité") …

Retour, avec une tribune de 2006 de l’activiste pakistano-canadienne Irshad Manji

Qui, fidèle à sa réputation d’enfant terrible de l’islam et à l’instar de l’enfant d’un fameux conte d’Andersen …

Rappelait déjà la criante évidence oubliée (rançon du succès ?) par toutes nos belles âmes, pape compris …

Avant le mur (et apparemment pas seulement pour Israël), n’y avait-il pas… le terroriste ?

How I Learned to Love the Wall
Irshad Manji
NYT
March 18, 2006

New Haven

ON March 28, Israelis will elect a new prime minister to replace the ailing Ariel Sharon. But I’d bet my last shekel that I’ll continue to hear the phrase "Ariel Sharon’s apartheid wall." It’s a phrase spoken — make that spewed — on almost every university campus I visit in North America and Europe.

Among a new generation of Muslims, this is what Mr. Sharon will be known for long after he leaves office: unilaterally erecting a barrier, most of it a fence, some of it a wall, that cuts Arab villages in half, chokes the movement of ordinary Palestinians, cripples local economies and, ultimately, separates human beings.

The critics have a point — up to a point.

They’re right that Palestinians are virtually wailing at "the wall." When I went to see its towering cement slabs in the West Bank town of Abu Dis last year, an Arab man approached me to unload his sadness. "It’s no good," he said. "It’s hard."

"Why do you think they built it?" I asked.

The man shook his head and repeated, "It’s hard." After some silence, he added, "We are not two people. We are one."

"How do you explain that to suicide bombers?" I wondered aloud.

The man smiled. "No understand," he replied. "No English. Thank you. Goodbye."

Was it something I said? Maybe my impolite mention of Palestinian martyrs? Then again, how could I not mention them?

After all, this barrier, although built by Mr. Sharon, was birthed by "shaheeds," suicide bombers whom Palestinian leaders have glorified as martyrs. Qassam missiles can kill two or three people at a time. Suicide bombers lay waste to many more. Since the barrier went up, suicide attacks have plunged, which means innocent Arab lives have been spared along with Jewish ones. Does a concrete effort to save civilian lives justify the hardship posed by this structure? The humanitarian in me bristles, but ultimately answers yes.

That’s not to deny or even diminish Arab pain. I had to twist myself like an amateur gymnast when I helped a Palestinian woman carry her grocery bags through a gap in the wall (such gaps, closely watched by Israeli soldiers, do exist). It made me wonder how much more difficult the obstacle course must be for people twice my age, who must travel to one of the wider official checkpoints nearby.

I appreciate that Israel’s intent is not to keep Palestinians "in" so much as to keep suicide bombers "out." But in the minds of many Palestinians, Ariel Sharon never adequately acknowledged the humiliation felt by a 60-year-old Arab whose family has harvested the Holy Land for generations when she has to show her identity card to an 18-year-old Ethiopian immigrant in an Israeli Army uniform who’s been in the country for eight months. In that context, fences and walls come off as cruelly gratuitous.

For all the closings, however, Israel is open enough to tolerate lawsuits by civil society groups who despise every mile of the barrier. Mr. Sharon himself agreed to reroute sections of it when the Israel High Court ruled in favor of the complainants. Where else in the Middle East can Arabs and Jews work together so visibly to contest, and change, state policies?

I reflected on this question as I observed an Israeli Army jeep patrol the gap in Abu Dis. The vehicle was crammed with soldiers who, in turn, observed me filming the anti-Israel graffiti scrawled by Western activists — "Scotland hates the blood-sucking Zionists!" I turned my video camera on the soldiers. Nobody ordered me to shut it off or show the tape. My Arab taxi driver stood by, unprotected by a diplomatic license plate or press banner.

Like all Muslims, I look forward to the day when neither the jeep nor the wall is in Abu Dis. So will we tell the self-appointed martyrs of Islam that the people — not just Arabs, but Arabs and Jews — "are one"? That before the barrier, there was the bomber? And that the barrier can be dismantled, but the bomber’s victims are gone forever?

Young Muslims, especially those privileged with a good education, cannot walk away from these questions as my interlocutor in Abu Dis did. If we follow in his footsteps, we are only conspiring against ourselves. After all, once the election is over, we won’t have Ariel Sharon to kick around anymore.

Irshad Manji, a fellow at Yale, is the author of "The Trouble With Islam Today: A Muslim’s Call for Reform in Her Faith."

Voir aussi:

L’imposture du pape François
Guy Millière
Dreuz info
25 mai 2014

J’entendais attendre la fin de la visite du pape François au Proche Orient pour réagir. Je pense utile de le faire dès aujourd’hui, de Jérusalem où je me trouve.

Le pape a donc choisi de commencer son voyage en Jordanie, Etat arabe palestinien créé sur quatre vingt pour cent du territoire confié au Royaume Uni pour y permettre la renaissance d’un foyer national juif. Il a rencontré le roi, héritier d’une dynastie venue d’Arabie et transplantée là par les soins des Britanniques. Il n’a pas eu un mot pour les Arabes palestiniens vivant en Jordanie comme des citoyens de seconde zone. Il a célébré une messe dans un pays où les Chrétiens sont persécutés, comme dans tous les pays musulmans, et traités en citoyens de seconde zone. Il s’est conduit en bon dhimmi.

Le pape n’a ensuite pas franchi la frontière séparant la Jordanie d’Israël, et s’est rendu en hélicoptère à Bethlehem.

Le programme du Vatican dit, Bethlehem, Palestine, et précise qu’à Bethlehem le pape a rencontré le Président de l’Etat palestinien. Il s’agit de Mahmoud Abbas, qui n’est pas Président, puisque son mandat, non renouvelé, a expiré il y a cinq ans, donc dictateur conviendrait mieux. Et il s’agit de l’Autorité palestinienne, qui n’est pas un Etat.

Le pape traite donc un dictateur comme s’il était Président

Le pape traite donc un dictateur comme s’il était Président. Et il confère le statut d’Etat à une entité corrompue et criminelle qui sera bientôt régie par le Hamas, groupe terroriste, antisémite et négationniste. Il n’a pas un seul mot pour les Arabes chrétiens persécutés et chassés des terres occupées par l’Autorité palestinienne, et cautionne l’idée que Bethlehem est encore une ville chrétienne.

En appelant Jésus, juif né en terre juive, que les Chrétiens considèrent comme le Fils de Dieu, « prince de la paix », il utilise un vocabulaire qui retire à Jésus ses racines juives, et lui donne une dimension politique hors de propos.

En parlant devant un déploiement d’illustrations mêlant scènes de la vie de Jésus, et « oppression des Palestiniens », et en se plaçant devant une présentation de Jésus enveloppé d’un keffieh, il se fait propagandiste « anti-sioniste » et militant du négationnisme « palestinien » anti-juif.

En rendant visite à des « réfugiés » qui ne sont pas des réfugiés, mais les otages du monde arabe depuis quatre générations, il cautionne le fait que ces gens ont été maintenus dans des camps depuis quatre générations par décision du monde arabe.

Il cautionne le lavage de cerveau qui transforme ces gens en outils de la haine anti-juive.

En s’arrêtant ensuite devant la barrière de sécurité à l’endroit où il y a des graffitis disant Free Palestine, il devient militant de la « cause palestinienne » que le Hamas incarne désormais. Il ne dit bien-sûr pas que la barrière est effectivement une barrière de sécurité érigée parce que ses amis terroristes islamistes sont allés se faire sauter pour tuer des enfants et des adultes juifs ou pour les égorger, et, on n’en est plus à un mensonge près, les communiqués parlent de « barrière de séparation », comme si Israël voulait une barriėre juste pour se séparer des Arabes, alors qu’il y a vingt pour cent d’Arabes en Israël, ce que le pape ne dira pas.

Le pape se rend ensuite, en hélicoptère à nouveau, à l’aéroport de Tel Aviv. Il évite à nouveau de franchir la frontière vers Jérusalem, geste montrant qu’il ne reconnait pas Jérusalem comme ville israélienne, et, a fortiori, comme capitale d’Israël.

Le programme prévoit qu’il se rendra à Jérusalem par la route. Il y rencontrera des représentants de la religion orthodoxe, le mufti de Jérusalem sur « l’esplanade des mosquées » (parleront ils du mufti Amin Al Husseini?), des rabbins. Il se rendra, entre autres, à Yad Vashem.

Certains parleront de voyage équilibré. Je ne vois rien d’équilibré dans tout cela, strictement rien.

Certains diront que le pape oeuvre pour la paix. On n’oeuvre pas pour la paix en cautionnant la propagande anti-juive et les idées exterminationnistes des dirigeants « palestiniens ». On oeuvre pour la transformation d’Arabes en assassins, pour un gang de crapules sanguinaires appelé Autorité palestinienne, pour l’assassinat de Juifs, contre la démocratie et la liberté qu’Israël incarne.

L’Eglise a derrière elle deux mille ans, ou presque, d’antisémitisme. Elle a retiré des catéchismes il y a quelques décennies seulement la mention de « peuple déïcide ». Il lui faudra encore faire des efforts pour cesser d’être antisémite.

L’Eglise a mis plus de quarante ans pour reconnaître l’existence d’Israël. Elle a toujours du mal à reconnaitre l’existence d’Israël. Elle trahit ce faisant l’éthique qu’elle prétend incarner.

La presse internationale cautionne tout cela, et après, on voudrait s’étonner qu’il y ait des Mohamed Merah, et des assassins tels ceux qui viennent de frapper Bruxelles!

Voir également:

Saudi security barrier stirs anger in Yemen
Brian Whitaker
The Guardian
17 February 2004

The leaders of Yemen and Saudi Arabia are due to meet today in an effort to settle a dispute over a security barrier the Saudis are building along their shared frontier.

Saudi Arabia, which is battling against insurgents sympathetic to Osama bin Laden, says the barrier will stem the flow of militants and weapons from its southern neighbour.

Yemeni opposition newspapers have likened it to the barrier that Israel is constructing in the West Bank – though in fact it is a simpler and even odder structure: a pipeline three metres (10ft) high, supported on posts and filled with concrete.

Yemen, which is said to have three times as many guns as people, has several flourishing markets where rocket-propelled grenades and other items are sold openly.

In remote areas, most men carry weapons for their own protection and some tribes have well-armed militias capable of putting up a serious fight against the Yemeni army.

Saudi border patrols say they intercept weapons smuggled into the kingdom from Yemen almost every day. These include 90,000 rounds of ammunition and 2,000 sticks of dynamite seized since the bombings in Riyadh last May.

The 1,500-mile frontier, which runs through mountains in the west and the barren Empty Quarter in the east, has always been relatively easy to cross unnoticed for those with local knowledge.

It was not until 2000, after more than 65 years of sporadic conflict, that Yemen and Saudi Arabia finally agreed on where the border lay and began marking it with concrete posts.

Smuggling, not just of weapons, has long been a valuable source of income for Yemen’s border tribes. Among the most important unofficial exports, thought to earn more than £100m a year from Saudi Arabia, is qat – whose leaves are chewed by millions of Yemenis for their amphetamine-like effect, and which is illegal in the kingdom.

Amid Saudi efforts to tighten border controls in order to prevent terrorism, the smugglers have also become more resourceful. According to a senior Yemeni official, they have begun using "smart" donkeys which can not only find their way across unaccompanied but can also recognise the uniform of Saudi border guards and avoid them.

So far, the Yemeni government has downplayed the smuggling aspects. When President Ali Abdullah Salih meets Crown Prince Abdullah in the Saudi capital today, he is likely to seek assurances that the barrier will not breach the terms of the border treaty signed almost four years ago.

The treaty provided grazing rights for shepherds in a 13-mile strip on both sides of the frontier and stipulated that no armed forces could be stationed in the zone.

According to a Yemeni newspaper, the first 25-mile stretch of the barrier, erected in the last month, is less than 100 metres from the border line.

The head of Saudi Arabia’s border guard, Talal Anqawi, told an Arab newspaper last week that the barrier was being constructed inside Saudi territory but did not specify the exact location. He also dismissed comparisons with Israel’s West Bank barrier, which has sparked international condemnation.

"What is being constructed inside our borders with Yemen is a sort of screen … which aims to prevent infiltration and smuggling," he said. "It does not resemble a wall in any way."

Voir encore:
The List
Security Fences
Abigail Cutler
The Atlantic monthly
Mar 1 2005

This spring Israel is scheduled to withdraw from the Gaza Strip, but it plans to continue building a controversial 400-mile anti-terrorist barrier between itself and the West Bank. Though the International Court of Justice has ruled that the fence violates international law, it remains highly popular among Israelis—attacks have declined by as much as 90 percent in certain areas since construction began, two years ago. Similar security barriers have been constructed throughout history, from the Great Wall of China to the lesser-known wall between Israel and Gaza that was built in 1994. Today the West Bank barrier is just one of many partitions around the world aimed at repelling invaders—whether terrorists, guerrillas, or immigrants. Here are the sites of other notable security barriers, in chronological order of inception.

1. North Korea/South Korea: Called "the scariest place on earth" by President Bill Clinton, this 151-mile-long demilitarized zone has separated the two Koreas since 1953 and is the most heavily fortified border in the world.

2. Belfast, Northern Ireland: Nicknamed the "Peace Line," this series of brick, iron, and steel barriers was first erected in the 1970s to curb escalating violence between Catholic and Protestant neighborhoods. The barriers have more than doubled in number over the past decade, and currently stretch over thirteen miles of Northern Ireland.

3. Cyprus: A 112-mile-long construction of concrete, barbed wire, watchtowers, minefields, and ditches has separated the island’s Turks from its Greeks since 1974. The Turkish Cypriot government reduced restrictions on cross-border travel in April of 2003.

4. Morocco/Western Sahara: Known as "The Wall of Shame," these ten-foot-high sand and stone barriers, some mined, run for at least 1,500 miles through the Western Sahara. Built in the 1980s, they are intended to keep West Saharan guerrilla fighters out of Morocco.

5. India/Bangladesh: Aiming to curb infiltration from its neighbor, India in 1986 sanctioned what will ultimately be a 2,043-mile barbed-wire barrier. It’s expected to cost $1 billion by the time it is completed, next year.

6. India/Pakistan: In 1989 India began erecting a fence to stem the flow of arms from Pakistan. So far it has installed more than 700 miles of fencing, much of which is electrified and stands in the disputed Kashmir region. The anti-terrorist barriers will eventually run the entire 1,800-mile border with Pakistan.

7. Kuwait/Iraq: The 120-mile demilitarized zone along this border has been manned by UN soldiers and observers since the Gulf War ended, in 1991. Made of electric fencing and wire, and supplemented by fifteen-foot-wide trenches, the barrier extends from Saudi Arabia to the Persian Gulf. Last year Kuwait decided to install an additional 135-mile iron partition.

8. United States/Mexico: In the mid-1990s President Clinton initiated two programs, Operation Gatekeeper and Operation Hold the Line, to crack down on illegal immigration from Mexico. They produced a system of high-tech barriers, including a fourteen-mile fence separating San Diego from Tijuana. All told, security barriers stretch along at least seventy miles of the border.

9. Botswana/Zimbabwe: The government of Botswana claims to have started building a ten-foot-high electric fence along its border with Zimbabwe to control the spread of foot-and-mouth disease. However, most Zimbabweans believe that the fence—begun in 2003 and intended to stretch up to 300 miles—really aims to stanch the immigration flow from troubled Zimbabwe into calmer Botswana.

10. Saudi Arabia/Yemen: In 2003 Saudi Arabia began building a ten-foot-high barrier along its border with Yemen to prevent terrorist infiltration (you read that correctly). Heeding Yemeni protests that the fence violated a border treaty, the Saudi government vowed last year to complete the project in cooperation with Yemen.

Voir enfin:

Death toll of Israeli civilians killed by Palestinians hit a low in 2006

Dion Nissenbaum

McClatchy Newspapers

June 14, 2007

JERUSALEM — JERUSALEM—Israel’s summer war with Hezbollah in the north and small rocket attacks from the Gaza Strip in the south have overshadowed a striking reality: Fewer Israeli civilians died in Palestinian attacks in 2006 than in any year since the Palestinian uprising began in 2000.

Palestinian militants killed 23 Israelis and foreign visitors in 2006, down from a high of 289 in 2002 during the height of the uprising.

Most significant, successful suicide bombings in Israel nearly came to a halt. Last year, only two Palestinian suicide bombers managed to sneak into Israel for attacks that killed 11 people and wounded 30 others. Israel has gone nearly nine months without a suicide bombing inside its borders, the longest period without such an attack since 2000.

The figures highlight Israel’s success in insulating most of its citizens from the unresolved conflict with the Palestinians, largely by containing battles to the predominantly Palestinian West Bank and Gaza Strip.

The drop in Israeli casualties was accompanied by a dramatic rise in Palestinian deaths, which more than tripled, to 660 from 197 in 2005—28 Palestinian deaths for every Israeli killed. Most of those deaths came in the second half of the year, during an unsuccessful Israeli military campaign in Gaza sparked by the capture of an Israeli soldier last June.

An Israeli military spokeswoman said one major factor in that success had been Israel’s controversial separation barrier, a still-growing 250-mile network of concrete walls, high-tech fencing and other obstacles that cuts through parts of the West Bank.

"The security fence was put up to stop terror, and that’s what it’s doing," said Capt. Noa Meir, a spokeswoman for the Israel Defense Forces.

Israel began building the barrier in 2002 when Palestinian suicide bombings were at their peak. It’s pressed ahead with construction despite an international court opinion criticizing the route as cutting across wide swaths of Palestinian land. About 10 percent of the land that Palestinians want for a state now lies on the Israeli side of the wall, and several large Palestinian settlements have been divided by 25-foot-tall concrete slabs.

Opponents of the wall grudgingly acknowledge that it’s been effective in stopping bombers, though they complain that its route should have followed the border between Israel and the Palestinian territories known as the Green Line.

"Although undoubtedly it has had an effect in blocking suicide bombers, the point is that it still would have had that impact if it had been built legally under international law on the Green Line or inside Israel," said Ray Dolphin, the author of "The West Bank Wall: Unmaking Palestine."

Jeff Halper, an Israeli activist and longtime critic of the barrier, said it was doing more harm than good.

"I suppose that the wall has a certain effect, but the damage is disproportionate to the advantages," said Halper, the coordinator of The Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions. "The only way Israel is going to have peace is by giving up territories, not annexing them."

Halper and Dolphin also said Israel’s security had been aided by a decision last year by the leading Palestinian groups to declare a cease-fire that largely was still holding.

IDF spokeswoman Meir said Israeli military operations that disrupted militants planning attacks from the West Bank also deserved credit for the drop in Israeli fatalities.

She cautioned that the decline might be misleading. While successful suicide bombings are at a low, the number of attempts is rising, she said. The Israeli army arrested 187 potential suicide bombers last year, up from 96 in 2005, according to Israeli military statistics.

"The motivation is there, but thanks to our activity we have managed to thwart it and spare many, many Israeli lives," Meir said.

As the Israeli-Palestinian conflict dragged on last year, Israelis faced a more immediate threat from the north when Hezbollah militants from Lebanon captured two Israeli soldiers in a mid-July cross-border attack that sparked a 34-day war.

During that time, Hezbollah fired hundreds of rockets into Israel, killing 43 civilians. In response, Israel staged a widespread air and ground operation that claimed more than 1,100 Lebanese lives. Before a cease-fire took hold in mid-August, 119 Israeli soldiers also were killed.


Mort de Nelson Mandela: Mandela ou l’anti-Arafat (Robben Island was a tremendous school in human relations – the kind of thing that a lot of politicians could do with)

6 décembre, 2013
http://www.rightsidenews.com/images/stories/December_2013/Editorial/US_Opinion/320x276xANC_MANDELA_COUPLE_JOE_SLOVO_COMMUNIST.jpg.pagespeed.ic.naRfeQ9VR6.jpgNelson Mandela (L) is embraced by PLO leader Yasser Arafat as he arrives at Lusaka airport February 27, 1990.  REUTERS/Howard BurdittJe ne saurais trop insister sur le rôle que l’Église méthodiste a joué dans ma vie. Nelson Mandela (23e anniversaire de la Gospel Church power of Republic of South Africa, 1995)
Sans l’Église, sans les institutions religieuses, je ne serais pas là aujourd’hui.  Nelson Mandela (parlement mondial des religions, 1999)
Nous qui avons grandi dans des maisons religieuses et qui avons étudié dans les écoles des missionnaires, nous avons fait l’expérience d’un profond conflit spirituel quand nous avons vu le mode de vie que nous jugions sacré remis en question par de nouvelles philosophies, et quand nous nous sommes rendu compte que, parmi ceux qui traitaient notre foi d’opium, il y avait des penseurs dont l’intégrité et l’amour pour les hommes ne faisaient pas de doute. Nelson Mandela (lettre à Fatima Meer, 1977)
J’assiste encore à tous les services de l’Église et j’apprécie certains sermons.  Nelson Mandela (lettre de Robben island)
Partager le sacrement qui fait partie de la tradition de mon Église était important à mes yeux. Cela me procurait l’apaisement et le calme intérieur. En sortant des services, j’étais un homme neuf. (…) Je n’ai jamais abandonné mes croyances chrétiennes. Nelson Mandela (lettre à Ahmed Kathrada, 1993)
J’ai bien sûr été baptisé à l’Église wesleyenne et j’ai fréquenté ses écoles missionnaires. Dehors comme ici, je lui reste fidèle, mais mes conceptions ont eu tendance à s’élargir et à être bienveillantes envers l’unité religieuse. Nelson Mandela (1977)
La relation entre un homme et son Dieu est un sujet extrêmement privé, qui ne regarde pas les mass media. Cela dit, les institutions religieuses m’ont aidé à garder le moral pendant mon séjour en prison. Les prêtres nous rendaient visite régulièrement pour célébrer la messe; plusieurs sermons nous ont renforcés dans notre détermination. Les religieux ont fréquemment agi comme des intermédiaires entre les prisonniers et leurs familles, aussi. Et l’Eglise a veillé à nous fournir des livres, quand l’administration pénitentiaire les autorisait. Nelson Mandela (interview à l’Express, 1995)
The Gandhian influence dominated freedom struggles on the African continent right up to the 1960s because of the power it generated and the unity it forged among the apparently powerless. Nonviolence was the official stance of all major African coalitions, and the South African A.N.C. remained implacably opposed to violence for most of its existence. Gandhi remained committed to nonviolence; I followed the Gandhian strategy for as long as I could, but then there came a point in our struggle when the brute force of the oppressor could no longer be countered through passive resistance alone. We founded Unkhonto we Sizwe and added a military dimension to our struggle. Even then, we chose sabotage because it did not involve the loss of life, and it offered the best hope for future race relations. Militant action became part of the African agenda officially supported by the Organization of African Unity (O.A.U.) following my address to the Pan-African Freedom Movement of East and Central Africa (PAFMECA) in 1962, in which I stated, "Force is the only language the imperialists can hear, and no country became free without some sort of violence." Gandhi himself never ruled out violence absolutely and unreservedly. He conceded the necessity of arms in certain situations. He said, "Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence… I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor …" Violence and nonviolence are not mutually exclusive; it is the predominance of the one or the other that labels a struggle. Nelson Mandela (Time, 1999)
Trois modernes ont marqué ma vie d’un sceau profond et ont fait mon enchantement: Raychandbhai [écrivain gujarati connu pour ses polémiques religieuses], Tolstoï, par son livre "Le Royaume des Cieux est en vous", et Ruskin et son Unto This Last. Gandhi
In planning the direction and form that MK would take, we considered four types of violent activities: sabotage, guerrilla warfare, terrorism, and open revolution. For a small and fledgling army, open revolution was inconceivable. Terrorism inevitably reflected poorly on those who used it, undermining any public support it might otherwise garner. Guerrilla warfare was a possibility, but since the ANC had been reluctant to embrace violence at all, it made sense to start with the form of violence that inflicted the least harm against individuals: sabotage. Because it did not involve loss of life it offered the best hope for reconciliation among the races afterward. We did not want to start a blood feud between white and black. Animosity between Afrikaner and Englishman was still sharp fifty years after the Anglo-Boer War; what would race relations be like between white and black if we provoked a civil war? Sabotage had the added virtue of requiring the least manpower. Our strategy was to make selective forays against military installations, power plants, telephone lines, and transportation links; targets that would not only hamper the military effectiveness of the state, but frighten National Party supporters, scare away foreign capital, and weaken the economy. This we hoped would bring the government to the bargaining table. Strict instructions were given to members of MK that we would countenance no loss of life. But if sabotage did not produce the results we wanted, we were prepared to move on to the next stage: guerrilla warfare and terrorism. Mandela (Long walk to freedom, 1995)
He needed that time in prison to mellow. Desmond Tutu (Sky News)
Perhaps the most difficult case to make is that of the ANC in South Africa. If ever a group could legitimately claim to have resorted to force only as a last resort, it is the ANC. Founded in 1912, for the first fifty years the movement treated nonviolence as a core principle. In 1961, however, with all forms of political organization closed to it, Nelson Mandela was authorized to create a separate military organization, Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK). In his autobiography Mandela describes the strategy session as the movement examined the options available to them: We considered four types of violent activities: sabotage, guerrilla warfare, terrorism and open revolution. For a small and fledgling army, open revolution was inconceivable. Terrorism inevitably reflected poorly on those who used it, undermining any public support it might otherwise garner. Guerrilla warfare was a possibility, but since the ANC had been reluctant to embrace violence at all, it made sense to start with the form of violence that inflicted the least harm against individuals: sabotage. These fine distinctions were lost on the court in Rivonia that convicted Mandela and most of the ANC leadership in 1964 and sentenced them to life imprisonment. For the next twenty years an increasingly repressive white minority state denied the most basic political rights to the majority black population. An uprising in Soweto was defeated, as was an MK guerrilla campaign launched from surrounding states. In 1985, the government declared a state of emergency, which was followed within three weeks by thirteen terrorist bombings in major downtown areas. Reasonable people can differ on whether or not the terrorism of the ANC was justified, given the legitimacy of the goals it sought and the reprehensible nature of the government it faced. The violent campaign of the ANC in the early and mid-1980s, however, was indisputably a terrorist campaign. Unless and until we are willing to label a group whose ends we believe to be just a terrorist group, if it deliberately targets civilians in order to achieve those ends, we are never going to be able to forge effective international cooperation against terrorism. Louise Richardson
In the end, Mandela was arrested before the armed struggle reached that stage. Then, as he languished in prison—a powerful symbol, but no longer accountable as a commander—terrorism did come to the fore. The infamous Church Street bombing in 1983, for instance, targeted the South African Air Force headquarters, killing 19 people and wounding 217, among them many innocent bystanders. When at last the white South African government, facing the possibility of wider civil war and pressured by international sanctions, turned to Mandela for secret talks, it could do so knowing he had the authority to negotiate without the taint of direct involvement with the carnage. His combination of pragmatism and humanity was key. The Daily Beast
Crucially, Mandela was open to escalation to terror tactics and guerrilla war. The ANC’s 1982 attack of the Koeberg nuclear plant — yes, crucial infrastructure — killed 19 people. Unsurprisingly, the ANC was listed as a terrorist organization by the United States. Mandela himself was on a U.S. terror watch list until 2008. Natasha Lennard
Like many other anti-Communists and Cold Warriors, I feared that releasing Nelson Mandela from jail, especially amid the collapse of South Africa’s apartheid government, would create a Cuba on the Cape of Good Hope at best and an African Cambodia at worst. After all, Mandela had spent 27 years locked up in Robben Island prison due to his leadership of the African National Congress. The ANC was a violent, pro-Communist organization. (…) Having seen Communists terrorize nations around the world while the Berlin Wall still stood, Mandela looked like one more butcher waiting to take his place on the 20th Century’s blood-soaked stage. The example of the Ayatollah Khomeini also was fresh in our minds. He went swiftly from exile in Paris to edicts in Tehran and quickly turned Iran into a vicious and bloodthirsty dictatorship at the vanguard of militant Islam. Nelson Mandela was just another Fidel Castro or a Pol Pot, itching to slip from behind bars, savage his country, and surf atop the bones of his victims. WRONG! Far, far, far from any of that, Nelson Mandela turned out to be one of the 20th Century’s great moral leaders, right up there with Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Deroy Murdock
Envoyé à la cour du roi, Rolhlahla se prépare à assurer la succession à la chefferie, à l’école des pasteurs méthodistes d’abord, puis, en 1938 à l’University College for Bantu de Fort Hare, seul établissement secondaire habilité à l’époque à recevoir des «non-Blancs». Les fondateurs blancs de Fort Hare entendaient former une élite noire capable de servir leur dessein colonial. Mais face à la conjugaison d’esprits éveillés, l’épreuve de la réalité étant la plus forte, l’université «bantoue» s’est transformée en pépinière du nationalisme d’Afrique australe, d’où sortirent notamment les frères ennemis zimbabwéens Joshua Nkomo et Robert Mugabe ou le «père de la Nation» zambienne, Kenneth Kaunda. (…) Fondé à Bloemfontein en 1912, l’African native national congress (ANNC) avait abandonné son initiale coloniale «native» (indigène) en 1923 pour devenir ANC. Largement inspiré par les idées légalistes du promoteur de l’émancipation des Noirs américains, Booker T. Washington, l’ANC avait entrepris d’informer la communauté noire sud-africaine sur ses droits ou ce qui en restait, faisant aussi campagne par exemple contre la loi sud-africaine sur les laissez-passer. (…) En 1951, Tambo et Mandela sont les deux premiers avocats noirs inscrits au barreau de Johannesburg. L’année suivante, ils ouvrent un cabinet ensemble. En 1950, les principales lois de l’apartheid ont été adoptées, en particulier le Group areas act qui assigne notamment à «résidence» les Noirs dans les bantoustans et les townships. Le Supression communist act inscrit dans son champ anti-communiste toute personne qui «cherche à provoquer un changement politique, industriel, économique ou social par des moyens illégaux». Bien évidemment, pour l’apartheid il n’y a pas de possibilité de changement légal. Mais en rangeant dans le même sac nationalistes, communistes, pacifistes et révolutionnaires, il ferme la fracture idéologique qui opposait justement ces derniers au sein de l’ANC. Pour sa part, Nelson Mandela rompt avec son anti-communisme chrétien intransigeant pour recommander l’unité de lutte anti-apartheid entre les nationalistes noirs et les Blancs du SACP. Elu président de l’ANC pour le Transvaal et vice président national de l’ANC, Nelson Mandela est également choisi comme «volontaire en chef» pour lancer en juin 1952 une action de désobéissance civile civile de grande envergure à la manière du Mahatma Ghandi, la «défiance campaign», où il anime des cohortes de manifestants descendus en masse dans la rue. La campagne culmine en octobre, contre la ségrégation légalisée et en particulier contre le port obligatoire des laissez-passer imposé aux Noirs. Tout un arsenal de loi sur la «sécurité publique» verrouille l’état d’urgence qui autorise l’apartheid à gouverner par décrets. Condamné à neuf mois de prison avec sursis, le charismatique Mandela est interdit de réunion et assigné à résidence à Johannesburg. Il en profite pour mettre au point le «Plan M» qui organise l’ANC en cellules clandestines. La répression des années cinquante contraint Mandela à faire disparaître son nom de l’affiche officielle de l’ANC mais ne l’empêche pas de participer en 1955 au Congrès des peuples qui adopte une Charte des Libertés préconisant l’avènement d’une société multiraciale et démocratique. Le Congrès parvient en effet à rassembler l’ANC, le Congrès indien, l’Organisation des métis sud-africain (SACPO), le Congrès des démocrates -composé de communistes proscrits depuis 1950 et de radicaux blancs- ainsi que le Congrès des syndicats sud-africains (SACTU). Le 5 décembre 1956, Nelson Mandela est arrêté avec Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo, Albert Luthuli (prix Nobel de la paix 1960) et des dizaines de dirigeants du mouvement anti-apartheid. Ils sont accusés, toutes races et toutes obédiences confondues, de comploter contre l’Etat au sein d’une organisation internationale d’inspiration communiste. En mars 1961, le plus long procès de l’histoire judiciaire sud-africaine s’achève sur un non-lieu général. L’ANC estime avoir épuisé tous les recours de la non-violence. Le 21 mars 1960, à Sharpeville, la police de l’apartheid transforme en bain de sang (69 morts et 180 blessés) une manifestation pacifique contre les laissez-passer. L’état d’urgence est réactivé. Des milliers de personnes font les frais de la répression terrible qui s’ensuit dans tous le pays. Le 8 avril, l’ANC et le Congrès panafricain (le PAC né d’une scission anti-communiste) sont interdits. Cette même année de sang, Nelson épouse en deuxièmes noces Winnie, une assistante sociale, et entre en clandestinité. En mai 1961, le succès de son mot d’ordre de grève générale à domicile «stay at house» déchaîne les foudres de Pretoria qui déploie son grand jeu militaro-policier pour briser la résistance. En décembre, l’ANC met en application le plan de passage graduel à la lutte armée rédigé par Nelson Mandela. Avant d’en arriver à «la guérilla, le terrorisme et la révolution ouverte», Mandela préconise le sabotage des cibles militaro-industrielles qui, écrit-il, «n’entraîne aucune perte en vie humaine et ménage les meilleures chances aux relations interraciales». Le 16 décembre 1961 des explosions marquent aux quatre coins du pays le baptême du feu d’Umkhonto We Sizwe, le «fer de lance de la Nation», la branche militaire de l’ANC. D’Addis-Abeba en janvier 1962 où se tient la conférence du Mouvement panafricain pour la libération de l’Afrique australe et orientale, à l’Algérie fraîchement indépendante d’Ahmed Ben Bella où il suit une formation militaire avec son ami Tambo, Nelson Mandela sillonne l’Afrique pour plaider la cause de l’ANC et recueillir subsides et bourses universitaires. Le pacifiste se met à l’étude de la stratégie militaire. Clausewitz, Mao et Che Guevara voisinent sur sa table de chevet avec les spécialistes de la guerre anglo-boers. A son retour, il est arrêté, le 5 août 1962, grâce à un indicateur de police, après une folle cavale où il emprunte toutes sortes de déguisements. En novembre, il écope de 5 ans de prison pour sortie illégale du territoire mais aussi comme fauteur de grève. Alors qu’il a commencé à purger sa peine, une deuxième vague d’accusation va le clouer en prison pour deux décennies de plus. Les services de l’apartheid sont parvenus à infiltrer l’ANC jusqu’à sa tête. Le 11 juillet 1963, les principaux chefs d’Umkhonto We Sizwe tombent dans ses filets. Avec eux, dans la ferme de Lilliesleaf, à Rivonia, près de Johannesburg, la police de Pretoria met la main sur des kilos de documents, parmi lesquels le plan de passage à la lutte armée signé Mandela. RFI
Les dirigeants révolutionnaires cambodgiens sont pour la plupart issus de familles de la bourgeoisie. Beaucoup effectuèrent leurs études dans des universités françaises dans les années 1950. Dans une atmosphère parisienne cosmopolite et propice aux échanges d’idées, ils se rallièrent à l’idéologie communiste. Ses principaux dirigeants (Pol Pot, Khieu Samphân, Son Sen…) furent formés à Paris dans les années 1950 au Cercle des Études Marxistes fondé par le Bureau Politique du PCF en 1930. Wikipedia
Il est malheureux que le Moyen-Orient ait rencontré pour la première fois la modernité occidentale à travers les échos de la Révolution française. Progressistes, égalitaristes et opposés à l’Eglise, Robespierre et les jacobins étaient des héros à même d’inspirer les radicaux arabes. Les modèles ultérieurs — Italie mussolinienne, Allemagne nazie, Union soviétique — furent encore plus désastreux. (…) Ce qui rend l’entreprise terroriste des islamistes aussi dangereuse, ce n’est pas tant la haine religieuse qu’ils puisent dans des textes anciens — souvent au prix de distorsions grossières —, mais la synthèse qu’ils font entre fanatisme religieux et idéologie moderne. Ian Buruma et Avishai Margalit
Today’s black leadership pretty much lives off the fumes of moral authority that linger from its glory days in the 1950s and ’60s. The Zimmerman verdict lets us see this and feel a little embarrassed for them. Consider the pathos of a leadership that once transformed the nation now lusting for the conviction of the contrite and mortified George Zimmerman, as if a stint in prison for him would somehow assure more peace and security for black teenagers everywhere. This, despite the fact that nearly one black teenager a day is shot dead on the South Side of Chicago—to name only one city—by another black teenager. This would not be the first time that a movement begun in profound moral clarity, and that achieved greatness, waned away into a parody of itself—not because it was wrong but because it was successful. Today’s civil-rights leaders have missed the obvious: The success of their forbearers in achieving social transformation denied to them the heroism that was inescapable for a Martin Luther King Jr. or a James Farmer or a Nelson Mandela. Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton cannot write a timeless letter to us from a Birmingham jail or walk, as John Lewis did in 1965, across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., into a maelstrom of police dogs and billy clubs. That America is no longer here (which is not to say that every trace of it is gone). The Revs. Jackson and Sharpton have been consigned to a hard fate: They can never be more than redundancies, echoes of the great men they emulate because America has changed. Hard to be a King or Mandela today when your monstrous enemy is no more than the cherubic George Zimmerman. The purpose of today’s civil-rights establishment is not to seek justice, but to seek power for blacks in American life based on the presumption that they are still, in a thousand subtle ways, victimized by white racism. This idea of victimization is an example of what I call a "poetic truth." Like poetic license, it bends the actual truth in order to put forward a larger and more essential truth—one that, of course, serves one’s cause. Poetic truths succeed by casting themselves as perfectly obvious: "America is a racist nation"; "the immigration debate is driven by racism"; "Zimmerman racially stereotyped Trayvon." And we say, "Yes, of course," lest we seem to be racist. Poetic truths work by moral intimidation, not reason. In the Zimmerman/Martin case the civil-rights establishment is fighting for the poetic truth that white animus toward blacks is still such that a black teenager—Skittles and ice tea in hand—can be shot dead simply for walking home. But actually this establishment is fighting to maintain its authority to wield poetic truth—the authority to tell the larger society how it must think about blacks, how it must respond to them, what it owes them and, then, to brook no argument. One wants to scream at all those outraged at the Zimmerman verdict: Where is your outrage over the collapse of the black family? Today’s civil-rights leaders swat at mosquitoes like Zimmerman when they have gorillas on their back. Seventy-three percent of all black children are born without fathers married to their mothers. And you want to bring the nation to a standstill over George Zimmerman? Shelby Steele
I think he probably is the one man who stands out as having a moral integrity and a far-sighted view. I think that′s why other politicians such as Bill Clinton or Tony Blair feel a great awe of him, because he has those qualities which I′m not sure they have themselves.′ (…) He started as a tribalist, then he became a nationalist, and then he became a multi-nationalist or a multi-culturalist, and gradually saw a wider and wider world.  (…) there were of course two sides of him. He was a practising lawyer, and he had tremendous respect for the law, and was always quoting it – as he does now – but at the same time he was very aware that it was impossible to achieve any kind of redress through non-violent means. He never really believed in the Ghandi-ist principle of ′turn the other cheek′. Long before 1960 he was inclined to go further towards the suggestion of violence. But at that point the logic became almost incontrovertible. There was no alternative. But perhaps more important was the fact that his own people were turning towards more dangerous kinds of violence. So it would have been impossible for him to maintain any leadership if he was purely pacifist.′ (…) There′s no doubt in my mind that it (Robben Island) tremendously increased his self-discipline and his understanding of people. It was a tremendously enclosed world, and for most of the time he was only with 30 of his colleagues together with the warders so it had the intensity of a boarding school, albeit with much more discipline and harshness. So for somebody who was strong enough, who had the necessary confidence in themselves, it was a tremendous school in human relations. It was the kind of thing that a lot of politicians could do with, actually. ′During his twenty-seven years in Robben Island, Mandela was able to extend his influence beyond the ANC to the rival groups, which was very important when he got out. But above all he acquired an increased sensitivity to other people. He sharpened his skills of debate and persuasion tremendously, and probably his greatest gift is his capacity to persuade. You can see how, for someone who had that sense of self-respect and dignity, the jail experience was almost a training ground. Anthony Simpson
Né le 18 juillet 1918 dans l’ancien Transkei, mort le 5 décembre 2013, Nelson Mandela ne ressemblait pas à la pieuse image que le politiquement correct planétaire donne aujourd’hui de lui. Par delà les émois lénifiants et les hommages hypocrites, il importe de ne jamais perdre de vue les éléments suivants :(…) Aristocrate xhosa issu de la lignée royale des Thembu, Nelson Mandela n’était pas un « pauvre noir opprimé ». Eduqué à l’européenne par des missionnaires méthodistes, il commença ses études supérieures à Fort Hare, université destinée aux enfants des élites noires, avant de les achever à Witwatersrand, au Transvaal, au cœur de ce qui était alors le « pays boer ». Il s’installa ensuite comme avocat à Johannesburg. (…) Il n’était pas non plus ce gentil réformiste que la mièvrerie médiatique se plait à dépeindre en « archange de la paix » luttant pour les droits de l’homme, tel un nouveau Gandhi ou un nouveau Martin Luther King. Nelson Mandela fut en effet et avant tout un révolutionnaire, un combattant, un militant qui mit « sa peau au bout de ses idées », n’hésitant pas à faire couler le sang des autres et à risquer le sien. Il fut ainsi l’un des fondateurs de l’Umkonto We Sizwe, « le fer de lance de la nation », aile militaire de l’ANC, qu’il co-dirigea avec le communiste Joe Slovo, planifiant et coordonnant plus de 200 attentats et sabotages pour lesquels il fut condamné à la prison à vie. (…) Nelson Mandela n’a pas apaisé les rapports inter-raciaux. Ainsi, entre 1970 et 1994, en 24 ans, alors que l’ANC était "en guerre" contre le « gouvernement blanc », une soixantaine de fermiers blancs furent tués. Depuis avril 1994, date de l’arrivée au pouvoir de Nelson Mandela, plus de 2000 fermiers blancs ont été massacrés dans l’indifférence la plus totale des médias européens. Bernard Lugan (historien français controversé)
At present his legacy in some respects still exists in emergent form, has yet to express its true contours. This is to my mind the key difference between how he is viewed at home and internationally, where the lacquer of adulation laid thick upon the "human-rights legend" has long since hardened. Abroad, Mandela is the African the world loves to love, even if in a strikingly over-compensatory way. Africa the continent of famine, corruption and social abjection has produced, at least, this one fine human being, Europeans and Americans appear to breathe as they cluster around him. A hostile Sunday Times (London) magazine article, which appeared the weekend before his 18 July birthday, opined that the one task Mandela can still competently carry out is to smile his dazzling smile, only now it is on command. There is little that is meaningful in it: in his old age he has become a mask of his former charismatic self, to which the world has grown accustomed to genuflect. For the international community the paradox is that by heaping excessive adoration upon the head of this one seemingly superhuman African, we have left Africa, the continent, its people, more lacking of attention by contrast. There have been many great Africans yet their reputation has been dangerously eclipsed by this one over-hyped African hero of our times. Yet it is here, within the gap between his fully manifested yet relatively shallow international fame, and his still-latent local significance, that, it seems to me, the potential for renewed understandings of Mandela have the opportunity to emerge, which, when all is said and done, is a good thing. Within this gap, then, I would venture to place the following desiderata. Let us not allow our image of Mandela to petrify into cliché, especially yet not only while he is still alive amongst us. Let his meanings evolve and change in rhythm with his times. Let his legacy organisations perhaps relax a little in wanting to predetermine how the future will see him. His achievement on its own dwarfs the efforts of such tireless PR policing. What is not in doubt is that Mandela is a great and humane human being not in spite of his Africanness, as his western acolytes (according to the Sunday Times) believe, but because of his Africanness. Perhaps most important, let us not forget that his greatness as an African was dependent on the cooperation of hosts of other Africans, little and great, ordinary and extraordinary, as he himself has always recognised. Elleke Boehmer
Tout au long de leur vie, Yasser Arafat et Nelson Mandela, icônes respectives de la cause de leur peuple, récompensés à une année d’écart par le Prix Nobel de la Paix affichaient la solidarité et la complicité de vieux camarades de lutte. Libération
Les Israéliens voient en Mandela un leader qui prit la décision de principe de faire la paix avec ses ennemis et tint parole. Les Palestiniens voient en lui un combattant nationaliste qui refusa de compromettre ses principes, même si cela impliquait d’immenses souffrances personnelles — et comme un leader guidé par ces mêmes principes, lorsqu’il fallut faire les compromis historiques nécessaires pour minimiser les effusions de sang tout en poursuivant ses objectifs. Et dans les deux cas — comme dans d’autres — Arafat ne tient tout simplement pas la comparaison. Time

Fils de chef héréditaire, élève d’école missionnaire, méthodiste, étudiant en droit, avocat, pacifiste gandhien, tribaliste, nationaliste, marxiste, communiste, stagiaire des camps militaires algériens, chef de l’aile militaire de l’ANC, terroriste, terroriste repenti, humaniste, multiculturaliste …

Attention: un camarade de lutte peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où nos médias et nos journaux croulent sous les hommages au véritable saint laïc qu’était devenu l’ancien président sud-africain Nelson Mandela

Pendant qu’en Afrique du sud même la tentation zimbabwéenne ne semble pas encore totalement écartée …

Et qu’après l’avoir refusé pendant des années, la veuve du dirigeant historique palestinien en est encore à contester, neuf ans après sa probable mort de poivrot aux amitiés douteuses,  la dernière autopsie de "l’erreur" de sa vie …

Comment ne pas voir, avec son biographe Anthony Simpson, l’inestimable effet qu’eurent finalement, sans compter tant son instruction anglaise et chrétienne qu’à l’instar de Gandhi (mais contrairement à un Pol Pot) sa formation de juriste britannique, ses 27 ans d’internement  sur l’ancien terroriste repenti ?

Ou, avec son ancien organisateur, la véritable renaissance médiatique qu’apporta à celui qui fut un moment tenté de faire sauter des hôpitaux, le prétendu concert-anniversaire de Wembley de juin 1988 ?

Mais aussi en contraste, avec le magazine Time, tout ce qui a pu manquer comme l’incroyable gâchis que fut presqu’en même temps la vie d’un autre terroriste qui lui, en dépit de son prix Nobel, le restera …

A savoir l’ex-leader palestinien Yasser Arafat ?

Unfortunately, Arafat’s No Nelson Mandela

Tony Karon

Time

Jun. 05, 2001

"The problem with Yasser Arafat is that he’s no Nelson Mandela." I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve head that complaint, both from Palestinians and Israelis.

It’s an apples and oranges comparison, of course, given the widely different historical and political contexts that produced the PLO chairman and the imprisoned guerrilla leader who led South Africa’s peaceful transition from apartheid. But the fact that it occurs so often on both sides of the intractable Middle East divide makes it worthy of examination.

The Israelis see in Mandela a leader who took a principled decision to make peace with his enemies, and kept his word. The Palestinians see him as a nationalist fighter who refused to compromise his principles even when that meant immense personal suffering — and as a leader guided by those same principles when making the historic compromises necessary to minimize bloodshed while pursuing his goals. And in both instances — and others — Arafat falls short by comparison.

Intifada as a bargaining chip

Arafat’s leadership abilities are once more in the spotlight, as the latest cease-fire effort plunges him into yet another strategic crisis. While many of those who have waged the intifada on the ground these past nine months believe that a long-term, low-intensity war will eventually drive the Israeli soldiers and settlers out of the West Bank and Gaza — as it did in Lebanon — Arafat’s agenda has been somewhat different. He can only achieve his goal of a Palestinian State in the West Bank and Gaza through negotiation with Israel and the international community, and so as much he chants the slogans of struggle he has, throughout, looked upon the uprising that has killed almost 500 Palestinians and more than 100 Israelis and ruined thousands of lives and livelihoods, as a means of improving his bargaining position. He has spent much of the uprising shuttling around foreign capitals trying to win support for renewed negotiations, hoping the uprising would function strengthen his hand at the table.

Last weekend he called it off, "in the higher interests of the Palestinian people," after the Europeans made it clear that funding for Arafat’s Palestinian Authority would be withheld if he failed to take steps against terrorism. But the Palestinian leader has a problem, of course, because while a recent opinion poll in the West Bank and Gaza found that 76 percent of Palestinians support suicide bombings inside Israel, only a minority would give Arafat’s notoriously corrupt administration a positive rating.

Palestinians are angry at Arafat, too

Indeed, as much as it suited Arafat’s immediate agenda, the intifada was also viewed by many observers of Palestinian politics as an outpouring of anger against the Palestinian Authority. And many grassroots leaders of the uprising have made clear that they have no interest in a return to the negotiating table, regardless of Arafat’s own intentions.

That’s a major problem for Arafat, since any cease-fire would ultimately require the Palestinian Authority to begin re-arresting the Hamas and Islamic Jihad members released when the current intifada began. Arafat will have to convince his own security forces, who have been on the frontline of confrontation with Israel, that they need to once again round up some of the Islamist militants alongside whom they’ve fought these past nine months, in order to ensure Israel’s security — and in exchange for no political gains beyond, perhaps, the easing of some of the collective punishments imposed by Israel in response to the uprising.

Arafat’s dilemma is, in many ways, of his own making. And the Palestinians, who will at some point in the not-too-distant future have to choose his successor, may want to pay close attention to Arafat’s mistakes — and, perhaps, to Mandela’s example.

Pulling the keffiyeh over Palestinian eyes

The problem is ultimately a lack of communication. Arafat never made clear to his own people the massive compromises involved in the Oslo Peace process — the fact that the Palestinians were signing away their claim to most of historic Palestine, and that the best the millions of Palestinians descended from those made refugees by Israel’s foundation in 1948 could hope for under the circumstances was some form of financial compensation. Arafat told his people that he was in negotiations with Israel that would lead to the creation of a Palestinian State with Jerusalem as its capital. On the ground, though, all they could see was the arrival of a class of PLO bureaucrats from Tunis who began to rapidly enrich themselves on the aid money pouring into the Palestinian Administration, and the continued expansion, at their expense, of Israel’s settlements in the West Bank and Gaza.

In contrast, Mandela negotiated with a lot more transparency, and always held himself accountable to his supporters, working to persuade them of the necessity of compromise rather than simply pretending it wasn’t happening. He had rejected terrorism on principle: his soldiers were always under orders to avoid attacking civilians, even when their unarmed supporters on the ground were being massacred by the apartheid regime. And the South African leader also always displayed a keen understanding of his adversary’s motivations and concerns, which gave him the ability both to read their tactics and articulate positions that could assuage their fears.

Arafat proclaimed his intention to fly the Palestinian flag over Jerusalem, but sent one of his lieutenants, Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen) to negotiate a formula for "sharing" the Holy City that involved the Palestinian Authority setting up shop in the village of Abu Dis, which falls outside of Jerusalem’s current municipal boundaries and declaring it their capital. When details of the plan leaked, Arafat denied and disowned it. And that may have been symbolic of his leadership style throughout the negotiation process.

No wonder, then, that Arafat hit a wall at Camp David, when the Israelis put their final offer on the table and it fell well short of what Arafat — or any other Palestinian leader —would be able to accept and survive politically (or even physically). He’d been speaking out of two different sides of his mouth all along, but now the game was up. And that left him no room to maneuver, except stir up confrontation in the hope that it would force the Israelis and their American backers to offer him a better deal.

Little gained, much lost

That hasn’t happened. In fact, he’s being offered a lot less than last year, and it’s unlikely that any Israeli government will ever again trust him as a negotiating partner. But the Israelis still need him, because he remains the frontline of their defense against Hamas and Islamic Jihad.

Ultimately, Arafat’s primary weakness may be his distance from his own people. Mandela came of age politically in a mass movement based in the dusty streets of South Africa’s townships, before finding himself forced underground and eventually jailed. Circumstances forced Arafat, by contrast, almost from the outset to engage in the underground politics of conspiracy — small groups of trusted insiders launching guerrilla attacks and melting back into the civilian population. Later, as the leader of an exiled Palestinian movement more often than not at odds with its Arab hosts, those methods kept Arafat alive and maintained the coherence of a movement attempting to represent a nation that straddled the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza and a diaspora scattered across the Arab world.

But once back home, Arafat’s time-honored methods translated into rampant cronyism and a singular failure to nurture a democratic political culture in the areas under his control. And while that may have kept things stable, for a time, it appears to have worked against Arafat when the time comes to take unpopular decisions.

Of course, the Israelis would be wrong to think a Palestinian leader who was more like Mandela would be more pliant. Quite the contrary. They’d find it a lot harder to conclude a deal with a Mandela, or any leader of more democratic bent than Arafat. But in the end, they’d be able to rest a lot more assured that such a deal would hold.

Voir aussi:

Anger at the Heart of Nelson Mandela’s Violent Struggle

The future president of South Africa once considered guerilla warfare and terrorism to overturn Apartheid. Imprisoned for so long, his anger mellowed.

Christopher Dickey

The Daily Beast

12.06.13

In Nelson Mandela’s autobiography he tells a story about a sparrow. This was in the early 1960s when the late South African leader was hiding out on a farm near Johannesburg with members of the Communist Party and the African National Congress and some of their families. They were plotting what was called “armed struggle” against the Apartheid regime. (Many others would call it terrorism.) But at the time Mandela’s only gun was an old air rifle he used for target practice and dove hunting.

“One day, I was on the front lawn of the property and aimed the gun at a sparrow perched high in a tree,” Mandela writes in Long Walk to Freedom. A friend said Mandela would never hit the little creature. But he did, and he was about to boast about it when his friend’s five-year-old son, with tears in his eyes, asked Mandela, “Why did you kill that bird? Its mother will be sad.”

“My mood immediately shifted from one of pride to shame,” Mandela recalled. “I felt that this small boy had far more humanity than I did. It was an odd sensation for a man who was the leader of a nascent guerrilla army.”

Of course autobiographies always rely to some extent on recovered memories, some of them recovered myths. But Mandela’s thinking about warfare, revolution and terrorism—tempered by pragmatism and humanity—is almost as instructive as his later actions in support of peace.

In the early 1960s, just before his arrest and incarceration for more than a quarter century, Mandela was, in fact, a very angry man. As his longtime friend Bishop Desmond Tutu once told Sky News, “he needed that time in prison to mellow.”

Mandela had given up on Ghandian passive resistance after the massacre of protesters in Sharpeville in 1960. “Our policy to achieve a nonracial state by nonviolence had achieved nothing,” he concluded. But from the beginning, Mandela’s anger was controlled, and his use of violence calculated. He never trained as a soldier, but he made himself a student of revolution. Mandela sent fighters for training and indoctrination to China when it was still ruled by that revolutionary icon, Mao Tse-Tung. He studied Menachem Begin’s bloody struggle against the British in Palestine.

Mandela learned much from the Algerian war against the French, which was then at its height, and not the least of those lessons was the vital role of global propaganda: “International public opinion,” one Algerian envoy told him, “is sometimes worth more than a fleet of jet fighters.”

So, when it came to the use of violence, as with so much else in his life, Mandela opted for pragmatism over ideology. The little sparrow notwithstanding, the question was not just one of morality or humanity, but of whether the means would serve his ends.

“We considered four types of violent activities,” Mandela recalled: “sabotage, guerrilla warfare, terrorism, and open revolution. For a small and fledgling army, open revolution was inconceivable. Terrorism inevitably reflected poorly on those who used it, undermining any public support it might otherwise garner. Guerrilla warfare was a possibility, but since the ANC had been reluctant to embrace violence at all, it made sense to start with the form of violence that inflicted the least harm against individuals.”

When it came to the use of violence, as with so much else in his life, Mandela opted for pragmatism over ideology

This was imminently practical. The last thing Mandela wanted to do was unite, through fear, the often bitterly divided white Anglo and Afrikaner populations. So, strict instructions were given “that we would countenance no loss of life. But if sabotage did not produce the results we wanted, we were prepared to move on to the next stage: guerrilla war and terrorism.” (My emphasis.)

In the end, Mandela was arrested before the armed struggle reached that stage. Then, as he languished in prison—a powerful symbol, but no longer accountable as a commander—terrorism did come to the fore. The infamous Church Street bombing in 1983, for instance, targeted the South African Air Force headquarters, killing 19 people and wounding 217, among them many innocent bystanders.

When at last the white South African government, facing the possibility of wider civil war and pressured by international sanctions, turned to Mandela for secret talks, it could do so knowing he had the authority to negotiate without the taint of direct involvement with the carnage. His combination of pragmatism and humanity was key.

As Mao famously said, “a revolution is not a dinner party.” But if its leaders are as wise as Mandela, at the end of the day they can find a way for everyone to sit down at the same table.

Voir également:

The graduates of Robben Island

The bars of apartheid’s most infamous jail could not cage the spirit of its ANC prisoners. Anthony Sampson , who has known Nelson Mandela for 45 years, returned with him to the island that schooled a generation of political leaders (The Observer, February 1996)

Anthony Sampson

The Guardian

18 February 1996

It was a bewilderingly cheerful excursion, almost as if a president were revisiting his old university.

Last week, to mark the sixth anniversary of his release, President Mandela went back again to the notorious Robben Island off Cape Town where he spent most of his 27 years in prison.

He brought with him Mrs Brundtland, the Prime Minister of Norway – one of the few western countries, he stressed, which had always stood by him.

He showed her his tiny cell, joked about his experiences, and then went to the quarry where he had hacked stones for 13 years, now looking like a bright open-air amphitheatre, where he welcomed the new woman governor, Colonel Jones, who is gradually closing down the prison.

In this weird setting I found him relaxed and outspoken, as if reverting to an earlier role. He reminisced about how he had been warned by President George Bush to give up the armed struggle, and to drop his old allies Castro and Gadaffi.

He insisted it would be quite wrong for an old freedom fighter to renounce old friends: ‘your enemies are not our enemies’. And he explained he had just invited Castro to visit South Africa, and was thinking of inviting Gadaffi.

He was clearly buoyed up by his country’s international status, its economic growth and, above all, its sporting victories in rugby, soccer and cricket. ‘When I am invited by the Queen of England to London in July,’ he said, ‘I will apologise to her for what we did to her cricketers.’

He saw the new patriotism in sport as crucial to the nation-building. But he was also impatient that in other fields both whites and blacks were slow to recognise that they were all part of the same nation.

In the quarry, he presented Mrs Brundtland with a piece of the limestone, brightly packaged in a cardboard box – the first of a line of souvenirs to be sold to finance a fund for ex-political prisoners. I was given a box, with Mandela ‘s smiling face alongside the piece of lime – a neat symbol of the transmuting of the ghastly prison experience into a friendly commercial process.

Mandela as usual gave no hint of bitterness about the wastage of a quarter-century, no reference to the blazing sun in the quarry which damaged his eyesight, to the beating of his friends, or to the arrogance and inhumanity of the men who had kept him locked up – some of whom he had been welcoming at the opening of parliament two days before.

Alongside him was his closest Indian colleague, Ahmed Kathrada, who shared his ordeals on the island, and is now responsible for its future. He was careful to contradict exaggerations about the past brutalities. And he is full of enthusiasm for proje cts to make proper use of the island’s surprising beauties, including wild birds, Cape penguins, ostriches and springbok. He is now specially keen on the idea of a University of Robben Island, originated by British educationalist Lord (Michael) Young.

Watching it all, I still could not understand how these men had emerged from those inhuman cells more rounded, more humorous and tolerant than before. I had first known them both 45 years ago when I was editing the black magazine Drum in Johannesburg, and they were committed young leaders embarking on a passive resistance campaign.

And I had reported Mandela ‘s trial in the Pretoria court-room in 1964 before he was sentenced to life imprisonment, when he had sat listening to the venomous prosecutor Percy Yutar, and had sent a message asking me to help edit his own speech to court.

After the judge sentenced him, most white South Africans assumed with relief that he would never emerge again. By the time of the all-white elections in 1970 I could find no white politician who took the ANC seriously. But in the meantime, the isolation of Robben Island was forging a more formidable and thoughtful kind of leader.

In the Sixties, Mandela was already a tested and courageous leader, but aloof and quite stiff in public, inclined to cliches. By his release in 1990, he had acquired a common touch, magnanimity and sense of humour which was surprising to everyone.

He had last shown it at the opening of parliament, two days before last week’s return to Robben Island, in the middle of his formal speech about his government’s reforms. He took a long drink of water and then, aware of the tense silence, raised his glass towards de Klerk’s side of the house, and said ‘Cheers!’ – to roars of laughter. His command of the House was absolute.

It is here no doubt that Robben Island has contributed to this mastery and warmth. In those sub-humanconditions he had insisted, with his mentor Walter Sisulu, on thinking the best of everybody. He had retained and developed his natural dignity and courtesy, influencing both his fellow-prisoners and his warders. As a younger islander put it to me: ‘he treated the warders as human beings, even if they did not treat him as such’. And he simply refused to accept subservience.

His chief lawyer, George Bizos, remembers one scene which summed up his stubborn dignity, when he was being marched out in the most humiliating circumstances, flanked by armed guards and wearing short trousers and shoes without socks. Encountering Bizos, he exclaimed: ‘George, let me introduce you to my guard of honour!’.

More important, he and his closest colleagues established a pattern of behaviour which influenced nearly all the other political prisoners, to treat the island not as a place of bitter constraint and wasted lives, but as an opportunity for constant intellectual debate and political education.

One document written in 1978, which has only recently come to light, evokes all that vigour. It carefully sums up the two main arguments between Marxists and broader ANC supporters and concludes in the non-Marxist camp. It reads like a lively seminar at a left-wing university, with only one reference to’conducting the discussions under very difficult conditions,’ as a reminder that it was written on Robben Island (where Mandela approved it before it was confiscated).

They also had intense discussions about culture and sport. Mandela recalled: ‘We realised that culture was a very important aspect to building a nation’ and these concerns bore fruit in South Africa’s recent sporting victories.

Talking to Robben Islanders over the past two weeks, and reading their recollections, I’ve come to realise how far they form a distinctive elite, with a special self-respect and discipline – not so unlike the old stereotype of the Edwardian English gentleman with the stiff upper lip confronting emotional foreigners or natives. They reminisce about it as if it were a public school or a Guards’ barracks, but with a more intellectual background and idealism – more like members of the wartime French Resistance – and with much more time to develop their minds and memories (since they had to keep much of the argument in their heads). ‘We had time to think on Robben Island’, said Govan Mbeki, ‘about how we could really beat the authorities.

‘You must eventually like the place if you are to survive,’ recorded Tokyo Sexwale. ‘I loved it because it was a place of fresh air, fresh ideas, fresh friendships and teaching the enemy. We transformed Robben Island into the University of the ANC.’ Sexwale afterwards married his white prison visitor and became premier of Gauteng (the province centring on Johannesburg).

‘I can see another Robben Islander a mile away,’ I was told by ‘Raks’ Seakhoa, a poet who now runs the Congress of South African Writers. ‘I can see it when they find themselves in a conflict, this containment and channelling of anger. I’m really thankful for it. The way that we lived on Robben Island, you became an all-rounder, an organiser. When I came out, I submitted an article to a newspaper. They thought ‘this guy must have been at Rhodes University or something’.’

Robben Island remains the central symbol of both the evils of apartheid and the need for reconciliation. As Auschwitz is preserved in remembrance of the death camps, so is it a monument to intolerance and racism but like wartime heroes, the islanders hold the promise of a brave new world.

Mandela does not need to remind anyone of the ordeals he endured on the island. Some of his friends are exasperated by his friendly visits to the people who helped to put and keep him there – from his bullying old persecutor President Botha and Percy Yutar, the creepy prosecutor at his trial, to Mrs Verwoerd, the widow of the architect of apartheid, in her all-white enclave. It was like the story of the hardened criminal who gets out of jail to murder each of the people who had locked him up – turned upside down.

But those visits help to underline his moral authority, and the collapse of the alternative system. When he met Yutar, towering over the sycophantic little man, he could not resist saying: ‘I didn’t realise how small you were’. Forgiveness, after all, can be a kind of revenge, a kind of power.

Nor does Mandela need to remind younger, more radical black politicians that he has sacrificed more than any of them. They may criticise him for being too moderate towards the whites, but no one dare ever accuse him of being a sell-out. And only rarely does he need actually to spell out the message of the island: ‘if I can work alongside with the men who put me there, how can you refuse. . .’

But it is not just Mandela ‘s island and it also offers some answer to the obsessive question among whites, including foreign businessmen: what happens after Mandela retires in 1999?

He has given one answer himself: that for 27 years his people achieved their country’s liberation quite well without him, so why can’t they do without him in the future?

Robben Island forged a whole breed of younger leaders with many of Mandela ‘s strengths, who now hold key positions in the cabinet, or as premiers of the provinces. These include Patrick Lekota in the Orange Free State, Popo Molefe in the North West, and perhaps the most formidable, Tokyo Sexwale.

Sexwale, with his Robben Islander’s confidence, does not conceal his ambition. In his Johannesburg drawing-room I noticed a framed newspaper cartoon showing Thabo Mbeki, Mandela ‘s deputy, and ANC chairman Cyril Ramaphosa as two boxers slugging each other in the ring, not noticing the third figure of Tokyo climbing under the ropes.

These prison graduates, with their discipline and tolerance, offer much reassurance for a future South Africa without Mandela . Like him, they do not need to prove their heroism with macho postures for their followers and they have learnt the secrets of self-reliance and building a community in the strictest school of all.

They form the core of the present ANC leadership as assuredly as aristocrats and army officers once formed the core of the British Conservative Party – or as ex-fighters such as Jan Smuts and Louis Botha dominated the Afrikaner leadership after the Boer War, when they too were determined on reconciliation.

Yet today the process of reconciliation is worryingly one-sided. The majority of the whites have felt no great pressure to concentrate their minds and widen their awareness. ‘We can neither heal nor build,’ said Mandela in his opening speech to parliament, ‘with the victims of past injustices forgiving and the beneficiaries merely content in gratitude.’ It was followed by loud applause on the black side of the House, and only a few claps on the white side.

Mandela warned white businessmen against paying only lip service to affirmative action and assuming they could simply do business as usual. Such people too easily believe their problems have been miraculously solved by the arrival of a black president who has forgiven everyone, defused black anger and re-opened their country to the world.

No black leader, least of all Mandela , can afford such complacency. He has only to look to the Transkei, where he was born. It was turned into a bantustan and is a reminder of the evils of apartheid as vivid as Robben Island. Now it is an impoverished part of the Eastern Province.

Ten days ago I stayed in Umtata, the former capital of the Transkei: it is like a sacked city, with empty tower-blocks and slum streets the surrounding countryside is tragically desolate, with horrendous unemployment and crime.

Yet beside the main road, only a few miles out of Umtata, Mandela has built a spacious but unpretentious bungalow where he spends holidays. It is an emphatic statement that he will never be divorced from his own people.

The most serious problem of South Africa’s future is not the leadership of blacks after Mandela , but the leadership of the majority of whites. The English speakers have reverted to ‘business as usual’, leaving the politics to Afrikaners and others. But since F. W. de Klerk took his one great leap into the dark, there has been no comparable leadership, and an Afrikaner vacuum.

There has been no white equivalent to the Robben Island experience to concentrate minds, to compel them to see across their immediate self-interest and to push ahead with concessions and reconciliation. They may have been forgiven their past blunders but it will be unforgiveable if they fail to do their share of rebuilding the nation which was so nearly wrecked.

Voir encore:

Mandela: The Man Behind The Myth – An interview with Anthony Sampson

Harpers Collins.ca

Anthony Sampson is one of the most admired writers of today, and his brand new book is an outstanding biography of an outstanding man. Mandela: The Authorised Biography tells the full story of the last great statesman on the world stage. Since his release from South Africa′s notorious Robben Island prison in 1990, Mandela has been the focus of global attention, and his reputation as a politician and statesman has stood up to public scrutiny remarkably well. But who is the real Nelson Mandela? If anyone can answer this question, it is Anthony Sampson, who has known him for over forty years.

Nelson Mandela is one of the most extraordinary political figures of the twentieth century. His years of confinement in a South African prison made him a hero to many people around the world, and the story of his release and rise to power in the country′s first democratic elections filled a continent with hope. Now, as he approaches retirement, Nelson Mandela has allowed an acquaintance of many years to write his official biography. Anthony Sampson has been given access to all Mandela′s diaries, letters and papers, and many of the people to whom he has been closest have spoken out about Mandela, the man and the myth.

Mandela is the most admired politician in the world – is this admiration justified?

′I think it is, particularly when you look at all the others. I think that part of the reason why he′s admired is that he fills a tremendous gap. People have been longing for a politician who is removed from immediate pressures. There′s a tremendous shortage of great statesmen around the world compared, say, to forty years ago.

′I think he probably is the one man who stands out as having a moral integrity and a far-sighted view. I think that′s why other politicians such as Bill Clinton or Tony Blair feel a great awe of him, because he has those qualities which I′m not sure they have themselves.′

Not many people know about Mandela′s royal ancestry, and the fact that he was descended from the Tembu royal family. Did this play an important part in the formation of his character?

′I think it certainly gave him tremendous extra confidence. It is extraordinary to realise that within that very poor part of South Africa there was this particular sense of pride in traditions. And tribal loyalty remained intact despite European domination for more than a century. So that experience certainly deepened his consciousness, even though he was later deeply humiliated and ignored in white Johannesburg.′

Would you say that pride in his history and culture was the driving force for his success?

′Certainly it gave him a terrific sense of self-respect in the early years. He was fascinated by the history of his own people, particularly the Tembu tribe, he knew a lot about it, but of course his whole story was one of gradually widening those horizons. He started as a tribalist, then he became a nationalist, and then he became a multi-nationalist or a multi-culturalist, and gradually saw a wider and wider world. But it is true that that original pride in his ancestry was at the origins of his self-respect, and his dignity.′

Does he find the spotlight hard to bear?

′He told me that he worried a lot about it in jail – he saw in the last few years in jail how he was becoming a myth, and he was worried about that. He made it clear that he wasn′t a saint. He doesn′t say so but I think he was conscious of other African leaders who had built a cult around themselves, which was very dangerous. He was keen to avoid falling into that trap. Above all he was very careful not to use the word ′I′ when he came out of prison. He would make a point of speaking on behalf of the people.′

In the 1960′s Mandela put forward the proposal that the ANC abandon non-violence and form its own military wing. To what extent was this due to the Sharpeville massacre in 1960, and how had race relations deteriorated to such a difficult point that an educated lawyer could consider fighting back?

′It′s a good question because there were of course two sides of him. He was a practising lawyer, and he had tremendous respect for the law, and was always quoting it – as he does now – but at the same time he was very aware that it was impossible to achieve any kind of redress through non-violent means. He never really believed in the Ghandi-ist principle of ′turn the other cheek′.

′Long before 1960 he was inclined to go further towards the suggestion of violence. But at that point the logic became almost incontrovertible. There was no alternative. But perhaps more important was the fact that his own people were turning towards more dangerous kinds of violence. So it would have been impossible for him to maintain any leadership if he was purely pacifist.′

What effect did the years on Robben Island have on Mandela?

′There′s no doubt in my mind that it tremendously increased his self-discipline and his understanding of people. It was a tremendously enclosed world, and for most of the time he was only with 30 of his colleagues together with the warders so it had the intensity of a boarding school, albeit with much more discipline and harshness. So for somebody who was strong enough, who had the necessary confidence in themselves, it was a tremendous school in human relations. It was the kind of thing that a lot of politicians could do with, actually.

′During his twenty-seven years in Robben Island, Mandela was able to extend his influence beyond the ANC to the rival groups, which was very important when he got out. But above all he acquired an increased sensitivity to other people. He sharpened his skills of debate and persuasion tremendously, and probably his greatest gift is his capacity to persuade. You can see how, for someone who had that sense of self-respect and dignity, the jail experience was almost a training ground.′

By the time he came out of prison in 1990 Mandela was very conscious that he had acquired an almost mythical status. How did he handle this situation?

′He was very careful to avoid personifying the struggle. When the ′Free Mandela′ campaign began in the 1980′s, that was personifying him over his colleagues and some people thought it should be ′free the political prisoners′, but it was necessary to publicise the situation through one person.

′But while he was being personified, he was extremely careful always to speak on behalf of the people, and I think he deliberately suppressed any sort of self-promotion. Which was partly why when he came out of jail he made a speech, written by the ANC, which many people thought extremely boring.′

When he came out of prison he immediately identified himself with the ANC, which shocked many leaders around the world and showed that prison hadn′t made him any more compliant, but rather had had the opposite effect. And in the first two years following his release, as you point out, there was more violence than in the apartheid years. Was he disappointed by this?

′I think it was a shattering time for him. He did everything he could to control that violence, and of course this was used against him at the time by the government of the time. But he very early suspected that a lot of that violence was being secretly encouraged by the government which later proved to be the case. But that was an agonising period.′

What is Mandela actually like as a person?

′He′s a very private person, and I think that only very few people, such as his wife, really know him. His manners, and his alertness to people and especially to new people, is so great, that like many brilliant politicians, he appears equally pleased to see everybody, because he has this extraordinary instinctive ability to relate to people, particularly to children. Behind that he is very reserved.

′He′s sometimes exhausted when he appears to be energetic; you can sometimes see how suddenly his face will change, how a smile can suddenly disappear when the camera is not on him. During that lonely period, before he remarried, there was a feeling that he had to be professionally active to avoid being by himself, which of course is true of many politicians.

′But what is remarkable to me is how tremendously reflective he is. He really thinks things out, and once he has thought things out he is quite stubborn and can be difficult to change. But he′s much more effective than most politicians in my experience. Again that goes back to the prison experience. As one of his colleagues said, ′you can take them out of Robben Island but you can′t take Robben Island out of them′. And I think that′s very true. I think you feel there′s still a little cell inside him. He is much more interesting than most politicians are, because you don′t feel you′re listening to a gramophone record.′

What do you think the future holds for Nelson Mandela after he finishes his term in office?

′He says that he longs to get back to his home in the country and spend his time enjoying the beautiful countryside and being with his family and so on, but of course all people tend to think that before they do actually retire- and he also says he doesn′t want to be involved in international mediation which he has often been quite successful at, as in the Gadaffi operation.

′My own guess is that he will actually continue to travel, he will be asked to do things which he will want to say yes to. He wants to write another volume of his own memoirs. I think he will take things easier – certainly his wife wants him to, but he will continue to travel and he will continue to give his views as well. He won′t be restrained; he will speak out as an ordinary member of the African National Congress – but of course he will be much more than that.′

How will South Africa as a whole fare without him at the helm?

′When people talk about South Africa it always depends what viewpoint they are looking at it from. I think, myself, that South Africa will fare very well. The white South Africans will continue to complain a bit because their lifestyle is being changed. But I think they will resolve many of their problems, including crime which is the most difficult problem, over the next few years. It will have a very vibrant and creative atmosphere.

′The violence will probably continue; it has always been a relatively violent country, like America. But personally I think that South Africa will shake down in a very interesting way. And above all it will be almost uniquely multi-racial, which is why it will be so interesting to the rest of the world, because it appears to have begun to resolve those problems which other countries have not resolved.′

You say in the Introduction: ′It is not easy for a biographer to portray the Nelson Mandela behind the icon: it is a bit like trying to make out someone′s shape from the wrong side of the arc-lights.′ For you as a biographer what were the particular challenges in Mandela?

′He is a person who is very reluctant to talk about his own feelings. He is the absolute classic stiff-upper-lip Victorian Englishman, but he belongs very strongly to the nineteenth century world, which is a result of his missionary education, so he very much dislikes talking about himself and particularly his suffering, and that perhaps was the biggest challenge – to pick up, not so much from him but from his colleagues, exactly what he was feeling at those crucial moments.

′But I suppose the most interesting challenge was to try to trace his own development. I had known him back in 1951 and he had appeared to me to be a very different kind of person than he is now. He was much less certain of his leadership at that point, and it is fascinating to see how much deeper and more thoughtful he has become.′

Voir de même:

Beyond the icon: Nelson Mandela in his 90th year

Elleke Boehmer

12 November 2008

The celebration of Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday on 18 July 2008 confirmed once more perhaps the most obvious fact about him: that South Africa’s former president is universally admired, even revered, by world leaders and ordinary people alike. Less noted, however, is the disjunction in his stature abroad and at home. Worldwide, he is invoked as little less than a secular saint, domestically, the strong pride in the achievement of Madiba, the grand old man of the apartheid struggle, is coupled with an awareness that the legend remains a living legend, who still walks and breathes amongst his people today – and that with this presence come continuing responsibilities.

I encountered this notion repeatedly in the course of writing my book, Nelson Mandela: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2008). It struck me again forcibly when his 90th-birthday events in June-July 2008 were underway. Perhaps it is was accentuated by a sad coincidence of timing: for these months of what should have been acclaim and fond and grateful reminiscence took place against the background of vicious "xenophobic attacks" on "foreign" Africans in many of South Africa’s sprawling townships and conurbations. These events roused deep shame and anger in many South Africans, as well as a distinct realisation even among many loyal African National Congress (ANC) members that the "rainbow-nation" dream was over, or at least almost fatally damaged.

The combination of rabid anxiety about the "other" in one’s midst and the approaching celebration of a person famous for embracing friend and stranger alike, meant that people across South Africa looked to Madiba for guidance. There was widespread clamour to know out what he might have to say – as in the past – by way of chastisement, advice and inspiration. Was it not Madiba, after all, who had once announced that he would not demur from criticising his political friends, if he felt they had done wrong or committed atrocity? Would he not then have admonishing words to offer now, concerning the attacks?

The Nelson Mandela Foundation may neatly state that Madiba formally retired from his own official retirement in 2000; and it is true besides that he is a very elderly and now somewhat forgetful man. But many South Africans felt that were he to desist from speaking in his own person at such a time – rather than in the bland voice of his foundation or public-relations representatives – this might betray the values of justice, freedom and political plain-speaking for which he had so long contended.

The global imaginary

Outside South Africa, the moment of Nelson Mandela’s landmark birthday was far simpler and less inscribed with questioning. The concert on 27 June in London’s Hyde Park – in front of the symbolic number of 46,664 guests, officially to launch his foundation’s worldwide HIV/Aids campaign – revealed Mandela’s fans to be in the main content to admire, gasp, and generally be overawed. "There he is, there he is!", the whisper ran through the crowd when the great man briefly appeared to read a prepared statement; and then, "It’s him, it’s him!". Although standing towards the back of the crowd, I could feel people around me strain forward to see him more clearly, as if to be blessed by the holy man passing through.

From our vantage-point, Mandela was visible only as a very small speck on the stage; yet he also presided in gigantic form on the various screens positioned around the concert area. There was a metaphor in this somewhere, I remember thinking. Mandela wasn’t clearly visible without the help of cinematic projection: the living myth was a function of celebrity imaging – and he was indeed accompanied on stage by a whole range of musical or TV celebrities (Amy Winehouse, Will Smith, June Sarpong, Annie Lennox).

And yet, in reality, what did this all amount to? What did this adulation mean? Should we simply take for granted the appearance of Nelson Mandela, African nationalist, at one time the world’s longest-held political prisoner, as headline act to a line-up of (in truth, rather less than glittering) star performances fit to decorate the contents pages of celebrity magazines such as Closer or Now?

Asking these kinds of questions of "Mandela the symbol" is, after all, the point of my cultural history. What was the fridge-magnet symbol, the tourist website icon, telling us, if anything? Was there not an unmistakable oddity to the fact that the 90th birthday was being celebrated here in London, while there – in Mandela’s native land – many people felt consternation at his relative silence? Wasn’t there something disorienting about this "transplanted" birthday-party; something bizarre about the manic susurration of media stars, paparazzi, and wired-up security detail, enwrapping so very tightly the brief appearance of a elder statesman abroad, as if to imprison him (with cloying images, and saccharine words) all over again?

I was reminded of a batik-cloth image of Mandela I once saw in a Cape Town market, selling at a price that only a tourist of some means could have afforded. Nelson Mandela’s fame seemed here to have been reduced to an inaccessible icon who could no longer address, or indeed be heard by, his people. It was a melancholy contrast with the far younger leader, then United States presidential candidate Barack Obama (who is often compared to Mandela, and who manages to take national-hero status in his stride while yet managing through his fine rhetorical skills to get his message across powerfully and movingly to his supporters).

True, only a day or so before the concert Mandela had at last expressed his regret at the violence against fellow-Africans in his home country, and at the tragic "failure of leadership" in neighbouring Zimbabwe. Everywhere, there was relief that the moral beacon had at last spoken. Yet it was impossible not to notice that his statement had been delivered extremely late in the political day; and it had also taken place abroad, as part of a dinner where luminaries like Bill (and Chelsea) Clinton, and Britain’s prime minister Gordon Brown, had been present. The compunction to speak had finally been triggered not by the great urgency everywhere palpable at home, but abroad, where – it was again impossible not to notice – the icon was in effect under an obligation to speak.

The secular saint could arguably not have sustained at the same level his massive global status had words of sorrow, albeit brief, not been expressed in the international domain. In this way Mandela’s legendary star stayed steady in its path, while at home, despite some pleasure at bathing in his reflected glory, bafflement and disappointment remained. As Madiba’s myth was made safe for his fans abroad, so the myth of the reconciled rainbow country he had helped create, inevitably cracked further open – and now, with the split in the ANC, has cracked wider again. A twist of this 90th-birthday year must be that just when his reputation as the 20th century’s leading postcolonial leader seemed secure, the ways in which that reputation will endure in South Africa itself are suddenly a little less certain than before.

The multiple reality

As was repeatedly acknowledged in discussions in Johannesburg and other cities in mid-2008 that I either witnessed or contributed to, on his home ground the "meaning" of Madiba, the significance of his remarkable career and story of uncompromising struggle and negotiated reconciliation, has yet fully to unfold. What does his message comprise: a poetry of hope and courage; a primer of self-discipline?

At present his legacy in some respects still exists in emergent form, has yet to express its true contours. This is to my mind the key difference between how he is viewed at home and internationally, where the lacquer of adulation laid thick upon the "human-rights legend" has long since hardened. Abroad, Mandela is the African the world loves to love, even if in a strikingly over-compensatory way. Africa the continent of famine, corruption and social abjection has produced, at least, this one fine human being, Europeans and Americans appear to breathe as they cluster around him.

A hostile Sunday Times (London) magazine article, which appeared the weekend before his 18 July birthday, opined that the one task Mandela can still competently carry out is to smile his dazzling smile, only now it is on command. There is little that is meaningful in it: in his old age he has become a mask of his former charismatic self, to which the world has grown accustomed to genuflect. For the international community the paradox is that by heaping excessive adoration upon the head of this one seemingly superhuman African, we have left Africa, the continent, its people, more lacking of attention by contrast. There have been many great Africans yet their reputation has been dangerously eclipsed by this one over-hyped African hero of our times.

Yet it is here, within the gap between his fully manifested yet relatively shallow international fame, and his still-latent local significance, that, it seems to me, the potential for renewed understandings of Mandela have the opportunity to emerge, which, when all is said and done, is a good thing. Within this gap, then, I would venture to place the following desiderata.

Let us not allow our image of Mandela to petrify into cliché, especially yet not only while he is still alive amongst us. Let his meanings evolve and change in rhythm with his times. Let his legacy organisations perhaps relax a little in wanting to predetermine how the future will see him. His achievement on its own dwarfs the efforts of such tireless PR policing.

What is not in doubt is that Mandela is a great and humane human being not in spite of his Africanness, as his western acolytes (according to the Sunday Times) believe, but because of his Africanness. Perhaps most important, let us not forget that his greatness as an African was dependent on the cooperation of hosts of other Africans, little and great, ordinary and extraordinary, as he himself has always recognised.

About the author

Elleke Boehmer is professor of world literature in English in the faculty of English at Oxford University. Her work includes Colonial and Postcolonial Literature: Migrant Metaphors (Oxford University Press, 1995/2005); Empire, the National, and the Postcolonial, 1890-1920 (Oxford University Press, 2002/2005); Stories of Women: Gender and Narrative in the Postcolonial Nation (Manchester University Press); (as editor) Scouting for Boys A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship (Oxford University Press, 2004/2005); and Nelson Mandela: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2008). Elleke Boehmer is also the author of a novel, Nile Baby (Ayebia, 2008)

Voir également:

Nelson Mandela, R.I.P

Deroy Murdock

National Review on line

December 5, 2013

My friend James Deciuttis once asked me very directly, “Are you ever wrong?” It was not asked with bile, but very straightforwardly, as if asking if I ever had visited Spain.

I told James that if he referred to my writing, speaking, and political activism, I have made many bad calls and misjudgments. I can look forward to a brand-new year of them in just 27 days. In one particular case, however, I really blew it very, very, very badly. But I was not alone.

Like many other anti-Communists and Cold Warriors, I feared that releasing Nelson Mandela from jail, especially amid the collapse of South Africa’s apartheid government, would create a Cuba on the Cape of Good Hope at best and an African Cambodia at worst.

After all, Mandela had spent 27 years locked up in Robben Island prison due to his leadership of the African National Congress. The ANC was a violent, pro-Communist organization. By the guiding light of Ronald Wilson Reagan, many young conservatives like me spent much of the 1980s fighting Marxism-Leninism — from the classrooms of radical campuses to the battlefields of Grenada, Nicaragua, and El Salvador, both overtly and covertly. Having seen Communists terrorize nations around the world while the Berlin Wall still stood, Mandela looked like one more butcher waiting to take his place on the 20th Century’s blood-soaked stage.

The example of the Ayatollah Khomeini also was fresh in our minds. He went swiftly from exile in Paris to edicts in Tehran and quickly turned Iran into a vicious and bloodthirsty dictatorship at the vanguard of militant Islam.

Nelson Mandela was just another Fidel Castro or a Pol Pot, itching to slip from behind bars, savage his country, and surf atop the bones of his victims.

WRONG!

Far, far, far from any of that, Nelson Mandela turned out to be one of the 20th Century’s great moral leaders, right up there with Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He also was a statesman of considerable weight. If not as significant on the global stage as FDR, Winston Churchill, and Ronald Reagan, he approaches Margaret Thatcher as a national leader with major international reach.

Mandela invited the warden of Robben Island prison to his inauguration as president of South Africa. He sat him front and center. While most people would be tempted to lock up their jailers if they had the chance, Mandela essentially forgave him while the whole world and his own people, white and black, were watching. This quietly sent South Africa’s white population a message: Calm down. This will be okay. It also signaled black South Africans: Now is no time for vengeance. Let’s show our former oppressors that we are greater than that and bigger people than they were to us.

As Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon beautifully dramatize in the excellent film Invictus, Mandela resisted the ANC’s efforts to strip the national rugby team of its long-standing name, the Springboks. Seen as a symbol of apartheid, Mandela’s black colleagues were eager to give the team a new, less “white” identity. Mandela argued that white South Africans, stripped of political leadership and now quite clearly in the minority, should not be deprived of the one small point of pride behind which they could shield their anxieties.

Mandela then championed the team. He attended its games and rallied both blacks and whites behind it as a national sports organization, rather than an exclusive totem of South Africa’s white minority.

Mandela’s easy manner, warmth, and decency shone through and gave South Africans a common point of unity amid so many opportunities for division.

(As an American, it would be nice right now to have a leader who could bring our nation together, rather than pound one wedge after another into our dispirited population.)

Mandela’s economic record deserves deeper analysis later. However, for now it is worthwhile to remember that he came to power in 1994, less than half a decade after the Iron Curtain collapsed and the triumph of scientific socialism was exposed as a cruel and hollow fantasy. Rather than follow that vanquished model, Mandela looked to economic growth as the path his nation should follow. Among other things, he sold off stakes in South African Airways, utilities, and other state-owned companies. While some wish he had gone further, this was a far cry from the playbook of Marx and Lenin.

So, I was dead wrong about Nelson Mandela, a great man and fine example to others, not least the current occupant of the White House.

After 95 momentous years on Earth, may Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela rest in peace.

Voir aussi:

The concert that transformed Mandela from terrorist to icon

Jaime Velazquez, Agence France-Presse

ABS.CBnews

06/12/2013

JOHANNESBURG – So revered is Nelson Mandela today that it is easy to forget that for decades he was considered a terrorist by many foreign governments, and some of his now supporters.

The anti-apartheid hero was on a US terror watch list until 2008 and while still on Robben Island, Britain’s late "Iron Lady" Margaret Thatcher described his African National Congress as a "typical terrorist organization."

That Mandela’s image has been transformed so thoroughly is a testament to the man’s achievements, but also, in part, to a concert that took place in London 25 years ago this week.

For organizer Tony Hollingsworth the June 11, 1988 gig at London’s Wembley Stadium had very little to do with Mandela’s 70th birthday, as billed.

It had everything to do with ridding Mandela of his terrorist tag and ensuring his release.

"You can’t get out of jail as a terrorist, but you can get out of prison as a black leader," he told AFP during a visit to Johannesburg.

Hollingsworth, now 55, envisaged a star-studded concert that would transform Mandela from outlaw to icon in the public’s mind, and in turn press governments adopt a more accommodating stance.

He approached Archbishop Trevor Huddleston, president of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement, to pitch his musical strategy.

"I told Trevor that the African National Congress and the anti-apartheid movement had reached their glass ceiling; they couldn’t go further."

"Everything you are doing is ‘anti’, you are protesting on the streets, but it will remain in that space. Many people will agree, but you will not appeal them."

"Mandela and the movement should be seen as something positive, confident, something you would like to be in your living room with."

While Hollingsworth dealt with artists, Mike Terry — head of the movement in London — dealt with the ANC and the skeptics in the anti-apartheid movement.

And there were many, including Mandela himself, who asked several times that the struggle not be about him.

Many others insisted the focus remain on sanctions against the apartheid regime.

"A lot of people were criticizing me for sanitizing it," Hollingsworth remembered.

Eventually Terry convinced the ANC and Hollingsworth convinced Simple Minds, Dire Straits, Sting, George Michael, The Eurythmics, Eric Clapton, Whitney Houston and Stevie Wonder into the 83-artist line up.

With that musical firepower came contracts for a more than 11 hour broadcast.

"We signed with the entertainment department of television (stations). And when the head of the department got home and watched on his channel that they were calling Mandela a terrorist, they called straight to the news section to say, don’t call this man a terrorist, we just signed 11 hours of broadcasting for a tribute about him."

"This is how we turned Mandela from a black terrorist into a black leader."

The gig at Wembley attracted broadcasters in nearly 70 countries and was watched by more than half a billion people around the world, still one of the largest audiences ever for an entertainment event.

Despite some broadcasters’ demands for the politics to be toned down the message got out.

Singer Harry Belafonte opened with a rousing acclamation: "We are here today to honor a great man, the man is Nelson Mandela," he told the capacity crowd.

Nelson Mandela was released from jail 19 months later, after 27 years in prison. A second concert was later held to celebrate.

"Before the first event, the prospect of Nelson Mandela’s imminent release from prison seemed completely unrealistic," Terry would later say.

"Yet within 20 months he walked free and I have no doubt that the first event played a decisive role in making this happen."

Mandela went on to negotiate the end of the white supremacist regime and establish multiracial democracy in South Africa.

Few seemed to notice that the concert was actually more than a month before his July 18 birthday.

Voir encore:

Nelson Mandela ‘proven’ to be a member of the Communist Party after decades of denial

A new book claims that, 50 years after he was first accused of being a Communist, Nelson Mandela was a Communist party member after all.

Colin Freeman, and Jane Flanagan in Cape Town

08 Dec 2012

For decades, it was one of the enduring disputes of South Africa’s anti-apartheid struggle. Was Nelson Mandela, the leader of the African National Congress, really a secret Communist, as the white-only government of the time alleged? Or, as he claimed during the infamous 1963 trial that saw him jailed for life, was it simply a smear to discredit him in a world riven by Cold War tensions?

Now, nearly half a century after the court case that made him the world’s best-known prisoner of conscience, a new book claims that whatever the wider injustice perpetrated, the apartheid-era prosecutors were indeed right on one question: Mr Mandela was a Communist party member after all.

The former South African president, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993, has always denied being a member of the South African branch of the movement, which mounted an armed campaign of guerrilla resistance along with the ANC.

But research by a British historian, Professor Stephen Ellis, has unearthed fresh evidence that during his early years as an activist, Mr Mandela did hold senior rank in the South African Communist Party, or SACP. He says Mr Mandela joined the SACP to enlist the help of the Communist superpowers for the ANC’s campaign of armed resistance to white rule.

His book also provides fresh detail on how the ANC’s military wing had bomb-making lessons from the IRA, and intelligence training from the East German Stasi, which it used to carry out brutal interrogations of suspected "spies" at secret prison camps.

As evidence of Mr Mandela’s Communist party membership, Prof Ellis cites minutes from a secret 1982 SACP meeting, discovered in a collection of private papers at the University of Cape Town, in which a veteran former party member, the late John Pule Motshabi, talks about how Mr Mandela was a party member some two decades before.

In the minutes, Mr Motshabi, is quoted as saying: "There was an accusation that we opposed allowing Nelson [Mandela] and Walter (Sisulu, a fellow activist) into the Family (a code word for the party) … we were not informed because this was arising after the 1950 campaigns (a series of street protests). The recruitment of the two came after."

While other SACP members have previously confirmed Mr Mandela’s party membership, many of their testimonies were given under duress in police interviews, where they might have sought to implicate him. However, the minutes from the 1982 SACP meeting, said Prof Ellis, offered more reliable proof. "This is written in a closed party meeting so nobody is trying to impress or mislead the public," he said.

Although Mr Mandela appears to have joined the SACP more for their political connections than their ideas, his membership could have damaged his standing in the West had it been disclosed while he was still fighting to dismantle apartheid.

Africa was a Cold War proxy battleground until the end of the 1980s, and international support for his cause, which included the Free Nelson Mandela campaign in Britain, drew partly on his image as a compromise figure loyal neither to East nor West.

"Nelson Mandela’s reputation is based both on his ability to overcome personal animosities and to be magnanimous to all South Africans, white and black, and that is what impressed the world," said Prof Ellis, a former Amnesty International researcher who is based at the Free University of Amsterdam. "But what this shows is that like any politician, he was prepared to make opportunistic alliances.

"I think most people who supported the anti-apartheid movement just didn’t want to know that much about his background. Apartheid was seen as a moral issue and that was that. But if real proof had been produced at the time, some might have thought differently."

Mr Mandela made his denial of Communist Party membership in the opening statement of his Rivonia trial, when he and nine other ANC leaders were tried for 221 alleged acts of sabotage designed to overthrow the apartheid system. The defendants were also accused of furthering the aims of Communism, a movement that was then illegal in South Africa.

Addressing the court, Mr Mandela declared that he had "never been a member of the Communist Party," and that he disagreed with the movement’s contempt for Western-style parliamentary democracy.

He added: "The suggestion made by the State that the struggle in South Africa is under the influence of foreigners or communists is wholly incorrect. I have done whatever I did, both as an individual and as a leader of my people, because of my experience in South Africa and my own proudly felt African background, and not because of what any outsider might have said."

Mr Mandela joined the ANC in 1944, when its leadership still opposed armed struggle against the apartheid state. However, by the early 1950s he become personally convinced that a guerrilla war was inevitable, a view confirmed by the Sharpeville Massacre in March 1960, when police in a Transvaal township opened fire on black demonstrators, killing 69 people.

But while other ANC leaders also came round to his way of thinking after Sharpeville, the group still had no access to weaponry or financial support. Instead, says Prof Ellis, Mr Mandela looked for help from the Communists, with whom he already had close contacts due to their shared opposition to apartheid.

"He knew and trusted many Communist activists anyway, so it appears he was co-opted straight to the central committee with no probation required," said Prof Ellis. "But it’s fair to say he wasn’t a real convert, it was just an opportunist thing."

In the months after Sharpeville, Communist party members secretly visited Beijing and Moscow, where they got assurances of support for their own guerrilla campaign. In conjunction with a number of leading ANC members, they set up a new, nominally independent military organisation, known as Umkhonto we Sizwe or Spear of the Nation. With Mr Mandela as its commander, Umkhonto we Sizwe launched its first attacks on 16 December 1961.

Its campaign of "sabotage" and bombings over the subsequent three decades claimed the lives of dozens of civilians, and led to the organisation being classed as a terrorist group by the US.

In his book, Professor Ellis, who also authored a publication on the Liberian civil war, elaborates on other murky aspects of the ANC’s past. One is that bomb-making experts from the IRA trained the ANC at a secret base in Angola in the late 1970s, a link disclosed last year in the posthumous memoirs of Kader Asmal, a South African politician of Indian extraction who was exiled in Ireland. He was a member of the Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement, which, Prof Mr Ellis says, in turn had close links to the British and South African Communist parties.

The IRA tutoring, which was allegedly brokered partly through Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams, led to the ANC fighters improving their bombing skills considerably, thanks to the expertise of what Mr Ellis describes as "the world’s most sophisticated urban guerrilla force".

Angola was also the base for "Quatro", a notorious ANC detention centre, where dozens of the movement’s own supporters were tortured and sometimes killed as suspected spies by agents from their internal security service, some of whom were "barely teenagers". East German trainers taught the internal security agents that anyone who challenged official ANC dogma should be viewed as a potential spy or traitor.

On Friday night, a spokesman for the Nelson Mandela Foundation said: "We do not believe that there is proof that Madiba (Mandela’s clan name) was a Party member … The evidence that has been identified is comparatively weak in relation to the evidence against, not least Madiba’s consistent denial of the fact over nearly 50 years. It is conceivable that Madiba might indulge in legalistic casuistry, but not that he would make an entirely false statement.

"Recruitment and induction into the Party was a process that happened in stages over a period of time. It is possible that Madiba started but never completed the process. What is clear is that at a certain moment in the struggle he was sufficiently trusted as an ANC leader to participate in Party CC meetings. And it is probable that people in attendance at such meetings may have thought of him as a member."

Mr Mandela, now 94, retired from public life in 2004 and is now in poor health. He did, though, allude to a symbiotic relationship with the Communists in his bestselling biography, The Long Walk to Freedom. "There will always be those who say that the Communists were using us," he wrote. "But who is to say that we were not using them?"

"External Mission: The ANC in Exile, 1960-1990", is published by Hurst and Co.

Voir de même:

The sacred warrior

The liberator of South Africa looks at the seminal work of the liberator of India

Nelson Mandela

Time

December 27, 1999

India is Gandhi’s country of birth; South Africa his country of adoption. He was both an Indian and a South African citizen. Both countries contributed to his intellectual and moral genius, and he shaped the liberatory movements in both colonial theaters.

He is the archetypal anticolonial revolutionary. His strategy of noncooperation, his assertion that we can be dominated only if we cooperate with our dominators, and his nonviolent resistance inspired anticolonial and antiracist movements internationally in our century.

Both Gandhi and I suffered colonial oppression, and both of us mobilized our respective peoples against governments that violated our freedoms.

The Gandhian influence dominated freedom struggles on the African continent right up to the 1960s because of the power it generated and the unity it forged among the apparently powerless. Nonviolence was the official stance of all major African coalitions, and the South African A.N.C. remained implacably opposed to violence for most of its existence.

Gandhi remained committed to nonviolence; I followed the Gandhian strategy for as long as I could, but then there came a point in our struggle when the brute force of the oppressor could no longer be countered through passive resistance alone. We founded Unkhonto we Sizwe and added a military dimension to our struggle. Even then, we chose sabotage because it did not involve the loss of life, and it offered the best hope for future race relations. Militant action became part of the African agenda officially supported by the Organization of African Unity (O.A.U.) following my address to the Pan-African Freedom Movement of East and Central Africa (PAFMECA) in 1962, in which I stated, "Force is the only language the imperialists can hear, and no country became free without some sort of violence."

Gandhi himself never ruled out violence absolutely and unreservedly. He conceded the necessity of arms in certain situations. He said, "Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence… I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor …"

Violence and nonviolence are not mutually exclusive; it is the predominance of the one or the other that labels a struggle.

Gandhi arrived in South Africa in 1893 at the age of 23. Within a week he collided head on with racism. His immediate response was to flee the country that so degraded people of color, but then his inner resilience overpowered him with a sense of mission, and he stayed to redeem the dignity of the racially exploited, to pave the way for the liberation of the colonized the world over and to develop a blueprint for a new social order.

He left 21 years later, a near maha atma (great soul). There is no doubt in my mind that by the time he was violently removed from our world, he had transited into that state.

No ordinary leader–divinely inspired

He was no ordinary leader. There are those who believe he was divinely inspired, and it is difficult not to believe with them. He dared to exhort nonviolence in a time when the violence of Hiroshima and Nagasaki had exploded on us; he exhorted morality when science, technology and the capitalist order had made it redundant; he replaced self-interest with group interest without minimizing the importance of self. In fact, the interdependence of the social and the personal is at the heart of his philosophy. He seeks the simultaneous and interactive development of the moral person and the moral society.

His philosophy of Satyagraha is both a personal and a social struggle to realize the Truth, which he identifies as God, the Absolute Morality. He seeks this Truth, not in isolation, self-centeredly, but with the people. He said, "I want to find God, and because I want to find God, I have to find God along with other people. I don’t believe I can find God alone. If I did, I would be running to the Himalayas to find God in some cave there. But since I believe that nobody can find God alone, I have to work with people. I have to take them with me. Alone I can’t come to Him."

He sacerises his revolution, balancing the religious and the secular.

Awakening

His awakening came on the hilly terrain of the so-called Bambata Rebellion, where as a passionate British patriot, he led his Indian stretcher-bearer corps to serve the Empire, but British brutality against the Zulus roused his soul against violence as nothing had done before. He determined, on that battlefield, to wrest himself of all material attachments and devote himself completely and totally to eliminating violence and serving humanity. The sight of wounded and whipped Zulus, mercilessly abandoned by their British persecutors, so appalled him that he turned full circle from his admiration for all things British to celebrating the indigenous and ethnic. He resuscitated the culture of the colonized and the fullness of Indian resistance against the British; he revived Indian handicrafts and made these into an economic weapon against the colonizer in his call for swadeshi–the use of one’s own and the boycott of the oppressor’s products, which deprive the people of their skills and their capital.

A great measure of world poverty today and African poverty in particular is due to the continuing dependence on foreign markets for manufactured goods, which undermines domestic production and dams up domestic skills, apart from piling up unmanageable foreign debts. Gandhi’s insistence on self-sufficiency is a basic economic principle that, if followed today, could contribute significantly to alleviating Third World poverty and stimulating development.

Gandhi predated Frantz Fanon and the black-consciousness movements in South Africa and the U.S. by more than a half-century and inspired the resurgence of the indigenous intellect, spirit and industry.

Gandhi rejects the Adam Smith notion of human nature as motivated by self-interest and brute needs and returns us to our spiritual dimension with its impulses for nonviolence, justice and equality.

He exposes the fallacy of the claim that everyone can be rich and successful provided they work hard. He points to the millions who work themselves to the bone and still remain hungry. He preaches the gospel of leveling down, of emulating the kisan (peasant), not the zamindar (landlord), for "all can be kisans, but only a few zamindars."

He stepped down from his comfortable life to join the masses on their level to seek equality with them. "I can’t hope to bring about economic equality… I have to reduce myself to the level of the poorest of the poor."

From his understanding of wealth and poverty came his understanding of labor and capital, which led him to the solution of trusteeship based on the belief that there is no private ownership of capital; it is given in trust for redistribution and equalization. Similarly, while recognizing differential aptitudes and talents, he holds that these are gifts from God to be used for the collective good.

He seeks an economic order, alternative to the capitalist and communist, and finds this in sarvodaya based on nonviolence (ahimsa).

He rejects Darwin’s survival of the fittest, Adam Smith’s laissez-faire and Karl Marx’s thesis of a natural antagonism between capital and labor, and focuses on the interdependence between the two.

He believes in the human capacity to change and wages Satyagraha against the oppressor, not to destroy him but to transform him, that he cease his oppression and join the oppressed in the pursuit of Truth.

We in South Africa brought about our new democracy relatively peacefully on the foundations of such thinking, regardless of whether we were directly influenced by Gandhi or not.

Gandhi remains today the only complete critique of advanced industrial society. Others have criticized its totalitarianism but not its productive apparatus. He is not against science and technology, but he places priority on the right to work and opposes mechanization to the extent that it usurps this right. Large-scale machinery, he holds, concentrates wealth in the hands of one man who tyrannizes the rest. He favors the small machine; he seeks to keep the individual in control of his tools, to maintain an interdependent love relation between the two, as a cricketer with his bat or Krishna with his flute. Above all, he seeks to liberate the individual from his alienation to the machine and restore morality to the productive process.

As we find ourselves in jobless economies, societies in which small minorities consume while the masses starve, we find ourselves forced to rethink the rationale of our current globalization and to ponder the Gandhian alternative.

At a time when Freud was liberating sex, Gandhi was reining it in; when Marx was pitting worker against capitalist, Gandhi was reconciling them; when the dominant European thought had dropped God and soul out of the social reckoning, he was centralizing society in God and soul; at a time when the colonized had ceased to think and control, he dared to think and control; and when the ideologies of the colonized had virtually disappeared, he revived them and empowered them with a potency that liberated and redeemed.

Voir par ailleurs:

Nelson Mandela, un chrétien discret

Issu de l’Église méthodiste, Nelson Mandela, décédé le 5 décembre au soir, évitait d’en faire état en public. À bien l’écouter, cependant, cette dimension a été centrale dans sa vie.

Laurent Larcher

La Croix

6/12/13

Rares, parmi ceux qui chantent les louanges de Nelson Mandela en France, sont ceux qui évoquent son christianisme. Une dimension souvent gommée au profit de son « humanisme ». Pour leur défense, il est vrai que Nelson Mandela a toujours été discret, en public, sur ses liens avec le christianisme. Dans un entretien accordé à l’Express en 1995, il répond, un peu abrupt, au journaliste qui l’interroge sur le rôle de sa foi chrétienne dans sa lutte contre l’apartheid : « La relation entre un homme et son Dieu est un sujet extrêmement privé, qui ne regarde pas les mass media ».

Et dans son autobiographie, Conversation avec moi-même (La Martinière, 2010), il évoque à peine cette dimension dans sa vie (à deux reprises !). On le voit, Nelson Mandela n’a pas été un prosélyte : « Toujours faire de la religion une affaire privée, réservée à soi. N’encombre pas les autres avec ta religion et autres croyances personnelles. », écrit-il à Thulare, en 1977, de la prison de Robben Island.

« Je n’ai jamais abandonné mes croyances chrétiennes »

Pour autant, au fil de sa vie, de ses écrits et de ses confidences, Nelson Mandela n’a pas toujours été silencieux sur son rapport au christianisme. En premier lieu, il a été baptisé dans l’Église méthodiste et formé dans les écoles wesleyennes (une Église qui se sépare d’avec l’Église méthodiste en 1875) pour être précis. À Fort Hare, dans l’une de ces institutions, il a même été moniteur le dimanche. Que pensait-il de cette appartenance ? Visiblement, le plus grand bien !

À plusieurs reprises, il exprime sa dette envers son Église : « Je ne saurais trop insister sur le rôle que l’Église méthodiste a joué dans ma vie », déclarait-il à l’occasion du 23e anniversaire de la Gospel Church power of Republic of South Africa, en 1995. Et devant le parlement mondial des religions, en 1999 : « Sans l’Église, sans les institutions religieuses, je ne serais pas là aujourd’hui ».

Emprisonné à Robben Island, il assiste, écrit-il en 1977, « encore à tous les services de l’Église et j’apprécie certains sermons ». Dans sa correspondance avec Ahmed Kathrada, en 1993, il évoque la joie qu’il ressentait à fréquenter l’Eucharistie  : « Partager le sacrement qui fait partie de la tradition de mon Église était important à mes yeux. Cela me procurait l’apaisement et le calme intérieur. En sortant des services, j’étais un homme neuf. » Et il affirme au même : « Je n’ai jamais abandonné mes croyances chrétiennes ».

le christianisme de Mandela prend la forme d’une sagesse universelle

S’il lui est arrivé d’exprimer sa fidélité au christianisme, il semble cependant que sa spiritualité se soit modifiée au cours de son existence. Ainsi, sa rencontre avec le marxisme lui ouvre un nouvel horizon : « Nous qui avons grandi dans des maisons religieuses et qui avons étudié dans les écoles des missionnaires, nous avons fait l’expérience d’un profond conflit spirituel quand nous avons vu le mode de vie que nous jugions sacré remis en question par de nouvelles philosophies, et quand nous nous sommes rendu compte que, parmi ceux qui traitaient notre foi d’opium, il y avait des penseurs dont l’intégrité et l’amour pour les hommes ne faisaient pas de doute. », écrit-il à Fatima Meer en 1977.

Peu à peu, le christianisme de Mandela prend la forme d’une sagesse universelle : « J’ai bien sûr été baptisé à l’Église wesleyenne et j’ai fréquenté ses écoles missionnaires. Dehors comme ici, je lui reste fidèle, mais mes conceptions ont eu tendance à s’élargir et à être bienveillantes envers l’unité religieuse », constate-il en 1977.

La même année, il fait cet aveu : « J’ai mes propres croyances quant à l’existence ou non d’un Être suprême et il est possible que l’on puisse expliquer facilement pourquoi l’homme, depuis des temps immémoriaux, croit en l’existence d’un dieu. » Puis de dire en 1994 : « Je ne suis pas particulièrement religieux ou spirituel. Disons que je m’intéresse à toutes les tentatives qui sont faites pour découvrir le sens de la vie. La religion relève de cet exercice. ».

« une affaire strictement personnelle »

Tout au long de son existence, il s’est méfié du caractère dévastateur qu’il voyait en puissance dans la religion : « La religion, et notamment la croyance en l’existence d’un Être suprême, a toujours été un sujet de controverse qui déchire les nations, et même les familles. Il vaut toujours mieux considérer la relation entre un individu et son Dieu comme une affaire strictement personnelle, une question de foi et non de logique. Nul n’a le droit de prescrire aux autres ce qu’ils doivent croire ou non », écrit-il à Déborah Optiz en 1988.

Nous touchons là, sans doute, la raison pour laquelle Nelson Mandela évitait d’aborder en public, en particulier face aux médias, son rapport au christianisme. À cela s’ajoute son souci de ne pas heurter la sensibilité et les convictions de celui à qui il s’adressait. Il s’en explique à Maki Mandela en 1977 : «Sans le savoir, tu peux offenser beaucoup de gens pour qui tout cela n’a aucun fondement scientifique, qui considèrent que c’est pure fiction. »

Cette réserve ne l’a pas empêché d’assigner un rôle aux religions dans la société : en particulier sur le plan de la justice et de la morale. Alors qu’il présidait à la destinée de l’Afrique du Sud, il leur adressa cette feuille de route en 1997 : « Nous avons besoin que les institutions religieuses continuent d’être la conscience de la société, le gardien de la morale et des intérêts des faibles et des opprimés. Nous avons besoin que les organisations religieuses participent à la société civile mobilisée pour la justice et la protection des droits de l’homme. »

Voir enfin:

Nelson Mandela : un homme une voie

RFI

Première partie : Une conscience noire dans les geôles de l’apartheid

En retrouvant la liberté, un dimanche, le 11 février 1990, Nelson Mandela a recouvré un destin, dans le droit fil du mythe qu’il était devenu en 27 ans de prison. «Malgré mes soixante-et-onze ans, j’ai senti que ma vie recommençait. Mes dix mille jours de prison étaient finis», écrivit-il plus tard dans son auto-biographie, Long Walk to Freedom. Cette deuxième vie serait celle d’un président de la République arc-en-ciel et d’une autorité morale universelle. La première aura été celle d’un freedom fighter, un combattant de la liberté, un adepte de la non-violence conduit à la lutte armée par la ségrégation raciale, un «terroriste» au temps où l’idéologie de l’apartheid s’affichait comme ligne de défense de l’Occident travaillé par la guerre froide, un «communiste» (qu’il n’a jamais été) dans une Afrique du Sud où même le nationalisme était white only, réservé aux Afrikaners, les «Africains» blancs de souche boer.

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela est né le 18 juillet 1918 dans le village de Qunu, près d’Umtata, au Transkei. Il appartient à une lignée royale Xhosa du clan Madhiba, dont le nom a désormais fait le tour du monde comme raccourci affectueux pour désigner le fils de Henry Mgadla Mandela, un chef Thembu qui le laisse orphelin à 12 ans. Envoyé à la cour du roi, Rolhlahla se prépare à assurer la succession à la chefferie, à l’école des pasteurs méthodistes d’abord, puis, en 1938 à l’University College for Bantu de Fort Hare, seul établissement secondaire habilité à l’époque à recevoir des «non-Blancs».

Nationalisme et pacifisme

Les fondateurs blancs de Fort Hare entendaient former une élite noire capable de servir leur dessein colonial. Mais face à la conjugaison d’esprits éveillés, l’épreuve de la réalité étant la plus forte, l’université «bantoue» s’est transformée en pépinière du nationalisme d’Afrique australe, d’où sortirent notamment les frères ennemis zimbabwéens Joshua Nkomo et Robert Mugabe ou le «père de la Nation» zambienne, Kenneth Kaunda. Derrière les expériences propres à chacun des jeunes gens se profilent des peuples déchus de leurs droits de citoyens et confinés dans la misère par une barrière de couleur défendue par les pouvoirs blancs, un fusil à la main et une bible dans l’autre. Les colons ont fait de l’identité noire une condition sociale. Une conscience noire est en gestation. Reste à trouver les armes pour la défendre. A Fort Hare, Mandela discute de l’enseignement du Mahatma Ghandi (né en Afrique du Sud) avec son meilleur ami, Oliver Tambo (mort le 24 avril 1993). Convaincu des vertus de la non-violence, il découvre aussi, non sans scepticisme, les thèses marxistes introduites clandestinement dans les chambrées studieuses par le South african communist party (SACP), interdit.

En 1940, Mandela et Tambo sont chassés de Fort Hare après avoir conduit une grève pour empêcher que le Conseil représentatif des étudiants soit transformé en simple chambre d’enregistrement. Il finira ses études par correspondance. Pour les financer, il embauche en 1941 comme vigile aux Crown Mines de Johannesburg. Le choc est violent dans l’univers minier du développement séparé où la richesse des Blancs ruisselle dans la sueur et le sang des Noirs. Nelson Mandela a 23 ans, une stature de boxeur. Servir l’ordre économique de la ségrégation raciale en maniant la chicotte, le jeune homme entrevoit le privilège douteux que sa naissance lui réserve. Quelques mois plus tard, une rencontre avec Albertina, l’épouse d’un militant de la cause noire, Walter Sisulu, fait bifurquer son destin. Walter Sisulu l’emploie dans sa petite agence immobilière, lui paye des cours de droit et le place dans un cabinet d’avocats blancs, des juifs communistes opposés à la ségrégation raciale.

Programme d’action unitaire

Oliver Tambo a rejoint son ami Mandela à Johannesburg, comme professeur de mathématiques. Les jeunes gens épousent des collègues infirmières d’Albertina Sisulu. Ils partent s’installer dans la township d’Orlando où leur rencontre avec l’instituteur zoulou Anton Lembede sera déterminante. En effet, après l’instauration de la discrimination raciale qui fonde le «développement séparé» concocté après la guerre des Boers (contre l’imperium anglais) en 1902, au lendemain de l’institution, en 1911, du «colour bar» qui limite le droit au travail des non-Blancs, ces derniers ont entrepris d’organiser une résistance. Dans les années quarante, elle paraît bien essoufflée. Anton Lembede, Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu et Oliver Tambo vont tenter de ranimer la flamme et de lui donner des couleurs nationalistes en créant, en 1944, une ligue de la jeunesse au sein de l’ANC dirigé alors par le docteur Xuma.

Fondé à Bloemfontein en 1912, l’African native national congress (ANNC) avait abandonné son initiale coloniale «native» (indigène) en 1923 pour devenir ANC. Largement inspiré par les idées légalistes du promoteur de l’émancipation des Noirs américains, Booker T. Washington, l’ANC avait entrepris d’informer la communauté noire sud-africaine sur ses droits ou ce qui en restait, faisant aussi campagne par exemple contre la loi sud-africaine sur les laissez-passer. Mais les revendications de l’ANC avaient fini par s’user sur la soif de respectabilité de ses dirigeants et sur la violence de la répression du pouvoir blanc. Avec la ligue de la jeunesse, la Youth League, l’ANC prend un tournant qui lui permet d’avoir une action efficace lors des grandes manifestations de mineurs en 1946 et 1949. Mandela est élu secrétaire général de la ligue en 1947 puis président peu après. En 1949, l’ANC adoptera le programme d’action de la Youth League qui réclame «la fin de la domination blanche». Entre temps, le Parti national (PN), au pouvoir à Pretoria depuis 1948, a érigé l’apartheid en idéologie et en programme de gouvernement. Albert Luthuli (prix Nobel de la paix en 1960) préside l’ANC.

En 1951, Tambo et Mandela sont les deux premiers avocats noirs inscrits au barreau de Johannesburg. L’année suivante, ils ouvrent un cabinet ensemble. En 1950, les principales lois de l’apartheid ont été adoptées, en particulier le Group areas act qui assigne notamment à «résidence» les Noirs dans les bantoustans et les townships. Le Supression communist act inscrit dans son champ anti-communiste toute personne qui «cherche à provoquer un changement politique, industriel, économique ou social par des moyens illégaux». Bien évidemment, pour l’apartheid il n’y a pas de possibilité de changement légal. Mais en rangeant dans le même sac nationalistes, communistes, pacifistes et révolutionnaires, il ferme la fracture idéologique qui opposait justement ces derniers au sein de l’ANC. Pour sa part, Nelson Mandela rompt avec son anti-communisme chrétien intransigeant pour recommander l’unité de lutte anti-apartheid entre les nationalistes noirs et les Blancs du SACP.

Désobéissance civile et clandestinité

Elu président de l’ANC pour le Transvaal et vice président national de l’ANC, Nelson Mandela est également choisi comme «volontaire en chef» pour lancer en juin 1952 une action de désobéissance civile civile de grande envergure à la manière du Mahatma Ghandi, la «défiance campaign», où il anime des cohortes de manifestants descendus en masse dans la rue. La campagne culmine en octobre, contre la ségrégation légalisée et en particulier contre le port obligatoire des laissez-passer imposé aux Noirs. Tout un arsenal de loi sur la «sécurité publique» verrouille l’état d’urgence qui autorise l’apartheid à gouverner par décrets. Condamné à neuf mois de prison avec sursis, le charismatique Mandela est interdit de réunion et assigné à résidence à Johannesburg. Il en profite pour mettre au point le «Plan M» qui organise l’ANC en cellules clandestines.

La répression des années cinquante contraint Mandela à faire disparaître son nom de l’affiche officielle de l’ANC mais ne l’empêche pas de participer en 1955 au Congrès des peuples qui adopte une Charte des Libertés préconisant l’avènement d’une société multiraciale et démocratique. Le Congrès parvient en effet à rassembler l’ANC, le Congrès indien, l’Organisation des métis sud-africain (SACPO), le Congrès des démocrates -composé de communistes proscrits depuis 1950 et de radicaux blancs- ainsi que le Congrès des syndicats sud-africains (SACTU). Le 5 décembre 1956, Nelson Mandela est arrêté avec Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo, Albert Luthuli (prix Nobel de la paix 1960) et des dizaines de dirigeants du mouvement anti-apartheid. Ils sont accusés, toutes races et toutes obédiences confondues, de comploter contre l’Etat au sein d’une organisation internationale d’inspiration communiste. En mars 1961, le plus long procès de l’histoire judiciaire sud-africaine s’achève sur un non-lieu général. L’ANC estime avoir épuisé tous les recours de la non-violence.

Le 21 mars 1960, à Sharpeville, la police de l’apartheid transforme en bain de sang (69 morts et 180 blessés) une manifestation pacifique contre les laissez-passer. L’état d’urgence est réactivé. Des milliers de personnes font les frais de la répression terrible qui s’ensuit dans tous le pays. Le 8 avril, l’ANC et le Congrès panafricain (le PAC né d’une scission anti-communiste) sont interdits. Cette même année de sang, Nelson épouse en deuxièmes noces Winnie, une assistante sociale, et entre en clandestinité. En mai 1961, le succès de son mot d’ordre de grève générale à domicile «stay at house» déchaîne les foudres de Pretoria qui déploie son grand jeu militaro-policier pour briser la résistance. En décembre, l’ANC met en application le plan de passage graduel à la lutte armée rédigé par Nelson Mandela. Avant d’en arriver à «la guérilla, le terrorisme et la révolution ouverte», Mandela préconise le sabotage des cibles militaro-industrielles qui, écrit-il, «n’entraîne aucune perte en vie humaine et ménage les meilleures chances aux relations interraciales».

Sabotages et lutte armée

Le 16 décembre 1961 des explosions marquent aux quatre coins du pays le baptême du feu d’Umkhonto We Sizwe, le «fer de lance de la Nation», la branche militaire de l’ANC. D’Addis-Abeba en janvier 1962 où se tient la conférence du Mouvement panafricain pour la libération de l’Afrique australe et orientale, à l’Algérie fraîchement indépendante d’Ahmed Ben Bella où il suit une formation militaire avec son ami Tambo, Nelson Mandela sillonne l’Afrique pour plaider la cause de l’ANC et recueillir subsides et bourses universitaires. Le pacifiste se met à l’étude de la stratégie militaire. Clausewitz, Mao et Che Guevara voisinent sur sa table de chevet avec les spécialistes de la guerre anglo-boers. A son retour, il est arrêté, le 5 août 1962, grâce à un indicateur de police, après une folle cavale où il emprunte toutes sortes de déguisements. En novembre, il écope de 5 ans de prison pour sortie illégale du territoire mais aussi comme fauteur de grève. Alors qu’il a commencé à purger sa peine, une deuxième vague d’accusation va le clouer en prison pour deux décennies de plus.

Les services de l’apartheid sont parvenus à infiltrer l’ANC jusqu’à sa tête. Le 11 juillet 1963, les principaux chefs d’Umkhonto We Sizwe tombent dans ses filets. Avec eux, dans la ferme de Lilliesleaf, à Rivonia, près de Johannesburg, la police de Pretoria met la main sur des kilos de documents, parmi lesquels le plan de passage à la lutte armée signé Mandela. Le 9 octobre 1963, il partage le banc des accusés du procès de Rivonia avec sept compagnons : Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbéki dit Le Rouge (le père de l’actuel président sud-africain), Raymond Mhlaba, Elias Mtsouledi, Andrew Mlangeni, Ahmed Kathrada, Denis Goldberg et Lionel Bernstein.

En avril 1964, Mandela assure lui-même sa défense en une longue plaidoirie où il fait en même temps le procès de l’apartheid. «J’ai lutté contre la domination blanche et contre la domination noire. J’ai défendu l’idéal d’une société démocratique et libre dans laquelle tous les individus vivraient ensemble en harmonie et bénéficieraient de chances égales. C’est un idéal pour lequel j’espère vivre et que j’espère voir se réaliser. C’est un idéal pour lequel, s’il le faut, je suis prêt à mourir», dit-il avant d’accueillir sans ciller le verdict attendu de l’apartheid, la prison à perpétuité pour tous, à l’exception de Bernstein, acquitté. Conformément aux principes de la ségrégation raciale, le Blanc Denis Goldberg est incarcéré à Pretoria. Les autres prennent le ferry qui les conduit au bagne de Robben-Island, au large du cap «de Bonne espérance». Mandela y restera dix-huit ans, jusqu’en avril 1982 où il est transféré secrètement dans le quartier de haute sécurité de la prison de Pollsmoor, à vingt kilomètres du Cap. Son régime de détention sera bien plus tard allégé, l’apartheid tentant de le récupérer en vain plusieurs fois, jusqu’à ce que le plus ancien prisonnier de conscience du monde, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, «Madhiba», arrache la liberté de construire la nation arc-en-ciel de ses vœux, le 11 février 1990.

Voir enfin:

En Afrique du Sud, les fermiers blancs ont peur

Patricia Huon, Correspondante en Afrique du Sud

La Libre Belgique

11 octobre 2013

International Une campagne dénonce "le massacre" des Blancs. Les chiffres ne le confirment pas.

Un nuage de ballons rouges s’envole dans le ciel ensoleillé de Pretoria, devant le siège du gouvernement sud-africain. Baptisé "Octobre Rouge", l’événement n’a rien à voir avec un rassemblement communiste ou le roman d’espionnage de l’Américain Tom Clancy. Les quelques centaines de personnes rassemblées hier dans plusieurs villes d’Afrique du Sud sont venues, souvent en famille, pour protester contre ce qu’elles qualifient d’"oppression" et de "massacre" des Sud-Africains blancs.

A leur tête, des chanteurs afrikaners populaires, Steve Hofmeyr et Sunette Bridges, qui enchaînent photos-souvenirs et autographes. Dans le défilé, sur fond de musique en afrikaans, flottent les anciens drapeaux d’Afrique du Sud et des républiques boers et s’affichent quelques tenues militaires, des symboles fortement associés à l’extrême droite.

Violence raciale

Pour les manifestants, la population blanche est victime d’une violence dirigée contre elle en raison de sa couleur de peau. "Stop au génocide blanc" , clame une pancarte, illustration de l’angoisse qui a saisi les anciens maîtres du pays depuis l’avènement de la démocratie.

"Je suis ici pour mes enfants. Notre culture est menacée" , lance Tina Vermeer, une mère de famille vêtue d’un t-shirt rouge, qui peine à s’exprimer en anglais. "L’Afrique du Sud d’aujourd’hui, c’est l’apartheid à l’envers" , ajoute-t-elle. Pour elle, comme pour toutes les personnes présentes, le Black Economic Empowerment, cette forme de discrimination positive à l’emploi pour corriger les inégalités du passé, est perçu comme une injustice.

Les quatre millions de Blancs sud-africains représentent un peu moins de 8 % de la population du pays. Statistiquement, ils ne sont pas à plaindre. Un ménage blanc gagne en moyenne six fois plus qu’une famille noire. Malgré les politiques mises en place, les Sud-Africains blancs continuent d’avoir un meilleur accès à l’éducation et à l’emploi. Le chômage touche plus de 25 % de la population noire, contre environ 5 % chez les Blancs. Les postes à responsabilité sont toujours détenus à près de 80 % par des Blancs.

La population noire est aussi la première victime de la criminalité. Selon les statistiques de la police, plus de 85 % des victimes de meurtres sont noires et moins de 2 % blanches. " Peut-être souffrent-ils aussi de la violence , reconnaît Sunette Bridges. Mais ils ne sont pas abattus par des Blancs. Pourquoi alors les Noirs viennent-ils nous tuer alors que nous les laissons en paix ?"

La peur ne s’explique pas avec des statistiques. Les meurtres, souvent très violents, de fermiers blancs choquent. Et la crainte d’être le prochain Zimbabwe, d’où les anciens colons ont été expulsés de leurs propriétés, reste ancrée. Elle a été ravivée par les récentes provocations de Julius Malema, ancien leader des Jeunes de l’ANC (le parti au pouvoir), appelant à une nationalisation sans compensation des terres et des mines.

La campagne "Red October", si elle a attiré pas mal d’attention, n’a reçu que relativement peu de soutien. A Pretoria, la manifestation a rassemblé moins de 400 personnes. Sur les réseaux sociaux, beaucoup parmi les Sud-Africains blancs, ont tenu à se distancer des propos tenus par le mouvement. Et Trevor Noah, un célèbre humoriste sud-africain qui se délecte souvent des contradictions de l’Afrique du Sud post-apartheid, affirme sur son compte Twitter : "En tant que Sud-Africains, nous devrions protester contre TOUTE forme de crime et de corruption. Ces problèmes nous touchent TOUS de manière égale."

Voir enfin:

Nelson Mandela : l’icône et le néant

Communiqué de Bernard Lugan[1]

6 décembre 2013

Né le 18 juillet 1918 dans l’ancien Transkei, mort le 5 décembre 2013, Nelson Mandela ne ressemblait pas à la pieuse image que le politiquement correct planétaire donne aujourd’hui de lui. Par delà les émois lénifiants et les hommages hypocrites, il importe de ne jamais perdre de vue les éléments suivants :

1) Aristocrate xhosa issu de la lignée royale des Thembu, Nelson Mandela n’était pas un « pauvre noir opprimé ». Eduqué à l’européenne par des missionnaires méthodistes, il commença ses études supérieures à Fort Hare, université destinée aux enfants des élites noires, avant de les achever à Witwatersrand, au Transvaal, au cœur de ce qui était alors le « pays boer ». Il s’installa ensuite comme avocat à Johannesburg.

2) Il n’était pas non plus ce gentil réformiste que la mièvrerie médiatique se plait à dépeindre en « archange de la paix » luttant pour les droits de l’homme, tel un nouveau Gandhi ou un nouveau Martin Luther King. Nelson Mandela fut en effet et avant tout un révolutionnaire, un combattant, un militant qui mit « sa peau au bout de ses idées », n’hésitant pas à faire couler le sang des autres et à risquer le sien.

Il fut ainsi l’un des fondateurs de l’Umkonto We Sizwe, « le fer de lance de la nation », aile militaire de l’ANC, qu’il co-dirigea avec le communiste Joe Slovo, planifiant et coordonnant plus de 200 attentats et sabotages pour lesquels il fut condamné à la prison à vie.

3) Il n’était pas davantage l’homme qui permit une transmission pacifique du pouvoir de la « minorité blanche » à la « majorité noire », évitant ainsi un bain de sang à l’Afrique du Sud. La vérité est qu’il fut hissé au pouvoir par un président De Klerk appliquant à la lettre le plan de règlement global de la question de l’Afrique australe décidé par Washington. Trahissant toutes les promesses faites à son peuple, ce dernier :

- désintégra une armée sud-africaine que l’ANC n’était pas en mesure d’affronter,

- empêcha la réalisation d’un Etat multiracial décentralisé, alternative fédérale au jacobinisme marxiste et dogmatique de l’ANC,

- torpilla les négociations secrètes menées entre Thabo Mbeki et les généraux sud-africains, négociations qui portaient sur la reconnaissance par l’ANC d’un Volkstaat en échange de l’abandon de l’option militaire par le général Viljoen[2].

4) Nelson Mandela n’a pas permis aux fontaines sud-africaines de laisser couler le lait et le miel car l’échec économique est aujourd’hui total. Selon le Rapport Economique sur l’Afrique pour l’année 2013, rédigé par la Commission économique de l’Afrique (ONU) et l’Union africaine (en ligne), pour la période 2008-2012, l’Afrique du Sud s’est ainsi classée parmi les 5 pays « les moins performants » du continent sur la base de la croissance moyenne annuelle, devançant à peine les Comores, Madagascar, le Soudan et le Swaziland (page 29 du rapport).

Le chômage touchait selon les chiffres officiels 25,6% de la population active au second trimestre 2013, mais en réalité environ 40% des actifs. Quant au revenu de la tranche la plus démunie de la population noire, soit plus de 40% des Sud-africains, il est aujourd’hui inférieur de près de 50% à celui qu’il était sous le régime blanc d’avant 1994[3]. En 2013, près de 17 millions de Noirs sur une population de 51 millions d’habitants, ne survécurent que grâce aux aides sociales, ou Social Grant, qui leur garantit le minimum vital.

5) Nelson Mandela a également échoué politiquement car l’ANC connaît de graves tensions multiformes entre Xhosa et Zulu, entre doctrinaires post marxistes et « gestionnaires » capitalistes, entre africanistes et partisans d’une ligne « multiraciale ». Un conflit de génération oppose également la vieille garde composée de « Black Englishmen», aux jeunes loups qui prônent une « libération raciale » et la spoliation des fermiers blancs, comme au Zimbabwe.

6) Nelson Mandela n’a pas davantage pacifié l’Afrique du Sud, pays aujourd’hui livré à la loi de la jungle avec une moyenne de 43 meurtres quotidiens.

7) Nelson Mandela n’a pas apaisé les rapports inter-raciaux. Ainsi, entre 1970 et 1994, en 24 ans, alors que l’ANC était "en guerre" contre le « gouvernement blanc », une soixantaine de fermiers blancs furent tués. Depuis avril 1994, date de l’arrivée au pouvoir de Nelson Mandela, plus de 2000 fermiers blancs ont été massacrés dans l’indifférence la plus totale des médias européens.

8) Enfin, le mythe de la « nation arc-en-ciel » s’est brisé sur les réalités régionales et ethno-raciales, le pays étant plus divisé et plus cloisonné que jamais, phénomène qui apparaît au grand jour lors de chaque élection à l’occasion desquelles le vote est clairement « racial », les Noirs votant pour l’ANC, les Blancs et les métis pour l’Alliance démocratique.

En moins de deux décennies, Nelson Mandela, président de la République du 10 mai 1994 au 14 juin 1999, puis ses successeurs, Thabo Mbeki (1999-2008) et Jacob Zuma (depuis 2009), ont transformé un pays qui fut un temps une excroissance de l’Europe à l’extrémité australe du continent africain, en un Etat du « tiers-monde » dérivant dans un océan de pénuries, de corruption, de misère sociale et de violences, réalité en partie masquée par quelques secteurs ultraperformants, mais de plus en plus réduits, le plus souvent dirigés par des Blancs.

Pouvait-il en être autrement quand l’idéologie officielle repose sur ce refus du réel qu’est le mythe de la « nation arc-en-ciel » ? Ce « miroir aux alouettes » destiné à la niaiserie occidentale interdit en effet de voir que l’Afrique du Sud ne constitue pas une Nation mais une mosaïque de peuples rassemblés par le colonisateur britannique, peuples dont les références culturelles sont étrangères, et même souvent irréductibles, les unes aux autres.

Le culte planétaire quasi religieux aujourd’hui rendu à Nelson Mandela, le dithyrambe outrancier chanté par des hommes politiques opportunistes et des journalistes incultes ou formatés ne changeront rien à cette réalité.

[1] La véritable biographie de Nelson Mandela sera faite dans le prochain numéro de l’Afrique Réelle qui sera envoyé aux abonnés au début du mois de janvier 2014.

[2] Voir mes entretiens exclusifs avec les généraux Viljoen et Groenewald publiés dans le numéro de juillet 2013 de l’Afrique réelle http://www.bernard-lugan.com

[3] Institut Stats SA .

Voir par ailleurs:

Arafat’s Death and the Polonium Mystery

A twist in the tale seems to debunk the poisoning theory. But even an earlier suspicious finding may have had a less than sinister explanation.

Edward Jay Epstein

The Wall Street Journal

Dec. 3, 2013

The mystery over the death of Yasser Arafat deepened on Tuesday, when the results from a French forensic lab that had tested his remains were leaked. Last month, a Swiss lab reported finding evidence of polonium in Arafat’s body fluids and saliva—buttressing claims by the Palestinian Authority since his death in 2004 that the Palestinian leader had been poisoned. A later Russian forensic examination was reportedly inconclusive.

Now the French have found no evidence that polonium caused his death, attributing Arafat’s demise to natural causes, according to Reuters. His widow, Suha Arafat, told reporters in Paris that she was "upset by these contradictions." But Mrs. Arafat’s own lawyer and a Palestinian Authority official dismissed the report, signaling yet more chapters to come in the posthumous Arafat saga.

Arafat died from a hemorrhagic cerebrovascular failure at age 75 on Nov. 11, 2004, at the Percy Military Hospital in Clamart, France. He had become violently ill in his compound in Ramallah on the West Bank one month earlier.

He was flown to France for treatment and examined by teams of French, Swiss and Tunisian doctors. While family members prohibited an autopsy, hospital officials found, according to a report leaked to the French journal Canard Enchaine, lesions of Arafat’s liver which indicated cirrhosis, a condition often associated with alcohol consumption.

Since alcohol use is not condoned in Arafat’s Muslim religion, such a medical finding could mar his image. In any case, at the request of Palestinian officials, his 558-page medical record was sealed and turned over to his family.

But the cause of his death remained a subject of continuing speculation with Suha Arafat asserting that he had been murdered. To support this charge, she asked scientists at the Institute of Radiation Physics in Lausanne, Switzerland, to examine the contents of a gym bag, which contained the clothing and sneakers Arafat wore at the time of his illness, as well as his tooth brush.

Institute scientists found traces of polonium—specifically polonium 210, an extremely rare radioactive isotope that can be lethal if ingested—on the contents of the gym bag. Because it emits a steady stream of alpha particles as it

decays, one of polonium’s principal uses is to trigger the detonation of early-stage nuclear weapons. Since detection of the isotope can be a sign of clandestine nuclear bomb-building, its distribution is closely monitored.

At the time of Arafat’s death, only five individuals were known to have been contaminated by lethal doses of polonium—all of them scientists accidentally exposed to it through their work. But Arafat was not known to have visited any facilities where could have accidentally come into contact with the substance.

After the Institute of Radiation Physics report, Suha Arafat authorized the exhumation of Arafat’s body from its grave in Ramallah. Different parts of his remains were sent for analysis to forensic labs in France, Russia and Switzerland. On Nov. 5, the University Center of Legal Medicine in Lausanne reported that Arafat’s saliva (taken from his tooth brush), blood and other body fluids had abnormally high levels of polonium. If so, Arafat had been exposed to a substantial amount of the isotope before his death.

There are at least three different theories that might account for how Arafat might have come in contact with polonium 210. The first theory, and the one that has attracted the most attention, was that he was poisoned by his enemies. Suha Arafat accused the Israel intelligence service Mossad of killing her husband by adding polonium to his food or beverages.

There is no doubt that Israel has produced a supply of polonium for its nuclear program. Droh Sadeh, an Israeli physicist at the Weizmann Institute in Tel Aviv, died from accidental exposure to the isotope in the late 1950s. But the drawback is that there is no medical evidence that Arafat died of radiation poisoning.

Polonium 210, because it emits alpha particles that do not penetrate the skin, can contaminate individuals without causing medical harm. To result in radiation poisoning, it must be ingested, and, if that occurs—as happened in the 2006 death of Alexander Litvinenko, an ex-KGB officer, in London—there are observable symptoms, such as hair loss and skin discoloration. But Arafat did not exhibit any symptoms of radiation poisoning to the teams of medical specialists who examined him before his death.

In addition, a review of Arafat’s sealed medical records by forensic scientists and doctors at the Institute of Radiation Physics in Lausanne showed that the "symptoms described in Arafat’s medical reports were not consistent with polonium-210." If the medical evidence is to be believed, Arafat did not die from any contact he may have had with polonium.

So what accounts for the polonium 210 signature that the Swiss researchers said they found on Arafat’s person and clothing?

A second theory is that Arafat’s headquarters in Ramallah had been contaminated by a surreptitious listening device planted by an adversary intelligence service. Polonium 210 can be used as a source of energy for an electronic device, such as a transmitter—just one gram can produce 140 watts of power. Such an alternative use of polonium 210 was claimed by Iran when it was questioned by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2001 about the isotope found on Iranian gear. Iran said that it had produced the polonium to power instruments on a space craft (even though Iran did not have a space program).

Since polonium 210 generates pressure as it decays, it can also leak from its container and, attaching itself to dust, contaminate a large area. So it is possible that Arafat was accidentally contaminated—in a detectable but not fatal way—as the result of an espionage operation.

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303562904579227942815253368 12/7/2013

Edward Jay Epstein: Arafat’s Death and the Polonium Mystery – WSJ.com Page 3 of 3

A third possibility is that the polonium 210 came from North Korea, which had been acquiring the material in 2004 in preparation for nuclear tests. Yasser Arafat, designated a "Hero" of North Korea by President Kim Il Sung in 1981, made six trips to North Korea, and Arafat’s associates received covert military assistance from the regime. Such trafficking might have brought members of Arafat’s entourage in contact with polonium 210.

There are no doubt other ways in which Yasser Arafat’s quarters could have been tainted by polonium. But however the contamination might have happened, there is no reason to conclude that it was the result of a murder plot. The news on Tuesday threw more cold water on an already implausible theory.

Mr. Epstein’s most recent book is "The Annals of Unsolved Crime" (Melville House, 2013).

COMPLEMENT:

What Nelson Mandela can teach us all about violence

Mandela was a great man. He was also a violent man. Ignoring that fact does him no justice

Natasha Lennard

Salon

Dec 8, 2013

When journalist and commentator Chris Hedges decried “violent” anarchists as a “cancer” in the Occupy movement, the violence he had in mind amounted to little more than a few smashed commercial windows.

Ample digital ink has been spilled in the last day by smart observers urging against the whitewashing of Nelson Mandela’s past. In the eyes of his fervid opponents, and many of his fervent supporters, Madiba was a radical, and a violent one. Compared to the militant actions Mandela would countenance and support from his African National Congress, what gets deemed “violent” or “militant” in the U.S. today is both laughable and problematic. On the occasion of the death of a great and violent man, it seems worthwhile to discuss what does and does not get deemed “violent” — and by who, where and when.

It’s beyond the purview of these paragraphs — and to be honest, I’m tired of the hackneyed polemic — to address whether violence, especially politically motivated violence, is ever justifiable or commendable. Instead, I’ll simply posit that violence is itself a moving goalpost. In the contested terrain of political struggles, however, it’s safe to say that any acts posing a threat (existential, ideological and wherever the twain meet) to a ruling status quo will be deemed violent. Even an act as minimal as a smashed Starbucks window can pass muster here — spidering cracked glass serves as reminder to those who might notice: “We do not consent to a gleaming patina; shit’s fucked up and bullshit.”

But I’m not going to weigh in on the ethics of revolutionary violence. To do so would miss how the concept of violence operates in our society: We erroneously isolate certain acts to deem “violent” or “nonviolent” — then “justifiably violent” or not, and so on — and in so doing we miss that there’s never a singular “violence”: there’s an ongoing dialectic of violent and counter-violent acts.

It’s within such a dialectic that we understand Mandela’s support of violence. His relationship to armed and violent struggle is nuanced and certainly not unique to him. He knew counter-violence was necessary in his violent context. He has also expressed that he and his ANC comrades prioritized the reduction of harm to human bodies. For Mandela, violence was a tactic. As Christopher Dickey noted, “when it came to the use of violence, as with so much else in his life, Mandela opted for pragmatism over ideology.”

Mandela’s own explanation of the his group’s approach to militant tactics was nuanced, highlighting again that violence is not one stable category:

We considered four types of violent activities — sabotage, guerrilla warfare, terrorism, and open revolution. For a small and fledgling army, open revolution was inconceivable. Terrorism inevitably reflected poorly on those who used it, undermining any public support it might otherwise garner. Guerrilla warfare was a possibility, but since the ANC had been reluctant to embrace violence at all, it made sense to start with the form of violence that inflicted the least harm against individuals.

Crucially, Mandela was open to escalation to terror tactics and guerrilla war. The ANC’s 1982 attack of the Koeberg nuclear plant — yes, crucial infrastructure — killed 19 people. Unsurprisingly, the ANC was listed as a terrorist organization by the United States. Mandela himself was on a U.S. terror watch list until 2008. But now he is dead and the work of historicizing is well underway. Attempts, notably by white liberals, to enshrine Mandela as a peaceful freedom fighter do no justice to his actual fight. Musa Okwanga has put it best:

You will try to smooth him, to sandblast him, to take away his Malcolm X. You will try to hide his anger from view. Right now, you are anxiously pacing the corridors of your condos and country estates, looking for the right words, the right tributes, the right-wing tributes. You will say that Mandela was not about race. You will say that Mandela was not about politics. You will say that Mandela was about nothing but one love, you will try to reduce him to a lilting reggae tune. “Let’s get together, and feel alright.” Yes, you will do that.

He could go on: Yes, you will do that, and even as you offer up paeans sanitizing Madiba, you will sit back and watch as young blackness continues to be treated as a crime in U.S. cities. You will decry the flash riots in London and the streets of East Flatbush, as young, unarmed black men are shot by police. You will see violence only as you choose to, and often without thinking.

The deifying and sanitizing of Mandela reflects an all-too prevalent “Not In My Backyard” (NIMBY) mentality, often adopted by the white liberal commentariat. (The ass-backwards, explicitly racist opinions of the right-wing are not my focus here. Take it as read: they suck.) My friend Lorenzo Raymond has written about what he calls the “Nonviolent In My Backyard” tract of NIMBY — a position occupied by Chris Hedges among others. As Raymond noted of this sort of NIMBY liberal, “Yes, of course, they celebrate militant, spontaneous, non-bureaucratic grassroots uprisings outside of U.S. borders, even if they’re as physically close as Oaxaca or politically close as London. But as soon as the insurrection gets to their neck of the woods, suddenly we must have everything in triplicate, blessed by the elders, and executed quietly and even ‘neatly.’”

The parameters, by NIMBY reasoning, of acceptable or justified radical violence expand as the struggles in question are grow farther from U.S. soil, and when the event is separated by years and decades. We imprison today’s whistle-blowers and canonize yesterday’s insurrectionists. But (and here’s the trick) the ability to do so is premised on the belief (even a tacit one) that our current context is not so bad, but dissent, militancy and violence is fine there and then — just Not In My Backyard.

NIMBY liberalism rejects the background violence of its own context — the structural racism, the inequality, the totalized surveillance, the engorged prisons, the brutal police, the patriarchy, the poverty, the pain. A smashed window, a looted store, a dented cop car can be read as “violent” now only because a certain NIMBYism fails to see such (small) acts as counter-violent responses to ubiquitous violence. Heroic and necessary violence is reserved for distant lands and completed revolutions.

We see this sort of logic writ large in War on Terror ideology. In a fear-mongering propaganda segment on last week’s Sunday morning talk shows, Senate Intelligence Committee chair Dianne Feinstein and her House counterpart Mike Rogers warned viewers that terrorism is on the rise. “There are new bombs, very big bombs…There are more groups than ever. And there is huge malevolence out there”, said Feinstein. As I commented at the time, in describing rage at the U.S. as contentless “malevolence,” Feinstein tacitly rejects that the anger and radicalization may be grounded in responses to U.S. violence. Similarly, when British Prime Minister David Cameron described the events of the 2011 London riots as “criminality pure and simple,” he ignored the context which gave rise to the rage — the racist policing and widespread inequality highlighted by the London School of Economics and the Guardian in their study of the riots (and well-known by anyone paying attention to their social context).

I’m not suggesting for a second that the contemporary U.S. or U.K. should be compared to apartheid South Africa. I’m noting only that the treatment — either the validation or the whitewashing — of Mandela’s violent militancy is significant, nay crucial, at this current moment when even low-level dissent and property damage is decried and dismissed as violence, pure and simple. Mandela’s story should remind us that there’s nothing simple nor pure about violence.

Natasha Lennard

Natasha Lennard is an assistant news editor at Salon, covering non-electoral politics, general news and rabble-rousing. Follow her on Twitter @natashalennard, email nlennard@salon.com.


Apocalypse: Et si le christianisme était bien la source de tous nos maux ? (Think not that I am come to send peace on earth)

16 juillet, 2013
http://thepeoplescube.com/images/events/2007.09.24_Ajad_Rally/MushroomCloud2.jpgPhoto : OUT OF THE MOUTH OF BABES ? (nice change anyway from the usual Koran's recitations)Have ye never read, Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings thou hast perfected praise?Jesus (Matthew 21: 16) I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes.Jesus (Matthew 11: 25Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.Psalms 8: 2For example, they say women are equal to men in all matters except in matters that contradict islamic law. But then islamic laws allows men to discipline their wives.  (...) It's outrageous:  I can't beat up my wife and almost kill her and then tell you this is discipline. This is not discipline: this is abuse and insanity. Ali  Ahmed (12-year-old Egyptian, with due minder in back, Cairo, Oct 19, 2012)http://freearabs.com/index.php/politics/73-video-gallery/400-jb-span-egypt-jb-span-the-next-presidentNe croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Vous entendrez parler de guerres et de bruits de guerres: gardez-vous d’être troublés, car il faut que ces choses arrivent. Mais ce ne sera pas encore la fin. Une nation s’élèvera contre une nation, et un royaume contre un royaume, et il y aura, en divers lieux, des famines et des tremblements de terre. Tout cela ne sera que le commencement des douleurs. Alors on vous livrera aux tourments, et l’on vous fera mourir; et vous serez haïs de toutes les nations, à cause de mon nom. Jésus (Matt. 24: 6-9)
Je te loue, Père, Seigneur du ciel et de la terre, de ce que tu as caché ces choses aux sages et aux intelligents, et de ce que tu les as révélées aux enfants. Jésus (Matthieu 11: 25)
Nous prêchons la sagesse de Dieu, mystérieuse et cachée, que Dieu, avant les siècles, avait destinée pour notre gloire, sagesse qu’aucun des chefs de ce siècle n’a connue, car, s’ils l’eussent connue, ils n’auraient pas crucifié le Seigneur de gloire. Paul (1 Corinthiens 2, 6-8)
Par exemple, ils disent que les femmes sont les égales des hommes dans tous les domaines, sauf dans les cas qui contredisent la loi islamique. Mais alors la loi islamique permet aux hommes de discipliner leurs épouses. C’est scandaleux : je ne peux pas battre et presque tuer ma femme et ensuite vous dire qu’il s’agit de discipline. Ce n’est pas de la discipline : c’est de l’abus et de la folie. Ali Ahmed (écolier de 12 ans, Le Caire, 19 octobre 2012)
La nature d’une civilisation, c’est ce qui s’agrège autour d’une religion. Notre civilisation est incapable de construire un temple ou un tombeau. Elle sera contrainte de trouver sa valeur fondamentale, ou elle se décomposera. C’est le grand phénomène de notre époque que la violence de la poussée islamique. Sous-estimée par la plupart de nos contemporains, cette montée de l’islam est analogiquement comparable aux débuts du communisme du temps de Lénine. Les conséquences de ce phénomène sont encore imprévisibles. A l’origine de la révolution marxiste, on croyait pouvoir endiguer le courant par des solutions partielles. Ni le christianisme, ni les organisations patronales ou ouvrières n’ont trouvé la réponse. De même aujourd’hui, le monde occidental ne semble guère préparé à affronter le problème de l’islam. En théorie, la solution paraît d’ailleurs extrêmement difficile. Peut-être serait-elle possible en pratique si, pour nous borner à l’aspect français de la question, celle-ci était pensée et appliquée par un véritable homme d’Etat. Les données actuelles du problème portent à croire que des formes variées de dictature musulmane vont s’établir successivement à travers le monde arabe. Quand je dis «musulmane» je pense moins aux structures religieuses qu’aux structures temporelles découlant de la doctrine de Mahomet. Dès maintenant, le sultan du Maroc est dépassé et Bourguiba ne conservera le pouvoir qu’en devenant une sorte de dictateur. Peut-être des solutions partielles auraient-elles suffi à endiguer le courant de l’islam, si elles avaient été appliquées à temps. Actuellement, il est trop tard ! Les «misérables» ont d’ailleurs peu à perdre. Ils préféreront conserver leur misère à l’intérieur d’une communauté musulmane. Leur sort sans doute restera inchangé. Nous avons d’eux une conception trop occidentale. Aux bienfaits que nous prétendons pouvoir leur apporter, ils préféreront l’avenir de leur race. L’Afrique noire ne restera pas longtemps insensible à ce processus. Tout ce que nous pouvons faire, c’est prendre conscience de la gravité du phénomène et tenter d’en retarder l’évolution. André Malraux (1956)
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère "post-chrétienne" est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en "radicalisant" le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste , en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Ceux qui considèrent l’hébraïsme et le christianisme comme des religions du bouc émissaire parce qu’elles le rendent visible font comme s’ils punissaient l’ambassadeur en raison du message qu’il apporte. René Girard
Il y a deux grandes attitudes à mon avis dans l’histoire humaine, il y a celle de la mythologie qui s’efforce de dissimuler la violence, car, en dernière analyse, c’est sur la violence injuste que les communautés humaines reposent. (…) Cette attitude est trop universelle pour être condamnée. C’est l’attitude d’ailleurs des plus grands philosophes grecs et en particulier de Platon, qui condamne Homère et tous les poètes parce qu’ils se permettent de décrire dans leurs oeuvres les violences attribuées par les mythes aux dieux de la cité. Le grand philosophe voit dans cette audacieuse révélation une source de désordre, un péril majeur pour toute la société. Cette attitude est certainement l’attitude religieuse la plus répandue, la plus normale, la plus naturelle à l’homme et, de nos jours, elle est plus universelle que jamais, car les croyants modernisés, aussi bien les chrétiens que les juifs, l’ont au moins partiellement adoptée. L’autre attitude est beaucoup plus rare et elle est même unique au monde. Elle est réservée tout entière aux grands moments de l’inspiration biblique et chrétienne. Elle consiste non pas à pudiquement dissimuler mais, au contraire, à révéler la violence dans toute son injustice et son mensonge, partout où il est possible de la repérer. C’est l’attitude du Livre de Job et c’est l’attitude des Evangiles. C’est la plus audacieuse des deux et, à mon avis, c’est la plus grande. C’est l’attitude qui nous a permis de découvrir l’innocence de la plupart des victimes que même les hommes les plus religieux, au cours de leur histoire, n’ont jamais cessé de massacrer et de persécuter. C’est là qu’est l’inspiration commune au judaïsme et au christianisme, et c’est la clef, il faut l’espérer, de leur réconciliation future. C’est la tendance héroïque à mettre la vérité au-dessus même de l’ordre social. René Girard
Et immédiatement, le centre sacrificiel se mit à générer des réactions habituelles : un sentiment d’unanimité et de deuil. […] Des phrases ont commencé à se dire comme « Nous sommes tous Américains » – un sentiment purement fictif pour la plupart d’entre nous. Ce fut étonnant de voir l’unité se former autour du centre sacré, rapidement nommé Ground Zero, une unité qui se concrétisera ensuite par un drapeau, une grande participation aux cérémonies religieuses, les chefs religieux soudainement pris au sérieux, des bougies, des lieux saints, des prières, tous les signes de la religion de la mort. […] Et puis il y avait le deuil. Comme nous aimons le deuil ! Cela nous donne bonne conscience, nous rend innocents. Voilà ce qu’Aristote voulait dire par katharsis, et qui a des échos profonds dans les racines sacrificielles de la tragédie dramatique. Autour du centre sacrificiel, les personnes présentes se sentent justifiées et moralement bonnes. Une fausse bonté qui soudainement les sort de leurs petites trahisons, leurs lâchetés, leur mauvaise conscience. James Alison
Un des grands problèmes de la Russie – et plus encore de la Chine – est que, contrairement aux camps de concentration hitlériens, les leurs n’ont jamais été libérés et qu’il n’y a eu aucun tribunal de Nuremberg pour juger les crimes commis. Thérèse Delpech
Je crois aux principes affirmés à Nuremberg en 1945 : ’Les individus ont des devoirs internationaux qui transcendent les obligations nationales d’obéissance. Par conséquent, les citoyens ont à titre privé le devoir de violer les lois domestiques pour empêcher des crimes contre la paix et l’humanité d’avoir lieu.’ Edward Snowden
S’il veut rester ici, la condition, c’est qu’il cesse ses activités visant à faire du tort à nos partenaires américains, peu importe que cela puisse paraître étrange venant de ma part. Vladimir Poutine
Selon l’anthropologue René Girard, les sociétés humaines seraient, depuis la nuit des temps, fondées sur un mécanisme sacrificiel qui aurait permis d’assurer la cohésion du groupe en canalisant sa violence contre une victime, accusée de tous les maux, et dont l’immolation rituelle ramènerait la paix dans le groupe, pour autant que le mécanisme en question reste méconnu et que personne ne reconnaisse un « bouc émissaire ». Nous sommes les dignes héritiers de ces sociétés sacrificielles au sens où nous sommes tout autant portés à ces consensus accusateurs. La seule différence, mais elle est de taille, c’est que nous avons progressivement acquis la capacité à reconnaître l’existence de boucs émissaires, c’est-à-dire de victimes chargées d’une culpabilité qui n’est pas la leur dans le but de réconcilier le groupe. Cette capacité est précisément ce qui fait dérailler le processus sacrificiel car, en reconnaissant l’accusé comme victime, en n’acceptant pas l’accusation dont il fait l’objet et, en étant, en quelque sorte, témoins de son innocence, nous empêchons le consensus de se former. Lorsque l’accusation n’est pas unanime, lorsque certains se solidarisent avec la victime, la violence ne peut plus être expulsée par la mise à mort, elle reste dans le groupe. Le mécanisme sacrificiel ne peut s’accomplir et les accusés nous apparaissent alors pour ce qu’ils sont, des victimes, des boucs émissaires destinés à rassembler ou à mobiliser une communauté en détournant son attention des véritables coupables. Par exemple, l’historien Tacite raconte qu’en l’an 64 de notre ère, pour se défendre de la rumeur qui le rendait responsable de l’incendie de Rome, l’empereur Néron aurait accusé les chrétiens qui ont alors été suppliciés par la population. À l’heure actuelle, nous reconnaissons aisément ces chrétiens comme les boucs émissaires de Néron et des Romains parce que nous n’adhérons pas aux accusations portées contre ce qui était alors une secte détestée « pour ses abominations… [et sa] … haine pour le genre humain. » Par contre, lorsque notre capacité de reconnaissance des boucs émissaires est prise en défaut, nous participons à une accusation qui nous semble légitime, parce que unanime. Dans ce cas, le mécanisme sacrificiel fonctionne comme il l’a toujours fait. Luc-Laurent Salvador
C’est le système protecteur des boucs émissaires que les récits de la Crucifixion finiront par détruire en révélant l’innocence de Jésus, et, de proche en proche, de toutes les victimes analogues. Le processus d’éducation hors des sacrifices violents est donc en train de s’accomplir, mais très lentement, de façon presque toujours inconsciente. René Girard
(Le 11 septembre,) je le vois comme un événement déterminant, et c’est très grave de le minimiser aujourd’hui. Le désir habituel d’être optimiste, de ne pas voir l’unicité de notre temps du point de vue de la violence, correspond à un désir futile et désespéré de penser notre temps comme la simple continuation de la violence du XXe siècle. . Je pense, personnellement, que nous avons affaire à une nouvelle dimension qui est mondiale. Ce que le communisme avait tenté de faire, une guerre vraiment mondiale, est maintenant réalisé, c’est l’actualité. Minimiser le 11 Septembre, c’est ne pas vouloir voir l’importance de cette nouvelle dimension. (…) Mais la menace actuelle va au-delà de la politique, puisqu’elle comporte un aspect religieux. Ainsi, l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir un conflit plus total que celui conçu par les peuples totalitaires, comme l’Allemagne nazie, et qui puisse devenir en quelque sorte la propriété de l’islam, est tout simplement stupéfiante, tellement contraire à ce que tout le monde croyait sur la politique. (…) Le problème religieux est plus radical dans la mesure où il dépasse les divisions idéologiques – que bien sûr, la plupart des intellectuels aujourd’hui ne sont pas prêts d’abandonner.(…) Il s’agit de notre incompréhension du rôle de la religion, et de notre propre monde ; c’est ne pas comprendre que ce qui nous unit est très fragile. Lorsque nous évoquons nos principes démocratiques, parlons-nous de l’égalité et des élections, ou bien parlons-nous de capitalisme, de consommation, de libre échange, etc. ? Je pense que dans les années à venir, l’Occident sera mis à l’épreuve. Comment réagira-t-il : avec force ou faiblesse ? Se dissoudra-t-il ? Les occidentaux devraient se poser la question de savoir s’ils ont de vrais principes, et si ceux-ci sont chrétiens ou bien purement consuméristes. Le consumérisme n’a pas d’emprise sur ceux qui se livrent aux attentats suicides. (…) Allah est contre le consumérisme, etc. En réalité, le musulman pense que les rituels de prohibition religieuse sont une force qui maintient l’unité de la communauté, ce qui a totalement disparu ou qui est en déclin en Occident. Les gens en Occident ne sont motivés que par le consumérisme, les bons salaires, etc. Les musulmans disent : « leurs armes sont terriblement dangereuses, mais comme peuple, ils sont tellement faibles que leur civilisation peut être facilement détruite".
L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment. Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. (..) le monde actuel (…) confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent.
(la Guerre Froide est) complètement dépassée. (…) Et la rapidité avec laquelle elle a été dépassée est incroyable. L’Union Soviétique a montré qu’elle devenait plus humaine lorsqu’elle n’a pas tenté de forcer le blocus de Kennedy, et à partir de cet instant, elle n’a plus fait peur. Après Khrouchtchev on a eu rapidement besoin de Gorbatchev. Quand Gorbatchev est arrivé au pouvoir, les oppositions ne se trouvaient plus à l’intérieur de l’humanisme. (…) Cela dit, de plus en plus de gens en Occident verront la faiblesse de notre humanisme ; nous n’allons pas redevenir chrétiens, mais on fera plus attention au fait que la lutte se trouve entre le christianisme et l’islam, plus qu’entre l’islam et l’humanisme. Avec l’islam je pense que l’opposition est totale. Dans l’islam, si l’on est violent, on est inévitablement l’instrument de Dieu. Cela veut donc dire que la violence apocalyptique vient de Dieu. Aux États-Unis, les fondamentalistes disent cela, mais les grandes églises ne le disent pas. Néanmoins, ils ne poussent pas suffisamment leur pensée pour dire que si la violence ne vient pas de Dieu, elle vient de l’homme, et que nous en sommes responsables. Nous acceptons de vivre sous la protection d’armes nucléaires. Cela a probablement été la plus grande erreur de l’Occident. Imaginez-vous les implications. (…) Nous croyons que la violence est garante de la paix. Mais cette hypothèse ne me paraît pas valable. Nous ne voulons pas aujourd’hui réfléchir à ce que signifie cette confiance dans la violence. Avec un autre événement tel que le 11 Septembre) Je pense que les gens deviendraient plus conscients. Mais cela serait probablement comme la première attaque. Il y aurait une période de grande tension spirituelle et intellectuelle, suivie d’un lent relâchement. Quand les gens ne veulent pas voir, ils y arrivent. Je pense qu’il y aura des révolutions spirituelles et intellectuelles dans un avenir proche. Ce que je dis aujourd’hui semble complètement invraisemblable, et pourtant je pense que le 11 Septembre va devenir de plus en plus significatif.  René Girard

Et si le christianisme était bien la source de tous nos maux ?

En ces temps étranges où, en une sorte de guerre froide à l’envers et à fronts renversés, l’ex-agent du KGB et maitre ès chaises musicales nous la joue dorénavant défenseur des libertés fondamentales …

Et où au centre du débat et sur fond d’une guerre plus féroce que jamais avec le terrorisme islamique, le nouveau Sakharov venu cette fois des Etats-Unis en appelle au principe de Nuremberg dont ni ses actuels hôtes russes ni leurs prédécésseurs chinois n’ont probablement jamais entendu parler …

Pendant que dans le Pays autoproclamé des droits de l’homme on accorde l’asile politique et un nouveau timbre à une tronçonneuse de croix aux seins nus et que ne reconnaissant plus leurs enfants, nombre de pays à majorité musulmane le font payer à leurs chrétiens

Retour, avec un entretien de 2007 de René Girard …

Sur la nouveauté proprement apocalyptique, post-11 septembre, de la situation actuelle …

Pourtant étrangement non repérée par athées autant que croyants …

Victimes convergentes, dans la logique du châtiment de l’ambassadeur pour le  message qu’il apporte, de la même illusion d’optique …

Les uns percevant bien les effets effectivement déstabilisateurs et source de violence du christianisme mais pour en faire le nouveau bouc émissaire mondial …

Alors que pointant les apports indéniablement libérateurs du christianisme mais aveugles à l’évidence d’une violence purement humaine et pour la première fois de portée proprement planétaire, les autres s’en remettent à l’annonce apocalyptique d’une violence divine …

La pensée apocalyptique après le 11 Septembre : entretien avec René Girard

Robert DORAN

Revue des Bernardins

28 janvier 2013

Cet entretien a eu lieu, en anglais, le 10 février 2007 au domicile américain de R. Girard à Stanford, en Californie. Complété par un bref entretien le 8 août 2007, au même endroit. Il a déjà été publié en anglais : "Apocalyptic Thinking after 9/11 : An Interview with René Girard", SubStance vol. 37, n° 1, Cultural Theory After 9/11 : Terror, Religion, Media (2008), p. 20-32.

Robert Doran : Peu de temps après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001, vous avez accordé une interview au Monde, où vous avez déclaré : « ce qui se joue aujourd’hui est une rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire [1] ». Cette observation paraît encore plus vraisemblable aujourd’hui. Les faits semblent démontrer une continuité et une intensification du conflit mimétique : les guerres en Irak et en Afghanistan ; les bombes dans les transports publics à Madrid et à Londres ; les voitures incendiées dans les banlieues parisiennes ne semblent pas sans rapport. Rétrospectivement, comment percevez-vous les événements du 11 Septembre ?

René Girard : Je pense que votre remarque est juste. Mais je voudrais commencer par faire quelques commentaires. J’ai l’impression que beaucoup de gens ont oublié le 11 Septembre – pas complètement, mais ils l’ont réduit à une espèce de norme tacite. Quand j’ai donné cet entretien au Monde, l’opinion générale pensait qu’il s’agissait d’un événement inhabituel, nouveau, et incomparable. Aujourd’hui, je pense que beaucoup de gens seraient en désaccord avec cette remarque. Malheureusement, l’attitude des Américains face au 11 Septembre a été influencée par l’idéologie politique, à cause de la guerre en Irak. Le fait d’insister sur le 11 Septembre est devenu « conservateur » et « alarmiste ». Ceux qui aimeraient mettre une fin immédiate à la guerre en Irak tendent donc à le minimiser. Cela dit, je ne veux pas dire qu’ils ont tort de vouloir terminer la guerre en Irak, mais avant de minimiser le 11 Septembre, ils devraient faire très attention et considérer la situation dans sa globalité. Aujourd’hui, cette tendance est très répandue, car les événements dont vous parlez – qui ont eu lieu après le 11 Septembre et qui en sont, en quelque sorte, de vagues réminiscences – sont incomparablement moins puissants et ont beaucoup moins de visibilité. Par conséquent, il y a tout le problème de l’interprétation : qu’est-ce que le 11 Septembre ?

RD : Vous voyez vous-même le 11 Septembre comme une sorte de rupture, un événement déterminant ?

RG : Oui, je le vois comme un événement déterminant, et c’est très grave de le minimiser aujourd’hui. Le désir habituel d’être optimiste, de ne pas voir l’unicité de notre temps du point de vue de la violence, correspond à un désir futile et désespéré de penser notre temps comme la simple continuation de la violence du XXe siècle. Je pense, personnellement, que nous avons affaire à une nouvelle dimension qui est mondiale. Ce que le communisme avait tenté de faire, une guerre vraiment mondiale, est maintenant réalisé, c’est l’actualité. Minimiser le 11 Septembre, c’est ne pas vouloir voir l’importance de cette nouvelle dimension.

RD : Vous venez de faire référence à la guerre froide. Comment comparez-vous les deux menaces envers l’Occident ?

RG : Les deux sont similaires dans la mesure où elles représentent une menace révolutionnaire, une menace globale. Mais la menace actuelle va au-delà de la politique, puisqu’elle comporte un aspect religieux. Ainsi, l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir un conflit plus total que celui conçu par les peuples totalitaires, comme l’Allemagne nazie, et qui puisse devenir en quelque sorte la propriété de l’islam, est tout simplement stupéfiante, tellement contraire à ce que tout le monde croyait sur la politique. Il faudrait beaucoup y travailler, car il n’y a pas de vraie réflexion sur la coexistence des autres religions, et en particulier du christianisme avec l’islam. Le problème religieux est plus radical dans la mesure où il dépasse les divisions idéologiques – que bien sûr, la plupart des intellectuels aujourd’hui ne sont pas prêts d’abandonner. En deçà de ces visions idéologiques, nos réflexions sur le 11 Septembre resteront superficielles. Nous devons réfléchir dans le contexte plus large de la dimension apocalyptique du christianisme. Celle-ci est une menace, car la survie même de la planète est en jeu. Notre planète est menacée par trois choses qui émanent de l’homme : la menace nucléaire, la menace écologique et la manipulation biologique de l’espèce humaine. L’idée que l’homme ne puisse pas maîtriser ses propres pouvoirs est aussi vraie dans le domaine biologique que dans le domaine militaire. C’est cette triple menace mondiale qui domine aujourd’hui.

RD : Je reviendrai à la dimension apocalyptique dans un instant. Dans un livre récent, Zbigniew Brzezinski (conseiller personnel du Président Carter pour la sécurité nationale) écrit que « derrière pratiquement chaque acte terroriste se cache un problème politique. […] Pour paraphraser Clausewitz, le terrorisme est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens [2] ». Le terrorisme n’est-il pas toujours en partie politique puisque, quelle qu’en soit la cible, il est finalement toujours orienté contre les gouvernements ?

RG : Le terrorisme est une forme de guerre, et la guerre est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens. En ce sens, le terrorisme est politique. Mais le terrorisme est la seule forme possible de guerre face à la technologie. Les événements actuels en Irak le confirment. La supériorité de l’Occident, c’est sa technologie, et elle s’est révélée inutile en Irak. L’Occident s’est mis dans la pire des situations en déclarant qu’il transformerait l’Irak en une démocratie jeffersonienne ! C’est précisément ce qu’il ne peut pas faire. Il est impuissant face à l’islam car la division entre les sunnites et les chiites est infiniment plus importante. Alors même qu’ils combattent l’Occident, ils parviennent encore à lutter l’un contre l’autre. Pourquoi l’Occident devraitil s’investir dans ce conflit interne à l’islam alors que nous ne parvenons même pas à en concevoir l’immense puissance au sein du monde islamique lui-même ?

RD : S’agirait-il de notre incompréhension face au rôle de la religion ?

RG : Il s’agit de notre incompréhension du rôle de la religion, et de notre propre monde ; c’est ne pas comprendre que ce qui nous unit est très fragile. Lorsque nous évoquons nos principes démocratiques, parlons-nous de l’égalité et des élections, ou bien parlons-nous de capitalisme, de consommation, de libre échange, etc. ? Je pense que dans les années à venir, l’Occident sera mis à l’épreuve. Comment réagira-t-il : avec force ou faiblesse ? Se dissoudra-t-il ? Les occidentaux devraient se poser la question de savoir s’ils ont de vrais principes, et si ceux-ci sont chrétiens ou bien purement consuméristes. Le consumérisme n’a pas d’emprise sur ceux qui se livrent aux attentats suicides. L’Amérique devrait y réfléchir, car elle offre au monde ce que l’on considère de plus attrayant. Pourquoi cela ne fonctionne- t-il pas vraiment chez les musulmans ? Est-ce par ressentiment ou ont-ils, contre cela, un système de défense bien organisé ? Ou bien, leur perspective religieuse est-elle plus authentique et plus puissante ? Le vrai problème est là.

RD : Votre interprétation d’origine était que le 11 Septembre était dû au ressentiment.

RG : Je suis bien moins affirmatif que je ne l’étais au moment du 11 Septembre sur l’idée d’un ressentiment total. Je me souviens m’être emporté lors d’une rencontre à l’École Polytechnique lorsque je me suis mis d’accord avec Jean-Pierre Dupuy sur l’interprétation du ressentiment du monde musulman. Maintenant, je ne pense pas que cela suffise. Le ressentiment seul peut-il motiver cette capacité de mourir ainsi ? Le monde musulman pourrait-il vraiment être indifférent à la culture de consommation de masse ? Peut-être qu’il l’est. Je ne sais pas. Il serait sans doute excessif de leur attribuer une telle envie. Si les islamistes ont vraiment pour objectif la domination du monde, alors ils l’ont déjà dépassée. Nous ne savons pas si l’industrialisation rapide apparaîtra dans le monde musulman, ou s’ils tenteront de gagner sur la croissance démographique et la fascination qu’ils exercent. Il y a de plus en plus de conversions en Occident. La fascination de la violence y joue certainement un rôle.

RD : Mais, selon votre pensée, l’interprétation sur le ressentiment semblait logique.

RG : Il y a là du ressentiment, évidemment. Et c’est ce qui a dû émouvoir ceux qui ont applaudi les terroristes, comme s’ils étaient dans un stade. C’est cela le ressentiment. C’est évident et indéniable. Mais est-ce qu’il représente l’unique force ? La force majeure ? Peut-il être l’unique cause des attentats suicides ? Je n’en suis pas sûr. La richesse accumulée en Occident, comparée au reste du monde, est un scandale, et le 11 Septembre n’est pas sans rapport avec ce fait. Si je ne veux donc pas complètement supprimer l’idée du ressentiment, il ne peut pas être l’unique explication.

RD : Et l’autre force ?

RG : L’autre force serait religieuse. Allah est contre le consumérisme, etc. En réalité, le musulman pense que les rituels de prohibition religieuse sont une force qui maintient l’unité de la communauté, ce qui a totalement disparu ou qui est en déclin en Occident. Les gens en Occident ne sont motivés que par le consumérisme, les bons salaires, etc. Les musulmans disent : « leurs armes sont terriblement dangereuses, mais comme peuple, ils sont tellement faibles que leur civilisation peut être facilement détruite ». C’est ce qu’ils pensent et ils n’ont peut-être pas complètement tort. Il me semble qu’il y a quelque chose de juste dans ce propos. Finalement, je crois que la perspective chrétienne sur la violence surmontera tout, mais ce sera une épreuve importante.

RD : Jean-Pierre Dupuy considère le 11 Septembre comme « un vrai sacrifice dans le sens anthropologique du terme [3] ». Le 11 Septembre peut-il être pensé selon une logique du sacrifice ?

RG : La réponse à cette question doit être prudente. Il faut faire attention à ne pas justifier le 11 Septembre en le qualifiant de sacrificiel. Je pense que Jean-Pierre Dupuy ne le dit pas. Il maintient une sorte de neutralité. Mais ce qu’il dit sur la nature sacrée de Ground Zero au World Trade Center est, je pense, parfaitement justifié. Je me permets de citer un essai pertinent de James Alison, qui a écrit :

Et immédiatement, le centre sacrificiel se mit à générer des réactions habituelles : un sentiment d’unanimité et de deuil. […] Des phrases ont commencé à se dire comme « Nous sommes tous Américains » – un sentiment purement fictif pour la plupart d’entre nous. Ce fut étonnant de voir l’unité se former autour du centre sacré, rapidement nommé Ground Zero, une unité qui se concrétisera ensuite par un drapeau, une grande participation aux cérémonies religieuses, les chefs religieux soudainement pris au sérieux, des bougies, des lieux saints, des prières, tous les signes de la religion de la mort. […] Et puis il y avait le deuil. Comme nous aimons le deuil ! Cela nous donne bonne conscience, nous rend innocents. Voilà ce qu’Aristote voulait dire par katharsis, et qui a des échos profonds dans les racines sacrificielles de la tragédie dramatique. Autour du centre sacrificiel, les personnes présentes se sentent justifiées et moralement bonnes. Une fausse bonté qui soudainement les sort de leurs petites trahisons, leurs lâchetés, leur mauvaise conscience [4].

Je pense que James Alison a raison de parler de la katharsis dans le contexte du 11 Septembre. La notion de katharsis est extrêmement importante. C’est un mot religieux. En réalité, cela veut dire « la purge » au sens de purification. Dans l’Église orthodoxe, par exemple, katharos veut dire purification. C’est le mot qui exprime l’effet positif de la religion. La purge est ce qui nous rend purs. C’est ce que la religion est censée faire, et ce qu’elle fait avec le sacrifice. Je considère l’utilisation du mot katharsis par Aristote comme parfaitement juste. Quand les gens condamnent la théorie mimétique, ils ne voient pas l’apport d’Aristote. Il ne semble parler que de tragédie, mais pourtant, le théâtre tragique traite du sacrifice comme un drame. On l’appelle d’ailleurs « l’ode de la chèvre [5] ». Aristote est toujours conventionnel dans ses explications – conventionnel au sens positif. Un Grec très intelligent cherchant à justifier sa religion, utiliserait, je pense, le mot katharsis. Ainsi, ma réponse mettrait l’accent sur la katharsis au sens aristotélicien du terme.

RD : La dimension spectaculaire du 11 Septembre fait certainement penser au théâtre. Mais le 11 Septembre, nous avons tous été témoins d’un événement réel.

RG : Oui, pour le 11 Septembre, il y avait la télévision qui nous rendait présents à l’événement, et intensifiait ainsi l’expérience. L’événement était en direct, comme nous le disons en français. On ne savait pas ce qui allait advenir par la suite. Moi-même, j’ai vu le deuxième avion frapper le gratte-ciel, en direct. C’était comme un spectacle tragique, mais réel en même temps. Si nous ne l’avions pas vécu dans le sens le plus littéral, il n’aurait pas eu le même impact. Je pense que si j’avais écrit La Violence et le Sacré après le 11 Septembre, j’y aurais très probablement inclus cet événement [6]. C’est l’événement qui rend possible une compréhension des événements contemporains, car il rend l’archaïque plus intelligible. Le 11 Septembre représente un étrange retour à l’archaïque à l’intérieur du sécularisme de notre temps. Il n’y a pas si longtemps, les gens auraient eu une réaction chrétienne vis-à-vis du 11 Septembre. Aujourd’hui, ils ont une réaction archaïque, qui augure mal de l’avenir.

RD : Revenons-en à la dimension apocalyptique. Votre pensée est généralement considérée comme pessimiste. Considérezvous le 11 Septembre comme une étape vers un avenir apocalyptique  ?

RG : L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment.

RD : Mais cette interprétation permet à la violence de continuer à un autre niveau.

RG : Oui, mais pas en tant que force religieuse. À la fin, la force religieuse est du côté du Christ. Cependant, il semblerait que la vraie force religieuse soit du côté de la violence.

RD : À quoi ressembleront les choses lorsque les puissances seront vaincues ?

RG : Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. Comment le monde peut-il finir alors qu’il est tenu si fortement par les forces de l’ordre ?

RD : La révélation chrétienne serait-elle ambivalente dans la mesure où elle a des conséquences positives et négatives ?

RG : Pourquoi négatives ? Fondamentalement, c’est la religion qui annonce le monde à venir ; il n’est pas question de se battre pour ce monde. C’est le christianisme moderne qui oublie ses origines et sa vraie direction. L’apocalypse au début du christianisme était une promesse, pas une menace, car ils croyaient vraiment en un monde prochain.

RD : Peut-on dire que vous êtes a priori pessimiste ?

RG : Je suis pessimiste au sens actuel du terme. Mais en fait, je suis optimiste si l’on regarde le monde actuel qui confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent.

RD : Ne pouvons-nous pas dire que nous avons fait un progrès moral ?

RG : Les deux sont possibles. Par exemple, nous avons moins de violence privée. Comparé à aujourd’hui, si vous regardez les statistiques du XVIIIe siècle, c’est impressionnant de voir la violence qu’il y avait.

RD : Je pensais plutôt à quelque chose comme le mouvement pacifiste, qui aurait été inconcevable ne serait-ce qu’il y a cent ans.

RG : Oui, le mouvement pacifiste est totalement chrétien, qu’il l’avoue ou non. Mais en même temps, il y a un déferlement d’inventions technologiques qui ne sont plus retenues par aucune force culturelle. Jacques Maritain disait qu’il y a à la fois plus de bien et plus de mal dans le monde. Je suis d’accord avec lui. Au fond, le monde est en permanence plus chrétien et moins chrétien. Mais le monde est fondamentalement désorganisé par le christianisme.

RD : Ce que vous dites est en opposition avec la perspective humaniste d’un Marcel Gauchet, qui dit que le christianisme est la religion de la sortie de la religion [7].

RG : Oui, la pensée de Marcel Gauchet résulte de toute l’interprétation moderne du christianisme. Nous disons que nous sommes les héritiers du christianisme, et que l’héritage du christianisme est l’humanisme. Cela est en partie vrai. Mais en même temps, Marcel Gauchet ne considère pas le monde dans sa globalité. On peut tout expliquer avec la théorie mimétique. Dans un monde qui paraît plus menaçant, il est certain que la religion reviendra. Le 11 Septembre est le début de cela, car lors de cette attaque, la technologie n’était pas utilisée à des fins humanistes mais à des fins radicales, métaphysico-religieuses non chrétiennes. Je trouve cela incroyable, car j’ai l’habitude d’observer les forces religieuses et humanistes ensemble, et non pas en opposition. Mais suite au 11 Septembre, j’ai eu l’impression que la religion archaïque revenait, avec l’islam, d’une manière extrêmement rigoureuse. L’islam a beaucoup d’aspects propres aux religions bibliques à l’exception de la compréhension de la violence comme un mal non pas divin mais humain. Il considère la violence comme totalement divine. C’est pour cela que l’opposition est plus significative qu’avec le communisme, qui est un humanisme même s’il est factice et erroné, et qu’il tourne à la terreur. Mais c’est toujours un humanisme. Et tout à coup, on revient à la religion, la religion archaïque – mais avec des armes modernes. Ce que le monde attend est le moment où les musulmans radicaux pourront d’une certaine manière se servir d’armes nucléaires. Il faut regarder le Pakistan, qui est une nation musulmane possédant des armes nucléaires et l’Iran qui tente de les développer.

RD : Ainsi, vous considérez la Guerre Froide comme étant dépassée à la fois en portée et en importance par le radicalisme islamique ?

RG : Complètement dépassée, oui. Et la rapidité avec laquelle elle a été dépassée est incroyable. L’Union Soviétique a montré qu’elle devenait plus humaine lorsqu’elle n’a pas tenté de forcer le blocus de Kennedy, et à partir de cet instant, elle n’a plus fait peur. Après Khrouchtchev on a eu rapidement besoin de Gorbatchev. Quand Gorbatchev est arrivé au pouvoir, les oppositions ne se trouvaient plus à l’intérieur de l’humanisme. Les communistes voulaient organiser le monde pour qu’il n’y ait plus de pauvres. Les capitalistes ont constaté que les pauvres n’avaient pas de poids. Les capitalistes l’ont emporté.

RD : Et ce conflit sera plus dangereux parce qu’il ne s’agit plus d’une lutte au sein de l’humanisme ?

RG : Oui, bien qu’ils n’aient pas les mêmes armes que l’Union Soviétique – du moins pas encore. Le monde change si rapidement. Cela dit, de plus en plus de gens en Occident verront la faiblesse de notre humanisme ; nous n’allons pas redevenir chrétiens, mais on fera plus attention au fait que la lutte se trouve entre le christianisme et l’islam, plus qu’entre l’islam et l’humanisme.

RD : Vous voulez dire un conflit entre une conscience de la violence comme étant humaine et une conscience de la violence comme divine ?

RG : Oui. Avec l’islam je pense que l’opposition est totale. Dans l’islam, si l’on est violent, on est inévitablement l’instrument de Dieu. Cela veut donc dire que la violence apocalyptique vient de Dieu. Aux États-Unis, les fondamentalistes disent cela, mais les grandes églises ne le disent pas. Néanmoins, ils ne poussent pas suffisamment leur pensée pour dire que si la violence ne vient pas de Dieu, elle vient de l’homme, et que nous en sommes responsables. Nous acceptons de vivre sous la protection d’armes nucléaires. Cela a probablement été la plus grande erreur de l’Occident. Imaginez-vous les implications.

RD : Vous faites référence ici à la logique du suicide mutuel (MAD : Mutual Assured Destruction).

RG : Oui, la dissuasion nucléaire. Mais il s’agit de faibles excuses. Nous croyons que la violence est garante de la paix. Mais cette hypothèse ne me paraît pas valable. Nous ne voulons pas aujourd’hui réfléchir à ce que signifie cette confiance dans la violence.

RD : Comment concevez-vous l’effet d’un autre événement tel que le 11 Septembre ?

RG : Je pense que les personnes deviendraient plus conscientes. Mais cela serait probablement comme la première attaque. Il y aurait une période de grande tension spirituelle et intellectuelle, suivie d’un lent relâchement. Quand les gens ne veulent pas voir, ils y arrivent. Je pense qu’il y aura des révolutions spirituelles et intellectuelles dans un avenir proche. Ce que je dis aujourd’hui semble complètement invraisemblable, et pourtant je pense que le 11 Septembre va devenir de plus en plus significatif.

RD : Votre vision du rôle de la violence dans le christianisme at- elle changé ?

RG : Il y a des erreurs dans Des Choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde [8]. le refus d’utiliser le mot sacrificiel dans un sens positif, par exemple. Il y a trop d’opposition entre le sacrificiel et le non-sacrificiel. Dans le christianisme, tous les actes sacrificiels sont censés éloigner la violence, pour que l’homme en finisse avec sa propre violence. Je pense que le christianisme authentique sépare complètement Dieu de la violence ; cependant, le rôle de la violence dans le christianisme est une question complexe.

RD : Lors de la parution des Choses cachées vous disiez que le christianisme était une religion non-sacrificielle.

RG : Le christianisme a toujours été sacrificiel. Il est vrai que j’ai donné trop d’importance à l’interprétation non sacrificielle, pour rester sur mes positions avant-gardistes. Je devais être contre l’Église d’une certaine manière. Cette attitude était naturelle, puisque toute ma formation pédagogique s’appuyait sur le surréalisme, l’existentialisme, qui sont tous des courants anti – chrétiens. C’était probablement une bonne chose, car le livre n’aurait sans doute pas eu le même succès.

RD : Et si vous aviez paru plus orthodoxe ?

RG : Si j’avais paru plus orthodoxe, on m’aurait immédiatement fait taire, par le silence des médias.

RD : Quel est votre point de vue actuel sur le sacrifice dans le christianisme ?

RG : Il faut distinguer entre le sacrifice des autres et le sacrifice de soi. Le Christ dit au Père : « Vous ne vouliez ni holocauste, ni sacrifice ; moi je dis : “Me voici” » (cf. He 10, 6-7). Autrement dit, je préfère me sacrifier plutôt que de sacrifier l’autre. Mais cela doit toujours être nommé sacrifice. Lorsque nous utilisons le mot « sacrifice » dans nos langues modernes, c’est dans le sens chrétien. Dieu dit : « Si personne d’autre n’est assez bon pour se sacrifier lui plutôt que son frère, je le ferai. » Ainsi, je satisfais à la demande de Dieu envers l’homme. Je préfère mourir plutôt que tuer. Mais tous les autres hommes préfèrent tuer plutôt que mourir.

RD : Qu’en est-il de l’idée du martyr ?

RG : Dans le christianisme, on ne se martyrise pas soi-même. On n’est pas volontaire pour se faire tuer. On se met dans une situation où le respect des préceptes de Dieu (tendre l’autre joue, etc.) peut nous faire tuer. Cela dit, on se fera tuer parce que les hommes veulent nous tuer, non pas parce qu’on s’est porté volontaire. Ce n’est pas comme la notion japonaise de kamikaze. La notion chrétienne signifie que l’on est prêt à mourir plutôt qu’à tuer. C’est bien l’attitude de la bonne prostituée face au jugement de Salomon. Elle dit : « Donnez l’enfant à mon ennemi plutôt que de le tuer. » Sacrifier son enfant serait comme se sacrifier elle-même, car en acceptant une sorte de mort, elle se sacrifie elle-même. Et lorsque Salomon dit qu’elle est la vraie mère, cela ne signifie pas qu’elle est la mère biologique, mais la mère selon l’esprit. Cette histoire se trouve dans le Premier Livre des Rois (3, 16-28), qui est, à certains égards, un livre assez violent. Mais il me semble qu’il n’y a pas de meilleur symbole préchrétien du sacrifice de soi par le Christ.

RD : Concevez-vous ceci en contraste avec le concept du martyr en Islam ?

RG : Je vois en cela le contraste du christianisme avec toutes les religions archaïques du sacrifice. Cela dit, la religion musulmane a beaucoup copié le christianisme et elle n’est donc pas ouvertement sacrificielle. Mais la religion musulmane n’a pas détruit le sacrifice de la religion archaïque comme l’a fait le christianisme. Bien des parties du monde musulman ont conservé le sacrifice prémusulman.

RD : Cependant le lynchage spontané dans le Sud des États-Unis n’était-il pas un exemple de sacrifice archaïque ?

RG : Oui, bien entendu. Il faut lire les romans de William Faulkner. Bien des gens croient que le sud des États-Unis est une incarnation du christianisme. Je dirais que le sud est sans doute la partie la moins chrétienne des États-Unis en termes d’esprit, bien qu’il en soit la plus chrétienne en termes de rituel. Il n’y a pas de doute que le christianisme médiéval était beaucoup plus proche du fondamentalisme actuel. Mais il y a beaucoup de manières de trahir une religion. En ce qui concerne le sud, cela est évident, car il y a un grand retour aux formes les plus archaïques de la religion. Il faut interpréter ces lynchages comme une forme d’acte religieux archaïque.

RD : Que pensez-vous de la façon dont les gens emploient le terme de « violence religieuse » ?

RG : Le terme de « violence religieuse » est souvent employé d’une manière qui ne m’aide pas à résoudre les problèmes que je me pose, à savoir ceux d’un rapport à la violence en mouvement constant et également historique.

RD : Serait-il juste de dire que selon votre pensée, toute violence religieuse est nécessairement archaïque ?

RG : Je dirais que toute violence religieuse implique un degré d’archaïsme. Mais certains points sont très compliqués. Par exemple, lors de la première guerre mondiale, est-ce que les soldats qui acceptaient d’être mobilisés pour mourir pour leur pays, et beaucoup au nom du christianisme, avaient une attitude vraiment chrétienne ? Il y a là quelque chose qui est contraire au christianisme. Mais il y a aussi quelque chose de vrai. Cela ne supprime pas, à mon avis, le fait qu’il y a une histoire de la violence religieuse, et que les religions, surtout le christianisme, au fond, sont continuellement influencées par cette histoire, bien que son influence soit, le plus souvent, pervertie.

Robert DORAN Traduit de l’anglais par Caroline VIAL, révisé par Sabine de BEAUGRENIER

[1] Entretien avec Henri Tincq, Le Monde, le 6 novembre 2001.

[2] Zbigniew BRZEZINSKI, The Choice : Global Domination or Global Leadership, New York, Basic Books, 2004, p. 28.

[3] Jean-Pierre DUPUY, « Anatomy of 9/11 : Evil, Rationalism, and the Sacred », SubStance vol. 37, n° 1, Cultural Theory After 9/11 : Terror, Religion, Media (2008), p. 33-51.

[4] James ALISON, « Contemplation in a World of Violence : Girard, Merton, Tolle » http://www.thecentering.org/Alison_… %world%20of%20violence.html, dernier accès le 8 août 2007.

[5] Le mot grec tragoidia vient de tragos (chèvre) et ode (chanson) : « chanson de chèvre » ou « la chanson livrée au sacrifice de la chèvre ».

[6] René GIRARD, La Violence et le Sacré, Paris, Grasset, 1971.

[7] Cf. Marcel GAUCHET, Le Désenchantement du monde. Une histoire politique de la religion, Paris, Gallimard, 1985.

[8] René GIRARD, Des Choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, Paris, Grasset, 1978.


Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Rejoignez 309 autres abonnés