Mort de Nelson Mandela: Mandela ou l’anti-Arafat (Robben Island was a tremendous school in human relations – the kind of thing that a lot of politicians could do with)

6 décembre, 2013
http://www.rightsidenews.com/images/stories/December_2013/Editorial/US_Opinion/320x276xANC_MANDELA_COUPLE_JOE_SLOVO_COMMUNIST.jpg.pagespeed.ic.naRfeQ9VR6.jpgNelson Mandela (L) is embraced by PLO leader Yasser Arafat as he arrives at Lusaka airport February 27, 1990.  REUTERS/Howard BurdittJe ne saurais trop insister sur le rôle que l’Église méthodiste a joué dans ma vie. Nelson Mandela (23e anniversaire de la Gospel Church power of Republic of South Africa, 1995)
Sans l’Église, sans les institutions religieuses, je ne serais pas là aujourd’hui.  Nelson Mandela (parlement mondial des religions, 1999)
Nous qui avons grandi dans des maisons religieuses et qui avons étudié dans les écoles des missionnaires, nous avons fait l’expérience d’un profond conflit spirituel quand nous avons vu le mode de vie que nous jugions sacré remis en question par de nouvelles philosophies, et quand nous nous sommes rendu compte que, parmi ceux qui traitaient notre foi d’opium, il y avait des penseurs dont l’intégrité et l’amour pour les hommes ne faisaient pas de doute. Nelson Mandela (lettre à Fatima Meer, 1977)
J’assiste encore à tous les services de l’Église et j’apprécie certains sermons.  Nelson Mandela (lettre de Robben island)
Partager le sacrement qui fait partie de la tradition de mon Église était important à mes yeux. Cela me procurait l’apaisement et le calme intérieur. En sortant des services, j’étais un homme neuf. (…) Je n’ai jamais abandonné mes croyances chrétiennes. Nelson Mandela (lettre à Ahmed Kathrada, 1993)
J’ai bien sûr été baptisé à l’Église wesleyenne et j’ai fréquenté ses écoles missionnaires. Dehors comme ici, je lui reste fidèle, mais mes conceptions ont eu tendance à s’élargir et à être bienveillantes envers l’unité religieuse. Nelson Mandela (1977)
La relation entre un homme et son Dieu est un sujet extrêmement privé, qui ne regarde pas les mass media. Cela dit, les institutions religieuses m’ont aidé à garder le moral pendant mon séjour en prison. Les prêtres nous rendaient visite régulièrement pour célébrer la messe; plusieurs sermons nous ont renforcés dans notre détermination. Les religieux ont fréquemment agi comme des intermédiaires entre les prisonniers et leurs familles, aussi. Et l’Eglise a veillé à nous fournir des livres, quand l’administration pénitentiaire les autorisait. Nelson Mandela (interview à l’Express, 1995)
The Gandhian influence dominated freedom struggles on the African continent right up to the 1960s because of the power it generated and the unity it forged among the apparently powerless. Nonviolence was the official stance of all major African coalitions, and the South African A.N.C. remained implacably opposed to violence for most of its existence. Gandhi remained committed to nonviolence; I followed the Gandhian strategy for as long as I could, but then there came a point in our struggle when the brute force of the oppressor could no longer be countered through passive resistance alone. We founded Unkhonto we Sizwe and added a military dimension to our struggle. Even then, we chose sabotage because it did not involve the loss of life, and it offered the best hope for future race relations. Militant action became part of the African agenda officially supported by the Organization of African Unity (O.A.U.) following my address to the Pan-African Freedom Movement of East and Central Africa (PAFMECA) in 1962, in which I stated, "Force is the only language the imperialists can hear, and no country became free without some sort of violence." Gandhi himself never ruled out violence absolutely and unreservedly. He conceded the necessity of arms in certain situations. He said, "Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence… I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor …" Violence and nonviolence are not mutually exclusive; it is the predominance of the one or the other that labels a struggle. Nelson Mandela (Time, 1999)
Trois modernes ont marqué ma vie d’un sceau profond et ont fait mon enchantement: Raychandbhai [écrivain gujarati connu pour ses polémiques religieuses], Tolstoï, par son livre "Le Royaume des Cieux est en vous", et Ruskin et son Unto This Last. Gandhi
In planning the direction and form that MK would take, we considered four types of violent activities: sabotage, guerrilla warfare, terrorism, and open revolution. For a small and fledgling army, open revolution was inconceivable. Terrorism inevitably reflected poorly on those who used it, undermining any public support it might otherwise garner. Guerrilla warfare was a possibility, but since the ANC had been reluctant to embrace violence at all, it made sense to start with the form of violence that inflicted the least harm against individuals: sabotage. Because it did not involve loss of life it offered the best hope for reconciliation among the races afterward. We did not want to start a blood feud between white and black. Animosity between Afrikaner and Englishman was still sharp fifty years after the Anglo-Boer War; what would race relations be like between white and black if we provoked a civil war? Sabotage had the added virtue of requiring the least manpower. Our strategy was to make selective forays against military installations, power plants, telephone lines, and transportation links; targets that would not only hamper the military effectiveness of the state, but frighten National Party supporters, scare away foreign capital, and weaken the economy. This we hoped would bring the government to the bargaining table. Strict instructions were given to members of MK that we would countenance no loss of life. But if sabotage did not produce the results we wanted, we were prepared to move on to the next stage: guerrilla warfare and terrorism. Mandela (Long walk to freedom, 1995)
He needed that time in prison to mellow. Desmond Tutu (Sky News)
Perhaps the most difficult case to make is that of the ANC in South Africa. If ever a group could legitimately claim to have resorted to force only as a last resort, it is the ANC. Founded in 1912, for the first fifty years the movement treated nonviolence as a core principle. In 1961, however, with all forms of political organization closed to it, Nelson Mandela was authorized to create a separate military organization, Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK). In his autobiography Mandela describes the strategy session as the movement examined the options available to them: We considered four types of violent activities: sabotage, guerrilla warfare, terrorism and open revolution. For a small and fledgling army, open revolution was inconceivable. Terrorism inevitably reflected poorly on those who used it, undermining any public support it might otherwise garner. Guerrilla warfare was a possibility, but since the ANC had been reluctant to embrace violence at all, it made sense to start with the form of violence that inflicted the least harm against individuals: sabotage. These fine distinctions were lost on the court in Rivonia that convicted Mandela and most of the ANC leadership in 1964 and sentenced them to life imprisonment. For the next twenty years an increasingly repressive white minority state denied the most basic political rights to the majority black population. An uprising in Soweto was defeated, as was an MK guerrilla campaign launched from surrounding states. In 1985, the government declared a state of emergency, which was followed within three weeks by thirteen terrorist bombings in major downtown areas. Reasonable people can differ on whether or not the terrorism of the ANC was justified, given the legitimacy of the goals it sought and the reprehensible nature of the government it faced. The violent campaign of the ANC in the early and mid-1980s, however, was indisputably a terrorist campaign. Unless and until we are willing to label a group whose ends we believe to be just a terrorist group, if it deliberately targets civilians in order to achieve those ends, we are never going to be able to forge effective international cooperation against terrorism. Louise Richardson
In the end, Mandela was arrested before the armed struggle reached that stage. Then, as he languished in prison—a powerful symbol, but no longer accountable as a commander—terrorism did come to the fore. The infamous Church Street bombing in 1983, for instance, targeted the South African Air Force headquarters, killing 19 people and wounding 217, among them many innocent bystanders. When at last the white South African government, facing the possibility of wider civil war and pressured by international sanctions, turned to Mandela for secret talks, it could do so knowing he had the authority to negotiate without the taint of direct involvement with the carnage. His combination of pragmatism and humanity was key. The Daily Beast
Crucially, Mandela was open to escalation to terror tactics and guerrilla war. The ANC’s 1982 attack of the Koeberg nuclear plant — yes, crucial infrastructure — killed 19 people. Unsurprisingly, the ANC was listed as a terrorist organization by the United States. Mandela himself was on a U.S. terror watch list until 2008. Natasha Lennard
Like many other anti-Communists and Cold Warriors, I feared that releasing Nelson Mandela from jail, especially amid the collapse of South Africa’s apartheid government, would create a Cuba on the Cape of Good Hope at best and an African Cambodia at worst. After all, Mandela had spent 27 years locked up in Robben Island prison due to his leadership of the African National Congress. The ANC was a violent, pro-Communist organization. (…) Having seen Communists terrorize nations around the world while the Berlin Wall still stood, Mandela looked like one more butcher waiting to take his place on the 20th Century’s blood-soaked stage. The example of the Ayatollah Khomeini also was fresh in our minds. He went swiftly from exile in Paris to edicts in Tehran and quickly turned Iran into a vicious and bloodthirsty dictatorship at the vanguard of militant Islam. Nelson Mandela was just another Fidel Castro or a Pol Pot, itching to slip from behind bars, savage his country, and surf atop the bones of his victims. WRONG! Far, far, far from any of that, Nelson Mandela turned out to be one of the 20th Century’s great moral leaders, right up there with Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Deroy Murdock
Envoyé à la cour du roi, Rolhlahla se prépare à assurer la succession à la chefferie, à l’école des pasteurs méthodistes d’abord, puis, en 1938 à l’University College for Bantu de Fort Hare, seul établissement secondaire habilité à l’époque à recevoir des «non-Blancs». Les fondateurs blancs de Fort Hare entendaient former une élite noire capable de servir leur dessein colonial. Mais face à la conjugaison d’esprits éveillés, l’épreuve de la réalité étant la plus forte, l’université «bantoue» s’est transformée en pépinière du nationalisme d’Afrique australe, d’où sortirent notamment les frères ennemis zimbabwéens Joshua Nkomo et Robert Mugabe ou le «père de la Nation» zambienne, Kenneth Kaunda. (…) Fondé à Bloemfontein en 1912, l’African native national congress (ANNC) avait abandonné son initiale coloniale «native» (indigène) en 1923 pour devenir ANC. Largement inspiré par les idées légalistes du promoteur de l’émancipation des Noirs américains, Booker T. Washington, l’ANC avait entrepris d’informer la communauté noire sud-africaine sur ses droits ou ce qui en restait, faisant aussi campagne par exemple contre la loi sud-africaine sur les laissez-passer. (…) En 1951, Tambo et Mandela sont les deux premiers avocats noirs inscrits au barreau de Johannesburg. L’année suivante, ils ouvrent un cabinet ensemble. En 1950, les principales lois de l’apartheid ont été adoptées, en particulier le Group areas act qui assigne notamment à «résidence» les Noirs dans les bantoustans et les townships. Le Supression communist act inscrit dans son champ anti-communiste toute personne qui «cherche à provoquer un changement politique, industriel, économique ou social par des moyens illégaux». Bien évidemment, pour l’apartheid il n’y a pas de possibilité de changement légal. Mais en rangeant dans le même sac nationalistes, communistes, pacifistes et révolutionnaires, il ferme la fracture idéologique qui opposait justement ces derniers au sein de l’ANC. Pour sa part, Nelson Mandela rompt avec son anti-communisme chrétien intransigeant pour recommander l’unité de lutte anti-apartheid entre les nationalistes noirs et les Blancs du SACP. Elu président de l’ANC pour le Transvaal et vice président national de l’ANC, Nelson Mandela est également choisi comme «volontaire en chef» pour lancer en juin 1952 une action de désobéissance civile civile de grande envergure à la manière du Mahatma Ghandi, la «défiance campaign», où il anime des cohortes de manifestants descendus en masse dans la rue. La campagne culmine en octobre, contre la ségrégation légalisée et en particulier contre le port obligatoire des laissez-passer imposé aux Noirs. Tout un arsenal de loi sur la «sécurité publique» verrouille l’état d’urgence qui autorise l’apartheid à gouverner par décrets. Condamné à neuf mois de prison avec sursis, le charismatique Mandela est interdit de réunion et assigné à résidence à Johannesburg. Il en profite pour mettre au point le «Plan M» qui organise l’ANC en cellules clandestines. La répression des années cinquante contraint Mandela à faire disparaître son nom de l’affiche officielle de l’ANC mais ne l’empêche pas de participer en 1955 au Congrès des peuples qui adopte une Charte des Libertés préconisant l’avènement d’une société multiraciale et démocratique. Le Congrès parvient en effet à rassembler l’ANC, le Congrès indien, l’Organisation des métis sud-africain (SACPO), le Congrès des démocrates -composé de communistes proscrits depuis 1950 et de radicaux blancs- ainsi que le Congrès des syndicats sud-africains (SACTU). Le 5 décembre 1956, Nelson Mandela est arrêté avec Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo, Albert Luthuli (prix Nobel de la paix 1960) et des dizaines de dirigeants du mouvement anti-apartheid. Ils sont accusés, toutes races et toutes obédiences confondues, de comploter contre l’Etat au sein d’une organisation internationale d’inspiration communiste. En mars 1961, le plus long procès de l’histoire judiciaire sud-africaine s’achève sur un non-lieu général. L’ANC estime avoir épuisé tous les recours de la non-violence. Le 21 mars 1960, à Sharpeville, la police de l’apartheid transforme en bain de sang (69 morts et 180 blessés) une manifestation pacifique contre les laissez-passer. L’état d’urgence est réactivé. Des milliers de personnes font les frais de la répression terrible qui s’ensuit dans tous le pays. Le 8 avril, l’ANC et le Congrès panafricain (le PAC né d’une scission anti-communiste) sont interdits. Cette même année de sang, Nelson épouse en deuxièmes noces Winnie, une assistante sociale, et entre en clandestinité. En mai 1961, le succès de son mot d’ordre de grève générale à domicile «stay at house» déchaîne les foudres de Pretoria qui déploie son grand jeu militaro-policier pour briser la résistance. En décembre, l’ANC met en application le plan de passage graduel à la lutte armée rédigé par Nelson Mandela. Avant d’en arriver à «la guérilla, le terrorisme et la révolution ouverte», Mandela préconise le sabotage des cibles militaro-industrielles qui, écrit-il, «n’entraîne aucune perte en vie humaine et ménage les meilleures chances aux relations interraciales». Le 16 décembre 1961 des explosions marquent aux quatre coins du pays le baptême du feu d’Umkhonto We Sizwe, le «fer de lance de la Nation», la branche militaire de l’ANC. D’Addis-Abeba en janvier 1962 où se tient la conférence du Mouvement panafricain pour la libération de l’Afrique australe et orientale, à l’Algérie fraîchement indépendante d’Ahmed Ben Bella où il suit une formation militaire avec son ami Tambo, Nelson Mandela sillonne l’Afrique pour plaider la cause de l’ANC et recueillir subsides et bourses universitaires. Le pacifiste se met à l’étude de la stratégie militaire. Clausewitz, Mao et Che Guevara voisinent sur sa table de chevet avec les spécialistes de la guerre anglo-boers. A son retour, il est arrêté, le 5 août 1962, grâce à un indicateur de police, après une folle cavale où il emprunte toutes sortes de déguisements. En novembre, il écope de 5 ans de prison pour sortie illégale du territoire mais aussi comme fauteur de grève. Alors qu’il a commencé à purger sa peine, une deuxième vague d’accusation va le clouer en prison pour deux décennies de plus. Les services de l’apartheid sont parvenus à infiltrer l’ANC jusqu’à sa tête. Le 11 juillet 1963, les principaux chefs d’Umkhonto We Sizwe tombent dans ses filets. Avec eux, dans la ferme de Lilliesleaf, à Rivonia, près de Johannesburg, la police de Pretoria met la main sur des kilos de documents, parmi lesquels le plan de passage à la lutte armée signé Mandela. RFI
Les dirigeants révolutionnaires cambodgiens sont pour la plupart issus de familles de la bourgeoisie. Beaucoup effectuèrent leurs études dans des universités françaises dans les années 1950. Dans une atmosphère parisienne cosmopolite et propice aux échanges d’idées, ils se rallièrent à l’idéologie communiste. Ses principaux dirigeants (Pol Pot, Khieu Samphân, Son Sen…) furent formés à Paris dans les années 1950 au Cercle des Études Marxistes fondé par le Bureau Politique du PCF en 1930. Wikipedia
Il est malheureux que le Moyen-Orient ait rencontré pour la première fois la modernité occidentale à travers les échos de la Révolution française. Progressistes, égalitaristes et opposés à l’Eglise, Robespierre et les jacobins étaient des héros à même d’inspirer les radicaux arabes. Les modèles ultérieurs — Italie mussolinienne, Allemagne nazie, Union soviétique — furent encore plus désastreux. (…) Ce qui rend l’entreprise terroriste des islamistes aussi dangereuse, ce n’est pas tant la haine religieuse qu’ils puisent dans des textes anciens — souvent au prix de distorsions grossières —, mais la synthèse qu’ils font entre fanatisme religieux et idéologie moderne. Ian Buruma et Avishai Margalit
Today’s black leadership pretty much lives off the fumes of moral authority that linger from its glory days in the 1950s and ’60s. The Zimmerman verdict lets us see this and feel a little embarrassed for them. Consider the pathos of a leadership that once transformed the nation now lusting for the conviction of the contrite and mortified George Zimmerman, as if a stint in prison for him would somehow assure more peace and security for black teenagers everywhere. This, despite the fact that nearly one black teenager a day is shot dead on the South Side of Chicago—to name only one city—by another black teenager. This would not be the first time that a movement begun in profound moral clarity, and that achieved greatness, waned away into a parody of itself—not because it was wrong but because it was successful. Today’s civil-rights leaders have missed the obvious: The success of their forbearers in achieving social transformation denied to them the heroism that was inescapable for a Martin Luther King Jr. or a James Farmer or a Nelson Mandela. Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton cannot write a timeless letter to us from a Birmingham jail or walk, as John Lewis did in 1965, across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., into a maelstrom of police dogs and billy clubs. That America is no longer here (which is not to say that every trace of it is gone). The Revs. Jackson and Sharpton have been consigned to a hard fate: They can never be more than redundancies, echoes of the great men they emulate because America has changed. Hard to be a King or Mandela today when your monstrous enemy is no more than the cherubic George Zimmerman. The purpose of today’s civil-rights establishment is not to seek justice, but to seek power for blacks in American life based on the presumption that they are still, in a thousand subtle ways, victimized by white racism. This idea of victimization is an example of what I call a "poetic truth." Like poetic license, it bends the actual truth in order to put forward a larger and more essential truth—one that, of course, serves one’s cause. Poetic truths succeed by casting themselves as perfectly obvious: "America is a racist nation"; "the immigration debate is driven by racism"; "Zimmerman racially stereotyped Trayvon." And we say, "Yes, of course," lest we seem to be racist. Poetic truths work by moral intimidation, not reason. In the Zimmerman/Martin case the civil-rights establishment is fighting for the poetic truth that white animus toward blacks is still such that a black teenager—Skittles and ice tea in hand—can be shot dead simply for walking home. But actually this establishment is fighting to maintain its authority to wield poetic truth—the authority to tell the larger society how it must think about blacks, how it must respond to them, what it owes them and, then, to brook no argument. One wants to scream at all those outraged at the Zimmerman verdict: Where is your outrage over the collapse of the black family? Today’s civil-rights leaders swat at mosquitoes like Zimmerman when they have gorillas on their back. Seventy-three percent of all black children are born without fathers married to their mothers. And you want to bring the nation to a standstill over George Zimmerman? Shelby Steele
I think he probably is the one man who stands out as having a moral integrity and a far-sighted view. I think that′s why other politicians such as Bill Clinton or Tony Blair feel a great awe of him, because he has those qualities which I′m not sure they have themselves.′ (…) He started as a tribalist, then he became a nationalist, and then he became a multi-nationalist or a multi-culturalist, and gradually saw a wider and wider world.  (…) there were of course two sides of him. He was a practising lawyer, and he had tremendous respect for the law, and was always quoting it – as he does now – but at the same time he was very aware that it was impossible to achieve any kind of redress through non-violent means. He never really believed in the Ghandi-ist principle of ′turn the other cheek′. Long before 1960 he was inclined to go further towards the suggestion of violence. But at that point the logic became almost incontrovertible. There was no alternative. But perhaps more important was the fact that his own people were turning towards more dangerous kinds of violence. So it would have been impossible for him to maintain any leadership if he was purely pacifist.′ (…) There′s no doubt in my mind that it (Robben Island) tremendously increased his self-discipline and his understanding of people. It was a tremendously enclosed world, and for most of the time he was only with 30 of his colleagues together with the warders so it had the intensity of a boarding school, albeit with much more discipline and harshness. So for somebody who was strong enough, who had the necessary confidence in themselves, it was a tremendous school in human relations. It was the kind of thing that a lot of politicians could do with, actually. ′During his twenty-seven years in Robben Island, Mandela was able to extend his influence beyond the ANC to the rival groups, which was very important when he got out. But above all he acquired an increased sensitivity to other people. He sharpened his skills of debate and persuasion tremendously, and probably his greatest gift is his capacity to persuade. You can see how, for someone who had that sense of self-respect and dignity, the jail experience was almost a training ground. Anthony Simpson
Né le 18 juillet 1918 dans l’ancien Transkei, mort le 5 décembre 2013, Nelson Mandela ne ressemblait pas à la pieuse image que le politiquement correct planétaire donne aujourd’hui de lui. Par delà les émois lénifiants et les hommages hypocrites, il importe de ne jamais perdre de vue les éléments suivants :(…) Aristocrate xhosa issu de la lignée royale des Thembu, Nelson Mandela n’était pas un « pauvre noir opprimé ». Eduqué à l’européenne par des missionnaires méthodistes, il commença ses études supérieures à Fort Hare, université destinée aux enfants des élites noires, avant de les achever à Witwatersrand, au Transvaal, au cœur de ce qui était alors le « pays boer ». Il s’installa ensuite comme avocat à Johannesburg. (…) Il n’était pas non plus ce gentil réformiste que la mièvrerie médiatique se plait à dépeindre en « archange de la paix » luttant pour les droits de l’homme, tel un nouveau Gandhi ou un nouveau Martin Luther King. Nelson Mandela fut en effet et avant tout un révolutionnaire, un combattant, un militant qui mit « sa peau au bout de ses idées », n’hésitant pas à faire couler le sang des autres et à risquer le sien. Il fut ainsi l’un des fondateurs de l’Umkonto We Sizwe, « le fer de lance de la nation », aile militaire de l’ANC, qu’il co-dirigea avec le communiste Joe Slovo, planifiant et coordonnant plus de 200 attentats et sabotages pour lesquels il fut condamné à la prison à vie. (…) Nelson Mandela n’a pas apaisé les rapports inter-raciaux. Ainsi, entre 1970 et 1994, en 24 ans, alors que l’ANC était "en guerre" contre le « gouvernement blanc », une soixantaine de fermiers blancs furent tués. Depuis avril 1994, date de l’arrivée au pouvoir de Nelson Mandela, plus de 2000 fermiers blancs ont été massacrés dans l’indifférence la plus totale des médias européens. Bernard Lugan (historien français controversé)
At present his legacy in some respects still exists in emergent form, has yet to express its true contours. This is to my mind the key difference between how he is viewed at home and internationally, where the lacquer of adulation laid thick upon the "human-rights legend" has long since hardened. Abroad, Mandela is the African the world loves to love, even if in a strikingly over-compensatory way. Africa the continent of famine, corruption and social abjection has produced, at least, this one fine human being, Europeans and Americans appear to breathe as they cluster around him. A hostile Sunday Times (London) magazine article, which appeared the weekend before his 18 July birthday, opined that the one task Mandela can still competently carry out is to smile his dazzling smile, only now it is on command. There is little that is meaningful in it: in his old age he has become a mask of his former charismatic self, to which the world has grown accustomed to genuflect. For the international community the paradox is that by heaping excessive adoration upon the head of this one seemingly superhuman African, we have left Africa, the continent, its people, more lacking of attention by contrast. There have been many great Africans yet their reputation has been dangerously eclipsed by this one over-hyped African hero of our times. Yet it is here, within the gap between his fully manifested yet relatively shallow international fame, and his still-latent local significance, that, it seems to me, the potential for renewed understandings of Mandela have the opportunity to emerge, which, when all is said and done, is a good thing. Within this gap, then, I would venture to place the following desiderata. Let us not allow our image of Mandela to petrify into cliché, especially yet not only while he is still alive amongst us. Let his meanings evolve and change in rhythm with his times. Let his legacy organisations perhaps relax a little in wanting to predetermine how the future will see him. His achievement on its own dwarfs the efforts of such tireless PR policing. What is not in doubt is that Mandela is a great and humane human being not in spite of his Africanness, as his western acolytes (according to the Sunday Times) believe, but because of his Africanness. Perhaps most important, let us not forget that his greatness as an African was dependent on the cooperation of hosts of other Africans, little and great, ordinary and extraordinary, as he himself has always recognised. Elleke Boehmer
Tout au long de leur vie, Yasser Arafat et Nelson Mandela, icônes respectives de la cause de leur peuple, récompensés à une année d’écart par le Prix Nobel de la Paix affichaient la solidarité et la complicité de vieux camarades de lutte. Libération
Les Israéliens voient en Mandela un leader qui prit la décision de principe de faire la paix avec ses ennemis et tint parole. Les Palestiniens voient en lui un combattant nationaliste qui refusa de compromettre ses principes, même si cela impliquait d’immenses souffrances personnelles — et comme un leader guidé par ces mêmes principes, lorsqu’il fallut faire les compromis historiques nécessaires pour minimiser les effusions de sang tout en poursuivant ses objectifs. Et dans les deux cas — comme dans d’autres — Arafat ne tient tout simplement pas la comparaison. Time

Fils de chef héréditaire, élève d’école missionnaire, méthodiste, étudiant en droit, avocat, pacifiste gandhien, tribaliste, nationaliste, marxiste, communiste, stagiaire des camps militaires algériens, chef de l’aile militaire de l’ANC, terroriste, terroriste repenti, humaniste, multiculturaliste …

Attention: un camarade de lutte peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où nos médias et nos journaux croulent sous les hommages au véritable saint laïc qu’était devenu l’ancien président sud-africain Nelson Mandela

Pendant qu’en Afrique du sud même la tentation zimbabwéenne ne semble pas encore totalement écartée …

Et qu’après l’avoir refusé pendant des années, la veuve du dirigeant historique palestinien en est encore à contester, neuf ans après sa probable mort de poivrot aux amitiés douteuses,  la dernière autopsie de "l’erreur" de sa vie …

Comment ne pas voir, avec son biographe Anthony Simpson, l’inestimable effet qu’eurent finalement, sans compter tant son instruction anglaise et chrétienne qu’à l’instar de Gandhi (mais contrairement à un Pol Pot) sa formation de juriste britannique, ses 27 ans d’internement  sur l’ancien terroriste repenti ?

Ou, avec son ancien organisateur, la véritable renaissance médiatique qu’apporta à celui qui fut un moment tenté de faire sauter des hôpitaux, le prétendu concert-anniversaire de Wembley de juin 1988 ?

Mais aussi en contraste, avec le magazine Time, tout ce qui a pu manquer comme l’incroyable gâchis que fut presqu’en même temps la vie d’un autre terroriste qui lui, en dépit de son prix Nobel, le restera …

A savoir l’ex-leader palestinien Yasser Arafat ?

Unfortunately, Arafat’s No Nelson Mandela

Tony Karon

Time

Jun. 05, 2001

"The problem with Yasser Arafat is that he’s no Nelson Mandela." I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve head that complaint, both from Palestinians and Israelis.

It’s an apples and oranges comparison, of course, given the widely different historical and political contexts that produced the PLO chairman and the imprisoned guerrilla leader who led South Africa’s peaceful transition from apartheid. But the fact that it occurs so often on both sides of the intractable Middle East divide makes it worthy of examination.

The Israelis see in Mandela a leader who took a principled decision to make peace with his enemies, and kept his word. The Palestinians see him as a nationalist fighter who refused to compromise his principles even when that meant immense personal suffering — and as a leader guided by those same principles when making the historic compromises necessary to minimize bloodshed while pursuing his goals. And in both instances — and others — Arafat falls short by comparison.

Intifada as a bargaining chip

Arafat’s leadership abilities are once more in the spotlight, as the latest cease-fire effort plunges him into yet another strategic crisis. While many of those who have waged the intifada on the ground these past nine months believe that a long-term, low-intensity war will eventually drive the Israeli soldiers and settlers out of the West Bank and Gaza — as it did in Lebanon — Arafat’s agenda has been somewhat different. He can only achieve his goal of a Palestinian State in the West Bank and Gaza through negotiation with Israel and the international community, and so as much he chants the slogans of struggle he has, throughout, looked upon the uprising that has killed almost 500 Palestinians and more than 100 Israelis and ruined thousands of lives and livelihoods, as a means of improving his bargaining position. He has spent much of the uprising shuttling around foreign capitals trying to win support for renewed negotiations, hoping the uprising would function strengthen his hand at the table.

Last weekend he called it off, "in the higher interests of the Palestinian people," after the Europeans made it clear that funding for Arafat’s Palestinian Authority would be withheld if he failed to take steps against terrorism. But the Palestinian leader has a problem, of course, because while a recent opinion poll in the West Bank and Gaza found that 76 percent of Palestinians support suicide bombings inside Israel, only a minority would give Arafat’s notoriously corrupt administration a positive rating.

Palestinians are angry at Arafat, too

Indeed, as much as it suited Arafat’s immediate agenda, the intifada was also viewed by many observers of Palestinian politics as an outpouring of anger against the Palestinian Authority. And many grassroots leaders of the uprising have made clear that they have no interest in a return to the negotiating table, regardless of Arafat’s own intentions.

That’s a major problem for Arafat, since any cease-fire would ultimately require the Palestinian Authority to begin re-arresting the Hamas and Islamic Jihad members released when the current intifada began. Arafat will have to convince his own security forces, who have been on the frontline of confrontation with Israel, that they need to once again round up some of the Islamist militants alongside whom they’ve fought these past nine months, in order to ensure Israel’s security — and in exchange for no political gains beyond, perhaps, the easing of some of the collective punishments imposed by Israel in response to the uprising.

Arafat’s dilemma is, in many ways, of his own making. And the Palestinians, who will at some point in the not-too-distant future have to choose his successor, may want to pay close attention to Arafat’s mistakes — and, perhaps, to Mandela’s example.

Pulling the keffiyeh over Palestinian eyes

The problem is ultimately a lack of communication. Arafat never made clear to his own people the massive compromises involved in the Oslo Peace process — the fact that the Palestinians were signing away their claim to most of historic Palestine, and that the best the millions of Palestinians descended from those made refugees by Israel’s foundation in 1948 could hope for under the circumstances was some form of financial compensation. Arafat told his people that he was in negotiations with Israel that would lead to the creation of a Palestinian State with Jerusalem as its capital. On the ground, though, all they could see was the arrival of a class of PLO bureaucrats from Tunis who began to rapidly enrich themselves on the aid money pouring into the Palestinian Administration, and the continued expansion, at their expense, of Israel’s settlements in the West Bank and Gaza.

In contrast, Mandela negotiated with a lot more transparency, and always held himself accountable to his supporters, working to persuade them of the necessity of compromise rather than simply pretending it wasn’t happening. He had rejected terrorism on principle: his soldiers were always under orders to avoid attacking civilians, even when their unarmed supporters on the ground were being massacred by the apartheid regime. And the South African leader also always displayed a keen understanding of his adversary’s motivations and concerns, which gave him the ability both to read their tactics and articulate positions that could assuage their fears.

Arafat proclaimed his intention to fly the Palestinian flag over Jerusalem, but sent one of his lieutenants, Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen) to negotiate a formula for "sharing" the Holy City that involved the Palestinian Authority setting up shop in the village of Abu Dis, which falls outside of Jerusalem’s current municipal boundaries and declaring it their capital. When details of the plan leaked, Arafat denied and disowned it. And that may have been symbolic of his leadership style throughout the negotiation process.

No wonder, then, that Arafat hit a wall at Camp David, when the Israelis put their final offer on the table and it fell well short of what Arafat — or any other Palestinian leader —would be able to accept and survive politically (or even physically). He’d been speaking out of two different sides of his mouth all along, but now the game was up. And that left him no room to maneuver, except stir up confrontation in the hope that it would force the Israelis and their American backers to offer him a better deal.

Little gained, much lost

That hasn’t happened. In fact, he’s being offered a lot less than last year, and it’s unlikely that any Israeli government will ever again trust him as a negotiating partner. But the Israelis still need him, because he remains the frontline of their defense against Hamas and Islamic Jihad.

Ultimately, Arafat’s primary weakness may be his distance from his own people. Mandela came of age politically in a mass movement based in the dusty streets of South Africa’s townships, before finding himself forced underground and eventually jailed. Circumstances forced Arafat, by contrast, almost from the outset to engage in the underground politics of conspiracy — small groups of trusted insiders launching guerrilla attacks and melting back into the civilian population. Later, as the leader of an exiled Palestinian movement more often than not at odds with its Arab hosts, those methods kept Arafat alive and maintained the coherence of a movement attempting to represent a nation that straddled the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza and a diaspora scattered across the Arab world.

But once back home, Arafat’s time-honored methods translated into rampant cronyism and a singular failure to nurture a democratic political culture in the areas under his control. And while that may have kept things stable, for a time, it appears to have worked against Arafat when the time comes to take unpopular decisions.

Of course, the Israelis would be wrong to think a Palestinian leader who was more like Mandela would be more pliant. Quite the contrary. They’d find it a lot harder to conclude a deal with a Mandela, or any leader of more democratic bent than Arafat. But in the end, they’d be able to rest a lot more assured that such a deal would hold.

Voir aussi:

Anger at the Heart of Nelson Mandela’s Violent Struggle

The future president of South Africa once considered guerilla warfare and terrorism to overturn Apartheid. Imprisoned for so long, his anger mellowed.

Christopher Dickey

The Daily Beast

12.06.13

In Nelson Mandela’s autobiography he tells a story about a sparrow. This was in the early 1960s when the late South African leader was hiding out on a farm near Johannesburg with members of the Communist Party and the African National Congress and some of their families. They were plotting what was called “armed struggle” against the Apartheid regime. (Many others would call it terrorism.) But at the time Mandela’s only gun was an old air rifle he used for target practice and dove hunting.

“One day, I was on the front lawn of the property and aimed the gun at a sparrow perched high in a tree,” Mandela writes in Long Walk to Freedom. A friend said Mandela would never hit the little creature. But he did, and he was about to boast about it when his friend’s five-year-old son, with tears in his eyes, asked Mandela, “Why did you kill that bird? Its mother will be sad.”

“My mood immediately shifted from one of pride to shame,” Mandela recalled. “I felt that this small boy had far more humanity than I did. It was an odd sensation for a man who was the leader of a nascent guerrilla army.”

Of course autobiographies always rely to some extent on recovered memories, some of them recovered myths. But Mandela’s thinking about warfare, revolution and terrorism—tempered by pragmatism and humanity—is almost as instructive as his later actions in support of peace.

In the early 1960s, just before his arrest and incarceration for more than a quarter century, Mandela was, in fact, a very angry man. As his longtime friend Bishop Desmond Tutu once told Sky News, “he needed that time in prison to mellow.”

Mandela had given up on Ghandian passive resistance after the massacre of protesters in Sharpeville in 1960. “Our policy to achieve a nonracial state by nonviolence had achieved nothing,” he concluded. But from the beginning, Mandela’s anger was controlled, and his use of violence calculated. He never trained as a soldier, but he made himself a student of revolution. Mandela sent fighters for training and indoctrination to China when it was still ruled by that revolutionary icon, Mao Tse-Tung. He studied Menachem Begin’s bloody struggle against the British in Palestine.

Mandela learned much from the Algerian war against the French, which was then at its height, and not the least of those lessons was the vital role of global propaganda: “International public opinion,” one Algerian envoy told him, “is sometimes worth more than a fleet of jet fighters.”

So, when it came to the use of violence, as with so much else in his life, Mandela opted for pragmatism over ideology. The little sparrow notwithstanding, the question was not just one of morality or humanity, but of whether the means would serve his ends.

“We considered four types of violent activities,” Mandela recalled: “sabotage, guerrilla warfare, terrorism, and open revolution. For a small and fledgling army, open revolution was inconceivable. Terrorism inevitably reflected poorly on those who used it, undermining any public support it might otherwise garner. Guerrilla warfare was a possibility, but since the ANC had been reluctant to embrace violence at all, it made sense to start with the form of violence that inflicted the least harm against individuals.”

When it came to the use of violence, as with so much else in his life, Mandela opted for pragmatism over ideology

This was imminently practical. The last thing Mandela wanted to do was unite, through fear, the often bitterly divided white Anglo and Afrikaner populations. So, strict instructions were given “that we would countenance no loss of life. But if sabotage did not produce the results we wanted, we were prepared to move on to the next stage: guerrilla war and terrorism.” (My emphasis.)

In the end, Mandela was arrested before the armed struggle reached that stage. Then, as he languished in prison—a powerful symbol, but no longer accountable as a commander—terrorism did come to the fore. The infamous Church Street bombing in 1983, for instance, targeted the South African Air Force headquarters, killing 19 people and wounding 217, among them many innocent bystanders.

When at last the white South African government, facing the possibility of wider civil war and pressured by international sanctions, turned to Mandela for secret talks, it could do so knowing he had the authority to negotiate without the taint of direct involvement with the carnage. His combination of pragmatism and humanity was key.

As Mao famously said, “a revolution is not a dinner party.” But if its leaders are as wise as Mandela, at the end of the day they can find a way for everyone to sit down at the same table.

Voir également:

The graduates of Robben Island

The bars of apartheid’s most infamous jail could not cage the spirit of its ANC prisoners. Anthony Sampson , who has known Nelson Mandela for 45 years, returned with him to the island that schooled a generation of political leaders (The Observer, February 1996)

Anthony Sampson

The Guardian

18 February 1996

It was a bewilderingly cheerful excursion, almost as if a president were revisiting his old university.

Last week, to mark the sixth anniversary of his release, President Mandela went back again to the notorious Robben Island off Cape Town where he spent most of his 27 years in prison.

He brought with him Mrs Brundtland, the Prime Minister of Norway – one of the few western countries, he stressed, which had always stood by him.

He showed her his tiny cell, joked about his experiences, and then went to the quarry where he had hacked stones for 13 years, now looking like a bright open-air amphitheatre, where he welcomed the new woman governor, Colonel Jones, who is gradually closing down the prison.

In this weird setting I found him relaxed and outspoken, as if reverting to an earlier role. He reminisced about how he had been warned by President George Bush to give up the armed struggle, and to drop his old allies Castro and Gadaffi.

He insisted it would be quite wrong for an old freedom fighter to renounce old friends: ‘your enemies are not our enemies’. And he explained he had just invited Castro to visit South Africa, and was thinking of inviting Gadaffi.

He was clearly buoyed up by his country’s international status, its economic growth and, above all, its sporting victories in rugby, soccer and cricket. ‘When I am invited by the Queen of England to London in July,’ he said, ‘I will apologise to her for what we did to her cricketers.’

He saw the new patriotism in sport as crucial to the nation-building. But he was also impatient that in other fields both whites and blacks were slow to recognise that they were all part of the same nation.

In the quarry, he presented Mrs Brundtland with a piece of the limestone, brightly packaged in a cardboard box – the first of a line of souvenirs to be sold to finance a fund for ex-political prisoners. I was given a box, with Mandela ‘s smiling face alongside the piece of lime – a neat symbol of the transmuting of the ghastly prison experience into a friendly commercial process.

Mandela as usual gave no hint of bitterness about the wastage of a quarter-century, no reference to the blazing sun in the quarry which damaged his eyesight, to the beating of his friends, or to the arrogance and inhumanity of the men who had kept him locked up – some of whom he had been welcoming at the opening of parliament two days before.

Alongside him was his closest Indian colleague, Ahmed Kathrada, who shared his ordeals on the island, and is now responsible for its future. He was careful to contradict exaggerations about the past brutalities. And he is full of enthusiasm for proje cts to make proper use of the island’s surprising beauties, including wild birds, Cape penguins, ostriches and springbok. He is now specially keen on the idea of a University of Robben Island, originated by British educationalist Lord (Michael) Young.

Watching it all, I still could not understand how these men had emerged from those inhuman cells more rounded, more humorous and tolerant than before. I had first known them both 45 years ago when I was editing the black magazine Drum in Johannesburg, and they were committed young leaders embarking on a passive resistance campaign.

And I had reported Mandela ‘s trial in the Pretoria court-room in 1964 before he was sentenced to life imprisonment, when he had sat listening to the venomous prosecutor Percy Yutar, and had sent a message asking me to help edit his own speech to court.

After the judge sentenced him, most white South Africans assumed with relief that he would never emerge again. By the time of the all-white elections in 1970 I could find no white politician who took the ANC seriously. But in the meantime, the isolation of Robben Island was forging a more formidable and thoughtful kind of leader.

In the Sixties, Mandela was already a tested and courageous leader, but aloof and quite stiff in public, inclined to cliches. By his release in 1990, he had acquired a common touch, magnanimity and sense of humour which was surprising to everyone.

He had last shown it at the opening of parliament, two days before last week’s return to Robben Island, in the middle of his formal speech about his government’s reforms. He took a long drink of water and then, aware of the tense silence, raised his glass towards de Klerk’s side of the house, and said ‘Cheers!’ – to roars of laughter. His command of the House was absolute.

It is here no doubt that Robben Island has contributed to this mastery and warmth. In those sub-humanconditions he had insisted, with his mentor Walter Sisulu, on thinking the best of everybody. He had retained and developed his natural dignity and courtesy, influencing both his fellow-prisoners and his warders. As a younger islander put it to me: ‘he treated the warders as human beings, even if they did not treat him as such’. And he simply refused to accept subservience.

His chief lawyer, George Bizos, remembers one scene which summed up his stubborn dignity, when he was being marched out in the most humiliating circumstances, flanked by armed guards and wearing short trousers and shoes without socks. Encountering Bizos, he exclaimed: ‘George, let me introduce you to my guard of honour!’.

More important, he and his closest colleagues established a pattern of behaviour which influenced nearly all the other political prisoners, to treat the island not as a place of bitter constraint and wasted lives, but as an opportunity for constant intellectual debate and political education.

One document written in 1978, which has only recently come to light, evokes all that vigour. It carefully sums up the two main arguments between Marxists and broader ANC supporters and concludes in the non-Marxist camp. It reads like a lively seminar at a left-wing university, with only one reference to’conducting the discussions under very difficult conditions,’ as a reminder that it was written on Robben Island (where Mandela approved it before it was confiscated).

They also had intense discussions about culture and sport. Mandela recalled: ‘We realised that culture was a very important aspect to building a nation’ and these concerns bore fruit in South Africa’s recent sporting victories.

Talking to Robben Islanders over the past two weeks, and reading their recollections, I’ve come to realise how far they form a distinctive elite, with a special self-respect and discipline – not so unlike the old stereotype of the Edwardian English gentleman with the stiff upper lip confronting emotional foreigners or natives. They reminisce about it as if it were a public school or a Guards’ barracks, but with a more intellectual background and idealism – more like members of the wartime French Resistance – and with much more time to develop their minds and memories (since they had to keep much of the argument in their heads). ‘We had time to think on Robben Island’, said Govan Mbeki, ‘about how we could really beat the authorities.

‘You must eventually like the place if you are to survive,’ recorded Tokyo Sexwale. ‘I loved it because it was a place of fresh air, fresh ideas, fresh friendships and teaching the enemy. We transformed Robben Island into the University of the ANC.’ Sexwale afterwards married his white prison visitor and became premier of Gauteng (the province centring on Johannesburg).

‘I can see another Robben Islander a mile away,’ I was told by ‘Raks’ Seakhoa, a poet who now runs the Congress of South African Writers. ‘I can see it when they find themselves in a conflict, this containment and channelling of anger. I’m really thankful for it. The way that we lived on Robben Island, you became an all-rounder, an organiser. When I came out, I submitted an article to a newspaper. They thought ‘this guy must have been at Rhodes University or something’.’

Robben Island remains the central symbol of both the evils of apartheid and the need for reconciliation. As Auschwitz is preserved in remembrance of the death camps, so is it a monument to intolerance and racism but like wartime heroes, the islanders hold the promise of a brave new world.

Mandela does not need to remind anyone of the ordeals he endured on the island. Some of his friends are exasperated by his friendly visits to the people who helped to put and keep him there – from his bullying old persecutor President Botha and Percy Yutar, the creepy prosecutor at his trial, to Mrs Verwoerd, the widow of the architect of apartheid, in her all-white enclave. It was like the story of the hardened criminal who gets out of jail to murder each of the people who had locked him up – turned upside down.

But those visits help to underline his moral authority, and the collapse of the alternative system. When he met Yutar, towering over the sycophantic little man, he could not resist saying: ‘I didn’t realise how small you were’. Forgiveness, after all, can be a kind of revenge, a kind of power.

Nor does Mandela need to remind younger, more radical black politicians that he has sacrificed more than any of them. They may criticise him for being too moderate towards the whites, but no one dare ever accuse him of being a sell-out. And only rarely does he need actually to spell out the message of the island: ‘if I can work alongside with the men who put me there, how can you refuse. . .’

But it is not just Mandela ‘s island and it also offers some answer to the obsessive question among whites, including foreign businessmen: what happens after Mandela retires in 1999?

He has given one answer himself: that for 27 years his people achieved their country’s liberation quite well without him, so why can’t they do without him in the future?

Robben Island forged a whole breed of younger leaders with many of Mandela ‘s strengths, who now hold key positions in the cabinet, or as premiers of the provinces. These include Patrick Lekota in the Orange Free State, Popo Molefe in the North West, and perhaps the most formidable, Tokyo Sexwale.

Sexwale, with his Robben Islander’s confidence, does not conceal his ambition. In his Johannesburg drawing-room I noticed a framed newspaper cartoon showing Thabo Mbeki, Mandela ‘s deputy, and ANC chairman Cyril Ramaphosa as two boxers slugging each other in the ring, not noticing the third figure of Tokyo climbing under the ropes.

These prison graduates, with their discipline and tolerance, offer much reassurance for a future South Africa without Mandela . Like him, they do not need to prove their heroism with macho postures for their followers and they have learnt the secrets of self-reliance and building a community in the strictest school of all.

They form the core of the present ANC leadership as assuredly as aristocrats and army officers once formed the core of the British Conservative Party – or as ex-fighters such as Jan Smuts and Louis Botha dominated the Afrikaner leadership after the Boer War, when they too were determined on reconciliation.

Yet today the process of reconciliation is worryingly one-sided. The majority of the whites have felt no great pressure to concentrate their minds and widen their awareness. ‘We can neither heal nor build,’ said Mandela in his opening speech to parliament, ‘with the victims of past injustices forgiving and the beneficiaries merely content in gratitude.’ It was followed by loud applause on the black side of the House, and only a few claps on the white side.

Mandela warned white businessmen against paying only lip service to affirmative action and assuming they could simply do business as usual. Such people too easily believe their problems have been miraculously solved by the arrival of a black president who has forgiven everyone, defused black anger and re-opened their country to the world.

No black leader, least of all Mandela , can afford such complacency. He has only to look to the Transkei, where he was born. It was turned into a bantustan and is a reminder of the evils of apartheid as vivid as Robben Island. Now it is an impoverished part of the Eastern Province.

Ten days ago I stayed in Umtata, the former capital of the Transkei: it is like a sacked city, with empty tower-blocks and slum streets the surrounding countryside is tragically desolate, with horrendous unemployment and crime.

Yet beside the main road, only a few miles out of Umtata, Mandela has built a spacious but unpretentious bungalow where he spends holidays. It is an emphatic statement that he will never be divorced from his own people.

The most serious problem of South Africa’s future is not the leadership of blacks after Mandela , but the leadership of the majority of whites. The English speakers have reverted to ‘business as usual’, leaving the politics to Afrikaners and others. But since F. W. de Klerk took his one great leap into the dark, there has been no comparable leadership, and an Afrikaner vacuum.

There has been no white equivalent to the Robben Island experience to concentrate minds, to compel them to see across their immediate self-interest and to push ahead with concessions and reconciliation. They may have been forgiven their past blunders but it will be unforgiveable if they fail to do their share of rebuilding the nation which was so nearly wrecked.

Voir encore:

Mandela: The Man Behind The Myth – An interview with Anthony Sampson

Harpers Collins.ca

Anthony Sampson is one of the most admired writers of today, and his brand new book is an outstanding biography of an outstanding man. Mandela: The Authorised Biography tells the full story of the last great statesman on the world stage. Since his release from South Africa′s notorious Robben Island prison in 1990, Mandela has been the focus of global attention, and his reputation as a politician and statesman has stood up to public scrutiny remarkably well. But who is the real Nelson Mandela? If anyone can answer this question, it is Anthony Sampson, who has known him for over forty years.

Nelson Mandela is one of the most extraordinary political figures of the twentieth century. His years of confinement in a South African prison made him a hero to many people around the world, and the story of his release and rise to power in the country′s first democratic elections filled a continent with hope. Now, as he approaches retirement, Nelson Mandela has allowed an acquaintance of many years to write his official biography. Anthony Sampson has been given access to all Mandela′s diaries, letters and papers, and many of the people to whom he has been closest have spoken out about Mandela, the man and the myth.

Mandela is the most admired politician in the world – is this admiration justified?

′I think it is, particularly when you look at all the others. I think that part of the reason why he′s admired is that he fills a tremendous gap. People have been longing for a politician who is removed from immediate pressures. There′s a tremendous shortage of great statesmen around the world compared, say, to forty years ago.

′I think he probably is the one man who stands out as having a moral integrity and a far-sighted view. I think that′s why other politicians such as Bill Clinton or Tony Blair feel a great awe of him, because he has those qualities which I′m not sure they have themselves.′

Not many people know about Mandela′s royal ancestry, and the fact that he was descended from the Tembu royal family. Did this play an important part in the formation of his character?

′I think it certainly gave him tremendous extra confidence. It is extraordinary to realise that within that very poor part of South Africa there was this particular sense of pride in traditions. And tribal loyalty remained intact despite European domination for more than a century. So that experience certainly deepened his consciousness, even though he was later deeply humiliated and ignored in white Johannesburg.′

Would you say that pride in his history and culture was the driving force for his success?

′Certainly it gave him a terrific sense of self-respect in the early years. He was fascinated by the history of his own people, particularly the Tembu tribe, he knew a lot about it, but of course his whole story was one of gradually widening those horizons. He started as a tribalist, then he became a nationalist, and then he became a multi-nationalist or a multi-culturalist, and gradually saw a wider and wider world. But it is true that that original pride in his ancestry was at the origins of his self-respect, and his dignity.′

Does he find the spotlight hard to bear?

′He told me that he worried a lot about it in jail – he saw in the last few years in jail how he was becoming a myth, and he was worried about that. He made it clear that he wasn′t a saint. He doesn′t say so but I think he was conscious of other African leaders who had built a cult around themselves, which was very dangerous. He was keen to avoid falling into that trap. Above all he was very careful not to use the word ′I′ when he came out of prison. He would make a point of speaking on behalf of the people.′

In the 1960′s Mandela put forward the proposal that the ANC abandon non-violence and form its own military wing. To what extent was this due to the Sharpeville massacre in 1960, and how had race relations deteriorated to such a difficult point that an educated lawyer could consider fighting back?

′It′s a good question because there were of course two sides of him. He was a practising lawyer, and he had tremendous respect for the law, and was always quoting it – as he does now – but at the same time he was very aware that it was impossible to achieve any kind of redress through non-violent means. He never really believed in the Ghandi-ist principle of ′turn the other cheek′.

′Long before 1960 he was inclined to go further towards the suggestion of violence. But at that point the logic became almost incontrovertible. There was no alternative. But perhaps more important was the fact that his own people were turning towards more dangerous kinds of violence. So it would have been impossible for him to maintain any leadership if he was purely pacifist.′

What effect did the years on Robben Island have on Mandela?

′There′s no doubt in my mind that it tremendously increased his self-discipline and his understanding of people. It was a tremendously enclosed world, and for most of the time he was only with 30 of his colleagues together with the warders so it had the intensity of a boarding school, albeit with much more discipline and harshness. So for somebody who was strong enough, who had the necessary confidence in themselves, it was a tremendous school in human relations. It was the kind of thing that a lot of politicians could do with, actually.

′During his twenty-seven years in Robben Island, Mandela was able to extend his influence beyond the ANC to the rival groups, which was very important when he got out. But above all he acquired an increased sensitivity to other people. He sharpened his skills of debate and persuasion tremendously, and probably his greatest gift is his capacity to persuade. You can see how, for someone who had that sense of self-respect and dignity, the jail experience was almost a training ground.′

By the time he came out of prison in 1990 Mandela was very conscious that he had acquired an almost mythical status. How did he handle this situation?

′He was very careful to avoid personifying the struggle. When the ′Free Mandela′ campaign began in the 1980′s, that was personifying him over his colleagues and some people thought it should be ′free the political prisoners′, but it was necessary to publicise the situation through one person.

′But while he was being personified, he was extremely careful always to speak on behalf of the people, and I think he deliberately suppressed any sort of self-promotion. Which was partly why when he came out of jail he made a speech, written by the ANC, which many people thought extremely boring.′

When he came out of prison he immediately identified himself with the ANC, which shocked many leaders around the world and showed that prison hadn′t made him any more compliant, but rather had had the opposite effect. And in the first two years following his release, as you point out, there was more violence than in the apartheid years. Was he disappointed by this?

′I think it was a shattering time for him. He did everything he could to control that violence, and of course this was used against him at the time by the government of the time. But he very early suspected that a lot of that violence was being secretly encouraged by the government which later proved to be the case. But that was an agonising period.′

What is Mandela actually like as a person?

′He′s a very private person, and I think that only very few people, such as his wife, really know him. His manners, and his alertness to people and especially to new people, is so great, that like many brilliant politicians, he appears equally pleased to see everybody, because he has this extraordinary instinctive ability to relate to people, particularly to children. Behind that he is very reserved.

′He′s sometimes exhausted when he appears to be energetic; you can sometimes see how suddenly his face will change, how a smile can suddenly disappear when the camera is not on him. During that lonely period, before he remarried, there was a feeling that he had to be professionally active to avoid being by himself, which of course is true of many politicians.

′But what is remarkable to me is how tremendously reflective he is. He really thinks things out, and once he has thought things out he is quite stubborn and can be difficult to change. But he′s much more effective than most politicians in my experience. Again that goes back to the prison experience. As one of his colleagues said, ′you can take them out of Robben Island but you can′t take Robben Island out of them′. And I think that′s very true. I think you feel there′s still a little cell inside him. He is much more interesting than most politicians are, because you don′t feel you′re listening to a gramophone record.′

What do you think the future holds for Nelson Mandela after he finishes his term in office?

′He says that he longs to get back to his home in the country and spend his time enjoying the beautiful countryside and being with his family and so on, but of course all people tend to think that before they do actually retire- and he also says he doesn′t want to be involved in international mediation which he has often been quite successful at, as in the Gadaffi operation.

′My own guess is that he will actually continue to travel, he will be asked to do things which he will want to say yes to. He wants to write another volume of his own memoirs. I think he will take things easier – certainly his wife wants him to, but he will continue to travel and he will continue to give his views as well. He won′t be restrained; he will speak out as an ordinary member of the African National Congress – but of course he will be much more than that.′

How will South Africa as a whole fare without him at the helm?

′When people talk about South Africa it always depends what viewpoint they are looking at it from. I think, myself, that South Africa will fare very well. The white South Africans will continue to complain a bit because their lifestyle is being changed. But I think they will resolve many of their problems, including crime which is the most difficult problem, over the next few years. It will have a very vibrant and creative atmosphere.

′The violence will probably continue; it has always been a relatively violent country, like America. But personally I think that South Africa will shake down in a very interesting way. And above all it will be almost uniquely multi-racial, which is why it will be so interesting to the rest of the world, because it appears to have begun to resolve those problems which other countries have not resolved.′

You say in the Introduction: ′It is not easy for a biographer to portray the Nelson Mandela behind the icon: it is a bit like trying to make out someone′s shape from the wrong side of the arc-lights.′ For you as a biographer what were the particular challenges in Mandela?

′He is a person who is very reluctant to talk about his own feelings. He is the absolute classic stiff-upper-lip Victorian Englishman, but he belongs very strongly to the nineteenth century world, which is a result of his missionary education, so he very much dislikes talking about himself and particularly his suffering, and that perhaps was the biggest challenge – to pick up, not so much from him but from his colleagues, exactly what he was feeling at those crucial moments.

′But I suppose the most interesting challenge was to try to trace his own development. I had known him back in 1951 and he had appeared to me to be a very different kind of person than he is now. He was much less certain of his leadership at that point, and it is fascinating to see how much deeper and more thoughtful he has become.′

Voir de même:

Beyond the icon: Nelson Mandela in his 90th year

Elleke Boehmer

12 November 2008

The celebration of Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday on 18 July 2008 confirmed once more perhaps the most obvious fact about him: that South Africa’s former president is universally admired, even revered, by world leaders and ordinary people alike. Less noted, however, is the disjunction in his stature abroad and at home. Worldwide, he is invoked as little less than a secular saint, domestically, the strong pride in the achievement of Madiba, the grand old man of the apartheid struggle, is coupled with an awareness that the legend remains a living legend, who still walks and breathes amongst his people today – and that with this presence come continuing responsibilities.

I encountered this notion repeatedly in the course of writing my book, Nelson Mandela: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2008). It struck me again forcibly when his 90th-birthday events in June-July 2008 were underway. Perhaps it is was accentuated by a sad coincidence of timing: for these months of what should have been acclaim and fond and grateful reminiscence took place against the background of vicious "xenophobic attacks" on "foreign" Africans in many of South Africa’s sprawling townships and conurbations. These events roused deep shame and anger in many South Africans, as well as a distinct realisation even among many loyal African National Congress (ANC) members that the "rainbow-nation" dream was over, or at least almost fatally damaged.

The combination of rabid anxiety about the "other" in one’s midst and the approaching celebration of a person famous for embracing friend and stranger alike, meant that people across South Africa looked to Madiba for guidance. There was widespread clamour to know out what he might have to say – as in the past – by way of chastisement, advice and inspiration. Was it not Madiba, after all, who had once announced that he would not demur from criticising his political friends, if he felt they had done wrong or committed atrocity? Would he not then have admonishing words to offer now, concerning the attacks?

The Nelson Mandela Foundation may neatly state that Madiba formally retired from his own official retirement in 2000; and it is true besides that he is a very elderly and now somewhat forgetful man. But many South Africans felt that were he to desist from speaking in his own person at such a time – rather than in the bland voice of his foundation or public-relations representatives – this might betray the values of justice, freedom and political plain-speaking for which he had so long contended.

The global imaginary

Outside South Africa, the moment of Nelson Mandela’s landmark birthday was far simpler and less inscribed with questioning. The concert on 27 June in London’s Hyde Park – in front of the symbolic number of 46,664 guests, officially to launch his foundation’s worldwide HIV/Aids campaign – revealed Mandela’s fans to be in the main content to admire, gasp, and generally be overawed. "There he is, there he is!", the whisper ran through the crowd when the great man briefly appeared to read a prepared statement; and then, "It’s him, it’s him!". Although standing towards the back of the crowd, I could feel people around me strain forward to see him more clearly, as if to be blessed by the holy man passing through.

From our vantage-point, Mandela was visible only as a very small speck on the stage; yet he also presided in gigantic form on the various screens positioned around the concert area. There was a metaphor in this somewhere, I remember thinking. Mandela wasn’t clearly visible without the help of cinematic projection: the living myth was a function of celebrity imaging – and he was indeed accompanied on stage by a whole range of musical or TV celebrities (Amy Winehouse, Will Smith, June Sarpong, Annie Lennox).

And yet, in reality, what did this all amount to? What did this adulation mean? Should we simply take for granted the appearance of Nelson Mandela, African nationalist, at one time the world’s longest-held political prisoner, as headline act to a line-up of (in truth, rather less than glittering) star performances fit to decorate the contents pages of celebrity magazines such as Closer or Now?

Asking these kinds of questions of "Mandela the symbol" is, after all, the point of my cultural history. What was the fridge-magnet symbol, the tourist website icon, telling us, if anything? Was there not an unmistakable oddity to the fact that the 90th birthday was being celebrated here in London, while there – in Mandela’s native land – many people felt consternation at his relative silence? Wasn’t there something disorienting about this "transplanted" birthday-party; something bizarre about the manic susurration of media stars, paparazzi, and wired-up security detail, enwrapping so very tightly the brief appearance of a elder statesman abroad, as if to imprison him (with cloying images, and saccharine words) all over again?

I was reminded of a batik-cloth image of Mandela I once saw in a Cape Town market, selling at a price that only a tourist of some means could have afforded. Nelson Mandela’s fame seemed here to have been reduced to an inaccessible icon who could no longer address, or indeed be heard by, his people. It was a melancholy contrast with the far younger leader, then United States presidential candidate Barack Obama (who is often compared to Mandela, and who manages to take national-hero status in his stride while yet managing through his fine rhetorical skills to get his message across powerfully and movingly to his supporters).

True, only a day or so before the concert Mandela had at last expressed his regret at the violence against fellow-Africans in his home country, and at the tragic "failure of leadership" in neighbouring Zimbabwe. Everywhere, there was relief that the moral beacon had at last spoken. Yet it was impossible not to notice that his statement had been delivered extremely late in the political day; and it had also taken place abroad, as part of a dinner where luminaries like Bill (and Chelsea) Clinton, and Britain’s prime minister Gordon Brown, had been present. The compunction to speak had finally been triggered not by the great urgency everywhere palpable at home, but abroad, where – it was again impossible not to notice – the icon was in effect under an obligation to speak.

The secular saint could arguably not have sustained at the same level his massive global status had words of sorrow, albeit brief, not been expressed in the international domain. In this way Mandela’s legendary star stayed steady in its path, while at home, despite some pleasure at bathing in his reflected glory, bafflement and disappointment remained. As Madiba’s myth was made safe for his fans abroad, so the myth of the reconciled rainbow country he had helped create, inevitably cracked further open – and now, with the split in the ANC, has cracked wider again. A twist of this 90th-birthday year must be that just when his reputation as the 20th century’s leading postcolonial leader seemed secure, the ways in which that reputation will endure in South Africa itself are suddenly a little less certain than before.

The multiple reality

As was repeatedly acknowledged in discussions in Johannesburg and other cities in mid-2008 that I either witnessed or contributed to, on his home ground the "meaning" of Madiba, the significance of his remarkable career and story of uncompromising struggle and negotiated reconciliation, has yet fully to unfold. What does his message comprise: a poetry of hope and courage; a primer of self-discipline?

At present his legacy in some respects still exists in emergent form, has yet to express its true contours. This is to my mind the key difference between how he is viewed at home and internationally, where the lacquer of adulation laid thick upon the "human-rights legend" has long since hardened. Abroad, Mandela is the African the world loves to love, even if in a strikingly over-compensatory way. Africa the continent of famine, corruption and social abjection has produced, at least, this one fine human being, Europeans and Americans appear to breathe as they cluster around him.

A hostile Sunday Times (London) magazine article, which appeared the weekend before his 18 July birthday, opined that the one task Mandela can still competently carry out is to smile his dazzling smile, only now it is on command. There is little that is meaningful in it: in his old age he has become a mask of his former charismatic self, to which the world has grown accustomed to genuflect. For the international community the paradox is that by heaping excessive adoration upon the head of this one seemingly superhuman African, we have left Africa, the continent, its people, more lacking of attention by contrast. There have been many great Africans yet their reputation has been dangerously eclipsed by this one over-hyped African hero of our times.

Yet it is here, within the gap between his fully manifested yet relatively shallow international fame, and his still-latent local significance, that, it seems to me, the potential for renewed understandings of Mandela have the opportunity to emerge, which, when all is said and done, is a good thing. Within this gap, then, I would venture to place the following desiderata.

Let us not allow our image of Mandela to petrify into cliché, especially yet not only while he is still alive amongst us. Let his meanings evolve and change in rhythm with his times. Let his legacy organisations perhaps relax a little in wanting to predetermine how the future will see him. His achievement on its own dwarfs the efforts of such tireless PR policing.

What is not in doubt is that Mandela is a great and humane human being not in spite of his Africanness, as his western acolytes (according to the Sunday Times) believe, but because of his Africanness. Perhaps most important, let us not forget that his greatness as an African was dependent on the cooperation of hosts of other Africans, little and great, ordinary and extraordinary, as he himself has always recognised.

About the author

Elleke Boehmer is professor of world literature in English in the faculty of English at Oxford University. Her work includes Colonial and Postcolonial Literature: Migrant Metaphors (Oxford University Press, 1995/2005); Empire, the National, and the Postcolonial, 1890-1920 (Oxford University Press, 2002/2005); Stories of Women: Gender and Narrative in the Postcolonial Nation (Manchester University Press); (as editor) Scouting for Boys A Handbook for Instruction in Good Citizenship (Oxford University Press, 2004/2005); and Nelson Mandela: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2008). Elleke Boehmer is also the author of a novel, Nile Baby (Ayebia, 2008)

Voir également:

Nelson Mandela, R.I.P

Deroy Murdock

National Review on line

December 5, 2013

My friend James Deciuttis once asked me very directly, “Are you ever wrong?” It was not asked with bile, but very straightforwardly, as if asking if I ever had visited Spain.

I told James that if he referred to my writing, speaking, and political activism, I have made many bad calls and misjudgments. I can look forward to a brand-new year of them in just 27 days. In one particular case, however, I really blew it very, very, very badly. But I was not alone.

Like many other anti-Communists and Cold Warriors, I feared that releasing Nelson Mandela from jail, especially amid the collapse of South Africa’s apartheid government, would create a Cuba on the Cape of Good Hope at best and an African Cambodia at worst.

After all, Mandela had spent 27 years locked up in Robben Island prison due to his leadership of the African National Congress. The ANC was a violent, pro-Communist organization. By the guiding light of Ronald Wilson Reagan, many young conservatives like me spent much of the 1980s fighting Marxism-Leninism — from the classrooms of radical campuses to the battlefields of Grenada, Nicaragua, and El Salvador, both overtly and covertly. Having seen Communists terrorize nations around the world while the Berlin Wall still stood, Mandela looked like one more butcher waiting to take his place on the 20th Century’s blood-soaked stage.

The example of the Ayatollah Khomeini also was fresh in our minds. He went swiftly from exile in Paris to edicts in Tehran and quickly turned Iran into a vicious and bloodthirsty dictatorship at the vanguard of militant Islam.

Nelson Mandela was just another Fidel Castro or a Pol Pot, itching to slip from behind bars, savage his country, and surf atop the bones of his victims.

WRONG!

Far, far, far from any of that, Nelson Mandela turned out to be one of the 20th Century’s great moral leaders, right up there with Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He also was a statesman of considerable weight. If not as significant on the global stage as FDR, Winston Churchill, and Ronald Reagan, he approaches Margaret Thatcher as a national leader with major international reach.

Mandela invited the warden of Robben Island prison to his inauguration as president of South Africa. He sat him front and center. While most people would be tempted to lock up their jailers if they had the chance, Mandela essentially forgave him while the whole world and his own people, white and black, were watching. This quietly sent South Africa’s white population a message: Calm down. This will be okay. It also signaled black South Africans: Now is no time for vengeance. Let’s show our former oppressors that we are greater than that and bigger people than they were to us.

As Morgan Freeman and Matt Damon beautifully dramatize in the excellent film Invictus, Mandela resisted the ANC’s efforts to strip the national rugby team of its long-standing name, the Springboks. Seen as a symbol of apartheid, Mandela’s black colleagues were eager to give the team a new, less “white” identity. Mandela argued that white South Africans, stripped of political leadership and now quite clearly in the minority, should not be deprived of the one small point of pride behind which they could shield their anxieties.

Mandela then championed the team. He attended its games and rallied both blacks and whites behind it as a national sports organization, rather than an exclusive totem of South Africa’s white minority.

Mandela’s easy manner, warmth, and decency shone through and gave South Africans a common point of unity amid so many opportunities for division.

(As an American, it would be nice right now to have a leader who could bring our nation together, rather than pound one wedge after another into our dispirited population.)

Mandela’s economic record deserves deeper analysis later. However, for now it is worthwhile to remember that he came to power in 1994, less than half a decade after the Iron Curtain collapsed and the triumph of scientific socialism was exposed as a cruel and hollow fantasy. Rather than follow that vanquished model, Mandela looked to economic growth as the path his nation should follow. Among other things, he sold off stakes in South African Airways, utilities, and other state-owned companies. While some wish he had gone further, this was a far cry from the playbook of Marx and Lenin.

So, I was dead wrong about Nelson Mandela, a great man and fine example to others, not least the current occupant of the White House.

After 95 momentous years on Earth, may Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela rest in peace.

Voir aussi:

The concert that transformed Mandela from terrorist to icon

Jaime Velazquez, Agence France-Presse

ABS.CBnews

06/12/2013

JOHANNESBURG – So revered is Nelson Mandela today that it is easy to forget that for decades he was considered a terrorist by many foreign governments, and some of his now supporters.

The anti-apartheid hero was on a US terror watch list until 2008 and while still on Robben Island, Britain’s late "Iron Lady" Margaret Thatcher described his African National Congress as a "typical terrorist organization."

That Mandela’s image has been transformed so thoroughly is a testament to the man’s achievements, but also, in part, to a concert that took place in London 25 years ago this week.

For organizer Tony Hollingsworth the June 11, 1988 gig at London’s Wembley Stadium had very little to do with Mandela’s 70th birthday, as billed.

It had everything to do with ridding Mandela of his terrorist tag and ensuring his release.

"You can’t get out of jail as a terrorist, but you can get out of prison as a black leader," he told AFP during a visit to Johannesburg.

Hollingsworth, now 55, envisaged a star-studded concert that would transform Mandela from outlaw to icon in the public’s mind, and in turn press governments adopt a more accommodating stance.

He approached Archbishop Trevor Huddleston, president of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement, to pitch his musical strategy.

"I told Trevor that the African National Congress and the anti-apartheid movement had reached their glass ceiling; they couldn’t go further."

"Everything you are doing is ‘anti’, you are protesting on the streets, but it will remain in that space. Many people will agree, but you will not appeal them."

"Mandela and the movement should be seen as something positive, confident, something you would like to be in your living room with."

While Hollingsworth dealt with artists, Mike Terry — head of the movement in London — dealt with the ANC and the skeptics in the anti-apartheid movement.

And there were many, including Mandela himself, who asked several times that the struggle not be about him.

Many others insisted the focus remain on sanctions against the apartheid regime.

"A lot of people were criticizing me for sanitizing it," Hollingsworth remembered.

Eventually Terry convinced the ANC and Hollingsworth convinced Simple Minds, Dire Straits, Sting, George Michael, The Eurythmics, Eric Clapton, Whitney Houston and Stevie Wonder into the 83-artist line up.

With that musical firepower came contracts for a more than 11 hour broadcast.

"We signed with the entertainment department of television (stations). And when the head of the department got home and watched on his channel that they were calling Mandela a terrorist, they called straight to the news section to say, don’t call this man a terrorist, we just signed 11 hours of broadcasting for a tribute about him."

"This is how we turned Mandela from a black terrorist into a black leader."

The gig at Wembley attracted broadcasters in nearly 70 countries and was watched by more than half a billion people around the world, still one of the largest audiences ever for an entertainment event.

Despite some broadcasters’ demands for the politics to be toned down the message got out.

Singer Harry Belafonte opened with a rousing acclamation: "We are here today to honor a great man, the man is Nelson Mandela," he told the capacity crowd.

Nelson Mandela was released from jail 19 months later, after 27 years in prison. A second concert was later held to celebrate.

"Before the first event, the prospect of Nelson Mandela’s imminent release from prison seemed completely unrealistic," Terry would later say.

"Yet within 20 months he walked free and I have no doubt that the first event played a decisive role in making this happen."

Mandela went on to negotiate the end of the white supremacist regime and establish multiracial democracy in South Africa.

Few seemed to notice that the concert was actually more than a month before his July 18 birthday.

Voir encore:

Nelson Mandela ‘proven’ to be a member of the Communist Party after decades of denial

A new book claims that, 50 years after he was first accused of being a Communist, Nelson Mandela was a Communist party member after all.

Colin Freeman, and Jane Flanagan in Cape Town

08 Dec 2012

For decades, it was one of the enduring disputes of South Africa’s anti-apartheid struggle. Was Nelson Mandela, the leader of the African National Congress, really a secret Communist, as the white-only government of the time alleged? Or, as he claimed during the infamous 1963 trial that saw him jailed for life, was it simply a smear to discredit him in a world riven by Cold War tensions?

Now, nearly half a century after the court case that made him the world’s best-known prisoner of conscience, a new book claims that whatever the wider injustice perpetrated, the apartheid-era prosecutors were indeed right on one question: Mr Mandela was a Communist party member after all.

The former South African president, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993, has always denied being a member of the South African branch of the movement, which mounted an armed campaign of guerrilla resistance along with the ANC.

But research by a British historian, Professor Stephen Ellis, has unearthed fresh evidence that during his early years as an activist, Mr Mandela did hold senior rank in the South African Communist Party, or SACP. He says Mr Mandela joined the SACP to enlist the help of the Communist superpowers for the ANC’s campaign of armed resistance to white rule.

His book also provides fresh detail on how the ANC’s military wing had bomb-making lessons from the IRA, and intelligence training from the East German Stasi, which it used to carry out brutal interrogations of suspected "spies" at secret prison camps.

As evidence of Mr Mandela’s Communist party membership, Prof Ellis cites minutes from a secret 1982 SACP meeting, discovered in a collection of private papers at the University of Cape Town, in which a veteran former party member, the late John Pule Motshabi, talks about how Mr Mandela was a party member some two decades before.

In the minutes, Mr Motshabi, is quoted as saying: "There was an accusation that we opposed allowing Nelson [Mandela] and Walter (Sisulu, a fellow activist) into the Family (a code word for the party) … we were not informed because this was arising after the 1950 campaigns (a series of street protests). The recruitment of the two came after."

While other SACP members have previously confirmed Mr Mandela’s party membership, many of their testimonies were given under duress in police interviews, where they might have sought to implicate him. However, the minutes from the 1982 SACP meeting, said Prof Ellis, offered more reliable proof. "This is written in a closed party meeting so nobody is trying to impress or mislead the public," he said.

Although Mr Mandela appears to have joined the SACP more for their political connections than their ideas, his membership could have damaged his standing in the West had it been disclosed while he was still fighting to dismantle apartheid.

Africa was a Cold War proxy battleground until the end of the 1980s, and international support for his cause, which included the Free Nelson Mandela campaign in Britain, drew partly on his image as a compromise figure loyal neither to East nor West.

"Nelson Mandela’s reputation is based both on his ability to overcome personal animosities and to be magnanimous to all South Africans, white and black, and that is what impressed the world," said Prof Ellis, a former Amnesty International researcher who is based at the Free University of Amsterdam. "But what this shows is that like any politician, he was prepared to make opportunistic alliances.

"I think most people who supported the anti-apartheid movement just didn’t want to know that much about his background. Apartheid was seen as a moral issue and that was that. But if real proof had been produced at the time, some might have thought differently."

Mr Mandela made his denial of Communist Party membership in the opening statement of his Rivonia trial, when he and nine other ANC leaders were tried for 221 alleged acts of sabotage designed to overthrow the apartheid system. The defendants were also accused of furthering the aims of Communism, a movement that was then illegal in South Africa.

Addressing the court, Mr Mandela declared that he had "never been a member of the Communist Party," and that he disagreed with the movement’s contempt for Western-style parliamentary democracy.

He added: "The suggestion made by the State that the struggle in South Africa is under the influence of foreigners or communists is wholly incorrect. I have done whatever I did, both as an individual and as a leader of my people, because of my experience in South Africa and my own proudly felt African background, and not because of what any outsider might have said."

Mr Mandela joined the ANC in 1944, when its leadership still opposed armed struggle against the apartheid state. However, by the early 1950s he become personally convinced that a guerrilla war was inevitable, a view confirmed by the Sharpeville Massacre in March 1960, when police in a Transvaal township opened fire on black demonstrators, killing 69 people.

But while other ANC leaders also came round to his way of thinking after Sharpeville, the group still had no access to weaponry or financial support. Instead, says Prof Ellis, Mr Mandela looked for help from the Communists, with whom he already had close contacts due to their shared opposition to apartheid.

"He knew and trusted many Communist activists anyway, so it appears he was co-opted straight to the central committee with no probation required," said Prof Ellis. "But it’s fair to say he wasn’t a real convert, it was just an opportunist thing."

In the months after Sharpeville, Communist party members secretly visited Beijing and Moscow, where they got assurances of support for their own guerrilla campaign. In conjunction with a number of leading ANC members, they set up a new, nominally independent military organisation, known as Umkhonto we Sizwe or Spear of the Nation. With Mr Mandela as its commander, Umkhonto we Sizwe launched its first attacks on 16 December 1961.

Its campaign of "sabotage" and bombings over the subsequent three decades claimed the lives of dozens of civilians, and led to the organisation being classed as a terrorist group by the US.

In his book, Professor Ellis, who also authored a publication on the Liberian civil war, elaborates on other murky aspects of the ANC’s past. One is that bomb-making experts from the IRA trained the ANC at a secret base in Angola in the late 1970s, a link disclosed last year in the posthumous memoirs of Kader Asmal, a South African politician of Indian extraction who was exiled in Ireland. He was a member of the Irish Anti-Apartheid Movement, which, Prof Mr Ellis says, in turn had close links to the British and South African Communist parties.

The IRA tutoring, which was allegedly brokered partly through Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams, led to the ANC fighters improving their bombing skills considerably, thanks to the expertise of what Mr Ellis describes as "the world’s most sophisticated urban guerrilla force".

Angola was also the base for "Quatro", a notorious ANC detention centre, where dozens of the movement’s own supporters were tortured and sometimes killed as suspected spies by agents from their internal security service, some of whom were "barely teenagers". East German trainers taught the internal security agents that anyone who challenged official ANC dogma should be viewed as a potential spy or traitor.

On Friday night, a spokesman for the Nelson Mandela Foundation said: "We do not believe that there is proof that Madiba (Mandela’s clan name) was a Party member … The evidence that has been identified is comparatively weak in relation to the evidence against, not least Madiba’s consistent denial of the fact over nearly 50 years. It is conceivable that Madiba might indulge in legalistic casuistry, but not that he would make an entirely false statement.

"Recruitment and induction into the Party was a process that happened in stages over a period of time. It is possible that Madiba started but never completed the process. What is clear is that at a certain moment in the struggle he was sufficiently trusted as an ANC leader to participate in Party CC meetings. And it is probable that people in attendance at such meetings may have thought of him as a member."

Mr Mandela, now 94, retired from public life in 2004 and is now in poor health. He did, though, allude to a symbiotic relationship with the Communists in his bestselling biography, The Long Walk to Freedom. "There will always be those who say that the Communists were using us," he wrote. "But who is to say that we were not using them?"

"External Mission: The ANC in Exile, 1960-1990", is published by Hurst and Co.

Voir de même:

The sacred warrior

The liberator of South Africa looks at the seminal work of the liberator of India

Nelson Mandela

Time

December 27, 1999

India is Gandhi’s country of birth; South Africa his country of adoption. He was both an Indian and a South African citizen. Both countries contributed to his intellectual and moral genius, and he shaped the liberatory movements in both colonial theaters.

He is the archetypal anticolonial revolutionary. His strategy of noncooperation, his assertion that we can be dominated only if we cooperate with our dominators, and his nonviolent resistance inspired anticolonial and antiracist movements internationally in our century.

Both Gandhi and I suffered colonial oppression, and both of us mobilized our respective peoples against governments that violated our freedoms.

The Gandhian influence dominated freedom struggles on the African continent right up to the 1960s because of the power it generated and the unity it forged among the apparently powerless. Nonviolence was the official stance of all major African coalitions, and the South African A.N.C. remained implacably opposed to violence for most of its existence.

Gandhi remained committed to nonviolence; I followed the Gandhian strategy for as long as I could, but then there came a point in our struggle when the brute force of the oppressor could no longer be countered through passive resistance alone. We founded Unkhonto we Sizwe and added a military dimension to our struggle. Even then, we chose sabotage because it did not involve the loss of life, and it offered the best hope for future race relations. Militant action became part of the African agenda officially supported by the Organization of African Unity (O.A.U.) following my address to the Pan-African Freedom Movement of East and Central Africa (PAFMECA) in 1962, in which I stated, "Force is the only language the imperialists can hear, and no country became free without some sort of violence."

Gandhi himself never ruled out violence absolutely and unreservedly. He conceded the necessity of arms in certain situations. He said, "Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence… I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor …"

Violence and nonviolence are not mutually exclusive; it is the predominance of the one or the other that labels a struggle.

Gandhi arrived in South Africa in 1893 at the age of 23. Within a week he collided head on with racism. His immediate response was to flee the country that so degraded people of color, but then his inner resilience overpowered him with a sense of mission, and he stayed to redeem the dignity of the racially exploited, to pave the way for the liberation of the colonized the world over and to develop a blueprint for a new social order.

He left 21 years later, a near maha atma (great soul). There is no doubt in my mind that by the time he was violently removed from our world, he had transited into that state.

No ordinary leader–divinely inspired

He was no ordinary leader. There are those who believe he was divinely inspired, and it is difficult not to believe with them. He dared to exhort nonviolence in a time when the violence of Hiroshima and Nagasaki had exploded on us; he exhorted morality when science, technology and the capitalist order had made it redundant; he replaced self-interest with group interest without minimizing the importance of self. In fact, the interdependence of the social and the personal is at the heart of his philosophy. He seeks the simultaneous and interactive development of the moral person and the moral society.

His philosophy of Satyagraha is both a personal and a social struggle to realize the Truth, which he identifies as God, the Absolute Morality. He seeks this Truth, not in isolation, self-centeredly, but with the people. He said, "I want to find God, and because I want to find God, I have to find God along with other people. I don’t believe I can find God alone. If I did, I would be running to the Himalayas to find God in some cave there. But since I believe that nobody can find God alone, I have to work with people. I have to take them with me. Alone I can’t come to Him."

He sacerises his revolution, balancing the religious and the secular.

Awakening

His awakening came on the hilly terrain of the so-called Bambata Rebellion, where as a passionate British patriot, he led his Indian stretcher-bearer corps to serve the Empire, but British brutality against the Zulus roused his soul against violence as nothing had done before. He determined, on that battlefield, to wrest himself of all material attachments and devote himself completely and totally to eliminating violence and serving humanity. The sight of wounded and whipped Zulus, mercilessly abandoned by their British persecutors, so appalled him that he turned full circle from his admiration for all things British to celebrating the indigenous and ethnic. He resuscitated the culture of the colonized and the fullness of Indian resistance against the British; he revived Indian handicrafts and made these into an economic weapon against the colonizer in his call for swadeshi–the use of one’s own and the boycott of the oppressor’s products, which deprive the people of their skills and their capital.

A great measure of world poverty today and African poverty in particular is due to the continuing dependence on foreign markets for manufactured goods, which undermines domestic production and dams up domestic skills, apart from piling up unmanageable foreign debts. Gandhi’s insistence on self-sufficiency is a basic economic principle that, if followed today, could contribute significantly to alleviating Third World poverty and stimulating development.

Gandhi predated Frantz Fanon and the black-consciousness movements in South Africa and the U.S. by more than a half-century and inspired the resurgence of the indigenous intellect, spirit and industry.

Gandhi rejects the Adam Smith notion of human nature as motivated by self-interest and brute needs and returns us to our spiritual dimension with its impulses for nonviolence, justice and equality.

He exposes the fallacy of the claim that everyone can be rich and successful provided they work hard. He points to the millions who work themselves to the bone and still remain hungry. He preaches the gospel of leveling down, of emulating the kisan (peasant), not the zamindar (landlord), for "all can be kisans, but only a few zamindars."

He stepped down from his comfortable life to join the masses on their level to seek equality with them. "I can’t hope to bring about economic equality… I have to reduce myself to the level of the poorest of the poor."

From his understanding of wealth and poverty came his understanding of labor and capital, which led him to the solution of trusteeship based on the belief that there is no private ownership of capital; it is given in trust for redistribution and equalization. Similarly, while recognizing differential aptitudes and talents, he holds that these are gifts from God to be used for the collective good.

He seeks an economic order, alternative to the capitalist and communist, and finds this in sarvodaya based on nonviolence (ahimsa).

He rejects Darwin’s survival of the fittest, Adam Smith’s laissez-faire and Karl Marx’s thesis of a natural antagonism between capital and labor, and focuses on the interdependence between the two.

He believes in the human capacity to change and wages Satyagraha against the oppressor, not to destroy him but to transform him, that he cease his oppression and join the oppressed in the pursuit of Truth.

We in South Africa brought about our new democracy relatively peacefully on the foundations of such thinking, regardless of whether we were directly influenced by Gandhi or not.

Gandhi remains today the only complete critique of advanced industrial society. Others have criticized its totalitarianism but not its productive apparatus. He is not against science and technology, but he places priority on the right to work and opposes mechanization to the extent that it usurps this right. Large-scale machinery, he holds, concentrates wealth in the hands of one man who tyrannizes the rest. He favors the small machine; he seeks to keep the individual in control of his tools, to maintain an interdependent love relation between the two, as a cricketer with his bat or Krishna with his flute. Above all, he seeks to liberate the individual from his alienation to the machine and restore morality to the productive process.

As we find ourselves in jobless economies, societies in which small minorities consume while the masses starve, we find ourselves forced to rethink the rationale of our current globalization and to ponder the Gandhian alternative.

At a time when Freud was liberating sex, Gandhi was reining it in; when Marx was pitting worker against capitalist, Gandhi was reconciling them; when the dominant European thought had dropped God and soul out of the social reckoning, he was centralizing society in God and soul; at a time when the colonized had ceased to think and control, he dared to think and control; and when the ideologies of the colonized had virtually disappeared, he revived them and empowered them with a potency that liberated and redeemed.

Voir par ailleurs:

Nelson Mandela, un chrétien discret

Issu de l’Église méthodiste, Nelson Mandela, décédé le 5 décembre au soir, évitait d’en faire état en public. À bien l’écouter, cependant, cette dimension a été centrale dans sa vie.

Laurent Larcher

La Croix

6/12/13

Rares, parmi ceux qui chantent les louanges de Nelson Mandela en France, sont ceux qui évoquent son christianisme. Une dimension souvent gommée au profit de son « humanisme ». Pour leur défense, il est vrai que Nelson Mandela a toujours été discret, en public, sur ses liens avec le christianisme. Dans un entretien accordé à l’Express en 1995, il répond, un peu abrupt, au journaliste qui l’interroge sur le rôle de sa foi chrétienne dans sa lutte contre l’apartheid : « La relation entre un homme et son Dieu est un sujet extrêmement privé, qui ne regarde pas les mass media ».

Et dans son autobiographie, Conversation avec moi-même (La Martinière, 2010), il évoque à peine cette dimension dans sa vie (à deux reprises !). On le voit, Nelson Mandela n’a pas été un prosélyte : « Toujours faire de la religion une affaire privée, réservée à soi. N’encombre pas les autres avec ta religion et autres croyances personnelles. », écrit-il à Thulare, en 1977, de la prison de Robben Island.

« Je n’ai jamais abandonné mes croyances chrétiennes »

Pour autant, au fil de sa vie, de ses écrits et de ses confidences, Nelson Mandela n’a pas toujours été silencieux sur son rapport au christianisme. En premier lieu, il a été baptisé dans l’Église méthodiste et formé dans les écoles wesleyennes (une Église qui se sépare d’avec l’Église méthodiste en 1875) pour être précis. À Fort Hare, dans l’une de ces institutions, il a même été moniteur le dimanche. Que pensait-il de cette appartenance ? Visiblement, le plus grand bien !

À plusieurs reprises, il exprime sa dette envers son Église : « Je ne saurais trop insister sur le rôle que l’Église méthodiste a joué dans ma vie », déclarait-il à l’occasion du 23e anniversaire de la Gospel Church power of Republic of South Africa, en 1995. Et devant le parlement mondial des religions, en 1999 : « Sans l’Église, sans les institutions religieuses, je ne serais pas là aujourd’hui ».

Emprisonné à Robben Island, il assiste, écrit-il en 1977, « encore à tous les services de l’Église et j’apprécie certains sermons ». Dans sa correspondance avec Ahmed Kathrada, en 1993, il évoque la joie qu’il ressentait à fréquenter l’Eucharistie  : « Partager le sacrement qui fait partie de la tradition de mon Église était important à mes yeux. Cela me procurait l’apaisement et le calme intérieur. En sortant des services, j’étais un homme neuf. » Et il affirme au même : « Je n’ai jamais abandonné mes croyances chrétiennes ».

le christianisme de Mandela prend la forme d’une sagesse universelle

S’il lui est arrivé d’exprimer sa fidélité au christianisme, il semble cependant que sa spiritualité se soit modifiée au cours de son existence. Ainsi, sa rencontre avec le marxisme lui ouvre un nouvel horizon : « Nous qui avons grandi dans des maisons religieuses et qui avons étudié dans les écoles des missionnaires, nous avons fait l’expérience d’un profond conflit spirituel quand nous avons vu le mode de vie que nous jugions sacré remis en question par de nouvelles philosophies, et quand nous nous sommes rendu compte que, parmi ceux qui traitaient notre foi d’opium, il y avait des penseurs dont l’intégrité et l’amour pour les hommes ne faisaient pas de doute. », écrit-il à Fatima Meer en 1977.

Peu à peu, le christianisme de Mandela prend la forme d’une sagesse universelle : « J’ai bien sûr été baptisé à l’Église wesleyenne et j’ai fréquenté ses écoles missionnaires. Dehors comme ici, je lui reste fidèle, mais mes conceptions ont eu tendance à s’élargir et à être bienveillantes envers l’unité religieuse », constate-il en 1977.

La même année, il fait cet aveu : « J’ai mes propres croyances quant à l’existence ou non d’un Être suprême et il est possible que l’on puisse expliquer facilement pourquoi l’homme, depuis des temps immémoriaux, croit en l’existence d’un dieu. » Puis de dire en 1994 : « Je ne suis pas particulièrement religieux ou spirituel. Disons que je m’intéresse à toutes les tentatives qui sont faites pour découvrir le sens de la vie. La religion relève de cet exercice. ».

« une affaire strictement personnelle »

Tout au long de son existence, il s’est méfié du caractère dévastateur qu’il voyait en puissance dans la religion : « La religion, et notamment la croyance en l’existence d’un Être suprême, a toujours été un sujet de controverse qui déchire les nations, et même les familles. Il vaut toujours mieux considérer la relation entre un individu et son Dieu comme une affaire strictement personnelle, une question de foi et non de logique. Nul n’a le droit de prescrire aux autres ce qu’ils doivent croire ou non », écrit-il à Déborah Optiz en 1988.

Nous touchons là, sans doute, la raison pour laquelle Nelson Mandela évitait d’aborder en public, en particulier face aux médias, son rapport au christianisme. À cela s’ajoute son souci de ne pas heurter la sensibilité et les convictions de celui à qui il s’adressait. Il s’en explique à Maki Mandela en 1977 : «Sans le savoir, tu peux offenser beaucoup de gens pour qui tout cela n’a aucun fondement scientifique, qui considèrent que c’est pure fiction. »

Cette réserve ne l’a pas empêché d’assigner un rôle aux religions dans la société : en particulier sur le plan de la justice et de la morale. Alors qu’il présidait à la destinée de l’Afrique du Sud, il leur adressa cette feuille de route en 1997 : « Nous avons besoin que les institutions religieuses continuent d’être la conscience de la société, le gardien de la morale et des intérêts des faibles et des opprimés. Nous avons besoin que les organisations religieuses participent à la société civile mobilisée pour la justice et la protection des droits de l’homme. »

Voir enfin:

Nelson Mandela : un homme une voie

RFI

Première partie : Une conscience noire dans les geôles de l’apartheid

En retrouvant la liberté, un dimanche, le 11 février 1990, Nelson Mandela a recouvré un destin, dans le droit fil du mythe qu’il était devenu en 27 ans de prison. «Malgré mes soixante-et-onze ans, j’ai senti que ma vie recommençait. Mes dix mille jours de prison étaient finis», écrivit-il plus tard dans son auto-biographie, Long Walk to Freedom. Cette deuxième vie serait celle d’un président de la République arc-en-ciel et d’une autorité morale universelle. La première aura été celle d’un freedom fighter, un combattant de la liberté, un adepte de la non-violence conduit à la lutte armée par la ségrégation raciale, un «terroriste» au temps où l’idéologie de l’apartheid s’affichait comme ligne de défense de l’Occident travaillé par la guerre froide, un «communiste» (qu’il n’a jamais été) dans une Afrique du Sud où même le nationalisme était white only, réservé aux Afrikaners, les «Africains» blancs de souche boer.

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela est né le 18 juillet 1918 dans le village de Qunu, près d’Umtata, au Transkei. Il appartient à une lignée royale Xhosa du clan Madhiba, dont le nom a désormais fait le tour du monde comme raccourci affectueux pour désigner le fils de Henry Mgadla Mandela, un chef Thembu qui le laisse orphelin à 12 ans. Envoyé à la cour du roi, Rolhlahla se prépare à assurer la succession à la chefferie, à l’école des pasteurs méthodistes d’abord, puis, en 1938 à l’University College for Bantu de Fort Hare, seul établissement secondaire habilité à l’époque à recevoir des «non-Blancs».

Nationalisme et pacifisme

Les fondateurs blancs de Fort Hare entendaient former une élite noire capable de servir leur dessein colonial. Mais face à la conjugaison d’esprits éveillés, l’épreuve de la réalité étant la plus forte, l’université «bantoue» s’est transformée en pépinière du nationalisme d’Afrique australe, d’où sortirent notamment les frères ennemis zimbabwéens Joshua Nkomo et Robert Mugabe ou le «père de la Nation» zambienne, Kenneth Kaunda. Derrière les expériences propres à chacun des jeunes gens se profilent des peuples déchus de leurs droits de citoyens et confinés dans la misère par une barrière de couleur défendue par les pouvoirs blancs, un fusil à la main et une bible dans l’autre. Les colons ont fait de l’identité noire une condition sociale. Une conscience noire est en gestation. Reste à trouver les armes pour la défendre. A Fort Hare, Mandela discute de l’enseignement du Mahatma Ghandi (né en Afrique du Sud) avec son meilleur ami, Oliver Tambo (mort le 24 avril 1993). Convaincu des vertus de la non-violence, il découvre aussi, non sans scepticisme, les thèses marxistes introduites clandestinement dans les chambrées studieuses par le South african communist party (SACP), interdit.

En 1940, Mandela et Tambo sont chassés de Fort Hare après avoir conduit une grève pour empêcher que le Conseil représentatif des étudiants soit transformé en simple chambre d’enregistrement. Il finira ses études par correspondance. Pour les financer, il embauche en 1941 comme vigile aux Crown Mines de Johannesburg. Le choc est violent dans l’univers minier du développement séparé où la richesse des Blancs ruisselle dans la sueur et le sang des Noirs. Nelson Mandela a 23 ans, une stature de boxeur. Servir l’ordre économique de la ségrégation raciale en maniant la chicotte, le jeune homme entrevoit le privilège douteux que sa naissance lui réserve. Quelques mois plus tard, une rencontre avec Albertina, l’épouse d’un militant de la cause noire, Walter Sisulu, fait bifurquer son destin. Walter Sisulu l’emploie dans sa petite agence immobilière, lui paye des cours de droit et le place dans un cabinet d’avocats blancs, des juifs communistes opposés à la ségrégation raciale.

Programme d’action unitaire

Oliver Tambo a rejoint son ami Mandela à Johannesburg, comme professeur de mathématiques. Les jeunes gens épousent des collègues infirmières d’Albertina Sisulu. Ils partent s’installer dans la township d’Orlando où leur rencontre avec l’instituteur zoulou Anton Lembede sera déterminante. En effet, après l’instauration de la discrimination raciale qui fonde le «développement séparé» concocté après la guerre des Boers (contre l’imperium anglais) en 1902, au lendemain de l’institution, en 1911, du «colour bar» qui limite le droit au travail des non-Blancs, ces derniers ont entrepris d’organiser une résistance. Dans les années quarante, elle paraît bien essoufflée. Anton Lembede, Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu et Oliver Tambo vont tenter de ranimer la flamme et de lui donner des couleurs nationalistes en créant, en 1944, une ligue de la jeunesse au sein de l’ANC dirigé alors par le docteur Xuma.

Fondé à Bloemfontein en 1912, l’African native national congress (ANNC) avait abandonné son initiale coloniale «native» (indigène) en 1923 pour devenir ANC. Largement inspiré par les idées légalistes du promoteur de l’émancipation des Noirs américains, Booker T. Washington, l’ANC avait entrepris d’informer la communauté noire sud-africaine sur ses droits ou ce qui en restait, faisant aussi campagne par exemple contre la loi sud-africaine sur les laissez-passer. Mais les revendications de l’ANC avaient fini par s’user sur la soif de respectabilité de ses dirigeants et sur la violence de la répression du pouvoir blanc. Avec la ligue de la jeunesse, la Youth League, l’ANC prend un tournant qui lui permet d’avoir une action efficace lors des grandes manifestations de mineurs en 1946 et 1949. Mandela est élu secrétaire général de la ligue en 1947 puis président peu après. En 1949, l’ANC adoptera le programme d’action de la Youth League qui réclame «la fin de la domination blanche». Entre temps, le Parti national (PN), au pouvoir à Pretoria depuis 1948, a érigé l’apartheid en idéologie et en programme de gouvernement. Albert Luthuli (prix Nobel de la paix en 1960) préside l’ANC.

En 1951, Tambo et Mandela sont les deux premiers avocats noirs inscrits au barreau de Johannesburg. L’année suivante, ils ouvrent un cabinet ensemble. En 1950, les principales lois de l’apartheid ont été adoptées, en particulier le Group areas act qui assigne notamment à «résidence» les Noirs dans les bantoustans et les townships. Le Supression communist act inscrit dans son champ anti-communiste toute personne qui «cherche à provoquer un changement politique, industriel, économique ou social par des moyens illégaux». Bien évidemment, pour l’apartheid il n’y a pas de possibilité de changement légal. Mais en rangeant dans le même sac nationalistes, communistes, pacifistes et révolutionnaires, il ferme la fracture idéologique qui opposait justement ces derniers au sein de l’ANC. Pour sa part, Nelson Mandela rompt avec son anti-communisme chrétien intransigeant pour recommander l’unité de lutte anti-apartheid entre les nationalistes noirs et les Blancs du SACP.

Désobéissance civile et clandestinité

Elu président de l’ANC pour le Transvaal et vice président national de l’ANC, Nelson Mandela est également choisi comme «volontaire en chef» pour lancer en juin 1952 une action de désobéissance civile civile de grande envergure à la manière du Mahatma Ghandi, la «défiance campaign», où il anime des cohortes de manifestants descendus en masse dans la rue. La campagne culmine en octobre, contre la ségrégation légalisée et en particulier contre le port obligatoire des laissez-passer imposé aux Noirs. Tout un arsenal de loi sur la «sécurité publique» verrouille l’état d’urgence qui autorise l’apartheid à gouverner par décrets. Condamné à neuf mois de prison avec sursis, le charismatique Mandela est interdit de réunion et assigné à résidence à Johannesburg. Il en profite pour mettre au point le «Plan M» qui organise l’ANC en cellules clandestines.

La répression des années cinquante contraint Mandela à faire disparaître son nom de l’affiche officielle de l’ANC mais ne l’empêche pas de participer en 1955 au Congrès des peuples qui adopte une Charte des Libertés préconisant l’avènement d’une société multiraciale et démocratique. Le Congrès parvient en effet à rassembler l’ANC, le Congrès indien, l’Organisation des métis sud-africain (SACPO), le Congrès des démocrates -composé de communistes proscrits depuis 1950 et de radicaux blancs- ainsi que le Congrès des syndicats sud-africains (SACTU). Le 5 décembre 1956, Nelson Mandela est arrêté avec Walter Sisulu, Oliver Tambo, Albert Luthuli (prix Nobel de la paix 1960) et des dizaines de dirigeants du mouvement anti-apartheid. Ils sont accusés, toutes races et toutes obédiences confondues, de comploter contre l’Etat au sein d’une organisation internationale d’inspiration communiste. En mars 1961, le plus long procès de l’histoire judiciaire sud-africaine s’achève sur un non-lieu général. L’ANC estime avoir épuisé tous les recours de la non-violence.

Le 21 mars 1960, à Sharpeville, la police de l’apartheid transforme en bain de sang (69 morts et 180 blessés) une manifestation pacifique contre les laissez-passer. L’état d’urgence est réactivé. Des milliers de personnes font les frais de la répression terrible qui s’ensuit dans tous le pays. Le 8 avril, l’ANC et le Congrès panafricain (le PAC né d’une scission anti-communiste) sont interdits. Cette même année de sang, Nelson épouse en deuxièmes noces Winnie, une assistante sociale, et entre en clandestinité. En mai 1961, le succès de son mot d’ordre de grève générale à domicile «stay at house» déchaîne les foudres de Pretoria qui déploie son grand jeu militaro-policier pour briser la résistance. En décembre, l’ANC met en application le plan de passage graduel à la lutte armée rédigé par Nelson Mandela. Avant d’en arriver à «la guérilla, le terrorisme et la révolution ouverte», Mandela préconise le sabotage des cibles militaro-industrielles qui, écrit-il, «n’entraîne aucune perte en vie humaine et ménage les meilleures chances aux relations interraciales».

Sabotages et lutte armée

Le 16 décembre 1961 des explosions marquent aux quatre coins du pays le baptême du feu d’Umkhonto We Sizwe, le «fer de lance de la Nation», la branche militaire de l’ANC. D’Addis-Abeba en janvier 1962 où se tient la conférence du Mouvement panafricain pour la libération de l’Afrique australe et orientale, à l’Algérie fraîchement indépendante d’Ahmed Ben Bella où il suit une formation militaire avec son ami Tambo, Nelson Mandela sillonne l’Afrique pour plaider la cause de l’ANC et recueillir subsides et bourses universitaires. Le pacifiste se met à l’étude de la stratégie militaire. Clausewitz, Mao et Che Guevara voisinent sur sa table de chevet avec les spécialistes de la guerre anglo-boers. A son retour, il est arrêté, le 5 août 1962, grâce à un indicateur de police, après une folle cavale où il emprunte toutes sortes de déguisements. En novembre, il écope de 5 ans de prison pour sortie illégale du territoire mais aussi comme fauteur de grève. Alors qu’il a commencé à purger sa peine, une deuxième vague d’accusation va le clouer en prison pour deux décennies de plus.

Les services de l’apartheid sont parvenus à infiltrer l’ANC jusqu’à sa tête. Le 11 juillet 1963, les principaux chefs d’Umkhonto We Sizwe tombent dans ses filets. Avec eux, dans la ferme de Lilliesleaf, à Rivonia, près de Johannesburg, la police de Pretoria met la main sur des kilos de documents, parmi lesquels le plan de passage à la lutte armée signé Mandela. Le 9 octobre 1963, il partage le banc des accusés du procès de Rivonia avec sept compagnons : Walter Sisulu, Govan Mbéki dit Le Rouge (le père de l’actuel président sud-africain), Raymond Mhlaba, Elias Mtsouledi, Andrew Mlangeni, Ahmed Kathrada, Denis Goldberg et Lionel Bernstein.

En avril 1964, Mandela assure lui-même sa défense en une longue plaidoirie où il fait en même temps le procès de l’apartheid. «J’ai lutté contre la domination blanche et contre la domination noire. J’ai défendu l’idéal d’une société démocratique et libre dans laquelle tous les individus vivraient ensemble en harmonie et bénéficieraient de chances égales. C’est un idéal pour lequel j’espère vivre et que j’espère voir se réaliser. C’est un idéal pour lequel, s’il le faut, je suis prêt à mourir», dit-il avant d’accueillir sans ciller le verdict attendu de l’apartheid, la prison à perpétuité pour tous, à l’exception de Bernstein, acquitté. Conformément aux principes de la ségrégation raciale, le Blanc Denis Goldberg est incarcéré à Pretoria. Les autres prennent le ferry qui les conduit au bagne de Robben-Island, au large du cap «de Bonne espérance». Mandela y restera dix-huit ans, jusqu’en avril 1982 où il est transféré secrètement dans le quartier de haute sécurité de la prison de Pollsmoor, à vingt kilomètres du Cap. Son régime de détention sera bien plus tard allégé, l’apartheid tentant de le récupérer en vain plusieurs fois, jusqu’à ce que le plus ancien prisonnier de conscience du monde, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, «Madhiba», arrache la liberté de construire la nation arc-en-ciel de ses vœux, le 11 février 1990.

Voir enfin:

En Afrique du Sud, les fermiers blancs ont peur

Patricia Huon, Correspondante en Afrique du Sud

La Libre Belgique

11 octobre 2013

International Une campagne dénonce "le massacre" des Blancs. Les chiffres ne le confirment pas.

Un nuage de ballons rouges s’envole dans le ciel ensoleillé de Pretoria, devant le siège du gouvernement sud-africain. Baptisé "Octobre Rouge", l’événement n’a rien à voir avec un rassemblement communiste ou le roman d’espionnage de l’Américain Tom Clancy. Les quelques centaines de personnes rassemblées hier dans plusieurs villes d’Afrique du Sud sont venues, souvent en famille, pour protester contre ce qu’elles qualifient d’"oppression" et de "massacre" des Sud-Africains blancs.

A leur tête, des chanteurs afrikaners populaires, Steve Hofmeyr et Sunette Bridges, qui enchaînent photos-souvenirs et autographes. Dans le défilé, sur fond de musique en afrikaans, flottent les anciens drapeaux d’Afrique du Sud et des républiques boers et s’affichent quelques tenues militaires, des symboles fortement associés à l’extrême droite.

Violence raciale

Pour les manifestants, la population blanche est victime d’une violence dirigée contre elle en raison de sa couleur de peau. "Stop au génocide blanc" , clame une pancarte, illustration de l’angoisse qui a saisi les anciens maîtres du pays depuis l’avènement de la démocratie.

"Je suis ici pour mes enfants. Notre culture est menacée" , lance Tina Vermeer, une mère de famille vêtue d’un t-shirt rouge, qui peine à s’exprimer en anglais. "L’Afrique du Sud d’aujourd’hui, c’est l’apartheid à l’envers" , ajoute-t-elle. Pour elle, comme pour toutes les personnes présentes, le Black Economic Empowerment, cette forme de discrimination positive à l’emploi pour corriger les inégalités du passé, est perçu comme une injustice.

Les quatre millions de Blancs sud-africains représentent un peu moins de 8 % de la population du pays. Statistiquement, ils ne sont pas à plaindre. Un ménage blanc gagne en moyenne six fois plus qu’une famille noire. Malgré les politiques mises en place, les Sud-Africains blancs continuent d’avoir un meilleur accès à l’éducation et à l’emploi. Le chômage touche plus de 25 % de la population noire, contre environ 5 % chez les Blancs. Les postes à responsabilité sont toujours détenus à près de 80 % par des Blancs.

La population noire est aussi la première victime de la criminalité. Selon les statistiques de la police, plus de 85 % des victimes de meurtres sont noires et moins de 2 % blanches. " Peut-être souffrent-ils aussi de la violence , reconnaît Sunette Bridges. Mais ils ne sont pas abattus par des Blancs. Pourquoi alors les Noirs viennent-ils nous tuer alors que nous les laissons en paix ?"

La peur ne s’explique pas avec des statistiques. Les meurtres, souvent très violents, de fermiers blancs choquent. Et la crainte d’être le prochain Zimbabwe, d’où les anciens colons ont été expulsés de leurs propriétés, reste ancrée. Elle a été ravivée par les récentes provocations de Julius Malema, ancien leader des Jeunes de l’ANC (le parti au pouvoir), appelant à une nationalisation sans compensation des terres et des mines.

La campagne "Red October", si elle a attiré pas mal d’attention, n’a reçu que relativement peu de soutien. A Pretoria, la manifestation a rassemblé moins de 400 personnes. Sur les réseaux sociaux, beaucoup parmi les Sud-Africains blancs, ont tenu à se distancer des propos tenus par le mouvement. Et Trevor Noah, un célèbre humoriste sud-africain qui se délecte souvent des contradictions de l’Afrique du Sud post-apartheid, affirme sur son compte Twitter : "En tant que Sud-Africains, nous devrions protester contre TOUTE forme de crime et de corruption. Ces problèmes nous touchent TOUS de manière égale."

Voir enfin:

Nelson Mandela : l’icône et le néant

Communiqué de Bernard Lugan[1]

6 décembre 2013

Né le 18 juillet 1918 dans l’ancien Transkei, mort le 5 décembre 2013, Nelson Mandela ne ressemblait pas à la pieuse image que le politiquement correct planétaire donne aujourd’hui de lui. Par delà les émois lénifiants et les hommages hypocrites, il importe de ne jamais perdre de vue les éléments suivants :

1) Aristocrate xhosa issu de la lignée royale des Thembu, Nelson Mandela n’était pas un « pauvre noir opprimé ». Eduqué à l’européenne par des missionnaires méthodistes, il commença ses études supérieures à Fort Hare, université destinée aux enfants des élites noires, avant de les achever à Witwatersrand, au Transvaal, au cœur de ce qui était alors le « pays boer ». Il s’installa ensuite comme avocat à Johannesburg.

2) Il n’était pas non plus ce gentil réformiste que la mièvrerie médiatique se plait à dépeindre en « archange de la paix » luttant pour les droits de l’homme, tel un nouveau Gandhi ou un nouveau Martin Luther King. Nelson Mandela fut en effet et avant tout un révolutionnaire, un combattant, un militant qui mit « sa peau au bout de ses idées », n’hésitant pas à faire couler le sang des autres et à risquer le sien.

Il fut ainsi l’un des fondateurs de l’Umkonto We Sizwe, « le fer de lance de la nation », aile militaire de l’ANC, qu’il co-dirigea avec le communiste Joe Slovo, planifiant et coordonnant plus de 200 attentats et sabotages pour lesquels il fut condamné à la prison à vie.

3) Il n’était pas davantage l’homme qui permit une transmission pacifique du pouvoir de la « minorité blanche » à la « majorité noire », évitant ainsi un bain de sang à l’Afrique du Sud. La vérité est qu’il fut hissé au pouvoir par un président De Klerk appliquant à la lettre le plan de règlement global de la question de l’Afrique australe décidé par Washington. Trahissant toutes les promesses faites à son peuple, ce dernier :

- désintégra une armée sud-africaine que l’ANC n’était pas en mesure d’affronter,

- empêcha la réalisation d’un Etat multiracial décentralisé, alternative fédérale au jacobinisme marxiste et dogmatique de l’ANC,

- torpilla les négociations secrètes menées entre Thabo Mbeki et les généraux sud-africains, négociations qui portaient sur la reconnaissance par l’ANC d’un Volkstaat en échange de l’abandon de l’option militaire par le général Viljoen[2].

4) Nelson Mandela n’a pas permis aux fontaines sud-africaines de laisser couler le lait et le miel car l’échec économique est aujourd’hui total. Selon le Rapport Economique sur l’Afrique pour l’année 2013, rédigé par la Commission économique de l’Afrique (ONU) et l’Union africaine (en ligne), pour la période 2008-2012, l’Afrique du Sud s’est ainsi classée parmi les 5 pays « les moins performants » du continent sur la base de la croissance moyenne annuelle, devançant à peine les Comores, Madagascar, le Soudan et le Swaziland (page 29 du rapport).

Le chômage touchait selon les chiffres officiels 25,6% de la population active au second trimestre 2013, mais en réalité environ 40% des actifs. Quant au revenu de la tranche la plus démunie de la population noire, soit plus de 40% des Sud-africains, il est aujourd’hui inférieur de près de 50% à celui qu’il était sous le régime blanc d’avant 1994[3]. En 2013, près de 17 millions de Noirs sur une population de 51 millions d’habitants, ne survécurent que grâce aux aides sociales, ou Social Grant, qui leur garantit le minimum vital.

5) Nelson Mandela a également échoué politiquement car l’ANC connaît de graves tensions multiformes entre Xhosa et Zulu, entre doctrinaires post marxistes et « gestionnaires » capitalistes, entre africanistes et partisans d’une ligne « multiraciale ». Un conflit de génération oppose également la vieille garde composée de « Black Englishmen», aux jeunes loups qui prônent une « libération raciale » et la spoliation des fermiers blancs, comme au Zimbabwe.

6) Nelson Mandela n’a pas davantage pacifié l’Afrique du Sud, pays aujourd’hui livré à la loi de la jungle avec une moyenne de 43 meurtres quotidiens.

7) Nelson Mandela n’a pas apaisé les rapports inter-raciaux. Ainsi, entre 1970 et 1994, en 24 ans, alors que l’ANC était "en guerre" contre le « gouvernement blanc », une soixantaine de fermiers blancs furent tués. Depuis avril 1994, date de l’arrivée au pouvoir de Nelson Mandela, plus de 2000 fermiers blancs ont été massacrés dans l’indifférence la plus totale des médias européens.

8) Enfin, le mythe de la « nation arc-en-ciel » s’est brisé sur les réalités régionales et ethno-raciales, le pays étant plus divisé et plus cloisonné que jamais, phénomène qui apparaît au grand jour lors de chaque élection à l’occasion desquelles le vote est clairement « racial », les Noirs votant pour l’ANC, les Blancs et les métis pour l’Alliance démocratique.

En moins de deux décennies, Nelson Mandela, président de la République du 10 mai 1994 au 14 juin 1999, puis ses successeurs, Thabo Mbeki (1999-2008) et Jacob Zuma (depuis 2009), ont transformé un pays qui fut un temps une excroissance de l’Europe à l’extrémité australe du continent africain, en un Etat du « tiers-monde » dérivant dans un océan de pénuries, de corruption, de misère sociale et de violences, réalité en partie masquée par quelques secteurs ultraperformants, mais de plus en plus réduits, le plus souvent dirigés par des Blancs.

Pouvait-il en être autrement quand l’idéologie officielle repose sur ce refus du réel qu’est le mythe de la « nation arc-en-ciel » ? Ce « miroir aux alouettes » destiné à la niaiserie occidentale interdit en effet de voir que l’Afrique du Sud ne constitue pas une Nation mais une mosaïque de peuples rassemblés par le colonisateur britannique, peuples dont les références culturelles sont étrangères, et même souvent irréductibles, les unes aux autres.

Le culte planétaire quasi religieux aujourd’hui rendu à Nelson Mandela, le dithyrambe outrancier chanté par des hommes politiques opportunistes et des journalistes incultes ou formatés ne changeront rien à cette réalité.

[1] La véritable biographie de Nelson Mandela sera faite dans le prochain numéro de l’Afrique Réelle qui sera envoyé aux abonnés au début du mois de janvier 2014.

[2] Voir mes entretiens exclusifs avec les généraux Viljoen et Groenewald publiés dans le numéro de juillet 2013 de l’Afrique réelle http://www.bernard-lugan.com

[3] Institut Stats SA .

Voir par ailleurs:

Arafat’s Death and the Polonium Mystery

A twist in the tale seems to debunk the poisoning theory. But even an earlier suspicious finding may have had a less than sinister explanation.

Edward Jay Epstein

The Wall Street Journal

Dec. 3, 2013

The mystery over the death of Yasser Arafat deepened on Tuesday, when the results from a French forensic lab that had tested his remains were leaked. Last month, a Swiss lab reported finding evidence of polonium in Arafat’s body fluids and saliva—buttressing claims by the Palestinian Authority since his death in 2004 that the Palestinian leader had been poisoned. A later Russian forensic examination was reportedly inconclusive.

Now the French have found no evidence that polonium caused his death, attributing Arafat’s demise to natural causes, according to Reuters. His widow, Suha Arafat, told reporters in Paris that she was "upset by these contradictions." But Mrs. Arafat’s own lawyer and a Palestinian Authority official dismissed the report, signaling yet more chapters to come in the posthumous Arafat saga.

Arafat died from a hemorrhagic cerebrovascular failure at age 75 on Nov. 11, 2004, at the Percy Military Hospital in Clamart, France. He had become violently ill in his compound in Ramallah on the West Bank one month earlier.

He was flown to France for treatment and examined by teams of French, Swiss and Tunisian doctors. While family members prohibited an autopsy, hospital officials found, according to a report leaked to the French journal Canard Enchaine, lesions of Arafat’s liver which indicated cirrhosis, a condition often associated with alcohol consumption.

Since alcohol use is not condoned in Arafat’s Muslim religion, such a medical finding could mar his image. In any case, at the request of Palestinian officials, his 558-page medical record was sealed and turned over to his family.

But the cause of his death remained a subject of continuing speculation with Suha Arafat asserting that he had been murdered. To support this charge, she asked scientists at the Institute of Radiation Physics in Lausanne, Switzerland, to examine the contents of a gym bag, which contained the clothing and sneakers Arafat wore at the time of his illness, as well as his tooth brush.

Institute scientists found traces of polonium—specifically polonium 210, an extremely rare radioactive isotope that can be lethal if ingested—on the contents of the gym bag. Because it emits a steady stream of alpha particles as it

decays, one of polonium’s principal uses is to trigger the detonation of early-stage nuclear weapons. Since detection of the isotope can be a sign of clandestine nuclear bomb-building, its distribution is closely monitored.

At the time of Arafat’s death, only five individuals were known to have been contaminated by lethal doses of polonium—all of them scientists accidentally exposed to it through their work. But Arafat was not known to have visited any facilities where could have accidentally come into contact with the substance.

After the Institute of Radiation Physics report, Suha Arafat authorized the exhumation of Arafat’s body from its grave in Ramallah. Different parts of his remains were sent for analysis to forensic labs in France, Russia and Switzerland. On Nov. 5, the University Center of Legal Medicine in Lausanne reported that Arafat’s saliva (taken from his tooth brush), blood and other body fluids had abnormally high levels of polonium. If so, Arafat had been exposed to a substantial amount of the isotope before his death.

There are at least three different theories that might account for how Arafat might have come in contact with polonium 210. The first theory, and the one that has attracted the most attention, was that he was poisoned by his enemies. Suha Arafat accused the Israel intelligence service Mossad of killing her husband by adding polonium to his food or beverages.

There is no doubt that Israel has produced a supply of polonium for its nuclear program. Droh Sadeh, an Israeli physicist at the Weizmann Institute in Tel Aviv, died from accidental exposure to the isotope in the late 1950s. But the drawback is that there is no medical evidence that Arafat died of radiation poisoning.

Polonium 210, because it emits alpha particles that do not penetrate the skin, can contaminate individuals without causing medical harm. To result in radiation poisoning, it must be ingested, and, if that occurs—as happened in the 2006 death of Alexander Litvinenko, an ex-KGB officer, in London—there are observable symptoms, such as hair loss and skin discoloration. But Arafat did not exhibit any symptoms of radiation poisoning to the teams of medical specialists who examined him before his death.

In addition, a review of Arafat’s sealed medical records by forensic scientists and doctors at the Institute of Radiation Physics in Lausanne showed that the "symptoms described in Arafat’s medical reports were not consistent with polonium-210." If the medical evidence is to be believed, Arafat did not die from any contact he may have had with polonium.

So what accounts for the polonium 210 signature that the Swiss researchers said they found on Arafat’s person and clothing?

A second theory is that Arafat’s headquarters in Ramallah had been contaminated by a surreptitious listening device planted by an adversary intelligence service. Polonium 210 can be used as a source of energy for an electronic device, such as a transmitter—just one gram can produce 140 watts of power. Such an alternative use of polonium 210 was claimed by Iran when it was questioned by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2001 about the isotope found on Iranian gear. Iran said that it had produced the polonium to power instruments on a space craft (even though Iran did not have a space program).

Since polonium 210 generates pressure as it decays, it can also leak from its container and, attaching itself to dust, contaminate a large area. So it is possible that Arafat was accidentally contaminated—in a detectable but not fatal way—as the result of an espionage operation.

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303562904579227942815253368 12/7/2013

Edward Jay Epstein: Arafat’s Death and the Polonium Mystery – WSJ.com Page 3 of 3

A third possibility is that the polonium 210 came from North Korea, which had been acquiring the material in 2004 in preparation for nuclear tests. Yasser Arafat, designated a "Hero" of North Korea by President Kim Il Sung in 1981, made six trips to North Korea, and Arafat’s associates received covert military assistance from the regime. Such trafficking might have brought members of Arafat’s entourage in contact with polonium 210.

There are no doubt other ways in which Yasser Arafat’s quarters could have been tainted by polonium. But however the contamination might have happened, there is no reason to conclude that it was the result of a murder plot. The news on Tuesday threw more cold water on an already implausible theory.

Mr. Epstein’s most recent book is "The Annals of Unsolved Crime" (Melville House, 2013).

COMPLEMENT:

What Nelson Mandela can teach us all about violence

Mandela was a great man. He was also a violent man. Ignoring that fact does him no justice

Natasha Lennard

Salon

Dec 8, 2013

When journalist and commentator Chris Hedges decried “violent” anarchists as a “cancer” in the Occupy movement, the violence he had in mind amounted to little more than a few smashed commercial windows.

Ample digital ink has been spilled in the last day by smart observers urging against the whitewashing of Nelson Mandela’s past. In the eyes of his fervid opponents, and many of his fervent supporters, Madiba was a radical, and a violent one. Compared to the militant actions Mandela would countenance and support from his African National Congress, what gets deemed “violent” or “militant” in the U.S. today is both laughable and problematic. On the occasion of the death of a great and violent man, it seems worthwhile to discuss what does and does not get deemed “violent” — and by who, where and when.

It’s beyond the purview of these paragraphs — and to be honest, I’m tired of the hackneyed polemic — to address whether violence, especially politically motivated violence, is ever justifiable or commendable. Instead, I’ll simply posit that violence is itself a moving goalpost. In the contested terrain of political struggles, however, it’s safe to say that any acts posing a threat (existential, ideological and wherever the twain meet) to a ruling status quo will be deemed violent. Even an act as minimal as a smashed Starbucks window can pass muster here — spidering cracked glass serves as reminder to those who might notice: “We do not consent to a gleaming patina; shit’s fucked up and bullshit.”

But I’m not going to weigh in on the ethics of revolutionary violence. To do so would miss how the concept of violence operates in our society: We erroneously isolate certain acts to deem “violent” or “nonviolent” — then “justifiably violent” or not, and so on — and in so doing we miss that there’s never a singular “violence”: there’s an ongoing dialectic of violent and counter-violent acts.

It’s within such a dialectic that we understand Mandela’s support of violence. His relationship to armed and violent struggle is nuanced and certainly not unique to him. He knew counter-violence was necessary in his violent context. He has also expressed that he and his ANC comrades prioritized the reduction of harm to human bodies. For Mandela, violence was a tactic. As Christopher Dickey noted, “when it came to the use of violence, as with so much else in his life, Mandela opted for pragmatism over ideology.”

Mandela’s own explanation of the his group’s approach to militant tactics was nuanced, highlighting again that violence is not one stable category:

We considered four types of violent activities — sabotage, guerrilla warfare, terrorism, and open revolution. For a small and fledgling army, open revolution was inconceivable. Terrorism inevitably reflected poorly on those who used it, undermining any public support it might otherwise garner. Guerrilla warfare was a possibility, but since the ANC had been reluctant to embrace violence at all, it made sense to start with the form of violence that inflicted the least harm against individuals.

Crucially, Mandela was open to escalation to terror tactics and guerrilla war. The ANC’s 1982 attack of the Koeberg nuclear plant — yes, crucial infrastructure — killed 19 people. Unsurprisingly, the ANC was listed as a terrorist organization by the United States. Mandela himself was on a U.S. terror watch list until 2008. But now he is dead and the work of historicizing is well underway. Attempts, notably by white liberals, to enshrine Mandela as a peaceful freedom fighter do no justice to his actual fight. Musa Okwanga has put it best:

You will try to smooth him, to sandblast him, to take away his Malcolm X. You will try to hide his anger from view. Right now, you are anxiously pacing the corridors of your condos and country estates, looking for the right words, the right tributes, the right-wing tributes. You will say that Mandela was not about race. You will say that Mandela was not about politics. You will say that Mandela was about nothing but one love, you will try to reduce him to a lilting reggae tune. “Let’s get together, and feel alright.” Yes, you will do that.

He could go on: Yes, you will do that, and even as you offer up paeans sanitizing Madiba, you will sit back and watch as young blackness continues to be treated as a crime in U.S. cities. You will decry the flash riots in London and the streets of East Flatbush, as young, unarmed black men are shot by police. You will see violence only as you choose to, and often without thinking.

The deifying and sanitizing of Mandela reflects an all-too prevalent “Not In My Backyard” (NIMBY) mentality, often adopted by the white liberal commentariat. (The ass-backwards, explicitly racist opinions of the right-wing are not my focus here. Take it as read: they suck.) My friend Lorenzo Raymond has written about what he calls the “Nonviolent In My Backyard” tract of NIMBY — a position occupied by Chris Hedges among others. As Raymond noted of this sort of NIMBY liberal, “Yes, of course, they celebrate militant, spontaneous, non-bureaucratic grassroots uprisings outside of U.S. borders, even if they’re as physically close as Oaxaca or politically close as London. But as soon as the insurrection gets to their neck of the woods, suddenly we must have everything in triplicate, blessed by the elders, and executed quietly and even ‘neatly.’”

The parameters, by NIMBY reasoning, of acceptable or justified radical violence expand as the struggles in question are grow farther from U.S. soil, and when the event is separated by years and decades. We imprison today’s whistle-blowers and canonize yesterday’s insurrectionists. But (and here’s the trick) the ability to do so is premised on the belief (even a tacit one) that our current context is not so bad, but dissent, militancy and violence is fine there and then — just Not In My Backyard.

NIMBY liberalism rejects the background violence of its own context — the structural racism, the inequality, the totalized surveillance, the engorged prisons, the brutal police, the patriarchy, the poverty, the pain. A smashed window, a looted store, a dented cop car can be read as “violent” now only because a certain NIMBYism fails to see such (small) acts as counter-violent responses to ubiquitous violence. Heroic and necessary violence is reserved for distant lands and completed revolutions.

We see this sort of logic writ large in War on Terror ideology. In a fear-mongering propaganda segment on last week’s Sunday morning talk shows, Senate Intelligence Committee chair Dianne Feinstein and her House counterpart Mike Rogers warned viewers that terrorism is on the rise. “There are new bombs, very big bombs…There are more groups than ever. And there is huge malevolence out there”, said Feinstein. As I commented at the time, in describing rage at the U.S. as contentless “malevolence,” Feinstein tacitly rejects that the anger and radicalization may be grounded in responses to U.S. violence. Similarly, when British Prime Minister David Cameron described the events of the 2011 London riots as “criminality pure and simple,” he ignored the context which gave rise to the rage — the racist policing and widespread inequality highlighted by the London School of Economics and the Guardian in their study of the riots (and well-known by anyone paying attention to their social context).

I’m not suggesting for a second that the contemporary U.S. or U.K. should be compared to apartheid South Africa. I’m noting only that the treatment — either the validation or the whitewashing — of Mandela’s violent militancy is significant, nay crucial, at this current moment when even low-level dissent and property damage is decried and dismissed as violence, pure and simple. Mandela’s story should remind us that there’s nothing simple nor pure about violence.

Natasha Lennard

Natasha Lennard is an assistant news editor at Salon, covering non-electoral politics, general news and rabble-rousing. Follow her on Twitter @natashalennard, email nlennard@salon.com.


Apocalypse: Et si le christianisme était bien la source de tous nos maux ? (Think not that I am come to send peace on earth)

16 juillet, 2013
http://thepeoplescube.com/images/events/2007.09.24_Ajad_Rally/MushroomCloud2.jpgPhoto : OUT OF THE MOUTH OF BABES ? (nice change anyway from the usual Koran's recitations)Have ye never read, Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings thou hast perfected praise?Jesus (Matthew 21: 16) I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes.Jesus (Matthew 11: 25Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine enemies, that thou mightest still the enemy and the avenger.Psalms 8: 2For example, they say women are equal to men in all matters except in matters that contradict islamic law. But then islamic laws allows men to discipline their wives.  (...) It's outrageous:  I can't beat up my wife and almost kill her and then tell you this is discipline. This is not discipline: this is abuse and insanity. Ali  Ahmed (12-year-old Egyptian, with due minder in back, Cairo, Oct 19, 2012)http://freearabs.com/index.php/politics/73-video-gallery/400-jb-span-egypt-jb-span-the-next-presidentNe croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Vous entendrez parler de guerres et de bruits de guerres: gardez-vous d’être troublés, car il faut que ces choses arrivent. Mais ce ne sera pas encore la fin. Une nation s’élèvera contre une nation, et un royaume contre un royaume, et il y aura, en divers lieux, des famines et des tremblements de terre. Tout cela ne sera que le commencement des douleurs. Alors on vous livrera aux tourments, et l’on vous fera mourir; et vous serez haïs de toutes les nations, à cause de mon nom. Jésus (Matt. 24: 6-9)
Je te loue, Père, Seigneur du ciel et de la terre, de ce que tu as caché ces choses aux sages et aux intelligents, et de ce que tu les as révélées aux enfants. Jésus (Matthieu 11: 25)
Nous prêchons la sagesse de Dieu, mystérieuse et cachée, que Dieu, avant les siècles, avait destinée pour notre gloire, sagesse qu’aucun des chefs de ce siècle n’a connue, car, s’ils l’eussent connue, ils n’auraient pas crucifié le Seigneur de gloire. Paul (1 Corinthiens 2, 6-8)
Par exemple, ils disent que les femmes sont les égales des hommes dans tous les domaines, sauf dans les cas qui contredisent la loi islamique. Mais alors la loi islamique permet aux hommes de discipliner leurs épouses. C’est scandaleux : je ne peux pas battre et presque tuer ma femme et ensuite vous dire qu’il s’agit de discipline. Ce n’est pas de la discipline : c’est de l’abus et de la folie. Ali Ahmed (écolier de 12 ans, Le Caire, 19 octobre 2012)
La nature d’une civilisation, c’est ce qui s’agrège autour d’une religion. Notre civilisation est incapable de construire un temple ou un tombeau. Elle sera contrainte de trouver sa valeur fondamentale, ou elle se décomposera. C’est le grand phénomène de notre époque que la violence de la poussée islamique. Sous-estimée par la plupart de nos contemporains, cette montée de l’islam est analogiquement comparable aux débuts du communisme du temps de Lénine. Les conséquences de ce phénomène sont encore imprévisibles. A l’origine de la révolution marxiste, on croyait pouvoir endiguer le courant par des solutions partielles. Ni le christianisme, ni les organisations patronales ou ouvrières n’ont trouvé la réponse. De même aujourd’hui, le monde occidental ne semble guère préparé à affronter le problème de l’islam. En théorie, la solution paraît d’ailleurs extrêmement difficile. Peut-être serait-elle possible en pratique si, pour nous borner à l’aspect français de la question, celle-ci était pensée et appliquée par un véritable homme d’Etat. Les données actuelles du problème portent à croire que des formes variées de dictature musulmane vont s’établir successivement à travers le monde arabe. Quand je dis «musulmane» je pense moins aux structures religieuses qu’aux structures temporelles découlant de la doctrine de Mahomet. Dès maintenant, le sultan du Maroc est dépassé et Bourguiba ne conservera le pouvoir qu’en devenant une sorte de dictateur. Peut-être des solutions partielles auraient-elles suffi à endiguer le courant de l’islam, si elles avaient été appliquées à temps. Actuellement, il est trop tard ! Les «misérables» ont d’ailleurs peu à perdre. Ils préféreront conserver leur misère à l’intérieur d’une communauté musulmane. Leur sort sans doute restera inchangé. Nous avons d’eux une conception trop occidentale. Aux bienfaits que nous prétendons pouvoir leur apporter, ils préféreront l’avenir de leur race. L’Afrique noire ne restera pas longtemps insensible à ce processus. Tout ce que nous pouvons faire, c’est prendre conscience de la gravité du phénomène et tenter d’en retarder l’évolution. André Malraux (1956)
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère "post-chrétienne" est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en "radicalisant" le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste , en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Ceux qui considèrent l’hébraïsme et le christianisme comme des religions du bouc émissaire parce qu’elles le rendent visible font comme s’ils punissaient l’ambassadeur en raison du message qu’il apporte. René Girard
Il y a deux grandes attitudes à mon avis dans l’histoire humaine, il y a celle de la mythologie qui s’efforce de dissimuler la violence, car, en dernière analyse, c’est sur la violence injuste que les communautés humaines reposent. (…) Cette attitude est trop universelle pour être condamnée. C’est l’attitude d’ailleurs des plus grands philosophes grecs et en particulier de Platon, qui condamne Homère et tous les poètes parce qu’ils se permettent de décrire dans leurs oeuvres les violences attribuées par les mythes aux dieux de la cité. Le grand philosophe voit dans cette audacieuse révélation une source de désordre, un péril majeur pour toute la société. Cette attitude est certainement l’attitude religieuse la plus répandue, la plus normale, la plus naturelle à l’homme et, de nos jours, elle est plus universelle que jamais, car les croyants modernisés, aussi bien les chrétiens que les juifs, l’ont au moins partiellement adoptée. L’autre attitude est beaucoup plus rare et elle est même unique au monde. Elle est réservée tout entière aux grands moments de l’inspiration biblique et chrétienne. Elle consiste non pas à pudiquement dissimuler mais, au contraire, à révéler la violence dans toute son injustice et son mensonge, partout où il est possible de la repérer. C’est l’attitude du Livre de Job et c’est l’attitude des Evangiles. C’est la plus audacieuse des deux et, à mon avis, c’est la plus grande. C’est l’attitude qui nous a permis de découvrir l’innocence de la plupart des victimes que même les hommes les plus religieux, au cours de leur histoire, n’ont jamais cessé de massacrer et de persécuter. C’est là qu’est l’inspiration commune au judaïsme et au christianisme, et c’est la clef, il faut l’espérer, de leur réconciliation future. C’est la tendance héroïque à mettre la vérité au-dessus même de l’ordre social. René Girard
Et immédiatement, le centre sacrificiel se mit à générer des réactions habituelles : un sentiment d’unanimité et de deuil. […] Des phrases ont commencé à se dire comme « Nous sommes tous Américains » – un sentiment purement fictif pour la plupart d’entre nous. Ce fut étonnant de voir l’unité se former autour du centre sacré, rapidement nommé Ground Zero, une unité qui se concrétisera ensuite par un drapeau, une grande participation aux cérémonies religieuses, les chefs religieux soudainement pris au sérieux, des bougies, des lieux saints, des prières, tous les signes de la religion de la mort. […] Et puis il y avait le deuil. Comme nous aimons le deuil ! Cela nous donne bonne conscience, nous rend innocents. Voilà ce qu’Aristote voulait dire par katharsis, et qui a des échos profonds dans les racines sacrificielles de la tragédie dramatique. Autour du centre sacrificiel, les personnes présentes se sentent justifiées et moralement bonnes. Une fausse bonté qui soudainement les sort de leurs petites trahisons, leurs lâchetés, leur mauvaise conscience. James Alison
Un des grands problèmes de la Russie – et plus encore de la Chine – est que, contrairement aux camps de concentration hitlériens, les leurs n’ont jamais été libérés et qu’il n’y a eu aucun tribunal de Nuremberg pour juger les crimes commis. Thérèse Delpech
Je crois aux principes affirmés à Nuremberg en 1945 : ’Les individus ont des devoirs internationaux qui transcendent les obligations nationales d’obéissance. Par conséquent, les citoyens ont à titre privé le devoir de violer les lois domestiques pour empêcher des crimes contre la paix et l’humanité d’avoir lieu.’ Edward Snowden
S’il veut rester ici, la condition, c’est qu’il cesse ses activités visant à faire du tort à nos partenaires américains, peu importe que cela puisse paraître étrange venant de ma part. Vladimir Poutine
Selon l’anthropologue René Girard, les sociétés humaines seraient, depuis la nuit des temps, fondées sur un mécanisme sacrificiel qui aurait permis d’assurer la cohésion du groupe en canalisant sa violence contre une victime, accusée de tous les maux, et dont l’immolation rituelle ramènerait la paix dans le groupe, pour autant que le mécanisme en question reste méconnu et que personne ne reconnaisse un « bouc émissaire ». Nous sommes les dignes héritiers de ces sociétés sacrificielles au sens où nous sommes tout autant portés à ces consensus accusateurs. La seule différence, mais elle est de taille, c’est que nous avons progressivement acquis la capacité à reconnaître l’existence de boucs émissaires, c’est-à-dire de victimes chargées d’une culpabilité qui n’est pas la leur dans le but de réconcilier le groupe. Cette capacité est précisément ce qui fait dérailler le processus sacrificiel car, en reconnaissant l’accusé comme victime, en n’acceptant pas l’accusation dont il fait l’objet et, en étant, en quelque sorte, témoins de son innocence, nous empêchons le consensus de se former. Lorsque l’accusation n’est pas unanime, lorsque certains se solidarisent avec la victime, la violence ne peut plus être expulsée par la mise à mort, elle reste dans le groupe. Le mécanisme sacrificiel ne peut s’accomplir et les accusés nous apparaissent alors pour ce qu’ils sont, des victimes, des boucs émissaires destinés à rassembler ou à mobiliser une communauté en détournant son attention des véritables coupables. Par exemple, l’historien Tacite raconte qu’en l’an 64 de notre ère, pour se défendre de la rumeur qui le rendait responsable de l’incendie de Rome, l’empereur Néron aurait accusé les chrétiens qui ont alors été suppliciés par la population. À l’heure actuelle, nous reconnaissons aisément ces chrétiens comme les boucs émissaires de Néron et des Romains parce que nous n’adhérons pas aux accusations portées contre ce qui était alors une secte détestée « pour ses abominations… [et sa] … haine pour le genre humain. » Par contre, lorsque notre capacité de reconnaissance des boucs émissaires est prise en défaut, nous participons à une accusation qui nous semble légitime, parce que unanime. Dans ce cas, le mécanisme sacrificiel fonctionne comme il l’a toujours fait. Luc-Laurent Salvador
C’est le système protecteur des boucs émissaires que les récits de la Crucifixion finiront par détruire en révélant l’innocence de Jésus, et, de proche en proche, de toutes les victimes analogues. Le processus d’éducation hors des sacrifices violents est donc en train de s’accomplir, mais très lentement, de façon presque toujours inconsciente. René Girard
(Le 11 septembre,) je le vois comme un événement déterminant, et c’est très grave de le minimiser aujourd’hui. Le désir habituel d’être optimiste, de ne pas voir l’unicité de notre temps du point de vue de la violence, correspond à un désir futile et désespéré de penser notre temps comme la simple continuation de la violence du XXe siècle. . Je pense, personnellement, que nous avons affaire à une nouvelle dimension qui est mondiale. Ce que le communisme avait tenté de faire, une guerre vraiment mondiale, est maintenant réalisé, c’est l’actualité. Minimiser le 11 Septembre, c’est ne pas vouloir voir l’importance de cette nouvelle dimension. (…) Mais la menace actuelle va au-delà de la politique, puisqu’elle comporte un aspect religieux. Ainsi, l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir un conflit plus total que celui conçu par les peuples totalitaires, comme l’Allemagne nazie, et qui puisse devenir en quelque sorte la propriété de l’islam, est tout simplement stupéfiante, tellement contraire à ce que tout le monde croyait sur la politique. (…) Le problème religieux est plus radical dans la mesure où il dépasse les divisions idéologiques – que bien sûr, la plupart des intellectuels aujourd’hui ne sont pas prêts d’abandonner.(…) Il s’agit de notre incompréhension du rôle de la religion, et de notre propre monde ; c’est ne pas comprendre que ce qui nous unit est très fragile. Lorsque nous évoquons nos principes démocratiques, parlons-nous de l’égalité et des élections, ou bien parlons-nous de capitalisme, de consommation, de libre échange, etc. ? Je pense que dans les années à venir, l’Occident sera mis à l’épreuve. Comment réagira-t-il : avec force ou faiblesse ? Se dissoudra-t-il ? Les occidentaux devraient se poser la question de savoir s’ils ont de vrais principes, et si ceux-ci sont chrétiens ou bien purement consuméristes. Le consumérisme n’a pas d’emprise sur ceux qui se livrent aux attentats suicides. (…) Allah est contre le consumérisme, etc. En réalité, le musulman pense que les rituels de prohibition religieuse sont une force qui maintient l’unité de la communauté, ce qui a totalement disparu ou qui est en déclin en Occident. Les gens en Occident ne sont motivés que par le consumérisme, les bons salaires, etc. Les musulmans disent : « leurs armes sont terriblement dangereuses, mais comme peuple, ils sont tellement faibles que leur civilisation peut être facilement détruite".
L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment. Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. (..) le monde actuel (…) confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent.
(la Guerre Froide est) complètement dépassée. (…) Et la rapidité avec laquelle elle a été dépassée est incroyable. L’Union Soviétique a montré qu’elle devenait plus humaine lorsqu’elle n’a pas tenté de forcer le blocus de Kennedy, et à partir de cet instant, elle n’a plus fait peur. Après Khrouchtchev on a eu rapidement besoin de Gorbatchev. Quand Gorbatchev est arrivé au pouvoir, les oppositions ne se trouvaient plus à l’intérieur de l’humanisme. (…) Cela dit, de plus en plus de gens en Occident verront la faiblesse de notre humanisme ; nous n’allons pas redevenir chrétiens, mais on fera plus attention au fait que la lutte se trouve entre le christianisme et l’islam, plus qu’entre l’islam et l’humanisme. Avec l’islam je pense que l’opposition est totale. Dans l’islam, si l’on est violent, on est inévitablement l’instrument de Dieu. Cela veut donc dire que la violence apocalyptique vient de Dieu. Aux États-Unis, les fondamentalistes disent cela, mais les grandes églises ne le disent pas. Néanmoins, ils ne poussent pas suffisamment leur pensée pour dire que si la violence ne vient pas de Dieu, elle vient de l’homme, et que nous en sommes responsables. Nous acceptons de vivre sous la protection d’armes nucléaires. Cela a probablement été la plus grande erreur de l’Occident. Imaginez-vous les implications. (…) Nous croyons que la violence est garante de la paix. Mais cette hypothèse ne me paraît pas valable. Nous ne voulons pas aujourd’hui réfléchir à ce que signifie cette confiance dans la violence. Avec un autre événement tel que le 11 Septembre) Je pense que les gens deviendraient plus conscients. Mais cela serait probablement comme la première attaque. Il y aurait une période de grande tension spirituelle et intellectuelle, suivie d’un lent relâchement. Quand les gens ne veulent pas voir, ils y arrivent. Je pense qu’il y aura des révolutions spirituelles et intellectuelles dans un avenir proche. Ce que je dis aujourd’hui semble complètement invraisemblable, et pourtant je pense que le 11 Septembre va devenir de plus en plus significatif.  René Girard

Et si le christianisme était bien la source de tous nos maux ?

En ces temps étranges où, en une sorte de guerre froide à l’envers et à fronts renversés, l’ex-agent du KGB et maitre ès chaises musicales nous la joue dorénavant défenseur des libertés fondamentales …

Et où au centre du débat et sur fond d’une guerre plus féroce que jamais avec le terrorisme islamique, le nouveau Sakharov venu cette fois des Etats-Unis en appelle au principe de Nuremberg dont ni ses actuels hôtes russes ni leurs prédécésseurs chinois n’ont probablement jamais entendu parler …

Pendant que dans le Pays autoproclamé des droits de l’homme on accorde l’asile politique et un nouveau timbre à une tronçonneuse de croix aux seins nus et que ne reconnaissant plus leurs enfants, nombre de pays à majorité musulmane le font payer à leurs chrétiens

Retour, avec un entretien de 2007 de René Girard …

Sur la nouveauté proprement apocalyptique, post-11 septembre, de la situation actuelle …

Pourtant étrangement non repérée par athées autant que croyants …

Victimes convergentes, dans la logique du châtiment de l’ambassadeur pour le  message qu’il apporte, de la même illusion d’optique …

Les uns percevant bien les effets effectivement déstabilisateurs et source de violence du christianisme mais pour en faire le nouveau bouc émissaire mondial …

Alors que pointant les apports indéniablement libérateurs du christianisme mais aveugles à l’évidence d’une violence purement humaine et pour la première fois de portée proprement planétaire, les autres s’en remettent à l’annonce apocalyptique d’une violence divine …

La pensée apocalyptique après le 11 Septembre : entretien avec René Girard

Robert DORAN

Revue des Bernardins

28 janvier 2013

Cet entretien a eu lieu, en anglais, le 10 février 2007 au domicile américain de R. Girard à Stanford, en Californie. Complété par un bref entretien le 8 août 2007, au même endroit. Il a déjà été publié en anglais : "Apocalyptic Thinking after 9/11 : An Interview with René Girard", SubStance vol. 37, n° 1, Cultural Theory After 9/11 : Terror, Religion, Media (2008), p. 20-32.

Robert Doran : Peu de temps après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001, vous avez accordé une interview au Monde, où vous avez déclaré : « ce qui se joue aujourd’hui est une rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire [1] ». Cette observation paraît encore plus vraisemblable aujourd’hui. Les faits semblent démontrer une continuité et une intensification du conflit mimétique : les guerres en Irak et en Afghanistan ; les bombes dans les transports publics à Madrid et à Londres ; les voitures incendiées dans les banlieues parisiennes ne semblent pas sans rapport. Rétrospectivement, comment percevez-vous les événements du 11 Septembre ?

René Girard : Je pense que votre remarque est juste. Mais je voudrais commencer par faire quelques commentaires. J’ai l’impression que beaucoup de gens ont oublié le 11 Septembre – pas complètement, mais ils l’ont réduit à une espèce de norme tacite. Quand j’ai donné cet entretien au Monde, l’opinion générale pensait qu’il s’agissait d’un événement inhabituel, nouveau, et incomparable. Aujourd’hui, je pense que beaucoup de gens seraient en désaccord avec cette remarque. Malheureusement, l’attitude des Américains face au 11 Septembre a été influencée par l’idéologie politique, à cause de la guerre en Irak. Le fait d’insister sur le 11 Septembre est devenu « conservateur » et « alarmiste ». Ceux qui aimeraient mettre une fin immédiate à la guerre en Irak tendent donc à le minimiser. Cela dit, je ne veux pas dire qu’ils ont tort de vouloir terminer la guerre en Irak, mais avant de minimiser le 11 Septembre, ils devraient faire très attention et considérer la situation dans sa globalité. Aujourd’hui, cette tendance est très répandue, car les événements dont vous parlez – qui ont eu lieu après le 11 Septembre et qui en sont, en quelque sorte, de vagues réminiscences – sont incomparablement moins puissants et ont beaucoup moins de visibilité. Par conséquent, il y a tout le problème de l’interprétation : qu’est-ce que le 11 Septembre ?

RD : Vous voyez vous-même le 11 Septembre comme une sorte de rupture, un événement déterminant ?

RG : Oui, je le vois comme un événement déterminant, et c’est très grave de le minimiser aujourd’hui. Le désir habituel d’être optimiste, de ne pas voir l’unicité de notre temps du point de vue de la violence, correspond à un désir futile et désespéré de penser notre temps comme la simple continuation de la violence du XXe siècle. Je pense, personnellement, que nous avons affaire à une nouvelle dimension qui est mondiale. Ce que le communisme avait tenté de faire, une guerre vraiment mondiale, est maintenant réalisé, c’est l’actualité. Minimiser le 11 Septembre, c’est ne pas vouloir voir l’importance de cette nouvelle dimension.

RD : Vous venez de faire référence à la guerre froide. Comment comparez-vous les deux menaces envers l’Occident ?

RG : Les deux sont similaires dans la mesure où elles représentent une menace révolutionnaire, une menace globale. Mais la menace actuelle va au-delà de la politique, puisqu’elle comporte un aspect religieux. Ainsi, l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir un conflit plus total que celui conçu par les peuples totalitaires, comme l’Allemagne nazie, et qui puisse devenir en quelque sorte la propriété de l’islam, est tout simplement stupéfiante, tellement contraire à ce que tout le monde croyait sur la politique. Il faudrait beaucoup y travailler, car il n’y a pas de vraie réflexion sur la coexistence des autres religions, et en particulier du christianisme avec l’islam. Le problème religieux est plus radical dans la mesure où il dépasse les divisions idéologiques – que bien sûr, la plupart des intellectuels aujourd’hui ne sont pas prêts d’abandonner. En deçà de ces visions idéologiques, nos réflexions sur le 11 Septembre resteront superficielles. Nous devons réfléchir dans le contexte plus large de la dimension apocalyptique du christianisme. Celle-ci est une menace, car la survie même de la planète est en jeu. Notre planète est menacée par trois choses qui émanent de l’homme : la menace nucléaire, la menace écologique et la manipulation biologique de l’espèce humaine. L’idée que l’homme ne puisse pas maîtriser ses propres pouvoirs est aussi vraie dans le domaine biologique que dans le domaine militaire. C’est cette triple menace mondiale qui domine aujourd’hui.

RD : Je reviendrai à la dimension apocalyptique dans un instant. Dans un livre récent, Zbigniew Brzezinski (conseiller personnel du Président Carter pour la sécurité nationale) écrit que « derrière pratiquement chaque acte terroriste se cache un problème politique. […] Pour paraphraser Clausewitz, le terrorisme est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens [2] ». Le terrorisme n’est-il pas toujours en partie politique puisque, quelle qu’en soit la cible, il est finalement toujours orienté contre les gouvernements ?

RG : Le terrorisme est une forme de guerre, et la guerre est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens. En ce sens, le terrorisme est politique. Mais le terrorisme est la seule forme possible de guerre face à la technologie. Les événements actuels en Irak le confirment. La supériorité de l’Occident, c’est sa technologie, et elle s’est révélée inutile en Irak. L’Occident s’est mis dans la pire des situations en déclarant qu’il transformerait l’Irak en une démocratie jeffersonienne ! C’est précisément ce qu’il ne peut pas faire. Il est impuissant face à l’islam car la division entre les sunnites et les chiites est infiniment plus importante. Alors même qu’ils combattent l’Occident, ils parviennent encore à lutter l’un contre l’autre. Pourquoi l’Occident devraitil s’investir dans ce conflit interne à l’islam alors que nous ne parvenons même pas à en concevoir l’immense puissance au sein du monde islamique lui-même ?

RD : S’agirait-il de notre incompréhension face au rôle de la religion ?

RG : Il s’agit de notre incompréhension du rôle de la religion, et de notre propre monde ; c’est ne pas comprendre que ce qui nous unit est très fragile. Lorsque nous évoquons nos principes démocratiques, parlons-nous de l’égalité et des élections, ou bien parlons-nous de capitalisme, de consommation, de libre échange, etc. ? Je pense que dans les années à venir, l’Occident sera mis à l’épreuve. Comment réagira-t-il : avec force ou faiblesse ? Se dissoudra-t-il ? Les occidentaux devraient se poser la question de savoir s’ils ont de vrais principes, et si ceux-ci sont chrétiens ou bien purement consuméristes. Le consumérisme n’a pas d’emprise sur ceux qui se livrent aux attentats suicides. L’Amérique devrait y réfléchir, car elle offre au monde ce que l’on considère de plus attrayant. Pourquoi cela ne fonctionne- t-il pas vraiment chez les musulmans ? Est-ce par ressentiment ou ont-ils, contre cela, un système de défense bien organisé ? Ou bien, leur perspective religieuse est-elle plus authentique et plus puissante ? Le vrai problème est là.

RD : Votre interprétation d’origine était que le 11 Septembre était dû au ressentiment.

RG : Je suis bien moins affirmatif que je ne l’étais au moment du 11 Septembre sur l’idée d’un ressentiment total. Je me souviens m’être emporté lors d’une rencontre à l’École Polytechnique lorsque je me suis mis d’accord avec Jean-Pierre Dupuy sur l’interprétation du ressentiment du monde musulman. Maintenant, je ne pense pas que cela suffise. Le ressentiment seul peut-il motiver cette capacité de mourir ainsi ? Le monde musulman pourrait-il vraiment être indifférent à la culture de consommation de masse ? Peut-être qu’il l’est. Je ne sais pas. Il serait sans doute excessif de leur attribuer une telle envie. Si les islamistes ont vraiment pour objectif la domination du monde, alors ils l’ont déjà dépassée. Nous ne savons pas si l’industrialisation rapide apparaîtra dans le monde musulman, ou s’ils tenteront de gagner sur la croissance démographique et la fascination qu’ils exercent. Il y a de plus en plus de conversions en Occident. La fascination de la violence y joue certainement un rôle.

RD : Mais, selon votre pensée, l’interprétation sur le ressentiment semblait logique.

RG : Il y a là du ressentiment, évidemment. Et c’est ce qui a dû émouvoir ceux qui ont applaudi les terroristes, comme s’ils étaient dans un stade. C’est cela le ressentiment. C’est évident et indéniable. Mais est-ce qu’il représente l’unique force ? La force majeure ? Peut-il être l’unique cause des attentats suicides ? Je n’en suis pas sûr. La richesse accumulée en Occident, comparée au reste du monde, est un scandale, et le 11 Septembre n’est pas sans rapport avec ce fait. Si je ne veux donc pas complètement supprimer l’idée du ressentiment, il ne peut pas être l’unique explication.

RD : Et l’autre force ?

RG : L’autre force serait religieuse. Allah est contre le consumérisme, etc. En réalité, le musulman pense que les rituels de prohibition religieuse sont une force qui maintient l’unité de la communauté, ce qui a totalement disparu ou qui est en déclin en Occident. Les gens en Occident ne sont motivés que par le consumérisme, les bons salaires, etc. Les musulmans disent : « leurs armes sont terriblement dangereuses, mais comme peuple, ils sont tellement faibles que leur civilisation peut être facilement détruite ». C’est ce qu’ils pensent et ils n’ont peut-être pas complètement tort. Il me semble qu’il y a quelque chose de juste dans ce propos. Finalement, je crois que la perspective chrétienne sur la violence surmontera tout, mais ce sera une épreuve importante.

RD : Jean-Pierre Dupuy considère le 11 Septembre comme « un vrai sacrifice dans le sens anthropologique du terme [3] ». Le 11 Septembre peut-il être pensé selon une logique du sacrifice ?

RG : La réponse à cette question doit être prudente. Il faut faire attention à ne pas justifier le 11 Septembre en le qualifiant de sacrificiel. Je pense que Jean-Pierre Dupuy ne le dit pas. Il maintient une sorte de neutralité. Mais ce qu’il dit sur la nature sacrée de Ground Zero au World Trade Center est, je pense, parfaitement justifié. Je me permets de citer un essai pertinent de James Alison, qui a écrit :

Et immédiatement, le centre sacrificiel se mit à générer des réactions habituelles : un sentiment d’unanimité et de deuil. […] Des phrases ont commencé à se dire comme « Nous sommes tous Américains » – un sentiment purement fictif pour la plupart d’entre nous. Ce fut étonnant de voir l’unité se former autour du centre sacré, rapidement nommé Ground Zero, une unité qui se concrétisera ensuite par un drapeau, une grande participation aux cérémonies religieuses, les chefs religieux soudainement pris au sérieux, des bougies, des lieux saints, des prières, tous les signes de la religion de la mort. […] Et puis il y avait le deuil. Comme nous aimons le deuil ! Cela nous donne bonne conscience, nous rend innocents. Voilà ce qu’Aristote voulait dire par katharsis, et qui a des échos profonds dans les racines sacrificielles de la tragédie dramatique. Autour du centre sacrificiel, les personnes présentes se sentent justifiées et moralement bonnes. Une fausse bonté qui soudainement les sort de leurs petites trahisons, leurs lâchetés, leur mauvaise conscience [4].

Je pense que James Alison a raison de parler de la katharsis dans le contexte du 11 Septembre. La notion de katharsis est extrêmement importante. C’est un mot religieux. En réalité, cela veut dire « la purge » au sens de purification. Dans l’Église orthodoxe, par exemple, katharos veut dire purification. C’est le mot qui exprime l’effet positif de la religion. La purge est ce qui nous rend purs. C’est ce que la religion est censée faire, et ce qu’elle fait avec le sacrifice. Je considère l’utilisation du mot katharsis par Aristote comme parfaitement juste. Quand les gens condamnent la théorie mimétique, ils ne voient pas l’apport d’Aristote. Il ne semble parler que de tragédie, mais pourtant, le théâtre tragique traite du sacrifice comme un drame. On l’appelle d’ailleurs « l’ode de la chèvre [5] ». Aristote est toujours conventionnel dans ses explications – conventionnel au sens positif. Un Grec très intelligent cherchant à justifier sa religion, utiliserait, je pense, le mot katharsis. Ainsi, ma réponse mettrait l’accent sur la katharsis au sens aristotélicien du terme.

RD : La dimension spectaculaire du 11 Septembre fait certainement penser au théâtre. Mais le 11 Septembre, nous avons tous été témoins d’un événement réel.

RG : Oui, pour le 11 Septembre, il y avait la télévision qui nous rendait présents à l’événement, et intensifiait ainsi l’expérience. L’événement était en direct, comme nous le disons en français. On ne savait pas ce qui allait advenir par la suite. Moi-même, j’ai vu le deuxième avion frapper le gratte-ciel, en direct. C’était comme un spectacle tragique, mais réel en même temps. Si nous ne l’avions pas vécu dans le sens le plus littéral, il n’aurait pas eu le même impact. Je pense que si j’avais écrit La Violence et le Sacré après le 11 Septembre, j’y aurais très probablement inclus cet événement [6]. C’est l’événement qui rend possible une compréhension des événements contemporains, car il rend l’archaïque plus intelligible. Le 11 Septembre représente un étrange retour à l’archaïque à l’intérieur du sécularisme de notre temps. Il n’y a pas si longtemps, les gens auraient eu une réaction chrétienne vis-à-vis du 11 Septembre. Aujourd’hui, ils ont une réaction archaïque, qui augure mal de l’avenir.

RD : Revenons-en à la dimension apocalyptique. Votre pensée est généralement considérée comme pessimiste. Considérezvous le 11 Septembre comme une étape vers un avenir apocalyptique  ?

RG : L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment.

RD : Mais cette interprétation permet à la violence de continuer à un autre niveau.

RG : Oui, mais pas en tant que force religieuse. À la fin, la force religieuse est du côté du Christ. Cependant, il semblerait que la vraie force religieuse soit du côté de la violence.

RD : À quoi ressembleront les choses lorsque les puissances seront vaincues ?

RG : Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. Comment le monde peut-il finir alors qu’il est tenu si fortement par les forces de l’ordre ?

RD : La révélation chrétienne serait-elle ambivalente dans la mesure où elle a des conséquences positives et négatives ?

RG : Pourquoi négatives ? Fondamentalement, c’est la religion qui annonce le monde à venir ; il n’est pas question de se battre pour ce monde. C’est le christianisme moderne qui oublie ses origines et sa vraie direction. L’apocalypse au début du christianisme était une promesse, pas une menace, car ils croyaient vraiment en un monde prochain.

RD : Peut-on dire que vous êtes a priori pessimiste ?

RG : Je suis pessimiste au sens actuel du terme. Mais en fait, je suis optimiste si l’on regarde le monde actuel qui confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent.

RD : Ne pouvons-nous pas dire que nous avons fait un progrès moral ?

RG : Les deux sont possibles. Par exemple, nous avons moins de violence privée. Comparé à aujourd’hui, si vous regardez les statistiques du XVIIIe siècle, c’est impressionnant de voir la violence qu’il y avait.

RD : Je pensais plutôt à quelque chose comme le mouvement pacifiste, qui aurait été inconcevable ne serait-ce qu’il y a cent ans.

RG : Oui, le mouvement pacifiste est totalement chrétien, qu’il l’avoue ou non. Mais en même temps, il y a un déferlement d’inventions technologiques qui ne sont plus retenues par aucune force culturelle. Jacques Maritain disait qu’il y a à la fois plus de bien et plus de mal dans le monde. Je suis d’accord avec lui. Au fond, le monde est en permanence plus chrétien et moins chrétien. Mais le monde est fondamentalement désorganisé par le christianisme.

RD : Ce que vous dites est en opposition avec la perspective humaniste d’un Marcel Gauchet, qui dit que le christianisme est la religion de la sortie de la religion [7].

RG : Oui, la pensée de Marcel Gauchet résulte de toute l’interprétation moderne du christianisme. Nous disons que nous sommes les héritiers du christianisme, et que l’héritage du christianisme est l’humanisme. Cela est en partie vrai. Mais en même temps, Marcel Gauchet ne considère pas le monde dans sa globalité. On peut tout expliquer avec la théorie mimétique. Dans un monde qui paraît plus menaçant, il est certain que la religion reviendra. Le 11 Septembre est le début de cela, car lors de cette attaque, la technologie n’était pas utilisée à des fins humanistes mais à des fins radicales, métaphysico-religieuses non chrétiennes. Je trouve cela incroyable, car j’ai l’habitude d’observer les forces religieuses et humanistes ensemble, et non pas en opposition. Mais suite au 11 Septembre, j’ai eu l’impression que la religion archaïque revenait, avec l’islam, d’une manière extrêmement rigoureuse. L’islam a beaucoup d’aspects propres aux religions bibliques à l’exception de la compréhension de la violence comme un mal non pas divin mais humain. Il considère la violence comme totalement divine. C’est pour cela que l’opposition est plus significative qu’avec le communisme, qui est un humanisme même s’il est factice et erroné, et qu’il tourne à la terreur. Mais c’est toujours un humanisme. Et tout à coup, on revient à la religion, la religion archaïque – mais avec des armes modernes. Ce que le monde attend est le moment où les musulmans radicaux pourront d’une certaine manière se servir d’armes nucléaires. Il faut regarder le Pakistan, qui est une nation musulmane possédant des armes nucléaires et l’Iran qui tente de les développer.

RD : Ainsi, vous considérez la Guerre Froide comme étant dépassée à la fois en portée et en importance par le radicalisme islamique ?

RG : Complètement dépassée, oui. Et la rapidité avec laquelle elle a été dépassée est incroyable. L’Union Soviétique a montré qu’elle devenait plus humaine lorsqu’elle n’a pas tenté de forcer le blocus de Kennedy, et à partir de cet instant, elle n’a plus fait peur. Après Khrouchtchev on a eu rapidement besoin de Gorbatchev. Quand Gorbatchev est arrivé au pouvoir, les oppositions ne se trouvaient plus à l’intérieur de l’humanisme. Les communistes voulaient organiser le monde pour qu’il n’y ait plus de pauvres. Les capitalistes ont constaté que les pauvres n’avaient pas de poids. Les capitalistes l’ont emporté.

RD : Et ce conflit sera plus dangereux parce qu’il ne s’agit plus d’une lutte au sein de l’humanisme ?

RG : Oui, bien qu’ils n’aient pas les mêmes armes que l’Union Soviétique – du moins pas encore. Le monde change si rapidement. Cela dit, de plus en plus de gens en Occident verront la faiblesse de notre humanisme ; nous n’allons pas redevenir chrétiens, mais on fera plus attention au fait que la lutte se trouve entre le christianisme et l’islam, plus qu’entre l’islam et l’humanisme.

RD : Vous voulez dire un conflit entre une conscience de la violence comme étant humaine et une conscience de la violence comme divine ?

RG : Oui. Avec l’islam je pense que l’opposition est totale. Dans l’islam, si l’on est violent, on est inévitablement l’instrument de Dieu. Cela veut donc dire que la violence apocalyptique vient de Dieu. Aux États-Unis, les fondamentalistes disent cela, mais les grandes églises ne le disent pas. Néanmoins, ils ne poussent pas suffisamment leur pensée pour dire que si la violence ne vient pas de Dieu, elle vient de l’homme, et que nous en sommes responsables. Nous acceptons de vivre sous la protection d’armes nucléaires. Cela a probablement été la plus grande erreur de l’Occident. Imaginez-vous les implications.

RD : Vous faites référence ici à la logique du suicide mutuel (MAD : Mutual Assured Destruction).

RG : Oui, la dissuasion nucléaire. Mais il s’agit de faibles excuses. Nous croyons que la violence est garante de la paix. Mais cette hypothèse ne me paraît pas valable. Nous ne voulons pas aujourd’hui réfléchir à ce que signifie cette confiance dans la violence.

RD : Comment concevez-vous l’effet d’un autre événement tel que le 11 Septembre ?

RG : Je pense que les personnes deviendraient plus conscientes. Mais cela serait probablement comme la première attaque. Il y aurait une période de grande tension spirituelle et intellectuelle, suivie d’un lent relâchement. Quand les gens ne veulent pas voir, ils y arrivent. Je pense qu’il y aura des révolutions spirituelles et intellectuelles dans un avenir proche. Ce que je dis aujourd’hui semble complètement invraisemblable, et pourtant je pense que le 11 Septembre va devenir de plus en plus significatif.

RD : Votre vision du rôle de la violence dans le christianisme at- elle changé ?

RG : Il y a des erreurs dans Des Choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde [8]. le refus d’utiliser le mot sacrificiel dans un sens positif, par exemple. Il y a trop d’opposition entre le sacrificiel et le non-sacrificiel. Dans le christianisme, tous les actes sacrificiels sont censés éloigner la violence, pour que l’homme en finisse avec sa propre violence. Je pense que le christianisme authentique sépare complètement Dieu de la violence ; cependant, le rôle de la violence dans le christianisme est une question complexe.

RD : Lors de la parution des Choses cachées vous disiez que le christianisme était une religion non-sacrificielle.

RG : Le christianisme a toujours été sacrificiel. Il est vrai que j’ai donné trop d’importance à l’interprétation non sacrificielle, pour rester sur mes positions avant-gardistes. Je devais être contre l’Église d’une certaine manière. Cette attitude était naturelle, puisque toute ma formation pédagogique s’appuyait sur le surréalisme, l’existentialisme, qui sont tous des courants anti – chrétiens. C’était probablement une bonne chose, car le livre n’aurait sans doute pas eu le même succès.

RD : Et si vous aviez paru plus orthodoxe ?

RG : Si j’avais paru plus orthodoxe, on m’aurait immédiatement fait taire, par le silence des médias.

RD : Quel est votre point de vue actuel sur le sacrifice dans le christianisme ?

RG : Il faut distinguer entre le sacrifice des autres et le sacrifice de soi. Le Christ dit au Père : « Vous ne vouliez ni holocauste, ni sacrifice ; moi je dis : “Me voici” » (cf. He 10, 6-7). Autrement dit, je préfère me sacrifier plutôt que de sacrifier l’autre. Mais cela doit toujours être nommé sacrifice. Lorsque nous utilisons le mot « sacrifice » dans nos langues modernes, c’est dans le sens chrétien. Dieu dit : « Si personne d’autre n’est assez bon pour se sacrifier lui plutôt que son frère, je le ferai. » Ainsi, je satisfais à la demande de Dieu envers l’homme. Je préfère mourir plutôt que tuer. Mais tous les autres hommes préfèrent tuer plutôt que mourir.

RD : Qu’en est-il de l’idée du martyr ?

RG : Dans le christianisme, on ne se martyrise pas soi-même. On n’est pas volontaire pour se faire tuer. On se met dans une situation où le respect des préceptes de Dieu (tendre l’autre joue, etc.) peut nous faire tuer. Cela dit, on se fera tuer parce que les hommes veulent nous tuer, non pas parce qu’on s’est porté volontaire. Ce n’est pas comme la notion japonaise de kamikaze. La notion chrétienne signifie que l’on est prêt à mourir plutôt qu’à tuer. C’est bien l’attitude de la bonne prostituée face au jugement de Salomon. Elle dit : « Donnez l’enfant à mon ennemi plutôt que de le tuer. » Sacrifier son enfant serait comme se sacrifier elle-même, car en acceptant une sorte de mort, elle se sacrifie elle-même. Et lorsque Salomon dit qu’elle est la vraie mère, cela ne signifie pas qu’elle est la mère biologique, mais la mère selon l’esprit. Cette histoire se trouve dans le Premier Livre des Rois (3, 16-28), qui est, à certains égards, un livre assez violent. Mais il me semble qu’il n’y a pas de meilleur symbole préchrétien du sacrifice de soi par le Christ.

RD : Concevez-vous ceci en contraste avec le concept du martyr en Islam ?

RG : Je vois en cela le contraste du christianisme avec toutes les religions archaïques du sacrifice. Cela dit, la religion musulmane a beaucoup copié le christianisme et elle n’est donc pas ouvertement sacrificielle. Mais la religion musulmane n’a pas détruit le sacrifice de la religion archaïque comme l’a fait le christianisme. Bien des parties du monde musulman ont conservé le sacrifice prémusulman.

RD : Cependant le lynchage spontané dans le Sud des États-Unis n’était-il pas un exemple de sacrifice archaïque ?

RG : Oui, bien entendu. Il faut lire les romans de William Faulkner. Bien des gens croient que le sud des États-Unis est une incarnation du christianisme. Je dirais que le sud est sans doute la partie la moins chrétienne des États-Unis en termes d’esprit, bien qu’il en soit la plus chrétienne en termes de rituel. Il n’y a pas de doute que le christianisme médiéval était beaucoup plus proche du fondamentalisme actuel. Mais il y a beaucoup de manières de trahir une religion. En ce qui concerne le sud, cela est évident, car il y a un grand retour aux formes les plus archaïques de la religion. Il faut interpréter ces lynchages comme une forme d’acte religieux archaïque.

RD : Que pensez-vous de la façon dont les gens emploient le terme de « violence religieuse » ?

RG : Le terme de « violence religieuse » est souvent employé d’une manière qui ne m’aide pas à résoudre les problèmes que je me pose, à savoir ceux d’un rapport à la violence en mouvement constant et également historique.

RD : Serait-il juste de dire que selon votre pensée, toute violence religieuse est nécessairement archaïque ?

RG : Je dirais que toute violence religieuse implique un degré d’archaïsme. Mais certains points sont très compliqués. Par exemple, lors de la première guerre mondiale, est-ce que les soldats qui acceptaient d’être mobilisés pour mourir pour leur pays, et beaucoup au nom du christianisme, avaient une attitude vraiment chrétienne ? Il y a là quelque chose qui est contraire au christianisme. Mais il y a aussi quelque chose de vrai. Cela ne supprime pas, à mon avis, le fait qu’il y a une histoire de la violence religieuse, et que les religions, surtout le christianisme, au fond, sont continuellement influencées par cette histoire, bien que son influence soit, le plus souvent, pervertie.

Robert DORAN Traduit de l’anglais par Caroline VIAL, révisé par Sabine de BEAUGRENIER

[1] Entretien avec Henri Tincq, Le Monde, le 6 novembre 2001.

[2] Zbigniew BRZEZINSKI, The Choice : Global Domination or Global Leadership, New York, Basic Books, 2004, p. 28.

[3] Jean-Pierre DUPUY, « Anatomy of 9/11 : Evil, Rationalism, and the Sacred », SubStance vol. 37, n° 1, Cultural Theory After 9/11 : Terror, Religion, Media (2008), p. 33-51.

[4] James ALISON, « Contemplation in a World of Violence : Girard, Merton, Tolle » http://www.thecentering.org/Alison_… %world%20of%20violence.html, dernier accès le 8 août 2007.

[5] Le mot grec tragoidia vient de tragos (chèvre) et ode (chanson) : « chanson de chèvre » ou « la chanson livrée au sacrifice de la chèvre ».

[6] René GIRARD, La Violence et le Sacré, Paris, Grasset, 1971.

[7] Cf. Marcel GAUCHET, Le Désenchantement du monde. Une histoire politique de la religion, Paris, Gallimard, 1985.

[8] René GIRARD, Des Choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, Paris, Grasset, 1978.


Expo Ahlam Shibli/Jeu de Paume: Dur dur de se faire remarquer dans le monde impitoyable de la photo (Suicide bomber art: How about a bin Laden photo show in a Paris museum ?)

2 juillet, 2013
http://s3.vidimg02.popscreen.com/original/41/NTE3MTQyMzQ3MjA=_o_mom-defends-daughters-photos.jpgAamna Aqeel racist photoshoothttp://thepossessionofstyle.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/01vogue02_650.jpg?w=450&h=299http://www.blogcdn.com/www.luxist.com/media/2008/09/vogueindia(2).jpghttp://mannequin-model.com/mannequinat/0-Victim-of-Beauty-12-magazine-Vasil-Germanov-Gabriela-Dasheva-Nora-Shopova.jpg
http://www.chelouchegallery.com/userfiles/Miki%20Kratsman,%20Wanted%201-5,%202007,%20digital%20print,%2070x50%20cm%20each.jpg
http://lunettesrouges.blog.lemonde.fr/files/2013/06/AShibli-Death-n37-Palestine-2011-2012.jpg
http://www.europe-israel.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/tract-Recto-Jeu-de-Paume.jpg
http://honestreporting.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/monalisaterrorist.jpg
Le roi de Moab, voyant qu’il avait le dessous dans le combat, (…) prit alors son fils premier-né, qui devait régner à sa place, et il l’offrit en holocauste sur la muraille. Et une grande indignation s’empara d’Israël, qui s’éloigna du roi de Moab et retourna dans son pays. 2 Rois 3: 26-27
Il faut se souvenir que le nazisme s’est lui-même présenté comme une lutte contre la violence: c’est en se posant en victime du traité de Versailles que Hitler a gagné son pouvoir. Et le communisme lui aussi s’est présenté comme une défense des victimes. Désormais, c’est donc seulement au nom de la lutte contre la violence qu’on peut commettre la violence. René Girard
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
J’espère offrir mon fils unique en martyr, comme son père. Dalal Mouazzi (jeune veuve d’un commandant du Hezbollah mort en 2006 pendant la guerre du Liban, à propos de son gamin de 10 ans)
Nous n’aurons la paix avec les Arabes que lorsqu’ils aimeront leurs enfants plus qu’ils ne nous détestent. Golda Meir
A chaque nouvel épisode sanglant dans un pays arabe, le culte de la mort de l’islam que les foules expriment devant les caméras ne peut manquer de nous interpeller. (…) D’un point de vue ethnologique, nous pourrions nous contenter d’observer ces différences sans les juger. Mais cela n’est pas possible, car de ces comportements envers les morts naissent des comportements envers les vivants qu’il n’est pas possible d’ignorer et de ne pas condamner. Le sang appelle la vengeance du sang. La vengeance, ce n’est pas l’action que l’on entreprend pour se débarrasser d’une menace ou d’un ennemi. La vengeance ne trouve pas sa récompense dans l’élimination de l’ennemi, mais dans le sang qu’on lui fait verser. Cette différence est importante, elle explique pourquoi les groupes terroristes n’ont pas d’état d’âme quant à leurs cibles. Leur but n’est pas d’affaiblir la force armée qui les opprimerait, mais de faire couler le sang de l’ennemi. L’armée d’Israël ne cherche pas à tuer des civils innocents, mais à éliminer les donneurs d’ordre des factions terroristes. Le seul but de ses interventions, c’est l’élimination d’une menace. Ceux qui prétendent que les groupes terroristes utilisent les moyens qui sont à leur disposition face à une armée sur-puissante font l’impasse sur l’aspect strictement culturel du mode de fonctionnement de ces assassins. C’est leur rapport à la mort qui dicte leur stratégie, et non pas le contexte du rapport de force. Tirer sur des civils est un acte délibéré qui est directement inspiré par leur psyché. Ceci mis au point, il devient légitime de se demander si ce rapport à la mort est lié à leur religion. Le christianisme envisage la mort des martyrs comme une béatification. En aucune façon le martyr doit entraîner ses persécuteurs dans la mort. Ce qui l’attend est de l’ordre du spirituel, une félicité éternelle qui n’est pas de ce monde. Le judaïsme parle d’un monde futur où règne une paix éternelle où sensualité et contingence terrestre auront disparu au profit d’un rapprochement de Dieu. L’islam, en tout cas celui des foules analphabètes et d’un certain nombre de meneurs psychopathes, imagine un au-delà de stupre et de plaisirs on ne peut plus sensuels. Pour le judaïsme et le christianisme, la mort est le passage vers un état spirituel qui n’a plus rien à voir avec la vie d’ici-bas. Pour cet islam, la mort est le passage vers une vie « idéale » où tous les sens du monde réel seront satisfaits, y compris les plaisirs sexuels qui nous sont interdit dans notre vie terrestre. Comment ne pas comprendre que cette mort fantasmée, cette vision obscène et perverse de l’au-delà a des conséquences directes sur la perception de la mort, de la sienne et de celle qu’on inflige à autrui.  Adam Harishon
La mort de Mohammed annule, efface celle de l’enfant juif, les mains en l’air devant les SS, dans le Ghetto de Varsovie. Catherine Nay (Europe 1)
Je ne suis pas une militante [...] Mon travail est de montrer, pas de dénoncer ni de juger. Ahlam Shibli
Je n’ai pas envie de jouer la médiatrice, de dire ‘voilà ce qu’il faut regarder’. Il y a quelque chose d’irreprésentable dans la cause palestinienne comme dans la condition de l’enfant orphelin, que je cherche néanmoins à montrer, tout du moins à suggérer. C’est l’un des challenges de la photographie. Ahlam Shibli
Ces images ne peuvent en aucun cas être une apologie du terrorisme : elles pourraient tout aussi bien être vues comme une critique du culte du martyr, avec sa profusion de clichés d’hommes en armes, paradant dans les foyers au milieu des enfants et des grand-mères, ou sur les murs de la ville. Les images d’Ahlam Shibli ne portent aucun jugement, attestant simplement d’une réalité. La photographe prouve (et c’est son rôle d’artiste) que toute image possède une dimension anthropologique et historique dont il faut tenir compte. Télérama
Quand des œuvres sont menacées de censure, est-il encore possible de les considérer d’un point de vue esthétique ? L’exercice critique reste-t-il pertinent ? Plus que jamais. Car la censure, toujours, nie les œuvres en tant que telles. Ceux qui par des pressions, comme celles exercées notamment par le Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France (Crif), ou par des actes violents (alertes à la bombe, menaces de mort…) tentent d’obtenir la fermeture de l’exposition consacrée actuellement à Ahlam Shibli au musée du Jeu de paume, à Paris, intitulée Foyers fantômes, n’ont pour la plupart pas vu les œuvres qu’ils incriminent. Quand bien même ce serait le cas, le simple fait que le Crif invoque la notion d’« apologie du terrorisme » à propos de ces photographies atteste de son aveuglement. Non qu’il y ait une approche des œuvres plus « objective » que d’autres. Mais la moindre des choses est de se rendre disponible pour les accueillir, de mettre à distance ses a priori et d’être attentif aux signes, aux images qui sont proposés. En outre, parce qu’il y a aveuglement, la voix de la censure est irrationnelle. Pour la contrer, le geste critique est nécessaire, qui s’efforce de produire un discours articulé. (…) Dans la salle Death, qui pose problème aux censeurs, Ahlam Shibli a apposé un texte de présentation. On peut y lire : « Death montre plusieurs façons pour ceux qui sont absents de retrouver une présence, une “représentation” : combattants palestiniens tombés lors de la résistance armée aux incursions israéliennes, et victimes de l’armée israélienne tuées dans des circonstances diverses […] ; militants ayant mené des actions où ils étaient certains de laisser leur vie, entre autres les hommes et les femmes bardés d’explosifs qu’ils ont mis à feu pour assassiner des Israéliens […] ; et enfin prisonniers ». Face aux attaques, Ahlam Shibli a précisé : « Je ne suis pas une militante […]. Mon travail est de montrer, pas de dénoncer ni de juger. » Dans le communiqué du ministère de la Culture, censé soutenir l’artiste et l’institution du Jeu de paume, mais qui en réalité s’en dédouane, Aurélie Filippetti a cru bon d’interpréter cette phrase comme la revendication d’une « neutralité ». Erreur. Ahlam Shibli, comme tout artiste digne de ce nom, assume un point de vue. (…) Certains clichés de Death sont particulièrement éloquents, surtout ceux où l’on voit des familles autour des effigies de leurs morts. Sur l’un d’eux, un garçon regarde son père avec amour et admiration. Sur un autre, la photo encadrée est époussetée par la sœur du défunt. Dans les maisons, ces portraits sont largement exposés sur les murs, les protagonistes souvent en situation : ce sont des saints guerriers, ou des « martyrs », comme les nomment les Palestiniens, dont la présence s’impose aux vivants. Ahlam Shibli a photographié « de l’intérieur ». L’absence de prise de distance est consubstantielle à son projet artistique. C’est pourquoi l’accuser de reprendre à son compte le mot « martyrs » dans les cartels de la salle Death, sans guillemets, comme il le lui a été reproché, relève du faux procès. Mais l’usage des cartels à portée informative, plus développé dans cette salle que dans les autres, a tendance à affaiblir les images de leur charge narrative et même émotionnelle. Contrairement à ce que certains ont réclamé, c’est-à-dire une plus grande contextualisation des photographies, la force de l’œuvre d’Ahlam Shibli est de donner à voir sans filtre l’univers mental de dominés au cœur du chaos de l’histoire. Le scandale est de ne pas admettre que cette œuvre s’avère par là même, et sans provocation aucune, nécessairement scandaleuse. Politis
Face aux gesticulations communautaristes (très parisiennes : l’exposition vient de Barcelone où nul n’a tenté de la censurer, et elle va au Portugal, où, très probablement, nul ne le fera), il est important que les spectateurs réalisent que le travail d’Ahlam Shibli est, non pas une apologie du terrorisme comme des propagandistes obtus voudraient le faire croire, mais une réflexion critique sur les ambiguïtés dont nul n’est exempt, sur la manière dont les hommes réagissent face à l’absence ou à la destruction de leur foyer, et s’adaptent aux contraintes qui en résultent. Les visiteurs du Jeu de Paume auront certainement l’intelligence de le comprendre, et de s’élever contre les tentatives de censure de cette exposition. (…) Des organes de presse ici et là ont repris les éléments de langage de la propagande du CRIF et de ses soutiens selon laquelle cette exposition ne serait consacrée qu’aux auteurs d’attentats-suicide : ‘"Death" montre des habitants des territoires occupés palestiniens, qui vivent au quotidien avec les photographies des membres de leur famille morts ayant commis un attentat-suicide" (Le Monde, corrigé depuis) et "murs tapis de photos à l’effigie des «martyrs» disparus: terroristes s’étant fait sauter" (Slate); le CRIF, lui, dit  que l’exposition montre "comment les familles ou la société palestinienne entretiennent la mémoire des terroristes qui ont été tués lors d’attentats-suicide perpétrés en Israël". Il suffit d’analyser même succinctement les données disponibles (sur les cartels ou dans le catalogue) pour voir que le CRIF détourne la vérité (pas la 1ère fois, me direz-vous) : sur les 68 photos de la série Death (rappelons-le, une des six séries de l’exposition), 10 sont des vues d’ensemble sans ‘martyr’ identifié. Parmi les personnes nommées sur les 58 autres photos (certaines à plusieurs reprises), 11 sont des prisonniers, 31 ont été tuées soit au combat, soit par des raids de l’armée israélienne, et 9 sont morts dans des attentats-suicide, d’après les légendes des photographies. Et on ne parle que de ces neuf là. Mais pour le CRIF et ses amis, c’est tellement plus facile de réduire la résistance palestinienne aux kamikazes … Lunettes rouges
Les personnes qui se sont déplacées hier dimanche pour visiter l’exposition d’Ahlam Shibli, au Musée du Jeu de Paume dans le Jardin des Tuileries à Paris, ont trouvé ses portes fermées, la LDJ ayant annoncé une « descente » sur le musée ce jour là ! Ainsi ce gouvernement de lâches, cette ministre de la Culture qui se couche quand les chiens du lobby israélien aboient, n’ont pas été en mesure de protéger l’accès à cette exposition ? Nous ne payons pas assez d’impôts pour que la culture soit respectée ? Ou bien s’agit-il de faire plaisir au CRIF et consorts ? Ou encore M. Valls et Mme Philipetti ont peur des bandes armées de la LDJ ? Alors qu’ils les interdisent ! (…)  Nous rappelons que l’exposition de la photographe palestinienne Ahlam Shibli esrt exposée au Musée du Jeu de Paume à Paris jusqu’au 1er septembre, que c’est une exposition magnifique et très instructive, et qu’il faut aller la voir ! (notamment) les réflexions et interrogations qu’elles suscitent sur divers problèmes, dont (…) des orphelins ou enfants abandonnés polonais qui recréent là un monde à eux (…) des homosexuels hommes et femmes qui ont dû fuir leurs pays, le plus souvent musulmans (pour… Tel Aviv ! – note de l’éditeur), où ils ne pouvaient assumer leurs choix de vie. la résistance à l’occupation pendant la deuxième guerre mondiale et l’engagement dans des luttes de conquêtes coloniales, par les mêmes personnes, en Corrèze, avec des lieux célébrant les deux à la fois et au même endroit ! et la manière dont les Palestiniens tentent de conserver leur dignité, qu’ils soient en prison ou dans des camps de réfugiés à Naplouse, sous occupation. Comment ils tentent, au milieu de la mort constamment présente, et de la négation de leur histoire, de leur liberté, de conserver la mémoire de leurs proches, ces martyrs tués en combattant l’armée d’occupation, à un check-point, ou en commettant des attentats suicide, signes d’un désespoir tel que leur vie ne leur semblait plus présenter la moindre utilité.Rappelons que cette très belle expo vient de Barcelone où nul n’a tenté de la censurer, et elle va au Portugal cet automne, où, très probablement, nul ne le fera. Les visiteurs normalement constitués, et surtout honnêtes, comprennent bien que le travail d’Ahlam Shibli est, non pas une apologie du terrorisme comme le lobby israélien voudrait le faire croire, mais une réflexion sur la manière dont les hommes réagissent face à l’absence ou à la destruction de leur foyer, et s’adaptent aux contraintes qui en résultent. Médiapart
Ahlam Shibli, artiste internationalement reconnue, propose une réflexion critique sur la manière dont les hommes et les femmes réagissent face à la privation de leur foyer qui les conduit à se construire, coûte que coûte, des lieux d’appartenance. Dans la série Death, conçue spécialement pour cette rétrospective, l’artiste Ahlam Shibli présente un travail sur les images qui ne constitue ni de la propagande ni une apologie du terrorisme, contrairement à ce que certains messages que le Jeu de Paume a reçus laissent entendre. Comme l’artiste l’explique elle-même : "Je ne suis pas une militante [...] Mon travail est de montrer, pas de dénoncer ni de juger". Death explore la manière dont des Palestiniens disparus — "martyrs", selon les termes repris par l’artiste — sont représentés dans les espaces publics et privés (affiches et graffitis dans les rues, inscriptions sur les tombes, autels et souvenirs dans les foyers…) et retrouvent ainsi une présence dans leur communauté. L’exposition monographique réunit cinq autres séries de l’artiste questionnant les contradictions inhérentes à la notion de "chez soi" dans différents contextes : celui de la société palestinienne, mais aussi des communautés d’enfants recueillis dans les orphelinats polonais, des commémorations de soulèvements de la Résistance contre les nazis à Tulle (Corrèze) et des guerres coloniales en Indochine et en Algérie, ou encore des ressortissants des pays orientaux qui ont quitté leur pays afin de vivre librement leur orientation sexuelle. La plupart de ces photographies sont accompagnées de légendes écrites par l’artiste, inséparables des images, qui les situent dans un temps et un lieu précis. Des mesures ont été prises par le Jeu de Paume pour le rappeler aux visiteurs. La rétrospective dédiée à Ahlam Shibli s’inscrit dans la volonté de montrer de nouvelles pratiques de la photographie documentaire, après les expositions consacrées à Sophie Ristelhueber (2009), Bruno Serralongue (2010) ou Santu Mofokeng (2011). La programmation du Jeu de Paume a pour objectif de s’interroger de façon critique sur les différentes formes de représentation des sociétés contemporaines et, dans cette démarche, revendique la liberté d’expression des artistes. Le Jeu de Paume ne souhaite pas esquiver le débat ni passer sous silence l’émoi que l’exposition suscite auprès d’un certain nombre de personnes, bien au contraire, il invite chacun à la découvrir sereinement. Après le MACBA de Barcelone (25 janvier-28 avril 2013) et avant la Fondation Serralves de Porto (15 novembre 2013-9 février 2014), tous deux coproducteurs, le Jeu de Paume présente, pour la première fois en France, l’œuvre de l’artiste palestinienne Ahlam Shibli avec l’exposition "Foyer Fantôme", du 27 mai au 1er septembre 2013. Musée du Jeu de Paume
Without question, Shibli’s new series, "Death" (2011-12), commissioned by the three museums co-hosting her retrospective (MACBA, the Jeu de Paume, Paris, and the Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serralves, Porto), is her most ambitious and difficult work to date. It provides an in-depth study of commemorative images of Palestinian martyrs in the city of Nablus, a bastion of Palestinian resistance during the Second Intifada (2000-05). A martyr in these circumstances is any Palestinian killed due to the Israeli occupation, including soldiers who died in confrontations with Israeli forces, civilians killed in Israeli attacks and suicide bombers who carried out attacks in Israel. Shibli sought out the families and friends of these people as well as contacted martyr support associations. The resulting 68 medium and large color prints present posters, murals, banners, paintings, photographs and graffiti of some of the most revered martyrs in Nablus (such as the first Palestinian woman to carry out a suicide bombing in Israel). The subjects are typically shown brandishing a weapon, with backgrounds that include patriotic decorative elements like the Palestinian flag and handwritten exaltations. In the public spaces of Nablus, a cult of martyrdom seems omnipresent. Commemorations are seen on concrete walls pockmarked by bullet holes, or in the shabby interiors of cafes. Large, framed pictures of prominent martyrs are mounted on metal structures above the crumbling entrance of an oft-visited cemetery. Shibli provides lengthy descriptive captions for each photograph (available at MACBA as printed gallery notes), indicating details about the people pictured. Perhaps the most disturbing photos are the ones taken in the intimacy of family homes, such as Untitled (Death, no. 37), in which a living room is dominated by a painting of Kayed Abu Mustafá (aka Mikere), a grim-faced young man with his finger on the trigger of an assault rifle. Mikere’s son looks up at the portrait of his father with pride, as his mother, daughter and young nephew sit nearby. Shibli’s "Death" series seems to be the culmination of many years of reflecting on her homeland. She has probed deeply into the devastating impact that the frustrated quest for a home has had, and presents a terrifying portrait of a place where a continuing cult of martyrdom—and terrorism—appears inevitable. This viewer wonders if the questions that "Death" poses are best served by its presentation in the rarefied context of a contemporary art museum. Kim Bradley
Ahlam Shibli montre, photographies alignées, des affiches faisant l’apologie de ces «martyrs» sur les murs de camps de réfugiés de Balata, sur ceux de la ville de Naplouse. Des hommes avec des poses de Rambo mais ayant tué pour de vrai. D’autres images montrent des foyers, murs tapis de photos à l’effigie des «martyrs» disparus: terroristes s’étant fait sauter. Ils sont fascinants ces foyers-mausolées.Cette série montre un monde fascinant où les terroristes sont adulés. Elle montre comment les images suppléent au discours et gardent vivants des morts pour que la force de leurs actions persiste. Elle pourrait montrer la façon dont un discours peut être renversé, une idéologie servie, des terroristes présentés en héros. Mais ces «représentations» sont livrées sans distance, sans regard de biais. Sans critique. Dans les légendes, les terroristes sont décrits en martyrs, en combattants, en victimes.(…) En mettant sur le même plan ces terroristes et les personnages des autres séries, victimes de régimes homophobes, d’occupants nazis en France, orphelins abandonnés, ces terroristes sont assimilés aux victimes. Dans cette région du monde où la propagande est si violente, l’artiste semble avoir été contaminée par le discours iconographique abêtissant. Et le Jeu de Paume, qui aurait pu se servir de ce travail pour montrer et la réalité et son travestissement en images, aussi. Slate
Il s’agit d’éviter à tout prix de rappeler le contexte historique et les drames qui ont été occasionnés par ces multiples attentats. Combien de bus israéliens éventrés? Combien de magasins ou de restaurants israéliens calcinés? Combien d’enfants israéliens assassinés? Combien de rues déchiquetées? Crif
A quand la glorification d’un Mohamed Merah ou d’un Ben Laden dans nos musées nationaux, financée par nos impôts ?!!! (…) La photographe Ahlam Shibli affirme je cite « je ne suis pas une militante, mon travail est de montrer, pas de dénoncer ni juger ». Alors pourquoi n’évoque t-elle pas les nombreuses victimes de ces attentats terroristes ? Pourquoi a t-elle choisi délibérément de traduire certains passages dans ses cartels et passer sous silence les appels à la mort ? Pourquoi ne nous informe t-elle pas sur le nombre des victimes innocentes ? Pourquoi ne nous montre t-elle pas leur portrait ?!! JSSNews
Il travaille dans un garage et voulait juste se faire un peu d’argent.  Aamna Aqeel
Lighten up, Vogue is about realizing the power of fashion and the shoot was saying that fashion is no longer a rich man’s privilege. Anyone can carry it off and make it look beautiful. Priya Tanna (Vogue India editor)
This provocative juxtaposition of luxury and poverty is something of a Campos hallmark. In shot after shot, fashion models and expensive clothes are set against backdrops of urban poverty. Personally, I find the images thought-provoking and beautiful. They free the fashion world from its ivory tower isolation and allow it to circle ethical issues — without forcing any particular conclusions on the viewer. They also raise the question of whether the beautiful artifacts of a traditional culture like India aren’t a match for the most expensive couture. Which raises, in turn, the worrying idea that, by thinking this way, we may be romanticizing (and therefore justifying) poverty. (…)  Revisiting Bringing the War Home, a set of Vietnam War-themed images  she made between 1967 and 1972, Rosler created a montage series in 2004, which imagined fashion shoots taking place on the streets of Baghdad. “Assembled from the pages of Life magazine,” Laura Cottingham wrote in an essay, “…Rosler’s montages re-connect two sides of human experience, the war in Vietnam, and the living rooms of America, which have been falsely separated.” The Campos images, with their uncomfortable beauty and ambiguous juxtapositions, may be making the same point about the “false separation” between luxury and poverty — with, perhaps, more seductive subtlety. Nick Currie
Martha Rosler: Bringing the War Home is the first museum exhibition to bring together Rosler’s two landmark series of photomontages. In the pioneering series, Bringing the War Home: House Beautiful (1967-1972), news photos of the Vietnam War are combined with images from contemporary architectural and design magazines. The prosperity of postwar America is integrated with images of soldiers, corpses and the wounded. Made during the height of the war, these images were originally disseminated in underground newspapers and on flyers and were made, in part, as a response to the artist’s frustration with media images, reporting techniques, and even some anti-war propaganda. The recent group, Bringing the War Home: House Beautiful, New Series (2004) combines news photos of the Iraq War with elegant landscapes and interiors from magazines, raising questions about the connections between advertising, journalism, politics, sexism, and violence. Rosler’s montages re-connect two sides of human experience that have been falsely separated – distant wars and the living rooms of America. Laura Cottingham
Une série mode intitulée "Victim of Beauty" publiée dans le magazine bulgare "12 Magazine" a créé la polémique internationale : une séance photo éditoriale provocante réalisée par le photographe Vasil Germanov qui met en scène les mannequins Gabriela Dasheva et Nora Shopova relookées en femmes violemment battues. Yeux au beurre noir, lèvres fendues, gorge tranchée, brûlures nauséabondes… des blessures réalistes en maquillage effets-spéciaux par Daniela Avramova qui provoquent l’indignation des associations de victimes de violences conjugales : les militants pour la cause féminine condamnent cette représentation "scandaleuse et perverse" de la beauté. Les éditeurs du magazine bulgare se défendent de faire l’apologie de la violence et déclarent que "la photo de mode n’est qu’une imitation de la réalité". Mannequin-model.com
Cette petite fille qui est née le 05 Avril 2001 en France, s’appelle Thylane et a fait sa première grande apparition par l’intermédiaire de Carine Roitfeld pour des photos qui font surface avec 7 mois de retard aux États-Unis… L’ex redac’chef confirme malgré tout qu’elle est dotée d’un sens aiguisé dans la découverte de futurs talents. Car oui, au delà de la polémique sur le fait d’avoir maquillé et habillé cette jeune fille en femme plus âgée dans les pages du Vogue Paris en décembre dernier, Thylane n’en reste pas moins une fillette de 10 ans qui voit une carrière de Top et d’égérie à succès se profiler à l’horizon. Sa mère, qui n’est autre que l’animatrice Veronika Loubry (reconvertie d’ailleurs dans la création de vêtements et la photo) l’encourage dans cette voie bien qu’elle affirme refuser les 3/4 des projets proposés. Il faut reconnaitre que malgré son jeune âge, elle est extrêmement douée et photogénique : un air de Bardot par-ci, d’Abbey Lee par là, elle possède l’esthétisme que l’on réclame aux mannequins d’aujourd’hui (excepté bien sur les mensurations qui seront déterminantes pour la suite). La question qui se pose aujourd’hui outre-Atlantique est de savoir si oui ou non il est néfaste pour une fillette d’adopter des postures et expressions d’adultes ou de poser topless ? Une limite est-elle franchie à cause de son âge ou est-ce uniquement de l’art? La mode "enfant" est un secteur en pleine expansion de nos jours, chose que les marques et les magazines ont bien intégré ; outre le fait qu’actuellement du scandale naît la notoriété, Thylane sera certainement une modèle à surveiller de près. Jules fashion
Nous avons voulu exposer de beaux articles de mode dans un contexte intéressant et plein de charme. Nous avons vu une immense beauté, de l’innocence et de la fraîcheur sur les visages que nous avons saisis. "La mode n’est plus le privilège des riches. N’importe qui peut la porter et la rendre magnifique. Priya Tanna (rédactrice en chef du magazine Vogue India)
Rabaisser la pauvreté à ce niveau de frivolité enlève tout sérieux à ce qu’elle représente réellement. Comme si les bébés indiens pauvres, dont la vie est menacée par la malnutrition, pouvaient profiter d’un déjeuner sympathique en portant un bavoir Fendi.  Archana Jahagirdar (Business Standard)
L’intervention du magazine ressemble à celle des premiers missionnaires, apportant Hermès et Miu Miu, comme des outils de civilisation. Amrita Shah ("La pauvreté comme papier peint", The Indian Express)
Le problème est que les Indiens aisés sont devenus complètement aveugles à la misère. Pavan Mehta
Mis en scène dans un contexte si différent, les pauvres ne suscitent plus l’indifférence. Les Indiens aisés prendront au moins conscience de leur existence. Hemant Sagar (couturier de Lecoanet Hemant)
Pas facile de produire une séance photo de mode mémorable; les photos de jolies filles portant de jolis vêtements peuvent vite devenir ennuyeuses. Les meilleures photos de mode sont engageantes, captivantes et imaginatives ; elles supposent talent, travail acharné et vision de designer, styliste, photographe et modèle. Bien sûr, si vous ne pouvez pas gérer tout cela, l’autre moyen de vous faire remarquer est de faire des photos de mode tellement controversées et d’un tel mauvais goût que l’attention des médias est garantie. Le dernier shooting de la créatrice Aamna Aqeel intitulé "Sois mon esclave" tombe carrément dans cette catégorie. De toute évidence conçu pour choquer, il montre un modèle servi par un enfant esclave à la peau noire. Les images sont répugnantes à connotation raciste et colonialiste.  Le fait que l’esclave dans les publicités est un enfant rend les images encore plus inexcusables. Aqeel ne travaille que depuis à peine deux ans. Elle a remporté quelques succès critiques lors de la cinquième édition de la Fashion Week du Pakistan qui s’est tenue récemment à Karachi, mais elle reste vraiment un designer émergent avec beaucoup à prouver. Il semble qu’elle ait décidé que le temps était venu, coûte que coûte, de se faire remarquer. La mode aime être provocante et parfois il semble que rien n’est tabou. Vogue France avait fait une séance avec des images sexualisées de modèles de dix ans, Vogue India un reportage avec des Indiens pauvres portant des parapluies de Burberry et des bavoirs Fendi à 100 dollars. Un magazine bulgare (12)  avait fait une série intitulée "Victime de la beauté" présentant des modèles meurtris qui semblait glorifier la violence domestique. A chaque fois, les magazines avaient une explication à donner, à savoir qu’ils essayaient de mettre en évidence l’utilisation de modèles de l’enfant, ou tenter de dire que la mode était pour tout le monde ou de montrer la juxtaposition entre les films d’horreur et le maquillage et la beauté. Dans chaque cas, la véritable raison était simple : commander des photos de mauvais goût pour s’assurer une couverture médiatique et stimuler les ventes. Salima Feerasta

Les temps sont décidément cruels !

Yeux au beurre noir, lèvres fendues, gorge tranchée, brûlures nauséabondes, petites filles de 10 ans hypersexualisées, vieil homme en haillons sous un parasol Burberry, bébé d’une femme édentée en bavoir Fendi à 100 dollars, femme portant au bras un sac Hermes à plus de 10 000 dollars, modèle blanc abritée par l’ombrelle d’un enfant noir vêtu d’un simple pagne …

A l’heure où, en Egypte, un jeune idéaliste juif américain vient de payer au prix fort sa dévotion pour les tenants de la religion d’amour de tolérance et de paix …

Et où, une fois de plus et dans l’indifférence ou l’incompréhension générales, le musée national du Jeu de Paume réaffirme courageusement son indéfectible soutien à la liberté culturelle et aux jeunes talents face au monde impitoyable qu’est devenue la création internationale …

Comment ne pas compatir à la diffculté que rencontrent de plus en plus pour se faire un nom nos jeunes créateurs et artistes ?

Surtout quand en plus ils se donnent tant de mal à lancer le débat sur l’esclavage, le travail des enfants, les femmes battues ….

Ou, à l’instar d’un Miki Kratsman israélien ou de notre Enderlin national (voire de votre serviteur dans le musée lui-même aujourd’hui), la manipulation en un véritable culte de la mort des terroristes-suicide ou des enfants boucliers humains …

Aamna Aqeel: It’s certainly not fashion!

Salima Feerasta

The Express Tribune

May 9, 2013

KARACHI:

It’s not easy producing a memorable fashion shoot; pictures of pretty women wearing pretty clothes can get boring fast. The best fashion shoots are engaging, compelling and imaginative; they require talent, hard work and vision from the designer, stylist, photographer and model. Of course, if you can’t manage all of that, the other way to ensure you get noticed is to make a fashion shoot so controversial and tasteless that getting media attention is guaranteed.

Designer Aamna Aqeel’s latest shoot titled “Be My Slave” falls squarely into this category. Obviously designed to shock, it shows a model being pandered to by a dark-skinned child slave. The images are repulsive with racist and colonialist overtones. The fact that the slave in the advertisements is a child, makes the images that much more inexcusable.

Aqeel has barely been designing for two years. She won some critical acclaim at the fifth edition of Fashion Pakistan Week held recently in Karachi, but she remains very much an emerging designer with a lot to prove. It seems that she’s decided, by hook or by crook, it’s time to get noticed.

Fashion loves to be provocative and sometimes it seems nothing is taboo. French Vogue did a shoot with sexualised images of models as young as 10, Vogue India did a feature with impoverished Indians carrying Burberry umbrellas and wearing $100 Fendi bibs. A Bulgarian magazine 12 did a shoot called “Victim of Beauty” showing bloodied, bruised models that appeared to glamourise domestic violence.

In each case, the magazines had an explanation to give, that they were trying to highlight the use of child models, or attempting to say fashion was for everyone or trying to show the juxtaposition between horror flick make-up and beauty. In each case, the real reason was simple: commissioning distasteful fashion shoots to ensure media coverage and boost sales.

When contacted, Aqeel vehemently denied any racist angle to the shoot at all. According to her, the choice of a dark-skinned Baloch child was purely incidental. “He works in a garage and wanted some work,” she said. Obviously the parents of usual child models wouldn’t have agreed to the shoot. The pampered little cuties who advertise soap, toothpaste and biscuits on TV may not have looked right for the part but even if they had, no one would have let their child play such a degrading role.

Aqeel’s argument is that she wanted to spark a debate on child labour. She says she is involved with a children’s charity and wanted to highlight how ‘society madams’ employ child labour in their homes. She is educating and supporting the child used in the shoot — it seems the least she can do after exploiting him in this fashion.

It’s facetious of the designer to claim that she was trying to stimulate a debate on child labour. The model wearing her clothes is clearly comfortable with her dominant position. She is not made up in a way that shows her to be the villain of the piece. The use of a dark skinned child in a shoot entitled “Be My Slave” certainly reeks of racism, however much the designer may deny it. And if anything, the shoot seems to condone child labour.

Aqeel went on to deny that this was a publicity-seeking move on her part and says she is happy at the pace her brand is developing. Her purpose for this shoot was apparently not to publicise her brand, but to raise public awareness of a social issue. Apparently, she feels so blessed with her success that she wants to give back to society and feels that it’s every individual’s duty to do what he or she can to make life better for the underprivileged.

To me, Aqeel’s stance stinks of hypocrisy. Designers do fashion shoots to sell a vision of their brand and to raise their profile. I wonder at the magazine that published the pictures. The stylist and photographer may have had to bend to the designer’s vision but the magazine had no such compulsion. I feel ashamed to be involuntarily publicising the shoot but we need to speak up against vile images of racism and exploitation. There are some taboos fashion shouldn’t break.

Oxford-grad Salima Feerasta is a social commentator and lover of style in any form or fashion. She blogs at karachista.blogspot.com and tweets @karachista

Voir encore:

The Post-Materialist | Fashion and Poverty

Women’s Fashion
Nick Currie
The NYT
September 5, 2008

A report from our Berlin correspondent on design and society.

Should poor people appear in fashion shoots for expensive clothing? What’s the difference between a $2 umbrella and a $200 umbrella? What’s the role of a magazine like Vogue in a nation where more than 75% of the population lives on less than $2 a day? Can cheap clothes enhance — even trump — expensive ones? Do couture items look cheap mixed into a poor person’s outfit?

These were some of the questions raised by an article by Heather Timmons in Sunday’s New York Times. Vogue’s Fashion Photos Spark Debate in India described — and showed — a photo shoot by Jean-François Campos which appeared in the August edition of Vogue India.

Since its launch last October, the Indian edition of Vogue has tended to concentrate on glitzy, aspirational images; Western models appear alongside Indian models whose styling (colored contact lenses and lightened skin tones — the subject of another New York Times article) nudges them in the direction of Western norms. Campos’s story — featuring impoverished Indians sporting a Fendi baby bib, a Burberry umbrella and a $10,000 Hermès Birkin bag — departs, provocatively, from that line.

Glance at his portfolio at creative agency Michele Filomeno and you’ll see that this provocative juxtaposition of luxury and poverty is something of a Campos hallmark. In shot after shot, fashion models and expensive clothes are set against backdrops of urban poverty. Personally, I find the images thought-provoking and beautiful. They free the fashion world from its ivory tower isolation and allow it to circle ethical issues — without forcing any particular conclusions on the viewer. They also raise the question of whether the beautiful artifacts of a traditional culture like India aren’t a match for the most expensive couture. Which raises, in turn, the worrying idea that, by thinking this way, we may be romanticizing (and therefore justifying) poverty.

When I wrote about the Vogue India controversy on my own blog, Click Opera, the South African artist Candice Breitz sent me some images by veteran New York artist Martha Rosler. Revisiting Bringing the War Home, a set of Vietnam War-themed images she made between 1967 and 1972, Rosler created a montage series in 2004, which imagined fashion shoots taking place on the streets of Baghdad.

“Assembled from the pages of Life magazine,” Laura Cottingham wrote in an essay, “…Rosler’s montages re-connect two sides of human experience, the war in Vietnam, and the living rooms of America, which have been falsely separated.” The Campos images, with their uncomfortable beauty and ambiguous juxtapositions, may be making the same point about the “false separation” between luxury and poverty — with, perhaps, more seductive subtlety.

Voir encore:

Sick poverty chic: Outrage as Pakistan designers underline rich-poor divide in adverts

Deepti Jakhar

Daily Mail

18 March 2012

Fashion is arguably about aspiration with its limited editions and price-on- request adornments. But when fashion, in the name of aspiration, creates an ugly divide between the haves and have-nots, it’s bound to create outrage.

That’s what Pakistani designer duo Sana-Safinaz is seemingly facing. The designers, considered one of the biggest names in luxurious design in their country, are no strangers to publicity – the most recent being their designs worn to the Oscars and the Vanity Fair party by Pakistan’s Oscar debutant Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy.

Their ‘Lawn’ collection print advertisement is, however, garnering the wrong kind of publicity with most labelling it as ‘distasteful’.

As soon as the design house posted a picture of its latest spring/summer ad campaign on Facebook, it received a slew of angry comments. The campaign shows model Neha Ahmed posing in front of coolies with Louis Vuitton luggage, most of whom can never think of affording a LV with a lifetime of earnings and savings.

The advertisement reminds the fashion-conscious of Vogue India’s 2008 issue when it used poor people not as models but as props for obscenely expensive brands such as Burberry and Fendi.

Poor as prop: A toddler wearing a Fendi bib in another Vogue ad

Poor as prop: A toddler wearing a Fendi bib in another Vogue ad

The issue that featured an old woman holding a child wearing a Fendi bib; a family squeezing on to a motorbike with the mother holding a Hermès Birkin bag; and a barefoot man holding a Burberry umbrella, created a lot of furore online about its vulgar display of luxury, juxtaposing it with extreme poverty.

For countries such as India and Pakistan – where the divide between the rich and the poor is so stark – campaigns that bring both the worlds together seem to be mocking the gap more than anything else.

The same is being experienced once again as Twitter and Facebook are full of critical remarks for the designers.

‘The image uses the poor as props. It not only dehumanises them, it also trivialises and celebrates the stark contrast,’ a post on Twitter read.

Designer Safinaz Munir has reacted to the angry tweets in an interview, saying: ‘We’re public figures and it goes with the territory… everyone uses porters for luggage. No one carries their own luggage.’

 Voir encore:

Far too much, far too young: Outrage over shocking images of the 10-YEAR-OLD model who has graced the pages of Vogue

Daily Mail

10 August 2011

Wearing heavy make-up and gold stilettos, Thylane Blondeau sprawls seductively on leopard print bed covers.

The provocative pose might seem like nothing unusual for a Vogue fashion shoot – except that Miss Blondeau is just ten years old.

Now the shocking images of the French child model have brought condemnation from parents’ groups and MPs.

And they are likely to take centre stage at a summit called by Prime Minister David Cameron and the Mothers’ Union aimed at cracking down on the sexualisation of children in advertising and the media.

Fleur Dorrell, of the Mothers’ Union, yesterday described the images as ‘physically disturbing’ and said they were ‘blurring all thoughts of beauty’.

And Labour MP Helen Goodman accused Vogue of being ‘disgraceful and totally irresponsible’ by publishing the pictures, saying it should have known better. ‘They have descended into the gutter by doing this,’ she said.

‘The sexualisation of children is one of the most pernicious ills of our era. They should not have done this.’

Born in the Ivory Coast, Miss Blondeau is the daughter of Véronika Loubry, an actress and television presenter, and former Sheffield Wednesday and Watford footballer Patrick Blondeau.

She walked the catwalk for Jean Paul Gaultier at the age of four and already boasts an impressive modelling CV, with several magazine shoots to her name.

In Paris, her piercing eyes, waist-length hair and pouting lips have brought comparisons with a youthful Brigitte Bardot, who was herself just 15 when she modelled for Elle magazine.

But it is the 15-page spread in a French Vogue issue guest-edited by fashion designer Tom Ford back in January that has emerged at the centre of the current debate on the over-sexualisation of children.

Miss Blondeau’s entry into the fashion world follows a recent trend for younger models.

Hollywood child actresses Elle Fanning, 13, and 14-year-old Hailee Steinfeld have both recently signed modelling deals with Marc Jacobs and Miu Miu respectively.

Last night the Mothers’ Union issued a damning criticism of Miss Blondeau’s Vogue pictures.

‘We have grave concerns about the modelling agency who represent Miss Blondeau, which clearly does not know if it represents a child or an adult,’ it said.

‘Photo shoots requiring her, a ten-year-old-girl, to dress in full make-up, teetering heels and a dress with a cleavage cut to the waist across her prepubescent body deny Miss Blondeau the right to be the child she is.’

Bloggers also attacked the images. One said on Tumblr: ‘This isn’t edgy. It’s inappropriate, and creepy.’

And Dr Emma Gray of the British CBT & Counselling Service (www.thebritishcbtcounsellingservice.co.uk) said: ‘This picture is the antithesis of what childhood in our society should be; a child being exposed to a world she is not yet equipped to deal with solely to serve the needs of the adults around her.’

Mothers’ Union chief executive Reg Bailey has been commissioned to carry out an independent review on the pressures faced by children and, with Mr Cameron, has invited the fashion and advertising industries to an inquiry in October.

Vogue’s publisher Condé Nast was unavailable for comment last night.

THE CHANGING FACE OF SOCIETY

The ‘ideal’ body image created by the media and the fashion industry are intertwined.

The advertising industry target women and younger girls as commodities, as well as important consumers.

A UK online survey in 2005 showed that 63 per cent of young girls between 15 to 19 years aspired to be glamour models rather than doctors or teachers.

The sociological reason for this can be debated but may be linked to a false sense of increased self esteem and confidence, associated with society’s acceptance of increasingly feminine role models.

It’s probably not ‘cool’ to be clever. Increased focus on not having the ideal ‘air brushed’ body may give rise to increased anxiety and worries related to body image, eating disorders in young people as young as 14 years, clinical depression and adjustment difficulties with usual life stresses.

As a doctor treating young people with emotional difficulties, one often faces the reality of aspiration and broken dreams of young people. It’s not enough to be just ‘cool’ to go through life.

DR SOUMITRA DATTA, Consultant Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist, London Medical

Environnement

POLÉMIQUE

"Be my slave": quand l’esclavage devient fashion

Après l’affaire des bijoux « style esclave » de Mango, et celle de la mannequin blanche maquillée en femme noire, les photos de mode intitulées « Be my slave » (« Sois mon esclave »), réalisées par la créatrice pakistanaise Aamna Aqeel, ont provoqué un tollé.

Dans le monde impitoyable de la mode, une des façons de se faire remarquer, « c’est de faire un shooting de mode si controversé et de si mauvais goût que l’attention des médias est garantie ».

« Le dernier shooting de la créatrice Aamna Aqeel intitulé « Be My Slave » tombe carrément dans cette catégorie. De toute évidence conçu pour choquer, il montre un modèle servi par un enfant esclave à la peau noire. Les images sont répugnantes à connotation raciste et colonialiste », écrit la bloggeuse pakistanaise Salima Feerasta, dans un article publié par l’Express Tribune.

Dérapages en série

Ce n’est pas la première fois que le milieu de la mode dérape sur des sujets aussi sensibles. En janvier 2012 déjà, un article publié par le magazine Elle sur le « style black » provoquait un tollé : la journaliste, qui proposait une analyse du style vestimentaire des femmes noires, déclarait que « le chic [était] devenu une option plausible pour une communauté jusque-là arrimée à ses codes streetwear », évoquant également les « codes blancs » désormais intégrés par la « black-geoisie ».

Plus récemment, des photos d’une mannequin blanche maquillée en femme noire, publiées dans le magazine Numéro, ont également scandalisé la fashion sphere. Et la marque de vêtements Mango en a remis une couche, avec sa gamme de bijoux « style esclave ».

Le choc des photos

C’est maintenant au tour de la créatrice de mode pakistanaise Aamna Aqeel, qui travaille pour Diva Magazine au Pakistan, de créer la polémique. Sur ses photos (désormais retirées de sa page Facebook), on voit un modèle blanc, à côté d’un enfant noir vêtu d’un simple pagne, qui protège la femme d’une ombrelle, porte son sac, lui tient sa tasse de thé ou dors à même le sol…

Pour le journaliste pakistanais Usama Hamayun, qui publie sur son blog Style Inn, « jouer avec un thème si sensible dans un pays où le racisme et le travail forcé sont des questions cruciales n’est en aucun cas acceptable ou esthétique. Vous pouvez être à la pointe de la mode et repousser les limites, mais ces photos relèvent d’un manque de goût et sont offensantes ».

Lancer le débat sur le travail infantile ?

Aamna Aqeel a déclaré que les photos n’étaient pas racistes et que son intention était de lancer le débat sur le travail des enfants au Pakistan. Quant au choix d’engager cet enfant pour les photos, elle s’est défendue en déclarant qu’elle le « soutenait financièrement et pourvoyait à sa scolarisation ». Celui-ci « travaillait dans un garage et voulait gagner un peu d’argent », selon la créatrice.

Voir aussi:

L’Inde lance la mode du "pauvre chic"

Julien Bouissou

Le Monde

11.09.2008

Ils sont pauvres. Leurs corps sont maigres et leurs visages cernés. Mais ils font l’effort de sourire devant l’objectif du photographe. Dans les bras d’une vieille femme édentée, un bébé porte un bavoir de la marque Fendi, d’une valeur de 100 dollars (72 euros).

Dans la cour d’une maison construite en pisé, un paysan mal rasé, vêtu d’une tunique sale et trouée, se protège du soleil en portant un parapluie de la marque Burberry, à 200 dollars. Les noms des marques de luxe sont les seuls à être mentionnés dans les légendes. Les personnages, eux, sont anonymes. On sait juste qu’ils habitent un village pauvre du Rajasthan, dans l’ouest de l’Inde.

Les seize pages de photographies ont été publiées par le magazine Vogue India, dans son édition du mois d’août, en vente à chaque carrefour des grandes villes indiennes. "Nous avons voulu exposer de beaux articles de mode dans un contexte intéressant et plein de charme. Nous avons vu une immense beauté, de l’innocence et de la fraîcheur sur les visages que nous avons saisis", déclare simplement Priya Tanna, la rédactrice en chef du magazine Vogue India.

Les commentateurs de la presse indienne ont surtout été choqués de voir des pauvres assurer la promotion d’articles de luxe. "Rabaisser la pauvreté à ce niveau de frivolité enlève tout sérieux à ce qu’elle représente réellement. Comme si les bébés indiens pauvres, dont la vie est menacée par la malnutrition, pouvaient profiter d’un déjeuner sympathique en portant un bavoir Fendi", écrit Archana Jahagirdar dans les colonnes du quotidien indien Business Standard. Mme Tanna croit au contraire que le luxe n’est plus interdit aux pauvres : "La mode n’est plus le privilège des riches. N’importe qui peut la porter et la rendre magnifique."

Si la mode devient accessible à tous, est-ce le signe que toute l’Inde s’enrichit ? Les statistiques affirment le contraire. Quelques jours après la publication des clichés de pauvres drapés dans des vêtements de luxe, la Banque mondiale rendait publics les chiffres de la pauvreté. Quelque 456 millions d’Indiens vivent avec moins de 1,25 dollar par jour. Le luxe, loin de réduire le fossé entre les riches et les exclus de la croissance, est même perçu par Amrita Shah comme une nouvelle forme de colonisation. "L’intervention du magazine ressemble à celle des premiers missionnaires, apportant Hermès et Miu Miu, comme des outils de civilisation", regrette la journaliste dans un article intitulé "La pauvreté comme papier peint", publié dans le quotidien The Indian Express.

La pauvreté est loin d’avoir disparu, mais le regard porté sur elle change. "Le problème est que les Indiens aisés sont devenus complètement aveugles à la misère", estime Pavan Mehta, l’auteur d’un essai intitulé Quand l’Inde s’éveillera. Le couturier Hemant Sagar, de Lecoanet Hemant, en conclut que les photographies controversées auront au moins le mérite d’ouvrir les yeux sur la misère : "Mis en scène dans un contexte si différent, les pauvres ne suscitent plus l’indifférence. Les Indiens aisés prendront au moins conscience de leur existence."

Vogue Inde, la polémique

Coco

Tendances de mode

03 septembre 2008

Lancé en octobre dernier, le Vogue Inde essuie son premier scandale. Il faut dire que dans un pays où la disparité entre les catégories sociales est si intense, il est difficile de prôner l’apogée du luxe sans risquer de tomber dans l’indécence…

Alors que le pays compte désormais plus d’un milliard d’habitants, la classe émergente de la population s’annonce comme le nouvel eldorado des marques de luxe. En effet, en Inde comme en Chine, les individus aiment faire état de leur réussite par le biais de produits haut de gamme, symbole d’avènement social.

Dans ce contexte, le groupe Condé Nast s’est empressé "d’éduquer" le peuple indien en lançant chez eux la 17e édition de Vogue. Depuis quelques mois, les Indiens ont ainsi la possibilité de découvrir les fastes de la société occidentale. Les magnats du secteur ont d’ailleurs tous répondu présents : Gucci, Fendi, Burberry, Hermès… pas un ne veut manquer l’opportunité d’accompagner la croissance indienne.

Cependant, on sait très bien que si le pays voit effectivement certains de ses ressortissants accéder à l’univers du luxe, la majorité d’entre eux vit avec moins d’1 dollar par jour, et est confrontée à une misère immense. C’est pourquoi un minimum de décence est nécessaire si l’on ne veut pas devenir complètement inhumain, gangrené par l’appât du gain. C’est ce "minimum" qui a malheureusement fait défaut à l’une des séries mode de la parution du mois d’août.

En effet, 16 pages – consacrées à la mise en valeur de sacs, parapluies et autres accessoires – furent shootées non pas dans un studio avec tel ou tel mannequins ou stars de Bollywood, mais dans la rue avec pour figurants des Indiens plus préoccupés par la survie au quotidien que par les dernières tendances.

Sur cette série, on peut ainsi voir un vieil homme s’abritant sous un parapluie Burberry, un bébé en bavoir Fendi ou encore une femme portant au bras un Birkin, entourée de ses 3 enfants vêtus de nippes… Certes, les photos sont superbes, le peuple indien possédant cette lumière, cette joie de vivre qui irradierait n’importe quel cliché, néanmoins leur incongruité révolte les journalistes du pays. Confronter une mère qui se bat pour nourrir sa famille à un sac coûtant plus de 10 000 dollars est en effet presque malsain…

Dans un pays ou l’on se suicide parfois pour échapper à une pauvreté écrasante, les médias luxe ne peuvent se permettre des inepties de ce genre. Pour sa défense, Vogue assure avoir voulu illustrer "la nouvelle Inde", où il est possible de réaliser une ascension sociale fulgurante et d’en afficher les signes. Qu’à cela ne tienne, lorsqu’on réalise que les légendes des photos ne font pas référence aux mannequins d’un jour mais simplement aux marques de sacs, on réalise à quel point Vogue n’a que faire du facteur humain…

Alors certes, il est évident que l’industrie du luxe va déferler en Inde et que seuls quelques élus y auront accès, et cela en soi n’est pas critiquable. Ce qui l’est plus, c’est de mélanger les genres de façon unilatérale. Que les sacs Hermès restent donc dans les boutiques de Mubai, et que les photographes se contentent de Gisele, on évitera peut-être ainsi des images malheureuses…

Voir aussi:

Thylane Blondeau : La fille de Véronika Loubry fait scandale

Sophie Bernard

News de stars

07 août 2011

Elle s’appelle Thylane Blondeau, elle a dix ans, c’est la fille de Véronika Loubry et de Patrick Blondeau, elle est mannequin et certaines de ses photos font scandale aux Etats-Unis.

Vous ne la connaissiez pas il y a une semaine, mais Thylane Blondeau c’est un peu la Kate Moss du mannequinat enfant. Comprenez par là qu’elle est le visage incontournable de la mode enfantine… En effet, la fille de Véronika Loubry – personnalité de la télévision française – et de Patrick Blondeau – ancien footballeur – est dans une agence de mannequins pour enfants et elle fait des pubs ainsi que des défilés depuis qu’elle est toute petite.

Mais ce n’est pas son succès qui fait parler aux Etats-Unis. Une série de clichés qu’elle a réalisés pour un numéro du Vogue français soulève la polémique outre-Atlantique. Sur ces photographies, Thylane est habillée avec des vêtements de femme adulte, elle porte entre autres des escarpins léopard, elle est très maquillée et elle joue le model comme une grande.

Est-elle trop jeune pour poser ainsi ? Fait-elle trop femme ? Voici les questions que se posent les Américains. L’émission Good Morning America diffusée sur ABC a consacré l’une de ses rubriques à ce sujet. Des associations US trouvent que ces images vont trop loin dans la sexualisation de la fillette. Chloe Angyal – directrice du site Feminsting – affirme "C’est inapproprié et choquant’, tandis que les internautes lancent des commentaires plus virulents comme ALSMac1 qui a posté sur le site de ABC : "Les photos sont un rêve pour les pédophiles. C’est dégoûtant".

Véronika Loubry s’est justifiée sur le blog de Jean-Marc Morandini :"Le seul élément qui me choque sur cette photo, c’est le collier qu’elle porte, qui vaut trois millions d’euros! [...] Je trouve beaucoup plus choquante une photo pour Petit Bateau, d’une petite fille de 11 ans qui a les seins qui pointent. Là, ma fille n’est pas nue, il ne faut pas exagérer!"

Et vous, qu’en pensez-vous ?

Voir par ailleurs:

Ahlam Shibli : l’exposition polémique qui agite Paris

Arts et scènes | La Palestinienne Ahlam Shibli photographie son pays pour témoigner des traumatismes de son peuple. Une démarche qui n’est pas acceptée par tout le monde.

Frédérique Chapuis

Télérama

22/06/2013

Depuis l’ouverture de l’exposition « Foyer fantôme » consacrée à l’artiste palestinienne Ahlam Shibli, l’équipe du musée du Jeu de Paume est harcelée, menacée, et obligée d’évacuer son public à la suite d’alertes à la bombe… Des organisations extrémistes accusent l’artiste et l’institution de faire l’apologie du terrorisme. Même le ministère de la Culture et de la Communication cède aux pressions en exigeant du Jeu de Paume qu’il clarifie le propos de l’artiste et distingue la proposition d’Ahlam Shibli de ce qu’exprime l’institution…

Principale accusée, la série Death, pour laquelle Ahlam Shibli s’est rendue à Naplouse et dans les camps de réfugiés des alentours, afin d’enquêter sur le culte des martyrs de la seconde intifada (2000- 2005). Un travail artistique montrant l’ominiprésence des défunts dans le quotidien palestinien.

Ces images ne peuvent en aucun cas être une apologie du terrorisme : elles pourraient tout aussi bien être vues comme une critique du culte du martyr, avec sa profusion de clichés d’hommes en armes, paradant dans les foyers au milieu des enfants et des grand-mères, ou sur les murs de la ville. Les images d’Ahlam Shibli ne portent aucun jugement, attestant simplement d’une réalité. La photographe prouve (et c’est son rôle d’artiste) que toute image possède une dimension anthropologique et historique dont il faut tenir compte. Retour sur un parcours et une démarche artistique remarquable.

L’enfance de l’art

C’est à côté de Jenine, dans un village de Galilée, qu’est née Ahlam Shibli, en 1970. La maison familiale est remplie de livres mais aussi de onze enfants, dont neuf filles. Ahlam est l’avant-dernière de la fratrie. Elle se souvient du jour où son frère, étudiant en ville, revint un week-end avec un appareil photo : « Dès lors, trois de mes soeurs et moi nous avons pris l’habitude de nous déguiser puis de prendre la pose. Ma mère autorisait que l’on emprunte ses vêtements ou le beau chapeau de mon père. Et nous avions exceptionnellement le droit d’aller dans son jardin pour les prises de vue. C’est en découvrant le résultat sur les tirages papier, que mon frère nous rapportait des semaines plus tard, que j’ai compris ce que signifiait une narration et la mise en scène de ses propres histoires. Ma vocation d’artiste est probablement née là. » En attendant, Ahlam rêve d’être électricienne. Son père refuse. Aspirant à aider la communauté palestinienne, elle devient conseillère d’éducation, monte un projet pour les enfants défavorisés où elle utilise l’art thérapie, et finit par reprendre des études de cinéma et de photographie. Pour être bien certaine d’avoir trouvé sa voie, elle s’exerce beaucoup, réfléchit longuement à l’acte photographique. Elle avoue qu’elle n’a pas eu confiance en elle jusqu’en 1996, année où, le travail et la maturité aidant, elle découvre enfin ce qu’elle a à dire et comment le montrer.

Son père, qui a fermement encouragé l’épanouissement de tous ses enfants, sera le premier à découvrir les neuf carnets de Wadi al-Salib (« Vallée de la croix »). Un travail photographique où sont reconstituées des scènes quotidiennes dans les maisons en ruine d’un quartier d’Haïfa, abandonné depuis l’expulsion des familles palestiniennes par les Israéliens en 1948. Cette série d’images annonce les questions du chez-soi, du traumatisme de l’expulsion et de la discrimination qui traversent l’oeuvre d’Ahlam Shibli. Une oeuvre résumée dans « Phantom Home » (« Foyer fantôme »), l’exposition qui lui est consacrée pour la première fois en France.

Ni empathie ni désespoir

Parmi les six séries d’images proposées, « Trackers » (2005) et « Death » (2012) ont pour sujet la condition du peuple palestinien ; « Dom Dziecka : la maison meurt de faim quand tu n’es pas là » (2008) s’attache aux orphelinats polonais ; et « Eastern LGBT » (2006) pose la question de la non-reconnaissance et de l’exil des gays, travestis et transexuels orientaux. Quant à la série « Trauma » (2009), réalisée en Corrèze lors de cérémonies de commémoration, elle montre qu’une victime du nazisme a pu, selon le cours de l’histoire, devenir à son tour un bourreau pendant les guerres coloniales d’Indochine et d’Algérie. « Ces images, précise Ahlam Shibli, posent la question de l’utilisation qui est faite du souvenir. Pour la Palestine, on recycle toujours les mêmes clichés de gens qui fuient ou des scènes de massacre. A tel point que les mots "martyr" et "palestinien " sont devenus synonymes. » Sa série la plus récente, « Death », comprend soixante-huit photos montrant, jusqu’à la nausée, la glorification des martyrs sur les affiches placardées dans les rues, sur les images qui envahissent les tombes et les murs des maisons ; qu’ils aient été tués par l’armée israélienne ou qu’ils aient donné la mort lors d’une opération suicide. La photographe dévoile l’intimité touchante des familles et le message politique, le portrait d’un individu et les symboles religieux. Mais la question que pose Ahlam Shibli est immuable : la représentation de la cause palestinienne est-elle possible ou, au contraire, irrémédiablement vouée à l’échec ? Pour autant, elle ne cède ni à l’empathie ni au désespoir, accompagnant ses images de légendes précises et factuelles.

Au côté de ces résistants palestiniens qui risquent l’expulsion ou voient leur maison détruite par les bulldozers israéliens, l’artiste évoque aussi le statut des « trackers », nomades d’origine bédouine, dont certains se sont mis au service de l’armée israélienne afin d’acquérir un bout de terre… subtilisé à d’autres Palestiniens. Là encore, elle ne porte aucun jugement. Sur l’une des photographies de la série « Trackers », on voit un homme en tenue militaire, les oreilles préservées du bruit par des bouchons, le regard perdu au loin. Il s’appuie sur une tige en fer plantée dans la terre et rongée par la rouille qui ne peut plus soutenir grand-chose. Au premier abord, la scène est anodine, mais à la regarder de près, cette image, sans prétention esthétique, se révèle tragique ; dans ce paysage de désolation, la solitude de cet homme est palpable.

« Quelque chose d’irreprésentable »

« Je n’ai pas envie de jouer la médiatrice, de dire "voilà ce qu’il faut regarder", affirme Ahlam Shibli. Il y a quelque chose d’irreprésentable dans la cause palestinienne comme dans la condition de l’enfant orphelin, que je cherche néanmoins à montrer, tout du moins à suggérer. C’est l’un des challenges de la photographie. » Au fond, qu’est-ce qui nous regarde avec insistance dans l’histoire de cet « autre », pour reprendre la formule du philosophe Georges Didi-Huberman ? A la question de l’altérité, donc, elle ne répond pas en sociologue mais veille toutefois à préserver une distance discrète. Les longues recherches documentaires menées pour chacun de ses sujets lui permettent sans doute de se défaire de la trop forte charge émotionnelle pour ne se concentrer que sur l’espace de son cadre photographique ; un chez-soi où elle est libre et son seul maître. D’ailleurs, à la question « Croyez-vous en Dieu ? », la jeune Palestinienne répond en riant et avec dérision : « Absolument pas ! Comment la croyance peut-elle s’appuyer sur le châtiment ? Dieu c’est moi ! »

A voir :

Exposition « Foyer fantôme », jusqu’au 27 août Jeu de Paume.

Voir encore:

Culture

Ahlam Shibli au Jeu de paume : La critique contre la censure

Une série de photos d’Ahlam Shibli est accusée d’« apologie du terrorisme ». Analyse d’une œuvre qui travaille le thème de la disparition.

Christophe Kantcheff

27 juin 2013

Politis n° 1259

Quand des œuvres sont menacées de censure, est-il encore possible de les considérer d’un point de vue esthétique ? L’exercice critique reste-t-il pertinent ? Plus que jamais. Car la censure, toujours, nie les œuvres en tant que telles. Ceux qui par des pressions, comme celles exercées notamment par le Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France (Crif), ou par des actes violents (alertes à la bombe, menaces de mort…) tentent d’obtenir la fermeture de l’exposition consacrée actuellement à Ahlam Shibli au musée du Jeu de paume, à Paris, intitulée Foyers fantômes, n’ont pour la plupart pas vu les œuvres qu’ils incriminent. Quand bien même ce serait le cas, le simple fait que le Crif invoque la notion d’« apologie du terrorisme » à propos de ces photographies atteste de son aveuglement. Non qu’il y ait une approche des œuvres plus « objective » que d’autres. Mais la moindre des choses est de se rendre disponible pour les accueillir, de mettre à distance ses a priori et d’être attentif aux signes, aux images qui sont proposés. En outre, parce qu’il y a aveuglement, la voix de la censure est irrationnelle. Pour la contrer, le geste critique est nécessaire, qui s’efforce de produire un discours articulé.

Dans cette exposition, qui regroupe l’essentiel de l’œuvre photographique réalisée depuis une dizaine d’années par Ahlam Shibli, on voit des enfants polonais vivant en foyer (Dom Dziecka), des lesbiennes, des gays, des bi et des trans exilés (Eastern LGBT), des Arabes israéliens d’origine bédouine ayant intégré l’armée israélienne (Trackers), les marques du souvenir des combattants de la Seconde Guerre mondiale et des guerres coloniales (Trauma), et la manière dont sont utilisées, dans des intérieurs ou dans l’espace public, les images des combattants défunts de la cause palestinienne (Death).

Thématiquement, ce qui relie ces nombreux clichés n’a rien d’une évidence. Les fils sont parfois directs, d’autres fois souterrains ou métaphoriques. Ahlam Shibli travaille sur les manifestations de résistance à la disparition et à l’invisibilité. Les personnes concernées, ses « sujets », ont pour la plupart perdu leur foyer, au sens large : leur famille pour les enfants polonais ; leur pays réprimant ce qu’ils sont pour les personnes LGBT ; les Palestiniens, quant à eux, ont vu leur existence gommée et leur État nié ; tandis que certains résistants à l’Occupation allemande se sont retrouvés, quelques années plus tard, faisant partie du mauvais camp en Indochine ou en Algérie. En outre, l’exposition s’ouvre sur une série intitulée Self Portrait, où une fille et un garçon inventent une histoire dans le village où a grandi l’artiste (elle-même Arabe israélienne d’origine bédouine). Il s’agit là d’une reconstitution, ou d’une fiction autobiographique, qui rend visible un souvenir, une émotion, un « foyer intime ».

Dans la salle Death, qui pose problème aux censeurs, Ahlam Shibli a apposé un texte de présentation. On peut y lire : « Death montre plusieurs façons pour ceux qui sont absents de retrouver une présence, une “représentation” : combattants palestiniens tombés lors de la résistance armée aux incursions israéliennes, et victimes de l’armée israélienne tuées dans des circonstances diverses […] ; militants ayant mené des actions où ils étaient certains de laisser leur vie, entre autres les hommes et les femmes bardés d’explosifs qu’ils ont mis à feu pour assassiner des Israéliens […] ; et enfin prisonniers ». Face aux attaques, Ahlam Shibli a précisé : « Je ne suis pas une militante […]. Mon travail est de montrer, pas de dénoncer ni de juger. » Dans le communiqué du ministère de la Culture, censé soutenir l’artiste et l’institution du Jeu de paume, mais qui en réalité s’en dédouane, Aurélie Filippetti a cru bon d’interpréter cette phrase comme la revendication d’une « neutralité ». Erreur. Ahlam Shibli, comme tout artiste digne de ce nom, assume un point de vue. Celui-ci est présent dans toutes les salles de l’exposition, pas seulement dans Death. Mais ce point de vue est à hauteur des personnes photographiées. Il cherche à se fondre avec celui de ses sujets, à s’identifier au leur. Afin de montrer quels types de représentations ils se fabriquent, quelle forme d’être-ensemble, de visibilité dans le champ social ou de souvenirs ils élaborent. La photographe révèle ainsi une construction d’identité, à l’image de la série Self Portrait, mais qui dans ce cas s’applique à elle-même. Il s’agit, dans tous les cas, d’« histoires qu’on se raconte sur soi ». La dimension documentaire de son œuvre n’exclut donc pas l’imagination, ni même la fiction.

Certains clichés de Death sont particulièrement éloquents, surtout ceux où l’on voit des familles autour des effigies de leurs morts. Sur l’un d’eux, un garçon regarde son père avec amour et admiration. Sur un autre, la photo encadrée est époussetée par la sœur du défunt. Dans les maisons, ces portraits sont largement exposés sur les murs, les protagonistes souvent en situation : ce sont des saints guerriers, ou des « martyrs », comme les nomment les Palestiniens, dont la présence s’impose aux vivants.

Ahlam Shibli a photographié « de l’intérieur ». L’absence de prise de distance est consubstantielle à son projet artistique. C’est pourquoi l’accuser de reprendre à son compte le mot « martyrs » dans les cartels de la salle Death, sans guillemets, comme il le lui a été reproché, relève du faux procès. Mais l’usage des cartels à portée informative, plus développé dans cette salle que dans les autres, a tendance à affaiblir les images de leur charge narrative et même émotionnelle. Contrairement à ce que certains ont réclamé, c’est-à-dire une plus grande contextualisation des photographies, la force de l’œuvre d’Ahlam Shibli est de donner à voir sans filtre l’univers mental de dominés au cœur du chaos de l’histoire. Le scandale est de ne pas admettre que cette œuvre s’avère par là même, et sans provocation aucune, nécessairement scandaleuse.

Voir de plus:

Aurélie Philipetti : choisit le camp des fascistes de la Ligue de Défense Juive (LDJ)

Di-Léta

Mediapart

02 juillet 2013

Expo Jeu de Paume : le gouvernement encourage le terrorisme

Les personnes qui se sont déplacées hier dimanche pour visiter l’exposition d’Ahlam Shibli, au Musée du Jeu de Paume dans le Jardin des Tuileries à Paris, ont trouvé ses portes fermées, la LDJ ayant annoncé une « descente » sur le musée ce jour là !

Ainsi ce gouvernement de lâches, cette ministre de la Culture qui se couche quand les chiens du lobby israélien aboient, n’ont pas été en mesure de protéger l’accès à cette exposition ?

Nous ne payons pas assez d’impôts pour que la culture soit respectée ? Ou bien s’agit-il de faire plaisir au CRIF et consorts ? Ou encore M. Valls et Mme Philipetti ont peur des bandes armées de la LDJ ? Alors qu’ils les interdisent !

C’est une honte !

Alors, la LDJ n’a qu’à annoncer un « raid » tous les jours, et on fermera le musée définitivement ?

Et quand on pense que ce sont des militants de la liberté et des droits de l’homme que le gouvernement poursuit en justice pour « entrave » quand nous nous contentions de distribuer pacifiquement des tracts aux consommateurs pour expliquer pourquoi il n’est pas éthique d’acheter des produits de l’occupant israélien !

C’est assez incroyable.

Le gouvernement français est minable : il encourage le terrorisme, l’intimidation et les menaces de ceux qui provoquent des alertes à la bombe, envoient des menaces de mort et harcèlent la direction du musée.

Nous rappelons que l’exposition de la photographe palestinienne Ahlam Shibli esrt exposée au Musée du Jeu de Paume à Paris jusqu’au 1er septembre, que c’est une exposition magnifique et très instructive, et qu’il faut aller la voir !

Nous sommes allés visiter cette exposition, et nous en sommes revenus bouleversés. Elle est passionnante et non réservée à des militants. Les visiteurs de tous âges et de tous milieux qui en prenaient connaissance, et profitaient des explications très intéressantes de la guide du Musée, n’ont pas émis la moindre critique, n’ont pas été choqués par une seule photographie. Ils étaient au contraire favorablement impressionnés par la beauté des photos,les réflexions et interrogations qu’elles suscitent sur divers problèmes, dont :

celui de l’exil et de la notion de foyer. Toujours intéressée par les précarités, les déracinements, les transplantations, Ahlam Shibli nous présente, dans la série « Maison d’enfants » des orphelins ou enfants abandonnés polonais qui recréent là un monde à eux. Elle traite par ailleurs des homosexuels hommes et femmes qui ont dû fuir leurs pays, le plus souvent musulmans, où ils ne pouvaient assumer leurs choix de vie.

la résistance à l’occupation pendant la deuxième guerre mondiale et l’engagement dans des luttes de conquêtes coloniales, par les mêmes personnes, en Corrèze, avec des lieux célébrant les deux à la fois et au même endroit !

et la manière dont les Palestiniens tentent de conserver leur dignité, qu’ils soient en prison ou dans des camps de réfugiés à Naplouse, sous occupation. Comment ils tentent, au milieu de la mort constamment présente, et de la négation de leur histoire, de leur liberté, de conserver la mémoire de leurs proches, ces martyrs tués en combattant l’armée d’occupation, à un check-point, ou en commettant des attentats suicide, signes d’un désespoir tel que leur vie ne leur semblait plus présenter la moindre utilité.

Rappelons que cette très belle expo vient de Barcelone où nul n’a tenté de la censurer, et elle va au Portugal cet automne, où, très probablement, nul ne le fera.

Les visiteurs normalement constitués, et surtout honnêtes, comprennent bien que le travail d’Ahlam Shibli est, non pas une apologie du terrorisme comme le lobby israélien voudrait le faire croire, mais une réflexion sur la manière dont les hommes réagissent face à l’absence ou à la destruction de leur foyer, et s’adaptent aux contraintes qui en résultent.

AGIR :

Il faut impérativement dire à notre ministre de la Culture ce que nous dénonçons sa complaisance vis à vis des terroristes, de ceux qui n’ont qu’une seule culture, celle de la violence et de l’intolérance :

ET QUE NOUS REFUSONS QUE CES TERRORISTES EMPÊCHENT L’OUVERTURE DU MUSEE, CE QUI EST UN SCANDALE !

Aurélie Philipetti : sp.ministre@culture.gouv.fr

CAPJPO-EuroPalestine : http://www.europalestine.com/spip.php?article8376

Voir également:

Ahlam Shibli: quand les terroristes deviennent des martyrs

La photographe palestinienne est exposée au Jeu de Paume. En filigrane de son travail, on peut lire un discours pro-palestinien qui excuse étonnamment le terrorisme. Voire le justifie. Voire le magnifie.

Slate.fr
11/06/2013
Ahlam Shibli, Sans titre (Death n° 48 ), Palestine, 2011-2012 / Jeu de Paume

MIS A JOUR LE 13/06 AVEC LA REACTION DU JEU DE PAUME

Au Jeu de Paume, à Paris, plusieurs expositions en cours. L’une d’elles est de la photographe palestinienne Ahlam Shibli: Foyer Fantôme. L’artiste aborde «les contradictions inhérentes à la notion de foyer», explique le musée.

Pour aborder ces contradictions, six séries photos parlent de déracinement, de déplacement, de spoliation. Des portraits d’homosexuels ou de transgenres contraints de quitter leurs foyers au Pakistan ou au Liban pour vivre leur sexualité comme ils l’entendent, des enfants grandissant dans des orphelinats en Pologne. Ahlam Shibli met tous ces parias sur ses images et ils sont soudain dans un chez-soi, inclus dans un ensemble.

Mais en filigrane, se dessine dans Foyer Fantôme une autre logique. Un discours pro-palestinien qui excuse étonnamment le terrorisme. Voire le justifie. Voire le magnifie.

Dès la série Trackers, quelque chose de complexe se dessine. Le texte d’introduction de la série est le suivant:

«Série réalisée en 2005, porte sur les Palestiniens d’origine bédouine qui ont servi ou servent encore comme volontaires de l’armée israélienne. Ce projet s’interroge sur le prix qu’une minorité colonisée est obligée de payer à une majorité. Composée de colons, peut-être pour se faire accepter, peut-être pour changer d’identité, peut-être pour survivre, peut-être aussi pour toutes ces raisons et pour d’autres encore.»

Les photos montrent des Palestiniens déracinés, peut-être, mais surtout contraints ou traîtres. Comme sur ces trois portraits, accrochés les uns au-dessus des autres. Les deux premiers ont les lèvres entrouvertes, comme quand on reprend douloureusement son souffle. Les trois ont de la peinture sur le visage, comme travestis contre leur gré. Changés en autres, prostitués.

Death

Mais c’est la série finale, Death, qui choque. Le Jeu de Paume a mis un petit carton dans la salle pour prévenir que les textes étaient de la photographe, comme une prise de distance. La photographe, donc, est celle qui écrit le texte d’introduction de la série:

«Ce travail porte sur la demande de reconnaissance née de la deuxième Intifada, le soulèvement palestinien contre la puissance coloniale dans les territoires occupés par Israël depuis 1967. La deuxième Intifada, qui a duré de 2000 à 2005, a fait plusieurs milliers de morts dans le camp palestinien.

Death montre plusieurs façons pour ceux qui sont absents de retrouver une présence, une représentation: combattants palestiniens, tombés lors de la résistance armée aux incursions israéliennes, et victimes de l’armée israélienne tuées dans des circonstances diverses (chahid et chahida); militants ayant mené des actions où ils étaient certains de laisser leur vie, entre autre les hommes et les femmes bardés d’explosifs qu’ils ont mis à feu pour assassiner les Israéliens (istichhadi et istichhadiya); et enfin prisonniers. Les premiers sont morts, les derniers vivants, condamnés à la prison pour le reste de leurs jours ou presque.

Ces représentations font de toute personne ayant perdu la vie par suite de l’occupation israélienne en Palestine un martyr.

Death se limite à quelques moyens de représentations des martyrs et des détenus (…) Toutes ces formes de représentations émanent des familles, des amis et des associations de combattants.»


Ahlam Shibli, Sans titre (Death n° 47), Palestine, 2011-2012, Camp de réfugiés de Balata, 7 mars 2012[1]

Représentations

Ce sont des «représentations», la photographe le dit bien. Ahlam Shibli montre, photographies alignées, des affiches faisant l’apologie de ces «martyrs» sur les murs de camps de réfugiés de Balata, sur ceux de la ville de Naplouse. Des hommes avec des poses de Rambo mais ayant tué pour de vrai.

D’autres images montrent des foyers, murs tapis de photos à l’effigie des «martyrs» disparus: terroristes s’étant fait sauter. Ils sont fascinants ces foyers-mausolées.


Ahlam Shibli, Sans titre (Death n° 33), Palestine, 2011-2012 © Ahlam Shibli

Cette série montre un monde fascinant où les terroristes sont adulés. Elle montre comment les images suppléent au discours et gardent vivants des morts pour que la force de leurs actions persiste. Elle pourrait montrer la façon dont un discours peut être renversé, une idéologie servie, des terroristes présentés en héros.

Mais ces «représentations» sont livrées sans distance, sans regard de biais. Sans critique. Dans les légendes, les terroristes sont décrits en martyrs, en combattants, en victimes. Pour la photo ci-dessus, la légende dit:

«Photos du martyr Khalil Marchoud qu’est en train d’épousseter sa sœur dans le séjour de la maison familiale. Sur l’affiche, cadeau des Brigades Abu Ali Mustafa, il est présenté comme le secrétaire général des Brigades des martyrs d’al-Aqsa à Balata.»

En mettant sur le même plan ces terroristes et les personnages des autres séries, victimes de régimes homophobes, d’occupants nazis en France, orphelins abandonnés, ces terroristes sont assimilés aux victimes. Dans cette région du monde où la propagande est si violente, l’artiste semble avoir été contaminée par le discours iconographique abêtissant. Et le Jeu de Paume, qui aurait pu se servir de ce travail pour montrer et la réalité et son travestissement en images, aussi.

Colère

Le Crif s’est ému de cette exposition. Une première fois, précisant dans un communiqué que l’exposition faisait «l’apologie du terrorisme»:

«Ces gens sont pour la plupart membres des Brigades d’al-Aqsa, Issal-dinal-Qassam et du Front populaire de libération de la Palestine (FPLP), considérées comme des organisations terroristes par le Conseil de l’Union européenne»

Puis une seconde:

«Il s’agit d’éviter à tout prix de rappeler le contexte historique et les drames qui ont été occasionnés par ces multiples attentats. Combien de bus israéliens éventrés? Combien de magasins ou de restaurants israéliens calcinés? Combien d’enfants israéliens assassinés? Combien de rues déchiquetées?»

La polémique a voyagé jusqu’en Israël, dont l’ambassade à Paris est allée voir l’exposition et a «décidé de saisir les autorités pour leur demander des explications».

Ce mardi, le Jeu de Paume était un peu embarrassé par l’affaire. Marta Gili, directrice du Jeu de Paume et commissaire de l’exposition, n’avait pas le temps de parler à la presse. Mais elle revenait du ministère de la Culture où une stratégie devait se décider.

Mercredi, un communiqué était envoyé aux rédactions:

«Le Jeu de Paume réfute fermement les accusations d’apologie du terrorisme ou de complaisance à l’égard de celui-ci, et portera plainte contre toutes les personnes lui adressant des menaces.

Ahlam Shibli, artiste internationalement reconnue, propose une réflexion critique sur la manière dont les hommes et les femmes réagissent face à la privation de leur foyer qui les conduit à se construire, coûte que coûte, des lieux d’appartenance.

Dans la série Death, conçue spécialement pour cette rétrospective, l’artiste Ahlam Shibli présente un travail sur les images qui ne constitue ni de la propagande ni une apol ogie du terrorisme, contrairement à ce que certains messages que le Jeu de Paume a reçus laissent entendre. Comme l’artiste l’explique elle-même : "Je ne suis pas une militante [...] Mon travail est de montrer, pas de dénoncer ni de juger".

Death explore la manière dont des Palestiniens disparus – "martyrs", selon les termes repris par l’artiste – sont représentés dans les espaces publics et privés (affiches et graffitis dans les rues, inscriptions sur les tombes, autels et souvenirs dans les foyers…) et retrouvent ainsi une présence dans leur communauté.»

C.P.

[1] Légende complète de l’image telle qu’affichée au Jeu de Paume: «Mémorial du martyr Hamouda Chtewei aménagé devant la maison familiale. Au mur, une peinture du martyr, enveloppé des couleurs palestiniennes, dans sa tombe, sur laquelle poussent des oliviers; au-dessus, un portrait de lui. Les mémoriaux de ce genre sont souvent décorés de plantes et d’arbres pour symboliser la vie qui continue. Ici, il s’agit d’un figuier. En haut, au balcon, la famille a accroché une affiche de Chtewei où l’on lit: “Beaucoup ont une arme, mais peu la portent jusqu’à la poitrine de l’ennemi.” Chtewei était un combattant qui figurait sur la liste des personnes recherchées par Israël. Après avoir échappé à plusieurs tentatives d’assassinat, il a été tué dans ce camp le 22 février 2006 lors d’un accrochage avec l’armée israélienne. Courtesy de l’artiste, © Ahlam Shibli.»

Voir aussi:

Le parti-pris du Musée du jeu de Paume

Marc Knobel

CRIF

11 Juin 2013

Dans un long article publié le 10 juin 2013, France 24 (1) revient sur l’exposition de photographies qui provoque la polémique, puisque le CRIF à ce sujet a parlé « d’apologie du terrorisme » (2) : la série prise par la Palestinienne Ahlam Shibli, exposée au Musée du jeu de Paume, à Paris depuis le 28 mai. 

Cet ensemble s’intitule Death. Rappelons ici que Shibli veut montrer « quelques moyens de représentation des martyrs et des détenus » dans Naplouse et comment les familles ou la société palestinienne entretiennent la mémoire des terroristes qui ont été tués lors d’attentats-suicide perpétrés en Israël. Mais, ce qui est incroyable dans cet article, c’est la réaction du Musée. Hallucinant.

Selon France 24, le musée du Jeu de Paume souhaite rester discret sur le sujet, pour ne pas alimenter davantage la polémique. Le Musée spécifie cependant que les légendes ont été rédigées entièrement par Ahlam Shibli, à la demande de l’artiste, et qu’elles font partie intégrante de l’œuvre. Étrange commentaire. D’abord, on comprend que les commissaires du Musée soient embarrassés. Et pour cause, on le serait à moins. Par ailleurs, comment aurait-il été possible que le Musée rédige les légendes ? Le scandale eut été encore plus grand. Bref, ce n’est pas une explication. Tout juste, un tour de passe-passe. Le musée rappelle qu’un texte de présentation, rédigé par les commissaires de l’exposition, remet ces photographies et ces légendes en contexte, selon France 24. La photographie d’Ahlam « suspend l’autonomie de l’image et fait basculer celle-ci dans un régime qui ne l’utilise plus dans un but informatif », estiment ainsi les commissaires. Le travail de la photographe « évite une obsession historique propre à ce médium, celle de fournir des preuves à tout prix. Ses images refusent d’expliquer le conflit ».

Les commissaires font siennes les explications tordues de la photographe palestinienne. Car il s’agit d’éviter à tout prix de rappeler le contexte historique et les drames qui ont été occasionnés par ces multiples attentats. Combien de bus israéliens éventrés ? Combien de magasins ou de restaurants israéliens calcinés ? Combien d’enfants israéliens assassinés ? Combien de rues déchiquetées ? Le commentaire des commissaires est invraisemblable. Il faut « éviter une obsession historique », disent-ils. Par contre, il ne faut (surtout) pas éviter de faire l’apologie de ces terroristes, terroristes glorifiés par la société palestinienne, rappelons-le ici. Ce sont des « martyrs », qui ont été tués en témoignage de leur foi ou de leur cause, selon Shibli. Une cause sacralisée par cette photographe. Et les kamikazes se trouvent donc légitimés, les attentats sont justifiés, les victimes sont oubliées. Et cette soi-disant « œuvre » n’est qu’une « œuvre » de basse propagande.

L’art peut interpeller et être subversif. Il questionne en Israël aussi. Mais l’exposition au Musée du Jeu de Paume ne répond pas à ces critères. Cette série de photographie est une entreprise de propagande peu conforme à la neutralité d’un établissement public et culturel.

Notes :

1.http://www.france24.com/fr/20130610-exposition-paris-photos-martyrs-palestiniens-polemique-ahlam-shibli-musee-jeu-paume-crif

2.http://www.crif.org/fr/lecrifenaction/une-exposition-inacceptable-au-mus%C3%A9e-du-jeu-de-paume/37353

Voir également:

Ahlam Shibli

American Art

5/20/13

MACBA

Kim Bradley

Barcelona

Ahlam Shibli’s first major retrospective, "Phantom Home," featured nine series of her documentary-style photographs, dating from 2000 to 2012. For Shibli, who was born in Galilee in 1970 and lives in Haifa, the concept of home is multilayered, encompassing one’s family home, one’s homeland and one’s body.

A Palestinian of Bedouin descent, Shibli has often focused on her homeland. All her projects involve months of investigation as well as direct contact with her subjects. The mostly black-and-white photos in "Goter" (2002-03) were taken in two types of areas where Bedouin families live: villages that they’ve inhabited for centuries but are unrecognized by the Israeli government, and "recognized" townships set up by the government. The images show barren, rocky terrains and desolate, flat landscapes, sometimes with a solitary building in the distance. Occasionally, people appear: we see children playing in dirt berms, and a family going about daily tasks in a simple home. The viewer cannot easily tell the types of villages apart; in both, a sense of desolation and impermanence prevails.

Shibli’s interest in the body as home led to "Eastern LGBT" (2004/2006), a group of works portraying the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Eastern Europeans who have fled the repression in their countries to live more freely in Tel Aviv, Barcelona, London and Zurich. One photo features a lone man adjusting his slinky red belly-dancing outfit in an empty concrete hallway. Others depict expats helping each other dress up for a night out.

Without question, Shibli’s new series, "Death" (2011-12), commissioned by the three museums co-hosting her retrospective (MACBA, the Jeu de Paume, Paris, and the Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serralves, Porto), is her most ambitious and difficult work to date. It provides an in-depth study of commemorative images of Palestinian martyrs in the city of Nablus, a bastion of Palestinian resistance during the Second Intifada (2000-05). A martyr in these circumstances is any Palestinian killed due to the Israeli occupation, including soldiers who died in confrontations with Israeli forces, civilians killed in Israeli attacks and suicide bombers who carried out attacks in Israel.

Shibli sought out the families and friends of these people as well as contacted martyr support associations. The resulting 68 medium and large color prints present posters, murals, banners, paintings, photographs and graffiti of some of the most revered martyrs in Nablus (such as the first Palestinian woman to carry out a suicide bombing in Israel). The subjects are typically shown brandishing a weapon, with backgrounds that include patriotic decorative elements like the Palestinian flag and handwritten exaltations.

In the public spaces of Nablus, a cult of martyrdom seems omnipresent. Commemorations are seen on concrete walls pockmarked by bullet holes, or in the shabby interiors of cafes. Large, framed pictures of prominent martyrs are mounted on metal structures above the crumbling entrance of an oft-visited cemetery. Shibli provides lengthy descriptive captions for each photograph (available at MACBA as printed gallery notes), indicating details about the people pictured.

Perhaps the most disturbing photos are the ones taken in the intimacy of family homes, such as Untitled (Death, no. 37), in which a living room is dominated by a painting of Kayed Abu Mustafá (aka Mikere), a grim-faced young man with his finger on the trigger of an assault rifle. Mikere’s son looks up at the portrait of his father with pride, as his mother, daughter and young nephew sit nearby.

Shibli’s "Death" series seems to be the culmination of many years of reflecting on her homeland. She has probed deeply into the devastating impact that the frustrated quest for a home has had, and presents a terrifying portrait of a place where a continuing cult of martyrdom—and terrorism—appears inevitable. This viewer wonders if the questions that "Death" poses are best served by its presentation in the rarefied context of a contemporary art museum.

"Phantom Home" travels to the Jeu de Paume, Paris, May 28- Sept. 1, and the Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serralves, Porto, Portugal, October 2013-February 2014.

Voir de même:

Martha Rosler: Bringing the War Home

the remains of the web

 04/09/2012

For a long time Martha Rosler was con­sid­ered to be an “under­ground artist”, as she pio­neered using dif­fer­ent media and com­bin­ing them.

Her work fre­quently con­trasts the domes­tic lives of women with inter­na­tional war, repres­sion and pol­i­tics, and pays close atten­tion to the mass media and archi­tec­tural structures.

Over the last 40 years she has com­mit­ted to an art that engages a pub­lic beyond the con­fines of the art world, Rosler inves­ti­gates how socioe­co­nomic real­i­ties and polit­i­cal ide­olo­gies dom­i­nate ordi­nary life. Rosler uses a vari­ety of medi­ums, but her most rec­og­niz­able medium is photo-collage and photo-text. She also works cre­ates video instal­la­tions and per­for­mance art.

We think of pho­tomon­tage works by the Ger­mans of the 1920s (John Heart­field and Han­nah Hoch) we also recall the Sit­u­a­tion­ists in France who, as part of their attack on the “spec­ta­cle” of media-capitalism, altered comic strips and advertisements.

In the 1960s she made pho­tomon­tages that protested the Viet­nam War and the objec­ti­fi­ca­tion of women. Dur­ing the 1970s she became known for her videos — some quite hilar­i­ous — that cri­tiqued female social roles.

She began mak­ing polit­i­cal pho­tomon­tages to protest the Viet­nam War, and reac­ti­vated the project dur­ing the 2004 pres­i­den­tial elec­tion, in response to the Iraq war. They are com­pos­ites con­structed from the incon­gru­ous pho­tographs com­monly found cheek by jowl in com­mer­cial news media: adver­tis­ing images of ide­al­ized Amer­i­can homes con­joined with com­bat scenes from overseas.

The ear­lier series, made from about 1967 to 1972, brought the war home; she intro­duced Viet­namese refugees and Amer­i­can troops into images of sub­ur­ban liv­ing rooms. The pieces were intended to be pho­to­copied and passed around at anti­war ral­lies in New York and Cal­i­for­nia, where Ms. Rosler, a Brook­lyn native, lived on and off through­out the 1970s.

The pho­tomon­tages of the 2000s dif­fer in that they are large, vibrantly col­ored, dig­i­tally printed and hung in a com­mer­cial gallery. In them Ms. Rosler often col­lages Amer­i­cans onto scenes from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Ini­tially Ms. Rosler felt some trep­i­da­tion about reviv­ing the project. “The down­side was that peo­ple could say, ‘She’s revis­it­ing some­thing she did 30 years ago,’ ” she said. “But I thought that actu­ally was a plus, because I wanted to make the point that with all the dif­fer­ences, this is exactly the same sce­nario. We haven’t advanced at all in the way we go to war.”, “Tout la change, tout la même chose.” — Martha Rosler, on “Bring­ing the War Home: House Beautiful”.

Martha Rosler teaches at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rut­gers Uni­ver­sity and the Städelschule in Frankfurt

Voir enfin:

Le Jeu de Paume répond aux accusations qui lui sont faites à propos de l’exposition de l’artiste palestinienne Ahlam Shibli

Le Jeu de Paume qui veille, depuis sa création, à promouvoir la pluralité des expressions artistiques autour de l’image sous toutes ses formes, regrette la polémique naissante autour de l’exposition "Foyer Fantôme" de l’artiste Ahlam Shibli.

Ces derniers jours, l’institution a reçu de nombreux messages de protestation à propos de cette exposition et plus particulièrement de l’une des séries présentées, intitulée Death.

Le Jeu de Paume réfute fermement les accusations d’apologie du terrorisme ou de complaisance à l’égard de celui-ci, et portera plainte contre toutes les personnes lui adressant des menaces.

Ahlam Shibli, artiste internationalement reconnue, propose une réflexion critique sur la manière dont les hommes et les femmes réagissent face à la privation de leur foyer qui les conduit à se construire, coûte que coûte, des lieux d’appartenance.

Dans la série Death, conçue spécialement pour cette rétrospective, l’artiste Ahlam Shibli présente un travail sur les images qui ne constitue ni de la propagande ni une apologie du terrorisme, contrairement à ce que certains messages que le Jeu de Paume a reçus laissent entendre. Comme l’artiste l’explique elle-même : "Je ne suis pas une militante [...] Mon travail est de montrer, pas de dénoncer ni de juger".

Death explore la manière dont des Palestiniens disparus — "martyrs", selon les termes repris par l’artiste — sont représentés dans les espaces publics et privés (affiches et graffitis dans les rues, inscriptions sur les tombes, autels et souvenirs dans les foyers…) et retrouvent ainsi une présence dans leur communauté.

L’exposition monographique réunit cinq autres séries de l’artiste questionnant les contradictions inhérentes à la notion de "chez soi" dans différents contextes : celui de la société palestinienne, mais aussi des communautés d’enfants recueillis dans les orphelinats polonais, des commémorations de soulèvements de la Résistance contre les nazis à Tulle (Corrèze) et des guerres coloniales en Indochine et en Algérie, ou encore des ressortissants des pays orientaux qui ont quitté leur pays afin de vivre librement leur orientation sexuelle.

La plupart de ces photographies sont accompagnées de légendes écrites par l’artiste, inséparables des images, qui les situent dans un temps et un lieu précis. Des mesures ont été prises par le Jeu de Paume pour le rappeler aux visiteurs.

La rétrospective dédiée à Ahlam Shibli s’inscrit dans la volonté de montrer de nouvelles pratiques de la photographie documentaire, après les expositions consacrées à Sophie Ristelhueber (2009), Bruno Serralongue (2010) ou Santu Mofokeng (2011). La programmation du Jeu de Paume a pour objectif de s’interroger de façon critique sur les différentes formes de représentation des sociétés contemporaines et, dans cette démarche, revendique la liberté d’expression des artistes.

Le Jeu de Paume ne souhaite pas esquiver le débat ni passer sous silence l’émoi que l’exposition suscite auprès d’un certain nombre de personnes, bien au contraire, il invite chacun à la découvrir sereinement.

Après le MACBA de Barcelone (25 janvier-28 avril 2013) et avant la Fondation Serralves de Porto (15 novembre 2013-9 février 2014), tous deux coproducteurs, le Jeu de Paume présente, pour la première fois en France, l’œuvre de l’artiste palestinienne Ahlam Shibli avec l’exposition "Foyer Fantôme", du 27 mai au 1er septembre 2013.


Mariage homosexuel pour tous: Attention, un pinkwashing peut en cacher un autre ! (Pinkwashing gets its first backlash)

24 juin, 2013

http://www.contre-info.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/pub-eram-2.jpghttp://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/de4d5-image2-lesbiennehomosexuellepublicitc3a9.jpg?w=450&h=633http://www.20min.ch/diashow/15531/02.jpghttp://static1.puremedias.com/articles/4/39/24/14/@/3938100-capture-puremedias-fr-diapo-1.jpghttp://i5.cdnds.net/13/09/450x450/harvey_nichs_lesbian_kiss.jpg

http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m5infhUgSU1qdbff9o1_1280.jpghttp://www.usageorge.com/Wallpapers/Celebrities/wallpaper/Britney-Madonna-Christina.jpghttp://www.france24.com/en/files/imagecache/france24_169_large/article/image/marseille-kiss.jpghttp://cdn2-b.examiner.com/sites/default/files/styles/image_content_width/hash/1d/1c/1d1c4386526066f0d3923f56a8c18c05.jpg?itok=XjQ76Agrhttp://www.yohyoh.com/img_upload/server/php//files/2360f5e41f3f31bbc8c478d79745f7e1cc14.jpeghttp://luciferschildren.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/blue-is-the-warmest-color.jpg?w=450&h=397http://comicsbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/planches.jpghttp://i.huffpost.com/gen/1206509/thumbs/o-OLIVIER-CIAPPA-570.jpg?4http://photo.europe1.fr/divers/tag-anti-mariage_930620/24556487-1-fre-FR/tag-anti-mariage_930620_mainstory2.jpgComme disent mes deux mamans, la famille c’est sacré ! Pub Eram
Il faudrait dire soit mariage pour tous, soit égalité face au mariage. Si on comprend bien que derrière le terme il y a une facilité de langage, il y a aussi un danger d’aller vers une union civile [c’est-à-dire une union qui reprendrait les droits du mariage, mais exclurait les questions d’adoption et de filiation], c’est-à-dire un droit spécifique. Nicolas Gougain (porte-parole de l’inter-LGBT)
Les écoles maternelles et élémentaires européennes pourront interdire les livres pour enfants et les contes de fées qui dépeignent la famille traditionnelle. Il s’agit d’une demande de la commission parlementaire des droits de la femme. Selon le comité, les contes de fées devraient parler de la diversité sexuelle. Pravda
Il y a décidemment une volonté manifeste et malsaine, de vouloir imposer l’homosexualité comme la nouvelle norme en Europe. Au nom du fameux principe d’égalité, la République Française vient à son tour d’imposer à sa population, une loi autorisant le mariage des personnes inverties et bientôt leur adoption d’enfants, imitant artificiellement le modèle de la famille traditionnelle et naturelle. Sitôt entérinée, le premier « mariage » a été célébré dans la ville de Montpellier dont sa mairesse, à l’image de la majorité socialiste à laquelle elle appartient, peine à trouver des solutions au marasme général et inflige donc à sa population, des animations sociétales moins coûteuses. Enfin, en apparence seulement, si l’on en juge par la débauche de moyens réunis par la commune, et donc à la charge des contribuables, pour unir deux agents municipaux en présence de personnalités comme Najat Valaux-Belkacem, sensées conférer à l’événement un caractère historique, comparable au sacre des Rois de France ou de la Révolution de 1789, si l’on en croit le traitement caricatural des journalistes français. Le voyage préalable de la porte-parole du gouvernement à Rouen pour rendre hommage soi-disant à sainte Jeanne-d’Arc, ne permet cependant pas de comparer ce non-évènement avec le sacre de Charles VII. D’acceptée, l’homosexualité devient promulguée. Cette parodie de mariage fait suite à la récompense délivrée par le jury de Cannes et son président américain Steven Spielberg, à un film mettant en scène les amours passionnées entre deux jeunes femmes. Film soi-disant transgressif, qui fait l’apologie de la pédophilie entre une jeune adulte et une mineure. Une histoire qui n’est pas si éloignée d’un sordide fait divers survenu dans le Nord de la France. Une enseignante de collège classé en zone d’éducation prioritaire, professeur d’anglais a entretenu une liaison pendant deux ans avec une élève de 12 ans issue d’une famille monoparentale, avant que la mère de cette dernière ne l’apprenne et ne dépose plainte. A en croire certain, normal pour un prof de langues à la pédagogie « innovante » et qui « aimait ses élèves » selon ses collègues. Pour d’autre, Normal qu’un enfant déboussolé reçoive l’Amour auquel il a « droit ». C’est peut-être cette « normalité » qui devient la plus dérangeante. Un nouvel ordre moral s’impose en Hollandie. Encore quelques années et quelques manigances de certains lobbies et elle sera certainement sacralisée comme une figure de la néo-religion égalitaire. D’exemple, la France est devenue le contre-exemple pour de nombreux peuples qui n’entendent pas la suivre dans son suicide civilisationnel. On a les saintes que l’on mérite : un professeur pédophile et homosexuelle ou une jeune vierge combattante se sacrifiant pour sa patrie. A la jeune génération qui se dresse de faire le choix. Prorussia
En France, tout le monde connaît le ruban rouge, signe de lutte contre le Sida. En Amérique du Nord, le ruban rose (pink ribbon) est associé à la lutte contre le cancer du sein. De nombreuses marques s’associent à cette cause en affichant ce signe distinctif et en indiquant qu’une somme sera reversée à un organisme de recherche ou une association. Et c’est là que les dérives commencent, en particulier en octobre, mois de sensibilisation au cancer du sein outre Atlantique. Construit sur la base du terme greenwashing, le pinkwashing est utilisé pour décrire les activités d’entreprises et de groupes qui se positionnent comme leaders dans la lutte contre le cancer du sein alors qu’elles sont engagées dans des activités qui peuvent/pourraient contribuer à augmenter le nombre de ces cancers… Plus largement, le terme s’applique aussi à ces sociétés qui cherchent tout simplement à exploiter ce filon et à faire du business. Sircome
"Pinkwashing" (le "marketing rose")  est un mot-valise combinant "rose" et "blanchiment". Le terme est le plus souvent utilisé pour décrire différentes formes de marketing à but non-lucratif. Il peut se référer à: la promotion de biens et services en utilisant le ruban rose qui représente le soutien aux organismes de bienfaisance liés au cancer du sein. (…) La promotion de l’attitude pro-homosexuels d’une entité commerciale ou politique pour tenter de minimiser ou d’adoucir ses côtés considérés comme négatifs. Wikipedia
Julie Maroh raconte, de façon sensible, comment la vie de la lycéenne Clémentine bascule le jour où elle croise le regard d’une fille aux cheveux bleus, Emma. Une histoire attachante, des dialogues et des situations justes, sur le thème du désir amoureux, de l’homosexualité féminine et de son acceptation dans la société d’aujourd’hui. La dessinatrice originaire du Nord de la France, âgée de 28 ans, a consacré des années de travail à ce premier album. Il a été son projet d’études de la section BD du célèbre Institut Saint-Luc, dont elle est sortie avec la Haute distinction. La poursuite de son cursus à l’Académie royale des Beaux-Arts de Bruxelles a encore repoussé la parution. Mais dès sa sortie en 2010, Le bleu est une couleur chaude a attiré les prix : Salon BD de Roubaix, Festival de BD de Blois, Prix du public Fauve à Angoulême… Ouest-France
On la sent en particulier assez tiède «quant au cul»: «en tant que lesbienne», elle se demande si le cinéaste et ses actrices se sont bien documentés. Pour sa part, elle a vu dans les scènes les plus chaudes «un étalage brutal et chirurgical, démonstratif et froid de sexe dit lesbien, qui tourne au porn, et qui [l]’a mise très mal à l’aise». Le Nouvel Observateur
C’est un processus à propos de l’idée de la répercussion de nos actes, d’écrire une ridicule histoire l’été de mes 19 ans et d’arriver à… « ça » aujourd’hui. (…) je suis traversée d’un sentiment indescriptible à propos de la répercussion. De se lever et de parler, et où cela peut mener. Moi ce qui m’intéresse c’est la banalisation de l’homosexualité. Je sais que certains sont dans un tout autre combat: garder cela hors-norme, subversif. Aucun de nous n’avait une intention militante, néanmoins j’ai très vite pris conscience après la parution du Bleu en 2010 que le simple fait de parler d’une minorité telle qu’elle soit participe à en défendre la cause (ou le contraire, selon.) et que cela nous dépasse complètement. (…) Quant au cul… Oui, quant au cul… Puisqu’il est beaucoup évoqué dans la bouche de celles et ceux qui parlent du film… Il est d’abord utile de clarifier que sur les trois heures du film, ces scènes n’occupent que quelques minutes. Si on en parle tant c’est en raison du parti pris du réalisateur. (…)  Maintenant, en tant que lesbienne… Il me semble clair que c’est ce qu’il manquait sur le plateau: des lesbiennes. Je ne connais pas les sources d’information du réalisateur et des actrices (qui jusqu’à preuve du contraire sont tous hétéros), et je n’ai pas été consultée en amont. Peut-être y’a t’il eu quelqu’un pour leur mimer grossièrement avec les mains les positions possibles, et/ou pour leur visionner un porn dit lesbien (malheureusement il est rarement à l’attention des lesbiennes). Parce que – excepté quelques passages – c’est ce que ça m’évoque: un étalage brutal et chirurgical, démonstratif et froid de sexe dit lesbien, qui tourne au porn, et qui m’a mise très mal à l’aise. Surtout quand, au milieu d’une salle de cinéma, tout le monde pouffe de rire. Les hérétonormé-e-s parce qu’ils/elles ne comprennent pas et trouvent la scène ridicule. Les homos et autres transidentités parce que ça n’est pas crédible et qu’ils/elles trouvent tout autant la scène ridicule. Et parmi les seuls qu’on n’entend pas rire il y a les éventuels mecs qui sont trop occupés à se rincer l’œil devant l’incarnation de l’un de leurs fantasmes. Je comprends l’intention de Kechiche de filmer la jouissance. Sa manière de filmer ces scènes est à mon sens directement liée à une autre, où plusieurs personnages discutent du mythe de l’orgasme féminin, qui… serait mystique et bien supérieur à celui de l’homme. Mais voilà, sacraliser encore une fois la femme d’une telle manière je trouve cela dangereux. En tant que spectatrice féministe et lesbienne, je ne peux donc pas suivre la direction prise par Kechiche sur ces sujets. Mais j’attends aussi de voir ce que d’autres femmes en penseront, ce n’est ici que ma position toute personnelle. (…) Cette nuit j’ai réalisé que c’était la première fois dans l’histoire du cinéma qu’une bande dessinée avait inspiré un film Palme d’Or, et cette idée me laisse pétrifiée. C’est beaucoup à porter. Je tiens à remercier tous ceux qui se sont montrés étonnés, choqués, écœurés que Kechiche n’ait pas eu un mot pour moi à la réception de cette Palme. Je ne doute pas qu’il avait de bonnes raisons de ne pas le faire, tout comme il en avait certainement de ne pas me rendre visible sur le tapis rouge à Cannes alors que j’avais traversé la France pour me joindre à eux, de ne pas me recevoir – même une heure – sur le tournage du film, de n’avoir délégué personne pour me tenir informée du déroulement de la prod’ entre juin 2012 et avril 2013, ou pour n’avoir jamais répondu à mes messages depuis 2011. Mais à ceux qui ont vivement réagi, je tiens à dire que je n’en garde pas d’amertume. Il ne l’a pas déclaré devant les caméras, mais le soir de la projection officielle de Cannes il y avait quelques témoins pour l’entendre me dire « Merci, c’est toi le point de départ » en me serrant la main très fort. Julie Maroh
J.C. Penney’s freefall should serve as a warning to other companies who are itching to jump on the same-sex bandwagon. Pandering to those who want to redefine marriage (and the rest of society with it) may earn you a pat on the back from the Human Rights Campaign, but in the long term, it’s bad policy. Americans want corporate neutrality in the culture wars, and when they don’t find it, they will go elsewhere. Family Research Center
L’inversion de la courbe de popularité de François Hollande, dans le baromètre Ifop pour le JDD, aura duré…un mois. Après avoir gagné quatre points en mai, il en perd trois en juin et annule ainsi l’effet "mariage pour tous" en retombant à 26% de personnes satisfaites. Un sondage préoccupant pour l’exécutif alors qu’il vient de lancer les consultations sur la réforme des retraites. JDD (22.06.13)
Dites-moi un peu maintenant avec quels arguments sérieux nous nous opposerons à la polygamie par exemple ? Nous avons mis le doigt dans un drôle d’engrenage. Tareq Oubrou (iman de Bordeaux)

Palme d’Or de Cannes à l’histoire d’un amour lesbien, tournage du premier mariage homosexuel pour le feuilleton politiquement correct de France 3 ("Plus belle la vie"), père homosexuel tenant son bébé dans les bras en couverture du magazine gay Têtu, volonté du principal syndicat du primaire (Snuipp) de relancer la théorie du genre à l’école ("Papa porte une robe" ou "Jean a deux mamans"), acceptation de membres (mais pas de cadres) homosexuels pour les scouts américains  …

Attention: un pinkwashing peut en cacher un autre !

Alors que nos apprentis-sorciers de gouvernants qui s’étaient un peu vite autocongratulés d’avoir bouleversé le code civil et la civilisation (jusqu’aux… contes de fée ?) pour accorder le droit à l’aberration pour tous à peut-être 100.000 couples homosexuels …

Font à présent, entre arrestation d’une mère porteuse pour escroquerie, fiasco du premier salon du mariage gay, chute des ventes dans certains grands magasins américains et vandalisation répétée d’une exposition photo contre l’homophobie, mine de s’étonner d’une radicalisation de la société que leur élection était censée apaiser …

Comment ne pas voir avec le chroniqueur du Figaro Ivan Rioufol et sans compter l’inquiétant précédent qui risque ainsi d’être créé …

Les prévisibles fruits du véritable matraquage auquel, de nos grands à nos petits écrans et de nos rues à nos magazines et à nos BD, sont de plus en plus soumises nos vies quotidiennes ?

Après le mariage gay, la polygamie?

Ivan Rioufol

29 mai 2013

Tourner la page? C’est ce qu’assurent le gouvernement et les députés PS, quand ils disent refuser une "scénarisation" des premiers mariages homosexuels. En réalité, le vote de la loi a libéré les esprits prosélytes. Ce mercredi, la porte-parole du gouvernement, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, assistera "à titre privé" à l’union de Vincent Autin et Bruno Boileau, à Montpellier, devant 500 invités et 230 journalistes, représentants 115 médias du monde entier. Ce n’est qu’un amuse-gueule. Il y a eu, ce week-end, la Palme d’Or du Festival de Cannes, qui a récompensé opportunément l’histoire d’un amour lesbien ("La vie d’Adèle", d’Abdellatif Kechiche). France 3 vient de tourner les noces de Thomas et Gabriel, pour son feuilleton très politiquement correct, "Plus belle la vie". Le magazine gay Têtu proposera, en couverture, un père homosexuel tenant son bébé dans les bras ("Rémy et son fils"). Le Figaro de ce mercredi dévoile que le principal syndicat du primaire (Snuipp) entend relancer la théorie du genre à l’école, en s’appuyant sur des livres tels que : "Papa porte une robe", ou "Jean a deux mamans". Ce matin, sur RTL, un auditeur se félicitait du "mariage gay pour tous": un lapsus reflétant l’indigestion dont Christine Boutin a eu le malheur de se plaindre, lundi : "Aujourd’hui, la mode c’est les gays (…) On est envahi de gays". Les lyncheurs ont fait le reste. C’est dans cette euphorie victorieuse que Manuel Valls vient de juger nécessaire, sur I-Télé, d’"incriminer davantage par la loi le discours et les actes homophobes". Je dis : basta !

En ayant imprudemment accédé aux revendications d’une minorité influente (l’Insee ne recense que 100.000 couples homosexuels en France), à qui a été reconnu le droit de bouleverser le code civil et la civilisation, le gouvernement socialiste a avalisé plus généralement le fait communautariste et sa ligne de défense. Elle est construite sur la victimisation et la non discrimination. Une brèche a été ouverte, dans laquelle vont être amenés à s’engouffrer dans l’avenir tous ceux qui s’estiment lésés par la loi commune et qui revendiquent des droits spécifiques, au nom de leur groupe, de leur particularisme, de l’égalitarisme. Comme le remarque l’iman de Bordeaux, Tareq Oubrou, dans des propos rapportés par Elisabeth Schemla (1) : "Dites-moi un peu maintenant avec quels arguments sérieux nous nous opposerons à la polygamie par exemple ? Nous avons mis le doigt dans un drôle d’engrenage". En effet, le temps est sans doute proche où des militants islamistes, prétextant de l’exemple du mariage pour tous, de la lutte contre l’islamophobie et de la réalité de comportements observables dans la communauté musulmane, exigeront la légalisation des pratiques polygames qui, de fait, existent déjà dans des cités. Les militants homosexuels auront alors enfanté une machine infernale et sa mise en marche.

(1)Islam, l’épreuve française, Plon

Voir aussi:

Le premier Salon du mariage gay tourne au fiasco

Stéphane Kovacs

Le Figaro

23/06/2013

Les exposants ont vu à peine 150 visiteurs. L’organisatrice met en cause les «homophobes».

Tristes débuts pour le Salon du mariage gay. Ils avaient prévu champagne, jus de fruits et des montagnes de petits fours… ils ont fini par «liquider tout ça» eux-mêmes. En deux jours, la soixantaine d’exposants présents au premier Salon du mariage pour tous a croisé à peine 150 visiteurs, dont… quelques «figurants», selon eux. «Remboursez!, Remboursez!», criaient-ils dimanche en début d’après-midi, tout en commençant à démonter leurs stands.

Allées désertes, hôtesses désœuvrées, agents de sécurité apathiques, en fin de matinée, Le Figaro n’avait pu rencontrer que trois clients. «Les gays se lèvent tard…», avait hasardé l’attachée de presse. Mais quelques heures plus tard, «il n’y a toujours pas un chat, s’énerve le bijoutier du Comptoir La Fayette. En quarante ans de métier, je n’ai jamais vu ça. J’ai investi 30.000 euros et je n’ai vendu qu’une seule paire d’alliances… à des hétéros!»

À côté, Johanna, qui vient de créer sa société organisatrice d’événements Eden Day, n’a signé aucun contrat. «C’est juste une catastrophe!, se désole la jeune femme. C’est mon premier salon, je comptais dessus pour démarrer. J’ai vu en tout et pour tout cinq personnes, et en parlant avec les autres, on a compris qu’on avait tous vu les cinq mêmes…» Pire, «aux questions qu’ils posaient, j’ai bien vu qu’ils n’étaient pas là pour se marier, raconte le bijoutier. On a tous remarqué que des gamins de 20 ans avaient passé toute la journée de samedi ici, pour faire semblant devant les journalistes».

Pétition des exposants

Furieux de ce «fiasco total», le DJ Emmanuel Attiach, de 1dream1event, fait signer une pétition aux autres exposants: «On nous avait promis 5000 à 7000 personnes!, s’énervent-ils. Où sont les VIP, tels que Manuel Valls (le ministre de l’Intérieur est… au Qatar), Laurent Ruquier ou Antoine de Caunes?Étant donné l’actualité autour du mariage gay, il est incroyable d’avoir eu si peu de visiteurs…»

Embarrassée, l’organisatrice du salon, Sandra Bibas, évoque «des soucis avec les homophobes». Certes, une exposition photo contre l’homophobie, affichée à l’extérieur de la mairie du IIIe arrondissement, a été vandalisée deux fois en 48 heures. Mais personne n’a vu la «trentaine d’opposants au mariage gay», qui, selon Sandra Bibas, auraient tenté samedi de perturber le salon… pas même les responsables de la sécurité du Parc floral à Paris (XIIe), qui abritait l’événement.

Fallait-il organiser un salon spécifique pour les homosexuels?, se demandent les exposants. «Je trouve ça dommage de les stigmatiser encore davantage en ouvrant un salon à part, indique Joffrey, réalisateur de vidéos. Peut-être qu’ils se sont sentis insultés?» Après avoir fait «un repérage» pour son mariage prévu en juin 2014, Marie, 48 ans, explique qu’elle ne fait confiance qu’à une organisatrice d’événement lesbienne, «la seule qui me comprenne et qui ne soit pas là que pour le business». Mais son espoir, «c’est de devenir transparente, considérée comme les autres, dit-elle, Ce jour-là, on pourra vraiment parler de mariage pour tous».

Voir encore:

Palme d’Or 2013: ce qu’en pense l’auteur(e) de la BD adaptée par Kechiche

28-05-2013

Grégoire Leménager

«La Vie d’Adèle» d’Abdellatif Kechiche est inspiré d’une BD signée Julie Maroh. Elle vient de sortir de son silence, «en tant qu’auteure» et «en tant que lesbienne»

Nouvel Observateur

"Le Bleu est une couleur chaude", de Julie Maroh (Glénat, 2010): la BD qui a inspiré "la Vie d’Adèle" d’Abdellatif Kechiche, Palme d’Or 2013 au festival de Cannes. (Glénat)

"Le Bleu est une couleur chaude", de Julie Maroh (Glénat, 2010): la BD qui a inspiré "la Vie d’Adèle" d’Abdellatif Kechiche, Palme d’Or 2013 au festival de Cannes. (Glénat)

A moins d’avoir passé le week-end sur Mars, vous devez être vaguement au courant: ce dimanche soir au festival de Cannes, la Palme d’Or 2013 a récompensé un film d’Abdellatif Kechiche qui s’appelle «la Vie d’Adèle – chapitre 1 & 2».

Ca raconte une belle histoire d’amour entre une jeune femme et une jeune fille, tout en citant «la Vie de Marianne» de Marivaux comme référence. C’est joué par Léa Seydoux et Adèle Exarchopoulos. Il paraît que c’est un choc, et que la Palme n’est pas volée.

Ce qui se sait un peu moins, peut-être parce que Kechiche a oublié de le dire en recevant son prix, c’est que le film est adapté d’une BD. La BD s’appelle «le Bleu est une couleur chaude», et son auteur Julie Maroh. C’est sorti chez Glénat en 2010.

Julie Maroh vient de passer deux semaines à se taire sur ce qu’elle pense du film. Elle a fini par sortir de son silence, ce 27 mai, sur son blog. C’est très intéressant.

Pendant que Madame Boutin nous explique avec une délicatesse de mollah ronchon qu’«on est envahis de gays», elle y dit d’abord que sa priorité était «la banalisation de l’homosexualité».

"Le bleu est une couleur chaude", de Julie Maroh (Glénat, 2010)Pas de faire «un livre uniquement pour les lesbiennes», donc, mais au contraire de se battre pour que «celles/ceux qu['elle] aime, et tous les autres, cess[ent] d’être:

- insulté-e-s

- rejeté-e-s

- tabassé-e-s

- violé-e-s

- assassiné-e-s»

Cette mise au point étant faite, elle passe à l’adaptation de Kechiche. C’est pour elle est «une autre version / vision / réalité d’une même histoire», «un film purement kéchichien, avec des personnages typiques de son univers cinématographique».

En bref, c’est «un coup de maître», mais il y a un petit mais.

On la sent en particulier assez tiède «quant au cul»: «en tant que lesbienne», elle se demande si le cinéaste et ses actrices se sont bien documentés. Pour sa part, elle a vu dans les scènes les plus chaudes «un étalage brutal et chirurgical, démonstratif et froid de sexe dit lesbien, qui tourne au porn, et qui [l]’a mise très mal à l’aise».

Pas question pour autant de voir «le film comme une trahison». Pas question non plus d’en vouloir à Kechiche parce qu’il a omis de la remercier en public. Le soir de la projection officielle, il lui a serré la main «très fort» en lui glissant: «Merci, c’est toi le point de départ». Et Julie Maroh sort de l’aventure «absolument comblée, ébahie, reconnaissante du cours des évènements»:

Cette nuit j’ai réalisé que c’était la première fois dans l’histoire du cinéma qu’une bande dessinée avait inspiré un film Palme d’Or, et cette idée me laisse pétrifiée.»

Marivaux, de son côté, n’a pour l’instant fait aucune déclaration.

Voir de même:

Le bleu d’Adèle

Julie Maroh

Les coeurs exacerbés

27 mai 2013

Edit du 6 juin: Puisque dans certains articles sur la toile il est déclaré que « Julie Maroh a répondu à {leurs} questions » en citant des extraits du communiqué ci-dessous souvent sans en donner la source, je précise que non, depuis l’attribution de « la Palme » je n’ai répondu à aucune interview concernant le film.

{an English version is available here in pdf!} {and there a .jpg}

La couleur d’origine

Voilà bientôt deux semaines que je repousse ma prise de parole quant à La vie d’Adèle. Et pour cause, étant l’auteure du livre adapté, je traverse un processus trop immense et intense pour être décrit correctement.

Ce n’est pas seulement à propos de ce que Kechiche a fait.

C’est un processus à propos de l’idée de la répercussion de nos actes, d’écrire une ridicule histoire l’été de mes 19 ans et d’arriver à… « ça » aujourd’hui.

C’est un processus à propos de l’idée de prendre la parole et transmettre sur la Vie, l’Amour, l’Humanité en tant qu’artiste, de manière générale. C’est un processus à propos de moi-même et du chemin que j’ai choisi.

Donc, oui… je suis traversée d’un sentiment indescriptible à propos de la répercussion. De se lever et de parler, et où cela peut mener.

Moi ce qui m’intéresse c’est la banalisation de l’homosexualité.

Je n’ai pas fait un livre pour prêcher des convaincu-e-s, je n’ai pas fait un livre uniquement pour les lesbiennes. Mon vœu était dès le départ d’attirer l’attention de celles et ceux qui:

- ne se doutaient pas

- se faisaient de fausses idées sans connaître

- me/nous détestaient

Je sais que certains sont dans un tout autre combat: garder cela hors-norme, subversif. Je ne dis pas que je ne suis pas prête à défendre cela. Je dis simplement que ce qui m’intéresse avant tout c’est que moi, celles/ceux que j’aime, et tous les autres, cessions d’être:

- insulté-e-s

- rejeté-e-s

- tabassé-e-s

- violé-e-s

- assassiné-e-s

Dans la rue, à l’école, au travail, en famille, en vacances, chez eux. En raison de nos différences.

Chacun aura pu interprété et s’identifier au livre à sa convenance. Je tenais toutefois à repréciser le point de départ. Il s’agissait également de raconter comment une rencontre se produit, comment cette histoire d’amour se construit, se déconstruit, et ce qu’il reste de l’amour éveillé ensemble, après une rupture, un deuil, une mort. C’est cela qui a intéressé Kechiche. Aucun de nous n’avait une intention militante, néanmoins j’ai très vite pris conscience après la parution du Bleu en 2010 que le simple fait de parler d’une minorité telle qu’elle soit participe à en défendre la cause (ou le contraire, selon.) et que cela nous dépasse complètement.

Le dégradé de la BD jusqu’au film

Kechiche et moi nous sommes rencontrés avant que j’accepte de lui céder les droits d’adaptation, c’était il y a plus de 2 ans. J’ai toujours eu beaucoup d’affection et d’admiration pour son travail. Mais surtout c’est la rencontre que nous avons eue qui m’a poussée à lui faire confiance. Je lui ai stipulé dès le départ que je ne voulais pas prendre part au projet, que c’était son film à lui. Peut-être est-ce ce qui l’a poussé à à me faire confiance en retour. Toujours est-il que nous nous sommes revus plusieurs fois. Je me souviens de l’exemplaire du Bleu qu’il avait sous le bras: il ne restait pas un cm2 de place dans les marges, tout était griffonné de ses notes. On a beaucoup parlé des personnages, d’amour, des douleurs, de la vie en somme. On a parlé de la perte du Grand Amour. J’avais perdu le mien l’année précédente. Lorsque je repense à la dernière partie de La vie d’Adèle, j’y retrouve tout le goût salé de la plaie.

Pour moi cette adaptation est une autre version / vision / réalité d’une même histoire. Aucune ne pourra annihiler l’autre. Ce qui est sorti de la pellicule de Kechiche me rappelle ces cailloux qui nous mutilent la chair lorsqu’on tombe et qu’on se râpe sur le bitume.

C’est un film purement kéchichien, avec des personnages typiques de son univers cinématographique. En conséquence son héroïne principale a un caractère très éloigné de la mienne, c’est vrai. Mais ce qu’il a développé est cohérent, justifié et fluide. C’est un coup de maître.

N’allez pas le voir en espérant y ressentir ce qui vous a traversés à la lecture du Bleu. Vous y reconnaîtrez des tonalités, mais vous y trouverez aussi autre chose.

Avant que je ne vois le film à Paris, on m’avait tellement prévenue à coups de « C’est librement adapté hein, ohlala c’est très très librement adapté », je me voyais déjà vivre un enfer… Chez Quat’Sous Films se trouvait tout le découpage des scènes filmées, épinglé au mur en petites étiquettes. J’ai battu des paupières en constatant que les deux-tiers suivaient clairement le cheminement du scénario du livre, je pouvais même en reconnaître le choix des plans, des décors, etc.

Comme certains le savent déjà, beaucoup trop d’heures ont été tournées, et Kechiche a taillé dans le tas. Pourtant, étant l’auteure du Bleu j’y retrouve toujours beaucoup du livre. C’est le cœur battant que j’en reconnais tout mon Nord natal tel que j’avais tenté de le retranscrire en images, enfin « réel ». Et suite à l’introduction de ma déclaration ici je vous laisse imaginer tout ce que j’ai pu ressentir en voyant défiler les plans, scènes, dialogues, jusqu’aux physiques des acteurs et actrices, similaires à la bande dessinée.

Donc quoi que vous entendiez ou lisiez dans les médias (qui cherchent souvent à aller à l’essentiel et peuvent facilement occulter certaines choses) je réaffirme ici que oui, La vie d’Adèle est l’adaptation d’une bande dessinée, et il n’y a rien de mal à le dire.

Quant au cul

Quant au cul… Oui, quant au cul… Puisqu’il est beaucoup évoqué dans la bouche de celles et ceux qui parlent du film… Il est d’abord utile de clarifier que sur les trois heures du film, ces scènes n’occupent que quelques minutes. Si on en parle tant c’est en raison du parti pris du réalisateur.

Je considère que Kechiche et moi avons un traitement esthétique opposé, peut-être complémentaire. La façon dont il a choisi de tourner ces scènes est cohérente avec le reste de ce qu’il a créé. Certes ça me semble très éloigné de mon propre procédé de création et de représentation. Mais je me trouverais vraiment stupide de rejeter quelque chose sous prétexte que c’est différent de la vision que je m’en fais.

Ça c’est en tant qu’auteure. Maintenant, en tant que lesbienne…

Il me semble clair que c’est ce qu’il manquait sur le plateau: des lesbiennes.

Je ne connais pas les sources d’information du réalisateur et des actrices (qui jusqu’à preuve du contraire sont tous hétéros), et je n’ai pas été consultée en amont. Peut-être y’a t’il eu quelqu’un pour leur mimer grossièrement avec les mains les positions possibles, et/ou pour leur visionner un porn dit lesbien (malheureusement il est rarement à l’attention des lesbiennes). Parce que – excepté quelques passages – c’est ce que ça m’évoque: un étalage brutal et chirurgical, démonstratif et froid de sexe dit lesbien, qui tourne au porn, et qui m’a mise très mal à l’aise. Surtout quand, au milieu d’une salle de cinéma, tout le monde pouffe de rire. Les hérétonormé-e-s parce qu’ils/elles ne comprennent pas et trouvent la scène ridicule. Les homos et autres transidentités parce que ça n’est pas crédible et qu’ils/elles trouvent tout autant la scène ridicule. Et parmi les seuls qu’on n’entend pas rire il y a les éventuels mecs qui sont trop occupés à se rincer l’œil devant l’incarnation de l’un de leurs fantasmes.

Je comprends l’intention de Kechiche de filmer la jouissance. Sa manière de filmer ces scènes est à mon sens directement liée à une autre, où plusieurs personnages discutent du mythe de l’orgasme féminin, qui… serait mystique et bien supérieur à celui de l’homme. Mais voilà, sacraliser encore une fois la femme d’une telle manière je trouve cela dangereux.

En tant que spectatrice féministe et lesbienne, je ne peux donc pas suivre la direction prise par Kechiche sur ces sujets.

Mais j’attends aussi de voir ce que d’autres femmes en penseront, ce n’est ici que ma position toute personnelle.

Quoi qu’il en soit je ne vois pas le film comme une trahison. La notion de trahison dans le cadre de l’adaptation d’une œuvre est à revoir, selon moi. Car j’ai perdu le contrôle sur mon livre dès l’instant où je l’ai donné à lire. C’est un objet destiné à être manipulé, ressenti, interprété.

Kechiche est passé par le même processus que tout autre lecteur, chacun y a pénétré et s’y est identifié de manière unique. En tant qu’auteure je perds totalement le contrôle sur cela, et il ne me serait jamais venu à l’idée d’attendre de Kechiche d’aller dans une direction ou une autre avec ce film, parce qu’il s’est approprié – humainement, émotionnellement – un récit qui ne m’appartient déjà plus dès l’instant où il figure dans les rayons d’une librairie.

La palme

Cette conclusion cannoise est évidemment magnifique, à couper le souffle.

Comme évoqué dans mon introduction, tout ce qui me traverse ces jours-ci est tellement fou et démesuré que je ne saurais vous le retranscrire.

Je reste absolument comblée, ébahie, reconnaissante du cours des évènements.

Cette nuit j’ai réalisé que c’était la première fois dans l’histoire du cinéma qu’une bande dessinée avait inspiré un film Palme d’Or, et cette idée me laisse pétrifiée. C’est beaucoup à porter.

Je tiens à remercier tous ceux qui se sont montrés étonnés, choqués, écœurés que Kechiche n’ait pas eu un mot pour moi à la réception de cette Palme. Je ne doute pas qu’il avait de bonnes raisons de ne pas le faire, tout comme il en avait certainement de ne pas me rendre visible sur le tapis rouge à Cannes alors que j’avais traversé la France pour me joindre à eux, de ne pas me recevoir – même une heure – sur le tournage du film, de n’avoir délégué personne pour me tenir informée du déroulement de la prod’ entre juin 2012 et avril 2013, ou pour n’avoir jamais répondu à mes messages depuis 2011. Mais à ceux qui ont vivement réagi, je tiens à dire que je n’en garde pas d’amertume. Il ne l’a pas déclaré devant les caméras, mais le soir de la projection officielle de Cannes il y avait quelques témoins pour l’entendre me dire « Merci, c’est toi le point de départ » en me serrant la main très fort.

Pour en savoir plus sur le film, vous pouvez télécharger son dossier de presse

Et concernant le porn lesbien, un petit lien

(Merci à Sarah et Dwam)

Voir aussi:

04/06/2013 – L’homosexualité comme la prochaine normalité?

"Les écoles maternelles et élémentaires européennes pourront interdire les livres pour enfants et les contes de fées qui dépeignent la famille traditionnelle. Il s’agit d’une demande de la commission parlementaire des droits de la femme. Selon le comité, les contes de fées devraient parler de la diversité sexuelle."

“Le Comité du Parlement européen sur les droits de la femme et l’Egalité des Genres a préparé un rapport qui appelle à une interdiction de tous les livres qui montrent la famille traditionnelle où le père est le chef de famille et la mère prend soin des enfants, dans les écoles et les garderies d’Europe.

“Les féministes craignent que les enfants à un âge précoce soient constamment confrontés à des « stéréotypes sexistes » dans les émissions de télévision et des publicités. Le mot «négatif» dans le rapport est synonyme du mot «traditionnel». Au fil du temps, l’interdiction sera étendue à la télévision et la publicité. Jusqu’à présent, il a été décidé de commencer par les livres.

“En fait, ces mesures ont déjà été prises dans certains pays, notamment en Scandinavie, qui se considèrent l’avant-garde de la démocratie occidentale.

“Le rapport du Parlement européen a également insisté sur le fait que « l’homosexualité devrait être enseignée à l’école maternelle comme une forme d’expérience et de connaissances. Selon eux, cela va élargir le concept de «l’identité de genre» pour les enfants. «La diversité sexuelle doit être évidente pour les enfants. Les enfants ont besoin de savoir que cela est normal quand ses parents sont homosexuels ou lesbiennes. ”

Pravda décembre 2012 sous le titre "European feminists gang up on children’s fairytales" -

Laitman

Voir enfin:

J.C. Penney fires CEO after plummeting sales following gay ad campaign

Family Research Center

Apr 11, 2013

Analysis

April 11, 2013 (Family Research Council) – Plenty of companies have argued that natural marriage is "bad for business"–but they’ll have a tough time persuading J.C. Penney. After a series of radical decisions, the retailer is struggling to survive a 25 percent drop in sales.

It started in 2011 when the company hired Ellen DeGeneres, a vocal proponent of same-sex "marriage" as its spokesperson.

The choice drew fire from organizations like the American Family Association (AFA) because it was a departure from the store’s longstanding values. When AFA’s One Million Moms complained, J.C. Penney’s new CEO, Ron Johnson, stubbornly dug in his heels.

Then, on Mothers’ Day, the company shocked customers with a blatant endorsement of homosexuality in an ad that featured two moms–followed by a two-dads ad for Fathers’ Day. Coupled with an overhaul of the stores’ pricing system, the stock never recovered.

Click "like" if you want to defend true marriage.

Now, months after the experiment failed, J.C. Penney has fired Johnson and replaced him with the former CEO, Myron Ullman.

Hinting that the problems are more political than the media is reporting, Ullman said bluntly,

Whether the retailer will learn from its mistakes is yet to be seen. But J.C. Penney’s freefall should serve as a warning to other companies who are itching to jump on the same-sex bandwagon. Pandering to those who want to redefine marriage (and the rest of society with it) may earn you a pat on the back from the Human Rights Campaign, but in the long term, it’s bad policy.

Americans want corporate neutrality in the culture wars, and when they don’t find it, they will go elsewhere.

This article originally appeared on the Family Research Council and is reprinted with permission.


Scandales Obama: Chassez le naturel … (These ethical gymnastics were not entirely unforeseeable)

11 juin, 2013
http://s1.lemde.fr/image/2013/06/07/534x0/3425989_6_b9ce_la-une-du-site-internet-americain-huffington_e37fa51f21e5a36f0870ab9851b49c7d.jpghttp://21stcenturywire.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/2013-05-01-Obama-Wiretapping.pngMa propre ville de Chicago a compté parmi les villes à la politique locale la plus corrompue de l’histoire américaine, du népotisme institutionnalisé aux élections douteuses. Barack Obama (Nairobi, Kenya, août 2006)
Protect Whistleblowers: Often the best source of information about waste, fraud, and abuse in government is an existing government employee committed to public integrity and willing to speak out. Such acts of courage and patriotism, which can sometimes save lives and often save taxpayer dollars, should be encouraged rather than stifled. We need to empower federal employees as watchdogs of wrongdoing and partners in performance. Barack Obama will strengthen whistleblower laws to protect federal workers who expose waste, fraud, and abuse of authority in government. Obama will ensure that federal agencies expedite the process for reviewing whistleblower claims and whistleblowers have full access to courts and due process. Obama transition ethics agenda (2007)
Cette Administration met en avant un faux choix entre les libertés que nous chérissons et la sécurité que nous procurons… Je vais donner à nos agences de renseignement et de sécurité les outils dont ils ont besoin pour surveiller et éliminer les terroristes sans nuire à notre Constitution et à notre liberté. Cela signifie l’arrêt des écoutes téléphoniques illégales de citoyens américains, l’arrêt des lettres de sécurité nationale pour espionner les citoyens américains qui ne sont pas soupçonnés d’un crime. L’arrêt de la surveillance des citoyens qui ne font rien de plus que protester contre une mauvaise guerre. L’arrêt de l’ignorance de la loi quand cela est incommode. Obama (août 2007)
C’est exactement le type de choses que M. Obama a un jour critiquées, quand il a dit en 2007 que la politique de surveillance de l’administration de George W. Bush ‘mettait en avant un mauvais choix entre les libertés que nous chérissons et la sécurité que nous procurons’. NYT (2013)
Obama est sans doute brillant, charismatique – mais il est beaucoup trop proche de Wall Street. Et désormais il est criminel de guerre. Comment peut-il arriver au bureau tous les mardis avec une liste de gens à flinguer et lancer des bombes sur eux à partir de drones ? Si cela était arrivé une fois, deux fois, et qu’il eut dit ’’jamais je n’aurais dû le faire, il faut que j’arrête’’… mais remettre cela mois après mois, année après année, nous sommes face à un schéma bien rodé. A mon sens Obama devrait être traîné en justice et c’est ce qu’il avait dit de George Bush. Car il s’agit bien de crimes de guerre. (…) Lorsqu’Obama a été élu Président, il s’est entouré de gens proches de Wall Street : Tim Geithner, Larry Summers. (…) Pour ma part, je préfère un président blanc qui se lance à fond pour éliminer la misère et secourir les travailleurs qu’un président noir en bons termes avec Wall Street et accro aux drones. Cornel West
The administration has now lost all credibility."—NY Times. I agree. Michael Moore
Dans ce contexte local plus que trouble, Peraica affirme que la montée au firmament d’Obama n’a pu se faire «par miracle».«Il a été aidé par la machine qui l’a adoubé, il est cerné par cette machine qui produit de la corruption et le risque existe qu’elle monte de Chicago vers Washington», va-t-il même jusqu’à prédire. Le conseiller régional républicain cite notamment le nom d’Emil Jones, l’un des piliers du Parti démocrate de l’Illinois, qui a apporté son soutien à Obama lors de son élection au Sénat en 2004. Il évoque aussi les connexions du président élu avec Anthony Rezko, cet homme d’affaires véreux, proche de Blagojevich et condamné pour corruption, qui fut aussi le principal responsable de la levée de fonds privés pour le compte d’Obama pendant sa course au siège de sénateur et qui l’aida à acheter sa maison à Chicago. «La presse a protégé Barack Obama comme un petit bébé. Elle n’a pas sorti les histoires liées à ses liens avec Rezko», s’indigne Peraica, qui cite toutefois un article du Los Angeles Times faisant état d’une affaire de financement d’un tournoi international de ping-pong qui aurait éclaboussé le président élu. Le Figaro
Qu’est donc devenu cet artisan de paix récompensé par un prix Nobel, ce président favorable au désarmement nucléaire, cet homme qui s’était excusé aux yeux du monde des agissements honteux de ces Etats-Unis qui infligeaient des interrogatoires musclés à ces mêmes personnes qu’il n’hésite pas aujourd’hui à liquider ? Il ne s’agit pas de condamner les attaques de drones. Sur le principe, elles sont complètement justifiées. Il n’y a aucune pitié à avoir à l’égard de terroristes qui s’habillent en civils, se cachent parmi les civils et n’hésitent pas à entraîner la mort de civils. Non, le plus répugnant, c’est sans doute cette amnésie morale qui frappe tous ceux dont la délicate sensibilité était mise à mal par les méthodes de Bush et qui aujourd’hui se montrent des plus compréhensifs à l’égard de la campagne d’assassinats téléguidés d’Obama. Charles Krauthammer
Les drones américains ont liquidé plus de monde que le nombre total des détenus de Guantanamo. Pouvons nous être certains qu’il n’y avait parmi eux aucun cas d’erreurs sur la personne ou de morts innocentes ? Les prisonniers de Guantanamo avaient au moins une chance d’établir leur identité, d’être examinés par un Comité de surveillance et, dans la plupart des cas, d’être relâchés. Ceux qui restent à Guantanamo ont été contrôlés et, finalement, devront faire face à une forme quelconque de procédure judiciaire. Ceux qui ont été tués par des frappes de drones, quels qu’ils aient été, ont disparu. Un point c’est tout. Kurt Volker
Sous la présidence Bush, Obama avait dénoncé comme un scandale un programme de collecte d’informations bien plus limité, qui permettait à la NSA d’espionner sans mandat judiciaire les conversations exclusivement vers l’étranger (et non au sein même des Etats-Unis) d’individus suspectés de terrorisme. Voir le même homme politique, devenu président, justifier la collecte systématique d’informations sur l’ensemble des citoyens américains montre son hypocrisie et son absence de principes. Or, aussi curieux que cela paraisse, lorsqu’un homme qui a démontré qu’il a ce type de caractère vous explique qu’il ne vous veut aucun mal, il n’est pas toujours universellement cru. (…) Pour le dire autrement, s’il fallait vraiment admettre que l’Etat rassemble toutes les informations sur les conversations téléphoniques et l’activité Internet des individus, beaucoup d’Américains auraient préféré que ce pouvoir ne soit pas donné à une équipe qui a utilisé les services fiscaux pour affaiblir ses opposants politiques ; placé sous écoute des dizaines de journalistes et les parents d’au moins l’un d’entre eux ; et fait envoyer en prison, sous un prétexte, l’auteur innocent d’une vidéo Youtube dont le président avait fait le bouc émissaire de sa propre inaction lors de l’attaque meurtrière d’un consulat américain. Sébastien Castellion
There is poetic justice in hearing the president excoriated in exactly the same terms as President George W. Bush was, by the very same people who worked to get him elected to end the terrible abuses of the Bush-Cheney regime. Rich Lowry
Obama’s effort to strike what he’s repeatedly called “a balance” between personal liberty and homeland security has exposed what amounts to a split political personality: Candidate Obama often spoke about personal freedom with the passion of a constitutional lawyer — while Commander-in-Chief Obama has embraced and expanded Bush-era surveillance efforts like the 2011 extension of the Patriot Act, which paved the way for a secret court order allowing the gathering of Verizon phone records. In an irony now being savored by his conservative critics, Obama administration officials are now relying on Republicans to defend him against charges from liberals and the libertarian right that he’s recklessly prioritized national security over personal liberty. (…) That tone was strikingly similar to the tone of Obama’s own comments when he was a back-bencher in the upper chamber. In 2005, then-Sen. Obama spoke out against the Bush-sponsored PATRIOT Act extension on the grounds that FBI agents would have been given wide berth in obtaining personal records on people suspected of terrorist links without having to get their searches approved by a federal judge under the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Act “This is legislation that puts our own Justice Department above the law,” he said during a much-publicized Senate floor speech at the time. “[F]ederal agents [can] conduct any search on any American, no matter how extensive or wide-ranging, without ever going before a judge to prove that the search is necessary. They simply need sign-off from a local FBI official,” he added. “If someone wants to know why their own government has decided to go on a fishing expedition through every personal record or private document — through library books they’ve read and phone calls they’ve made — this legislation gives people no rights to appeal the need for such a search in a court of law. No judge will hear their plea, no jury will hear their case.” Yet despite the vehemence of his remarks — which were to be repeated on the campaign trail two years later — Obama ultimately backed a 2006 compromise bill that limited but didn’t eliminate the use of so-called “National Security letters” allowing the FBI broad surveillance power without a court order. Like many Democrats, Obama was never philosophically opposed to deep dives by federal authorities if they served the broader interest of national security. Moreover, when it came time to extend the PATRIOT Act in 2011, Obama, now president, quietly sought to expand the reach of extra-judicial surveillance outside the jurisdiction of the FISA court. In fact, several news organizations reported at the time that Obama’s lawyers wanted to add a new provision to include Internet browsing and email records — “electronic communication transactional records” that didn’t include content — to a list of sources the FBI could demand without a judge’s approval. For all the criticism the administration is attracting for the Verizon bombshell, Obama aides are counting on a very Bush-like political calculation that carried the president through his first term and second election: that the public’s desire for protection outweighs their outrage over even a massive breach of privacy. Politico
These ethical gymnastics were not entirely unforeseeable. Obama ran as a reform candidate for the Senate in 2004, while his campaign was most likely involved in the leaking of the sealed divorce records of both his primary- and general-election opponents. As a senator, he characterized recess appointments as tainted, only as president to make just such appointments — some of which later were declared unconstitutional in a unanimous decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Senator Obama employed filibusters to block judicial appointments; President Obama now condemns as bad-faith partisans any who might follow his own former custom. He championed public campaign financing before he became the first general-election presidential candidate since the program was enacted to opt out of it. President Obama has railed against any who would vote against raising the debt ceiling as putting partisanship ahead of the national interest — which, as senator, he himself had done. He ran in 2008 on the excesses of the Bush administration’s War on Terror, and then as president embraced or even expanded almost all of the very programs he had so adroitly demagogued in his campaign. Victor Davis Hanson

Enlèvements extrajudiciaires, assassinats ciblés, secrets d’état, Guantanamo, surveillance électronique …

A l’heure où en un intéressant retour des choses, ceux qui, de Michael Moore à Hollywood, avaient le plus porté aux nues le messie noir de la Maison Blanche commence, comme le premier conspirationniste d’extrême-droite venu, à voir des hélicoptères noirs partout …

Suite au déballage par le dernier martyr en date de la lutte contre Big brother et futur réfugié politique en Chine (?), de la manière dont, contre toutes ses promesses de campagne et avec la complaisance de médias jusqu’ici bien peu curieux, l’Administration Obama a non seulement maintenu et largement étendu les mesures de son tant honni prédécesseur …

Mais menti sur l’attentat de Benghazi, fait espionner des journalistes et utilisé le fisc contre ses opposants …

Pendant que, revenant une à une sur ses promesses,  notre propre illusioniste de l’Elysée continue à avancer masqué …

Comment ne pas voir, avec l’historien militaire Victor Davis Hanson, l’incroyable malentendu qui a porté à deux reprises au pouvoir le Dissimulateur en chef de Chicago ?

Mais surtout, au-delà des inévitables nécessités de la lutte antiterroriste, la prévisible continuité avec celui qui avait, par deux fois et dès ses premières élections au sénat de l’Illinois en 2004, fait fuiter les papiers de divorce de ses adversaires tant démocrates que républicains ?

Obama’s Ethical Gymnastics

His morality is to be judged by his professed aims, not his means of achieving them.

Victor Davis Hanson

NRO

June 7, 2013

Presidential ethics are now situational. Obama is calling for a shield law to protect reporters from the sort of harassment that his attorney general, Eric Holder, and the FBI practiced against Fox News and the Associated Press. Through such rhetoric, he remains a staunch champion of the First Amendment — even though he now has the ability to peek into the private phone records of millions of Americans.

The president is outraged that the IRS went after those deemed politically suspicious. So he sacked the acting head of the IRS, Steven Miller, who was scheduled to step down soon anyway. The administration remains opposed to any partisanship of the sort that might deny tax-exempt status to the Barack H. Obama Foundation, founded by the president’s half-brother Malik, but would indefinitely delay almost all the applications from those suspected of tea-party sympathies. Consequently, Lois Lerner granted the former’s request in 30 days, but took the Fifth Amendment when asked the reasons for obstructing the applications of the latter.

These ethical gymnastics were not entirely unforeseeable. Obama ran as a reform candidate for the Senate in 2004, while his campaign was most likely involved in the leaking of the sealed divorce records of both his primary- and general-election opponents. As a senator, he characterized recess appointments as tainted, only as president to make just such appointments — some of which later were declared unconstitutional in a unanimous decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Senator Obama employed filibusters to block judicial appointments; President Obama now condemns as bad-faith partisans any who might follow his own former custom. He championed public campaign financing before he became the first general-election presidential candidate since the program was enacted to opt out of it. President Obama has railed against any who would vote against raising the debt ceiling as putting partisanship ahead of the national interest — which, as senator, he himself had done. He ran in 2008 on the excesses of the Bush administration’s War on Terror, and then as president embraced or even expanded almost all of the very programs he had so adroitly demagogued in his campaign.

One of the legacies of the Obama administration is presidential ethics as an entirely relative, abstract concept. Obama’s morality is to be judged by his professed aims, not his actual means of achieving them, thereby turning classical Aristotelian ethics on its head: Dreaming of doing the right thing becomes more important than actually doing it while awake. Apparently reporters who had their phones monitored are to be impressed that Obama is advocating a shield law to protect them from any future president not so ethical as Obama.

The problem, however, is not just that Obama’s declarations of moral intent are deemed more important than his concrete behavior, but also that his moral pieties serve as a psychological mechanism that offers exemption for his unethical conduct. Obama repeatedly declared that citing the bin Laden raid for partisan purposes would be “spiking the ball” of the worst sort — and thereby was freed to do just that without any guilt over his own hypocrisy, much less a worry that there was something untoward in using a national-security operation for campaign advantage.

The president deplores leaks as injurious to national security. Indeed, Attorney General Holder declares that the AP reporters endangered national security to a degree without precedent in modern memory. However, they did not do so as flagrantly as the administration itself, which leaked selected documents of the bin Laden trove to pet reporters, leaked the details of the Stuxnet cyber war against Iran, leaked information surrounding the drone targeting, and leaked details about the Yemeni double agent. The common theme was that such unlawful disclosures would let the voters know that their commander-in-chief was far more effective than they otherwise might have thought.

In contrast, the sin of the AP reporters was not leaking per se, but in some cases their freelancing attempts to beat the administration’s preplanned timing of its own leaks, and in others leaking things that the administration did not find particularly helpful to its reelection efforts. But again, Obama bought exemption for his own leaks by first citing the dangers that the AP leaks posed. Only by berating Wall Street “fat cats” and “corporate-jet owners” can one justify being the largest recipient of Goldman Sachs campaign cash in history. If you talk of kicking BP’s “ass,” then having taken more of its money than any other candidate becomes palatable.

Under situational ethics, the new transparency means that Obama can square the circle of promoting Susan Rice by doing so to a position that does not require Senate confirmation. Will Samantha Power, Obama’s nominee as ambassador to the U.N., receive the sort of congressional reception that once awaited John Bolton? Cf. Senator Obama on that recess appointment: “To some degree, he’s damaged goods. Not in the history of United Nations representatives have we ever had a recess appointment, somebody who couldn’t get through a nomination in the Senate. And I think that that means that we will have less credibility and ironically be less equipped to reform the United Nations in the way that it needs to be reformed.” Obama once noted that John Bolton had “a lot of ideological baggage,” presumably in a way that Samantha Power does not.

Power once wrote of the Bush administration that “We need a historical reckoning with crimes committed, sponsored, or permitted by the United States. This would entail restoring FOIA to its pre-Bush stature, opening the files, and acknowledging the force of a mantra we have spent the last decade promoting in Guatemala, South Africa, and Yugoslavia: A country has to look back before it can move forward. Instituting a doctrine of the mea culpa would enhance our credibility by showing that American decision-makers do not endorse the sins of their predecessors.” If such absolute standards of transparency and public apologies for untruth applied across the board, only the “doctrine of the mea culpa” would put to rest doubts over whether partisan concerns governed the fates of those trapped in Benghazi and the postmortem accounts of their tragic ends.

The new ethical transparency means that there is no conflict of interest when Susan Rice appears on ABC news programs that her husband once produced. Nor should anyone worry that the brother of one of the president’s closest advisers heads CBS News, or that the president of ABC News has a sister in a high position in the Obama administration, or that the wife of press secretary Jay Carney is the national correspondent of ABC’s Good Morning America. Under the new ethics, to point out any such connection is at best illiberal, and perhaps motivated by darker impulses; but to discuss with your spouse or sibling how you will cover his or her televised performance is a necessary means to an exalted ethical end.

What is the short-term effect of such postmodern ethical behavior? Not much. The media will determine publicly that the Benghazi, IRS, AP, and Fox scandals, to the extent that they remain in the public view much longer as scandals, were the products of overzealous subordinates, while privately concluding that too much public attention to them might aid the illiberal agenda of conservative Republicans. Thus the better — indeed, the more moral — course is to let the scandals go the way of Fast and Furious and Solyndra.

I think their reasoning, to the degree it is ever consciously examined, goes something like the following: Is pursuing a rogue IRS or a John Mitchell–like attorney general really worth wounding the second term of a reelected liberal president? Do we really need another Watergate or Iran-Contra, when the possible outcome this time around is not stopping the regressive efforts of a Richard Nixon or a Ronald Reagan, but rather endangering the political survival of the first black president, and the first northern liberal to be elected president since John Kennedy a half-century earlier — and, with him, a long-overdue progressive agenda that so far has given us needed higher taxes, socialized medicine, more entitlements, and liberal social initiatives?

What about the long-term consequences? To paraphrase Thucydides on the stasis at Corcyra, as a practical matter, it is always unwise when in power to destroy the ethical safety net that you may need when you are out of power. But here too Obama is not worried. He assumes that if Congress and the White House return to Republican control, the media will revert to their traditional watchdog role, resuscitated and on the scent once more of a lack of transparency, the revolving door, efforts to stifle the press, Guantanamo and drones, lobbyists in government, and the politicization of the federal government. Some day soon perhaps, once-bad filibusters and recess appointments will again turn bad. Lying attorney generals will again earn special prosecutors. Tapped reporters will again become courageous, not careerist opportunists. Whistleblowers will once more be lauded for speaking truth to power rather than be derided as reactionary snitches.

The lesson is not necessarily that Republicans are inherently more ethical than Democrats — although their aims are not so utopian — and thus more likely to adhere to a fixed notion of morality that transcends situational ethics. Rather, in the present climate, conservative politicians find it more difficult to get away with hypocrisies and opportunistic ethics, given their traditional adversarial relationship with the mainstream media.

Obama is not inherently more amoral than his predecessors, only more exempt from charges of amorality. He appreciates that this latitude has never been extended to any other president in modern memory. The result is that there is no longer such a thing as presidential ethics.

— NRO contributor Victor Davis Hanson is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. His The Savior Generals is just out from Bloomsbury Books.

Voir aussi:

George W. Bush’s ’4th term’?

Glenn Thrush

Politico

June 6, 2013

The outrage over President Barack Obama’s authorization of a nearly limitless federal dive into Americans’ phone records obscures a hiding-in-plain-sight truth about the 44th president many of his supporters have overlooked for years:

For all his campaign-trail talk of running the “most transparent administration” in U.S history, Obama never promised to reverse the 43rd president’s policies on domestic anti-terrorism surveillance — and he’s been good on his word.

Obama’s effort to strike what he’s repeatedly called “a balance” between personal liberty and homeland security has exposed what amounts to a split political personality: Candidate Obama often spoke about personal freedom with the passion of a constitutional lawyer — while Commander-in-Chief Obama has embraced and expanded Bush-era surveillance efforts like the 2011 extension of the Patriot Act, which paved the way for a secret court order allowing the gathering of Verizon phone records.

In an irony now being savored by his conservative critics, Obama administration officials are now relying on Republicans to defend him against charges from liberals and the libertarian right that he’s recklessly prioritized national security over personal liberty.

“Drone strikes. Wiretaps. Gitmo. Renditions. Military commissions. Obama is carrying out Bush’s fourth term, yet he attacked Bush for violating the Constitution,” said Ari Fleischer, George W. Bush’s press secretary.

“He’s helping keep the nation safe, vindicating President Bush, all while putting a bipartisan stamp on how to fight terror,” Fleischer added.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) defended the record-grab Thursday, publicly urging Attorney General Eric Holder to stay the course even if some corrections needed to be made.

“You keep up what you’re doing,” Graham said. “President Bush started it. President Obama’s continuing it. We need it, from my point of view.”

White House officials declined to comment on the record for this story.

But Tommy Vietor, a former Obama National Security Council spokesman, scoffed at Fleischer’s “fourth term” comment, saying, “If this was Bush’s fourth term, we’d have tens of thousands of troops in Iraq, there’d be no effort to be transparent about or constrain our use of drones, and we’d be throwing more people into GITMO.”

By seeking what administration officials call “metadata” — phone numbers, the duration of calls, frequency of contact between individual callers at home and abroad — Obama can technically deny that the surveillance is deeply intrusive because actual wiretaps require additional court orders in most cases.

But the data cadged in the Verizon case can be used as a menu — giving agents an idea of which individuals or organizations warrant further scrutiny.

“The information acquired does not include the content of any communications or the name of any subscriber,” said an aide who requested to be identified only as a “senior administration official” as a condition of sharing the administration’s thinking on the matter.

“It relates exclusively to metadata, such as a telephone number or the length of a call. Information of the sort described… has been a critical tool in protecting the nation from terrorist threats to the United States, as it allows counterterrorism personnel to discover whether known or suspected terrorists have been in contact with other persons who may be engaged in terrorist activities, particularly people located inside the United States.”

But critics in Obama’s own party say the net cast by the order poses a grave threat to free expression and the right Americans have — and Obama has so often championed — to live their lives without Big Brother poking into their affairs.

“This type of secret bulk data collection is an outrageous breach of Americans’ privacy,” said Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) who has repeatedly raised concerns about surveillance overreach by the administration.

“I have had significant concerns about the intelligence community over-collecting information about Americans’ telephone calls, emails and other records and that is why I voted against the reauthorization of the PATRIOT Act provisions in 2011 and the reauthorization of the FISA Amendments Act just six months ago.”

“This bulk data collection is being done under interpretations of the law that have been kept secret from the public. Significant FISA court opinions that determine the scope of our laws should be declassified. Can the FBI or the NSA really claim that they need data scooped up on tens of millions of Americans?”

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), one of the few Obama allies to vote against the 2011 extension of the PATRIOT Act, said, “The United States should not be accumulating phone records on tens of millions of innocent Americans. That is not what democracy is about. That is not what freedom is about.”

That tone was strikingly similar to the tone of Obama’s own comments when he was a back-bencher in the upper chamber.

In 2005, then-Sen. Obama spoke out against the Bush-sponsored PATRIOT Act extension on the grounds that FBI agents would have been given wide berth in obtaining personal records on people suspected of terrorist links without having to get their searches approved by a federal judge under the Federal Intelligence Surveillance Act

“This is legislation that puts our own Justice Department above the law,” he said during a much-publicized Senate floor speech at the time.

“[F]ederal agents [can] conduct any search on any American, no matter how extensive or wide-ranging, without ever going before a judge to prove that the search is necessary. They simply need sign-off from a local FBI official,” he added.

“If someone wants to know why their own government has decided to go on a fishing expedition through every personal record or private document — through library books they’ve read and phone calls they’ve made — this legislation gives people no rights to appeal the need for such a search in a court of law. No judge will hear their plea, no jury will hear their case.”

Yet despite the vehemence of his remarks — which were to be repeated on the campaign trail two years later — Obama ultimately backed a 2006 compromise bill that limited but didn’t eliminate the use of so-called “National Security letters” allowing the FBI broad surveillance power without a court order.

Like many Democrats, Obama was never philosophically opposed to deep dives by federal authorities if they served the broader interest of national security.

Moreover, when it came time to extend the PATRIOT Act in 2011, Obama, now president, quietly sought to expand the reach of extra-judicial surveillance outside the jurisdiction of the FISA court.

In fact, several news organizations reported at the time that Obama’s lawyers wanted to add a new provision to include Internet browsing and email records — “electronic communication transactional records” that didn’t include content — to a list of sources the FBI could demand without a judge’s approval.

Stewart A. Baker, a former senior Bush administration Homeland Security official, told The Washington Post in 2010 that the change meant investigations would broaden the bureau’s authority by making it “faster and easier to get the data.”

The provision was eventually added to the bill.

For all the criticism the administration is attracting for the Verizon bombshell, Obama aides are counting on a very Bush-like political calculation that carried the president through his first term and second election: that the public’s desire for protection outweighs their outrage over even a massive breach of privacy.

And here, at long last, is one issue where Obama can legitimately claim to have bipartisan backing.

Thursday morning at a hearing scheduled long before Glenn Greenwald of U.K.’s Guardian newspaper broke the NSA/Verizon story, Holder said the Obama administration kept Congress completely in the loop about a Verizon dragnet that the administration says is authorized by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

“Members of Congress have been fully briefed as these issues, these matters have been under way,” Holder said at a pre-scheduled Senate hearing Thursday.

But even Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.), the author of the PATRIOT Act, wasn’t comfortable with the turn things have taken, saying he is “extremely troubled” by a move he called “excessive and un-American.”

“While I believe the PATRIOT Act appropriately balanced national security concerns and civil rights, I have always worried about potential abuses,” Sensenbrenner said. “The bureau’s broad application for phone records was made under the so-called business records provision of the act. I do not believe the broadly drafted FISA order is consistent with the requirements of the PATRIOT Act.”

Voir aussi:

Scandales Obama : cela ne fait que commencer

Sébastien Castellion

Mena

10 juin 2013

Après les trois scandales que j’avais décrits dans ces colonnes il y a deux semaines (mensonges sur l’attaque du consulat de Benghazi, espionnage de journalistes, persécution systématique de groupes d’opposition par les services fiscaux américains), une série de nouvelles révélations a, depuis la publication de cet article, encore endommagé l’image du Président Obama dans l’opinion américaine.

Paradoxalement, l’histoire qui fait le plus de bruit en ce moment est celle qui mériterait, en principe, le traitement le plus nuancé.

Le journal de la gauche britannique, le Guardian, a révélé mercredi dernier que l’une des administrations chargées du renseignement en Amérique, la National Security Agency (ou NSA), enregistre systématiquement les données de tous les appels téléphoniques passés aux Etats-Unis à partir de téléphones portables. Le premier article du Guardian, fondé sur les documents auxquels le journal avait eu accès, limitait la révélation à un seul opérateur, Verizon ; mais des fuites supplémentaires, réalisées dans la semaine, ont montré que tous les opérateurs mobiles sont concernés.

Les données ainsi collectées ne s’étendent pas au contenu des conversations. Elles permettent en revanche à l’administration de savoir qui a appelé qui ; pendant combien de temps, et à quel endroit se trouvaient les deux interlocuteurs.

Ces données sont désormais à la disposition de l’administration pour tous les détenteurs d’une ligne mobile aux Etats-Unis, sans avoir besoin pour cela de l’autorisation d’un juge. Celle-ci n’est nécessaire que pour renouveler, tous les trois mois, l’autorisation de collecter l’ensemble des informations à la disposition des compagnies téléphoniques. Cependant, ces jugements sont classés "top secret" et ne sont pas publiés. Il a fallu une fuite au Guardian pour que leur existence soit rendue publique.

En pratique, il est donc désormais possible, pour les pouvoirs publics américains, de reconstituer les habitudes, les déplacements, les fréquentations et les amitiés de la plupart des citoyens américains, que ceux-ci soient ou non suspectés d’avoir enfreint la loi.

Le lendemain (jeudi dernier), le Guardian et un journal américain d’obédience Démocrate, le Washington Post, ont révélé l’existence d’un autre programme nommé PRISM. Ce programme permet à la NSA et à la principale administration policière fédérale, le FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) de demander aux principaux géants de l’Internet (Google, Apple, Facebook etc.) de leur transmettre toutes les données relatives à des individus nommément désignés.

Contrairement au premier programme, PRISM exige de désigner les personnes visées et n’implique aucun accès direct des organes de sécurité aux données ; mais, contrairement à lui, il permet de se faire transmettre le contenu de tous les échanges effectués sur le Net.

Confrontée à ces révélations, l’administration Obama n’a pas nié l’existence de ces programmes. Elle a expliqué qu’ils sont indispensables pour la sécurité des Etats-Unis et lancé des enquêtes pour identifier et punir les auteurs des fuites. Le président lui-même a justifié la collecte d’informations en rappelant que les comités du renseignement du Parlement en sont informés et que le programme est soumis au contrôle des juges.

Ces justifications, cependant, ne sont pas entièrement satisfaisantes – et à lire la presse, y compris Démocrate, n’ont manifestement pas convaincu l’opinion américaine. Il y a à cela trois raisons.

D’abord, les explications du Président mettent un peu trop en évidence sa tendance à dire une chose et son contraire en fonction de ses intérêts électoraux.

Sous la présidence Bush, Obama avait dénoncé comme un scandale un programme de collecte d’informations bien plus limité, qui permettait à la NSA d’espionner sans mandat judiciaire les conversations exclusivement vers l’étranger (et non au sein même des Etats-Unis) d’individus suspectés de terrorisme. Voir le même homme politique, devenu président, justifier la collecte systématique d’informations sur l’ensemble des citoyens américains montre son hypocrisie et son absence de principes. Or, aussi curieux que cela paraisse, lorsqu’un homme qui a démontré qu’il a ce type de caractère vous explique qu’il ne vous veut aucun mal, il n’est pas toujours universellement cru.

L’autre raison du scepticisme de l’opinion américaine est de simple bon sens : l’ampleur des moyens de surveillance mis à la disposition des services de renseignement semble disproportionnée par rapport à la gravité de la menace terroriste. Chacun comprend que les agences de renseignement puissent avoir accès aux conversations de suspects nommément identifiés, ou même de leur entourage.

Mais les données personnelles de 300 millions d’Américains ?

Dans une atmosphère de secret absolu qui s’applique aussi aux décisions des juges censés servir de contre-pouvoir ? Que vaut un contre-pouvoir qui ne peut pas publier ses opinions ?

En menaçant ceux qui ont fait fuiter, non pas les détails, mais la seule existence du programme, que l’administration revendique désormais ouvertement ? Si cette existence ne gêne pas le pouvoir, pourquoi – sauf par pure vengeance – vouloir emprisonner ceux qui l’ont révélée ?

Tout cela est-il vraiment adapté à la gravité de la menace, alors que le président lui-même a déclaré, il y a à peine plus de deux semaines (le 23 mai dernier), que "la guerre mondiale contre le terrorisme est terminée" ? Si elle est vraiment terminée, le programme devrait être en train d’être réduit en puissance. Or il est manifestement, au contraire, en plein développement.

Enfin, la troisième raison du scepticisme du public réside en cela que les trois scandales précédents ont donné de l’administration Obama l’image d’un groupe cynique, motivé uniquement par des considérations électorales et qui ne se soucie guère ni de la vérité, ni de l’Etat de droit.

Pour le dire autrement, s’il fallait vraiment admettre que l’Etat rassemble toutes les informations sur les conversations téléphoniques et l’activité Internet des individus, beaucoup d’Américains auraient préféré que ce pouvoir ne soit pas donné à une équipe qui a utilisé les services fiscaux pour affaiblir ses opposants politiques ; placé sous écoute des dizaines de journalistes et les parents d’au moins l’un d’entre eux ; et fait envoyer en prison, sous un prétexte, l’auteur innocent d’une vidéo Youtube dont le président avait fait le bouc émissaire de sa propre inaction lors de l’attaque meurtrière d’un consulat américain.

Une exagération, bien sûr … mais qui fait rire de moins en moins d’Américains

Puisque tous ces faits sont désormais avérés, il est assez peu probable que l’étendue des pouvoirs de surveillance que s’est attribuée l’administration Obama ne donne lieu qu’à un débat civilisé sur l’équilibre entre sécurité et liberté et sur l’utilité de créer des garde-fous supplémentaires.

D’abord parce que l’administration elle-même refuse ce débat. Sa position est que tout ce qu’elle a fait est bien, que nul n’a droit à davantage d’information et que les auteurs des fuites seront trouvés et traduits en justice. Fin du débat.

Ensuite, parce que face à cette attitude, de nombreux Américains se sentent trahis. Beaucoup d’entre eux, face aux enquêtes et aux menaces répétées de l’administration contre les auteurs de fuites, commencent à avoir peur. Il devient significatif, par exemple, qu’aucun des grands scandales identifiés lors des dernières semaines n’ait été révélé par la voie de la presse américaine classique. Il est probable que les auteurs des fuites estiment qu’ils ne peuvent plus faire confiance, pour préserver leur anonymat, aux grandes institutions de la presse nationale.

L’attitude de l’administration n’empêchera pas les fuites de se poursuivre ; mais elle garantit que les prochaines informations (car personne n’imagine que ce qui est connu aujourd’hui soit la fin de l’histoire) provoqueront une nouvelle dégradation de la confiance. On voit déjà se dessiner une situation dans laquelle l’administration Obama pourrait avoir pour principal adversaire le peuple américain, et inversement. Cela ne suffit pas pour conduire à la violence, puisque la démocratie américaine garantit qu’Obama aura quitté le pouvoir dans moins de quatre ans. Cependant, cette atmosphère de méfiance réciproque entre le pouvoir et le peuple est précisément ce que la création des Etats-Unis d’Amérique devait en principe empêcher.

L’explication d’Obama selon laquelle les moyens de surveillance déployés sont rendus indispensables par la lutte contre le terrorisme est d’autant moins crédible que, parallèlement aux dernières révélations, une enquête publiée par le Gloria Center d’Herzliyya a montré que l’administration Obama avait mis en place une politique systématique de réduction des moyens disponibles dans cette lutte.

Passée presque inaperçue du fait du scandale des programmes de surveillance, cette enquête du chercheur Patrick Poole a prouvé, en particulier, les points suivants.

Depuis son installation en 2009, l’administration Obama a mis en place une politique de "main tendue aux musulmans" (Muslim outreach) qui s’est traduite, de manière délibérée, par le choix systématique de "partenaires" proches des Frères musulmans et l’attribution à ces interlocuteurs d’une influence réelle sur la définition de la politique américaine en matière de lutte contre le terrorisme.

Le choix des interlocuteurs était fait en toute connaissance de cause et incluait des personnes qui étaient, simultanément, l’objet d’enquêtes judiciaires pour association avec des organisations terroristes. Poole cite l’exemple de réunions tenues à la Maison Blanche, dont la liste publique des invités était expurgée pour ne pas faire apparaître des participants dont la présence est par ailleurs démontrée par des photos.

Parmi ces participants, Poole donne les exemples de Mohamed Majid, impliqué dans le plus grand procès de financement d’activités terroristes dans l’histoire des Etats-Unis ; d’Abdul Rahman al-Amoudi, l’un des plus grands financeurs d’al Qaeda ; de Sami al-Arian, le représentant aux Etats-Unis du Djihad islamique, chez qui le FBI avait découvert un programme écrit pour infiltrer les institutions américaines d’agents acquis à la cause du djihad ; et une douzaine d’autres noms du même acabit.

(…)

Voir de plus:

La politique antiterroriste de "George W. Obama"

Hélène Sallon

Le Monde

07.06.2013

"George W. Obama", titre le Huffington Post en une de son site Internet. "Le quatrième mandat de Bush", renchérit le site Internet Politico. Le président Barack Obama est raillé par la presse américaine, après les révélations du Guardian sur les saisies de relevés téléphoniques effectuées par les services de renseignement auprès de l’opérateur américain Verizon, et celles du Washington Post sur la manière dont la NSA et le FBI accèdent à des données sur les utilisateurs de neuf géants américains de l’Internet.

La comparaison n’est délibérément pas flatteuse pour Barack Obama qui s’était, dès son premier mandat présidentiel en 2008, posé en rupture de son prédécesseur. Les deux mandats de George W. Bush avaient été marqués par des mesures liberticides au nom de la guerre contre le terrorisme lancée après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001. Or, dans son effort de trouver un équilibre entre les libertés personnelles et la sécurité nationale, Barack Obama a révélé une "personnalité politique partagée", analyse Politico. "Le candidat Obama a souvent parlé de libertés personnelles avec la passion d’un avocat constitutionnaliste alors que le chef des armées Obama a repris à son compte et étendu les efforts en matière de surveillance de l’ère Bush."

Pour le site Internet, ces révélations mettent pourtant en lumière ce que les soutiens du président Obama craignaient depuis des années. "S’il a promis pendant sa campagne de diriger ‘l’administration la plus transparente’ de l’histoire américaine, Obama n’a jamais promis de revenir sur les politiques de son prédécesseur en matière de surveillance antiterroriste sur le territoire américain, et il a en cela tenu ses promesses", indique Politico.

"LES ÉLÉMENTS D’UN ETAT POLICIER"

"Nous avons ici les éléments d’un Etat policier", a commenté le journaliste Mark Levin sur la chaîne de télévision conservatrice Fox news. "C’est l’Amérique, et notre gouvernement collecte beaucoup trop de données sur les citoyens !" Un constat partagé par l’ensemble de la presse américaine, qui s’interroge sur la nécessité pour l’administration Obama de collecter les données personnelles de tout citoyen et non uniquement de terroristes présumés. Dans le Washington Post, Eugene Robinson craint ainsi que "cette vieille idée voulant que les contacts et mouvements des citoyens respectueux de la loi ne sont pas l’affaire du gouvernement soit une relique d’un autre temps".

Aux yeux des commentateurs, le président américain a interprété de façon extensive les pouvoirs de surveillance que lui autorise la loi. "Permettre cette surveillance modifie fondamentalement l’équilibre du pouvoir entre individu et Etat et nie les principes constitutionnels régissant la recherche, les saisies et la vie privée", juge le New York Times. "C’est exactement le type de choses que M. Obama a un jour critiquées, quand il a dit en 2007 que la politique de surveillance de l’administration de George W. Bush ‘mettait en avant un mauvais choix entre les libertés que nous chérissons et la sécurité que nous procurons’." Le quotidien américain dresse pour l’occasion un comparatif entre les mesures de surveillance électronique prises par George W. Bush et Barack Obama pendant leurs mandats respectifs.

"L’ADMINISTRATION OBAMA A PERDU TOUTE CRÉDIBILITÉ SUR CE SUJET"

Les explications fournies par l’administration Obama à la suite de ces révélations n’ont pas davantage convaincu la presse. Des propos résumés ainsi par le New York Times : "les terroristes sont une réelle menace et vous devez nous faire confiance dans notre façon de les gérer car nous avons des mécanismes internes (que nous n’allons pas vous révéler) pour nous assurer que nous n’enfreignons pas vos droits." "Ces assurances ne sont pas convaincantes (…), surtout de la part d’un président qui a, un jour, promis transparence et responsabilité", poursuit le quotidien dans son éditorial. "L’administration Obama a désormais perdu toute crédibilité sur ce sujet."

Face à ce concert d’accusations, le site Slate se démarque en appelant à la modération. "Du calme. Vous pouvez contester ce programme, mais il n’est pas orwellien. Il est limité et contrôlé sous l’effet de contrepoids", estime William Saletan. Le journaliste liste plusieurs raisons pour étayer son propos : ce ne sont pas des écoutes téléphoniques ; le programme est sous supervision judiciaire et du Congrès ; il est temporaire ; et la validation des tribunaux reste nécessaire pour procéder à des écoutes téléphoniques.

Voir également:

Mounting controversies are all about trust

LIZ SIDOTI

AP

Jun. 10 2013

FILE – In this Oct. 23, 2012, file photo President Barack Obama campaigns for his reelection in Delray Beach, Fla. A Quinnipiac University poll conducted in late May 2013 shows a steep decline in the percentage of people who find Obama honest and trustworthy: 49 percent, versus the 58 percent of their 2011 poll. And since his second-term controversies have taken hold, the poll also shows Obama has taken a hit among independents, which used to be a source of strength for him: 40 percent say he is honest and trustworthy, down from 58 percent in September 2011. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a candidate, Barack Obama vowed to bring a different, better kind of leadership to the dysfunctional capital. He’d make government more efficient, accountable and transparent. He’d rise above the "small-ball" nature of doing business. And he’d work with Republicans to break Washington paralysis.

You can trust me, Obama said back in 2008. And — for a while, at least — a good piece of the country did.

But with big promises often come big failures — and the potential for big hits to the one thing that can make or break a presidency: credibility.

A series of mounting controversies is exposing both the risks of political promise-making and the limits of national-level governing while undercutting the core assurance Obama made from the outset: that he and his administration would behave differently.

The latest: the government’s acknowledgement that, in a holdover from the Bush administration and with a bipartisan Congress’ approval and a secret court’s authorization, it was siphoning the phone records of millions of American citizens in a massive data-collection effort officials say was meant to protect the nation from terrorism. This came after the disclosure that the government was snooping on journalists.

Also, the IRS’ improper targeting of conservative groups for extra scrutiny as they sought tax-exempt status has spiraled into a wholesale examination of the agency, including the finding that it spent $49 million in taxpayer money on 225 employee conferences over the past three years.

At the same time, Obama’s immigration reform agenda is hardly a sure thing on Capitol Hill, and debate starting this week on the Senate floor is certain to show deep divisions over it. Gun control legislation is all but dead. And he’s barely speaking to Republicans who control the House, much less working with them on a top priority: tax reform.

Even Democrats are warning that more angst may be ahead as the government steps up its efforts to implement Obama’s extraordinarily expensive, deeply unpopular health care law.

Collectively, the issues call into question not only whether the nation’s government can be trusted but also whether the leadership itself can. All of this has Obama on the verge of losing the already waning faith of the American people. And without their confidence, it’s really difficult for presidents to get anything done — particularly those in the second term of a presidency and inching toward lame-duck status.

The ramifications stretch beyond the White House. If enough Americans lose faith in Obama, he will lack strong coattails come next fall’s congressional elections. Big losses in those races will make it harder for the Democratic presidential nominee in 2016, especially if it’s Hillary Rodham Clinton, to run as an extension of Obama’s presidency and convince the American public to give Democrats another four years.

Obama seemed to recognize this last week. He emphasized to anxious Americans that the other two branches of government were as responsible as the White House for signing off on the vast data-gathering program.

"We’ve got congressional oversight and judicial oversight," Obama said. "And if people can’t trust not only the executive branch but also don’t trust Congress and don’t trust federal judges to make sure that we’re abiding by the Constitution, due process and rule of law, then we’re going to have some problems here."

The government is an enormous operation, and it’s unrealistic to think it will operate smoothly all of the time. But, as the head of it, Obama faces the reality of all of his successors: The buck stops with him.

If the controversies drag on, morale across America could end up taking a huge hit, just when the mood seems to be improving along with an economic uptick. Or, Americans could end up buying Obama’s arguments that safety sometimes trumps privacy, that his administration is taking action on the IRS, and that he’s doing the best he can to forge bipartisan compromise when Republicans are obstructing progress.

Every president faces the predicament of overpromising. Often the gap can be chalked up to the difference between campaigning and governing, between rhetoric and reality. As with past presidents, people desperate to turn the page on the previous administration voted for the Obama they wanted and now are grappling with the Obama they got.

From the start of his career, Obama tried to sculpt an almost nonpartisan persona as he spoke of bridging divides and rejecting politics as usual. He attracted scores of supporters from across the ideological spectrum with his promises to behave differently. And they largely believed what he said.

Back then, he held an advantage as one of the most trusted figures in American politics.

In January 2008, Obama had an 8-point edge over Clinton as the more honest and trustworthy candidate in the Democratic primary. That grew to a 23-point advantage by April of that year, according to Washington Post-ABC News polls. Later that year, the Post-ABC poll showed Obama up 8 points on Republican nominee John McCain as the more honest candidate.

Obama held such strong marks during his first term, with the public giving the new president the benefit of the doubt. Up for re-election, he went into the 2012 campaign home stretch topping Mitt Romney by 9 points on honesty in a mid-October ABC/Post poll.

But now, that carefully honed image of trustworthiness may be changing in Americans’ eyes.

A Quinnipiac University poll conducted late last month found 49 percent of people consider Obama honest and trustworthy, a dip from the organization’s last read on the matter in September 2011 when 58 percent said the same. He also has taken a hit among independents, which used to be a source of strength for him, since his second-term controversies have emerged. Now just 40 percent say he is honest and trustworthy, down from 58 percent in September 2011.

Obama has waning opportunities to turn it around. He’s halfway through his fifth year, and with midterm elections next fall, there’s no time to waste.

If he can’t convince the American people that they can trust him, he could end up damaging the legacy he has worked so hard to control and shape — and be remembered, even by those who once supported him, as the very opposite of the different type of leader he promised to be.

___

EDITOR’S NOTE: Liz Sidoti is the national politics editor for The Associated Press. Follow her on Twitter: http://twitter.com/lsidoti

Voir encore:

Leaking Secrets Empowers Terrorists

The NSA’s surveillance program doesn’t do damage. Revealing it does.

Michael B. Mukasey

Once again, the tanks-have-rolled left and the black-helicopters right have joined together in howls of protest. They were set off by last week’s revelations that the U.S. government has been collecting data that disclose the fact, but not the content, of electronic communications within the country, as well as some content data outside the U.S. that does not focus on American citizens. Once again, the outrage of the left-right coalition is misdirected.

Libertarian Republicans and liberal—progressive, if you prefer—Democrats see the specter of George Orwell’s "1984" in what they claim is pervasive and unlawful government spying. These same groups summoned "1984" in 2001 after passage of the Patriot Act, in 2008 after renewal of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA, and many times in between and since.

Regrettably, those best positioned to defend such surveillance programs are least likely to do so out of obvious security concerns. Without getting into detail here, intelligence agencies, with court authorization, have been collecting data in an effort that is neither pervasive nor unlawful. As to the data culled within the U.S., the purpose is to permit analysts to map relationships between and among Islamist fanatics.

For example, it would be helpful to know who communicated with the Tsarnaev brothers, who those people were in touch with, and whether there are overlapping circles that would reveal others bent on killing and maiming Americans—sort of a terrorist Venn diagram. Once these relationships are disclosed, information can be developed that would allow a court to give permission to monitor the content of communications.

As to monitoring content abroad, the utility is obvious. At least one conspiracy—headed by Najibullah Zazi and intended to maim and kill New York City subway riders—was disclosed through such monitoring and headed off. Zazi, arrested in 2009, pleaded guilty and awaits sentencing.

Because intelligence does not arrive in orderly chronological ranks, and getting useful data is an incremental process that often requires matching information gathered in the past with more current data, storing the information is essential. But, say the critics, information in the hands of "the government" can be misused—just look at the IRS. The IRS, as it happens, has a history of misusing information for political purposes. To be sure, there have been transgressions within intelligence agencies, but these have involved the pursuit of an intelligence mission, not a political objective.

Consider also that in a post-9/11 world all of those agencies live in dread of a similar attack. That ghastly prospect itself provides incentive for analysts to focus on the intelligence task at hand and not on political or recreational use of information. And the number of analysts with access to the information is not terribly large. The total number of analysts in the intelligence community, though certainly classified, appears to be a few thousand, with those focusing on terrorism likely a limited subset.

Given the nature of the data being collected and the relatively small number and awful responsibility of those who do the collecting, the claims of pervasive spying, even if sincere, appear not merely exaggerated, but downright irrational. Indeed, psychiatry has a term for the misplaced belief that the patient is the focus of the attention of others: delusions of reference.

Some wallow in the idea that they are being watched, their civil liberties endangered, simply because a handful of electrons they generated were among the vast billions being reviewed in a high-stakes antiterrorism effort. Of course, many are motivated politically or ideologically to oppose robust intelligence-gathering aimed at fending off Islamist terrorism. Criticism from that quarter can be left to lie where it fell.

All of that being said, it is at least theoretically possible that information could be misused to the prejudice of innocent citizens, which would be both a shame and a crime. But it makes about as much sense to deny intelligence agencies access to information necessary to defend the nation because some of that information theoretically could be misused as it does to deny guns to police because they could be turned on the innocent.

Nor do these programs violate the law. Start with the Constitution. The applicable provisions lie in two clauses in the Fourth Amendment. The first bars "unreasonable searches and seizures." The second provides that "no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause" established by affidavit, and it requires that warrants describe with particularity what or who is to be seized, and from where.

Notice that the first clause does not forbid warrantless searches, only unreasonable ones. And the second simply creates a warrant requirement that is read, with some exceptions, to bar evidence at trial if it is obtained without a valid warrant. The first clause has been read to protect the content of communications in which the speaker has a reasonable expectation of privacy—telephone conversations being an obvious example. It does not protect the fact of communications. Even in routine cases, prosecutors may obtain permission from a court to monitor the source of incoming calls and the destination of outgoing calls, as well as their date and duration, solely by averring that the information has to do with a criminal investigation.

The Founders were practical men who understood the need for secrecy. Indeed, they drafted the Constitution with windows and doors closed against prying eyes and ears even in sweltering summertime Philadelphia, lest their deliberations be revealed—not only prematurely, but at all. They realized that the free exchange of ideas was crucial to the success of their awesome project, and that it could only be inhibited by the prospect of disclosure, whether future or present.

They also understood that the nation could not survive without preserving its secrets. Article I, Section 5 of the document they created requires that "Each House . . . keep a journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in their judgment require secrecy." The Founders well understood the difference between government by consent and government by referendum.

Even zealots do not dispute that the Patriot Act, as amended, authorizes the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that was established under FISA to grant permission to gain access to the information at issue here. As to intercepting the content of foreign communications, I think it is best put starkly: The Constitution and U.S. laws are not a treaty with the universe; they protect U.S. citizens. Foreign governments spy on us and our citizens. We spy on them and theirs. Welcome to the world.

Real damage was done last week by Edward Snowden, who on Sunday claimed credit for leaking the secrets he learned while working for NSA contractors. Every time we tell terrorists how we can detect them, we encourage them to find ways to avoid detection.

Further, the current administration’s promiscuous treatment of national secrets suggests that the current disclosures will beget others. Recall the president’s startling boast in May 2011 that Osama bin Laden’s hideout had yielded a trove of valuable intelligence, which alerted anyone who had dealt with bin Laden and thereby rendered much of that material useless. Recall the June 2012 newspaper stories describing U.S. participation in implanting a malware worm called Stuxnet in Iran’s nuclear facilities, reports that even described White House Situation Room deliberations. And summon to mind also the president’s obvious discomfort as he defended—sort of—the programs now in question. There is little doubt that we will be treated to further disclosures to prove that these programs were successful.

If the current imbroglio opens an honest discussion of the legitimate need for secrecy in a fight against seventh-century primitives equipped with 21st-century technology, it may eventually prove to have been worth the cost, but I’m not laying down any bets.

Mr. Mukasey served as U.S. attorney general (2007-09) and as a U.S. district judge for the Southern District of New York (1988-2006).

Voir enfin:

Etats-Unis: de nouvelles révélations accablent Obama

Ivan Couronne

Courrier international

07.06.2013

• WASHINGTON (AFP)

Le renseignement américain récolte les relevés téléphoniques aux Etats-Unis et aurait accès aux serveurs de groupes informatiques comme Google et Facebook, des pratiques héritées de l’ère Bush et approuvées par l’administration de Barack Obama, selon deux journaux.

La classe politique américaine a vivement réagi jeudi aux révélations du Guardian et du Washington Post sur ces pratiques, dont l’existence était soupçonnée mais n’avait encore jamais été confirmée.

Le directeur du renseignement américain James Clapper a ainsi estimé que ces fuites menaçaient la sécurité nationale. Ces divulgations constituent "une menace potentielle à notre capacité à identifier et à répondre aux risques auxquels est confronté notre pays", a-t-il écrit dans un communiqué publié en fin de soirée.

De son côté, la Maison Blanche a démenti espionner les citoyens américains ou les personnes vivant aux Etats-Unis, selon un responsable de l’administration Obama ayant requis l’anonymat.

Le quotidien britannique The Guardian a publié une ordonnance de justice secrète forçant l’opérateur américain Verizon à livrer à l’Agence nationale de sécurité (NSA), à la demande du FBI, la totalité des données téléphoniques de ses abonnés, d’avril à juillet, en vertu d’une loi votée dans la foulée des attentats du 11 septembre 2001.

Des parlementaires ont ensuite confirmé que le programme existait sous cette forme systématique depuis 2007, mais ne concernait que les "métadonnées" telles que le numéro appelé et la durée d’appel, et non le contenu des conversations.

Sans confirmer formellement l’existence de ce programme, la Maison Blanche a assuré qu’il était indispensable à la lutte antiterroriste.

"La priorité numéro un du président est la sécurité nationale des Etats-Unis. Nous devons avoir les outils nécessaires pour faire face aux menaces posées par les terroristes", a déclaré un porte-parole de la Maison Blanche, Josh Earnest.

Le système a permis d’éviter "un attentat terroriste important" aux Etats-Unis "ces dernières années", a même assuré le président républicain de la commission du Renseignement de la Chambre des représentants, Mike Rogers.

Les informations sont accumulées dans les serveurs de la NSA, ont expliqué d’autres élus, mais ne sont analysées que lorsqu’il existe des soupçons précis.

"Si un numéro correspond à un numéro terroriste appelé depuis un numéro américain (…) alors il peut être signalé, et ils peuvent demander une ordonnance de justice pour aller plus loin dans ce cas précis", a précisé Saxby Chambliss, vice-président républicain de la commission du Renseignement du Sénat, lors d’une conférence de presse.

Accès direct à Facebook et Google

Quelques heures plus tard, le Washington Post et le Guardian ont affirmé sur la base de fuites d’un ancien employé du renseignement que la NSA avait un accès direct aux serveurs de neuf sociétés internet, dont Facebook, Microsoft, Apple et Google.

Grâce à un partenariat conclu avec ces compagnies, l’agence d’espionnage pourrait directement et sans ordonnance de justice lire les courriers électroniques et écouter les conversations des utilisateurs, tant qu’il existe une probabilité "raisonnable" que l’un des interlocuteurs se situe à l’étranger, la loi américaine exigeant une ordonnance dans le cas d’Américains.

Google a répondu dans un communiqué aux deux médias qu’il n’existait pas de "porte d’entrée cachée" à ses serveurs pour les services fédéraux.

Apple a lui aussi nié avoir connaissance de ce programme: "Nous ne fournissons aucun accès direct à nos serveurs à des agences gouvernementales, et toute agence de ce type recherchant des données sur un client doit obtenir un mandat judiciaire", a affirmé un porte-parole, Steve Dowling.

Mais ces révélations ont concrétisé les pires craintes des défenseurs des libertés individuelles, qui tentent depuis des années de faire la lumière sur l’utilisation par le gouvernement du "Patriot Act", la loi votée après le 11-Septembre.

"Cela va au-delà d’Orwell", a dénoncé Jameel Jaffer, de l’ONG American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), en référence au livre futuriste de George Orwell, "1984".

Une poignée d’élus, démocrates comme républicains, a dénoncé une atteinte à la vie privée "indéfendable et inacceptable", selon les mots du sénateur Bernie Sanders.

"La saisie et la surveillance par la NSA de quasiment tous les clients de Verizon est une attaque stupéfiante contre la Constitution", a dénoncé le républicain Rand Paul.

En 2006, le quotidien USA Today avait provoqué la stupeur en révélant que la NSA récoltait secrètement les données de communications d’Américains auprès des grands opérateurs. Le programme ne concernait alors que les communications entre un interlocuteur situé aux Etats-Unis et un autre à l’étranger. Il avait ensuite été transféré sous l’autorité d’une cour secrète de 11 juges chargés d’approuver toute écoute.

Verizon s’est contenté de relever dans un communiqué que la compagnie était légalement obligée d’obéir à une telle ordonnance.

Voir enfin:

Fièvre électorale aux Etats-Unis

Le président Obama, du prix Nobel aux drones

Arrestations arbitraires, détentions extrajudiciaires, tribunaux expéditifs… Malgré ses engagements, M. Barack Obama a poursuivi la politique de sécurité publique de son prédécesseur.

Chase Madar

Le Monde diplomatique

octobre 2012

En 2008, le candidat Barack Obama promettait de fermer la prison de Guantánamo, d’abroger la loi de 2001 sur la sécurité intérieure (Patriot Act) et de protéger contre toutes formes de représailles les militaires ou membres des services de renseignement qui ébruiteraient les abus de leur administration. Le postulant démocrate à la Maison Blanche se faisait fort de dompter un appareil sécuritaire qui, depuis les attentats du 11-Septembre, s’était mué en une bureaucratie hypertrophiée et souvent incontrôlable.

Quatre ans plus tard pourtant, Guantánamo est toujours en service, ses tribunaux militaires ont repris leurs audiences, et le Patriot Act a été reconduit. Résolu à sanctionner toute divulgation d’informations sensibles, le ministère de la justice a engagé six procédures pour violation de la loi sur l’espionnage — soit deux fois plus que sous la totalité des gouvernements précédents. De plus, la liste des passagers interdits de survol du territoire américain, établie en fonction de critères souvent arbitraires et systématiquement opaques, a plus que doublé entre 2011 et 2012 ; elle compte désormais vingt et un mille noms. Fin 2011, la Maison Blanche promulguait la loi d’autorisation de la défense nationale (National Defense Authorization Act, NDAA), qui permet au gouvernement fédéral d’emprisonner sans jugement et pour une durée indéterminée tout citoyen américain soupçonné de terrorisme, au mépris des principes de l’habeas corpus (1) et de la séparation des pouvoirs. L’administration Obama a enfin autorisé l’élimination physique, hors des frontières des Etats-Unis, de personnes désignées plus ou moins hâtivement comme « terroristes », quand bien même elles ne participent pas directement à des opérations armées. En dépit des bavures inhérentes à cette conception expéditive de la sécurité — comme cet adolescent américain de 16 ans, fils d’un responsable présumé d’Al-Qaida, tué par erreur en septembre 2011 au Yémen —, M. Obama a intensifié le programme « secret » d’exécutions sommaires visant des ressortissants étrangers, comme en témoigne l’usage de plus en plus fréquent de drones au Pakistan, au Yémen et en Somalie.

Fallait-il donc être naïf pour croire que M. Obama allait mettre un terme à l’expansion de l’appareil sécuritaire ? Sa promesse, après tout, s’appuyait sur un précédent historique. Au milieu des années 1970, dans la foulée de l’affaire du Watergate et de la guerre du Vietnam, la majorité démocrate au Congrès avait restreint les pouvoirs de police et de surveillance intérieure que voulait s’arroger le président républicain Gerald Ford. Un coup d’arrêt fut aussi donné à l’extension des prérogatives de l’exécutif dans le domaine militaire, notamment pour les opérations secrètes à l’étranger. Les électeurs de M. Obama étaient donc fondés à accorder un certain crédit aux promesses de leur candidat.

Ils ont été déçus. Dans la vie quotidienne des Américains, l’encadrement sécuritaire se fait chaque jour plus intrusif, à l’image des scanners corporels qui équipent aujourd’hui cent quarante aéroports dans le pays. De l’aveu même de certains experts, ces pratiques installent un « théâtre sécuritaire » qui fait perdre leur temps aux usagers plus qu’il ne les protège. Un rapport de l’Administration de la sécurité des transports (Transportation Security Administration, TSA) indique en outre que ces scanners sont « vulnérables » et faciles à déjouer (2). Si le voyageur peut refuser de s’y soumettre, c’est au prix d’une fouille corporelle souvent vécue comme une humiliation.

En 2011, soixante-dix-sept millions de documents ont été classés secret-défense par Washington

Plus saisissant encore, le renforcement de la surveillance intérieure sous la présidence Obama : l’administration fédérale emploie aujourd’hui trente mille personnes pour écouter les conversations téléphoniques des Américains. Le ministère de la sécurité intérieure, créé en 2002, est devenu en une décennie la troisième administration la plus forte du pays, après le Pentagone et le ministère des anciens combattants. Pour stocker les données recueillies par ce dispositif tentaculaire, un nouveau centre est en cours de construction à Bluffdale, dans l’Utah, sur un site de neuf hectares et pour un coût total de 2 milliards de dollars (3).

Il est difficile de mesurer dans quelles proportions l’Etat sécuritaire a enflé. Depuis les attentats du 11-Septembre, un maillage inextricable de fiefs bureaucratiques, chacun doté d’un budget de plus en plus opulent (auquel s’ajoutent des financements privés opaques), a déclenché un boom immobilier dans le centre-ville de Washington, avec la construction de trente-trois bâtiments éparpillés sur une surface totale de plus de cent cinquante hectares — l’équivalent de trois Pentagone ou de vingt-deux Capitole. Ce nouveau système de surveillance et de contrôle produit chaque année cinquante mille rapports, soit cent trente-six par jour. Selon la journaliste du Washington Post Dana Priest, lauréate d’un prix Pulitzer et spécialiste des questions de sécurité intérieure, le coût de la « fête aux dépenses sécuritaires » s’élève à 2 000 milliards de dollars en dix ans. Et cela en l’absence de toute autorité hiérarchique susceptible de surveiller les surveillants : le seul supérieur théorique des agences est le directeur du renseignement national (Director of National Intelligence, DNI), qui dans les faits n’exerce aucun pouvoir.

Dans le même temps, Washington a durci sa politique du secret. En 2011, soixante-dix-sept millions de documents ont ainsi été classifiés, soit 40 % de plus que l’année précédente. Le processus de « classification » coûterait à lui seul 10 milliards de dollars par an, selon l’estimation de M. William Bosanko, un ancien directeur du Bureau de surveillance de la sécurité de l’information. Il n’est dès lors pas étonnant que les déclassifications se fassent au compte-gouttes. L’année dernière, l’Agence de sécurité nationale (National Security Agency, NSA) a rendu publics les dossiers se rapportant à la guerre… de 1812 contre la Grande-Bretagne. Seules des organisations solides et assez riches pour s’offrir un bataillon d’avocats expérimentés parviennent à percer le mur du secret, en invoquant la loi sur la liberté d’information — mais avec un succès limité.

Cet appareil colossal qui engloutit des fortunes souffre pourtant de quelques problèmes d’étanchéité. En premier lieu, la prolifération des autorisations de sécurité (security clearances) — huit cent cinquante-quatre mille Américains disposent aujourd’hui d’un droit d’accès partiel à des renseignements confidentiels — remet en question la notion même de secret. En outre, il n’est pas rare que du matériel classifié transite d’un ordinateur portable vers un site Internet libre d’accès grâce à des programmes de peer-to-peer généralement installés par la progéniture de tel ou tel haut fonctionnaire grisonnant et peu familiarisé avec la Toile (4). Matthew M. Aid, historien de l’espionnage américain, a, quant à lui, eu la surprise de trouver des ordinateurs de l’armée américaine en vente sur des marchés à Kaboul, avec leurs disques durs intacts et remplis de fichiers classifiés (5). Et malgré la répression de plus en plus sévère des « gorges profondes », de hauts membres de l’administration américaine continuent d’abreuver les journalistes en informations classées secrètes. Le très confidentiel « Rapport du renseignement national sur l’Afghanistan » a ainsi connu des fuites en janvier dernier, et les frappes de drones au Pakistan font fréquemment l’objet d’indiscrétions dans la presse.

Durant les deux mandats de M. George W. Bush, l’extension de la sûreté nationale était perçue comme une menace par de nombreux Américains ; ce n’est plus le cas. Depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, il semble que la défense des libertés civiles ne progresse aux Etats-Unis que lorsque le Parti démocrate se trouve dans l’opposition, comme au début des années 1970. Dès qu’il accède au pouvoir, le mouvement s’essouffle. Aujourd’hui, de nombreux intellectuels prodémocrates s’emploient à expliquer au public que leurs objections passées ne visaient pas l’appareil sécuritaire en tant que tel, mais seulement son utilisation par le mauvais parti. « C’est un argument courant chez les progressistes qui refusent de s’attaquer à Obama comme ils se sont attaqués à Bush », déplore le juriste Jonathan Turley (6). Si les critiques de gauche brillent par leur timidité, les anciens responsables de l’administration Bush — à l’instar de M. Richard (« Dick ») Cheney — ne se privent pas d’applaudir le président pour son dévouement à la sûreté nationale post-11-Septembre.

La bureaucratie sécuritaire fera-t-elle les frais des politiques d’austérité ?

Au début de son mandat, M. Obama semblait pourtant vouloir tenir ses promesses. Il s’est rapidement trouvé confronté à l’hostilité des parlementaires. Le 21 mai 2009, le Congrès refusait d’allouer les 80 millions de dollars nécessaires pour réaliser ce projet. Faisant fi de cette obstruction, le ministre de la justice Eric Holder annonce sans crier gare que cinq détenus de Guantánamo seront transférés à New York devant une cour de justice civile. Controversée, sa décision se heurte cette fois-ci à l’opposition farouche des élus new-yorkais, obligeant M. Obama à admettre qu’il ne pourrait pas fermer la prison dans les délais annoncés. Depuis, le complexe de Guantánamo et ses corollaires (détention pour une durée indéterminée, tribunaux militaires…) reçoivent l’adhésion de plus en plus inconditionnelle du Congrès, notamment parmi les démocrates. On aurait donc tort d’interpréter le revirement sécuritaire de M. Obama comme le symptôme d’une « présidence impériale » piétinant les contre-pouvoirs législatif et judiciaire.

D’autant que l’expansion rapide de la sûreté nationale n’est pas un phénomène nouveau dans l’histoire américaine. L’actuel président a été surpassé dans ce domaine par son lointain prédécesseur Harry Truman (1945-1953), démocrate lui aussi, qui, galvanisé par l’anticommunisme en vogue après la seconde guerre mondiale, avait considérablement alourdi l’arsenal de surveillance et de répression intérieures. Cette politique s’est encore durcie sous les présidences de John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1961-1963) et de Ronald Reagan (1981-1989). Aux temps de la guerre froide, la sûreté d’Etat obtenait généralement tous les budgets et l’autonomie qu’elle réclamait.

S’il est de notoriété publique que les Américains exècrent toute forme d’ingérence de l’Etat dans leur vie privée, ils s’accommodent plutôt bien des dispositions sécuritaires. Les libertariens (une faction minoritaire du Parti républicain) ont certes nourri l’espoir que le Tea Party, particulièrement porté sur la notion de liberté individuelle, réussirait à endiguer l’appareil de contrôle et à réduire les interventions militaires américaines à l’étranger. C’était oublier que ce libertarisme droitier se préoccupe essentiellement de la défense du droit de propriété, raison pour laquelle ses représentants au Congrès ont voté comme un seul homme la reconduction du Patriot Act en 2011. Aussi fleurie que soit sa rhétorique anti-Washington, le Tea Party est parfaitement à l’aise avec ces politiques intrusives menées au nom de la sûreté nationale.

Aujourd’hui, la résistance à l’idéologie sécuritaire se fragmente en petits groupes dispersés à gauche comme à droite. Bien établie et dotée de moyens importants, l’Union américaine des libertés civiles (American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU), de centre gauche, milite depuis des décennies contre les surveillances illégales, le secret d’Etat et les abus de pouvoir. Curieusement, la seule personnalité politique nationalement connue à avoir pris clairement position contre la démesure sécuritaire est le républicain Ronald (« Ron ») Paul, qui fut candidat à l’investiture de son parti en vue de l’élection présidentielle de novembre prochain. Elu du Texas à la Chambre des représentants, ce libertarien radical incarne un pittoresque mélange de discours anti-impérialiste et d’orthodoxie ultralibérale. Mais, d’où qu’elles viennent, les tentatives pour défendre les libertés civiles ont toutes échoué. Lorsqu’elles trouvent un écho électoral, c’est dans certaines zones peu habitées, situées à l’intérieur du pays (les Etats montagneux, le Sud-Ouest et le nord du Midwest), davantage que dans les grandes agglomérations côtières. En Californie comme à New York, les sénateurs démocrates ont tendance à marcher main dans la main avec les pontes de la sûreté nationale et avec les industriels des télécommunications, gros pourvoyeurs de technologies pour les programmes de surveillance de l’Etat.

L’expansion de la bureaucratie sécuritaire s’est faite au rythme des interventions militaires américaines à l’étranger. Alors que les Etats-Unis se trouvent confrontés à une grave crise budgétaire, certains, au sein même du Parti républicain, envisagent de réduire les budgets de l’armée. Les dispositifs de surveillance feront-ils, eux aussi, les frais des politiques d’austérité ?

Chase Madar

Avocat des droits civiques et coauteur du rapport « Safety with dignity : Alternatives to the over-policing of schools », New York, juillet 2009.

(1) Principe juridique qui interdit d’emprisonner une personne sans jugement.

(2) David Kravets, « Homeland security concedes airport body scanner “vulnerabilities” », Wired, San Francisco, 7 mai 2012.

(3) James Bamford, « The NSA is building the country’s biggest spy center (watch what you say) », Wired, 15 mars 2012.

(4) Dana Priest et William M. Arkin, Top Secret America : The Rise of the New American Security State, Little, Brown and Company, New York, 2011.

(5) Matthew M. Aid, Intel Wars : The Secret Story of the Fight Against Terror, Bloomsbury, New York, 2012.

(6) Jonathan Turley, « 10 reasons why the US is no longer the land of the free », The Washington Post, 4 janvier 2012.


Terrorisme: L’incroyable aveuglement occidental devant la véritable horreur de ce que peut produire l’effacement des cultures traditionnelles (Last bang before the whimper ? : Why Israeli-Palestinian peace is not for tomorrow)

3 mai, 2013
http://www.undergroundvoices.com/ApocalypseNOV2011.jpgTravaillons donc à bien penser : Voilà le principe de la morale. Blaise Pascal
C’est ainsi que finit le monde pas sur un boum mais sur un murmure. TS Eliot
C’est quand les phénomènes vont mourir qu’ils s’exaspèrent. René Girard
Le « bazar » qu’est Al-Qaida – on ne peut en effet plus y distinguer une quelconque structure hiérarchique – est composé d’un cercle mondial de personnes qui commettent des attentats tout simplement nihilistes, puisqu’on ne décèle plus aucun objectif définissable pour lesquels ces acteurs se battent. (…) Ces gens sont complètement détachés des conflits: il s’agit d’une secte ou du moins d’une entité qui a le bagage idéologique d’une secte. Ce qui est dangereux, c’est qu’Internet permet justement à ces fanatiques de se regrouper, de s’organiser et de s’auto-encourager. (…) Al-Qaida est devenue une sorte d’agrégat dans lequel les relations personnelles avec les cadres ne sont plus nécessaires: il s’agit d’une pure idéologie, une idée selon laquelle le monde doit être « nettoyé » des infidèles et qu’il est en guerre, même dans des régions comme Casablanca, Madrid, Paris ou Londres où les gens n’ont pas le sentiment de vivre dans une situation de conflit. Si l’on considère Mohammed Siddique Khan et son message vidéo, on n’a l’impression qu’il se trouvait dans un autre pays qui s’appellerait par hasard « Angleterre ». Le monde est en guerre, et il s’agit de continuer la lutte. Ces gens sont complètement détachés des conflits: il s’agit d’une secte ou du moins d’une entité qui a le bagage idéologique d’une secte. Ce qui est dangereux, c’est qu’Internet permet justement à ces fanatiques de se regrouper, de s’organiser et de s’auto-encourager. (…) Les kamikazes de Casablanca, par exemple, sont allés à pied pour rejoindre le lieu de leur attentat: ils n’avaient pas les moyens de payer un taxi. Comment s’imaginer alors qu’ils aient eu suffisamment d’argent pour entreprendre un voyage en Irak? Je crois qu’il s’agit d’une erreur d’affirmer que les attentats d’Al-Qaida soient liés à une notion de territoire. Même en Irak, on observe depuis environ une année des combats massifs entre la résistance sunnite et des militants qui se sont établis comme Al-Qaida, du fait que sur place, Al-Qaida a assassiné tellement de sheiks, de personnalités locales dans les cercles radicaux que même leurs alliés se sont retournés contre eux plutôt que de perpétrer des attentats sur les Américains.(…) L’attentat-suicide constitue l’ultima ratio de la lutte, mais peut perdre sa valeur s’il est utilisé de manière indiscriminée, comme ce fut le cas durant la guerre Iran-Irak où des centaines de milliers d’enfants ont été envoyés à la mort. Dans ce dernier cas, presque la moitié des familles des quartiers pauvres de Téhéran pourraient prétendre au titre de familles de martyrs. Mais cela crée des conflits puisqu’il n’y pas assez d’argent et qu’il est difficile d’honorer la mémoire de 50.000 personnes chaque année, alors que dans le cas du LTTE et du Hezbollah, il existe des reliquaires pour les martyrs dont on fête l’anniversaire et dont on se souvient. Mais cela ne peut fonctionner que si l’on sacrifie une trentaine de personnes en l’espace de 25 ans, comme dans le cas du Hezbollah. Ce qui se passe en Irak est lié à la désintégration générale d’Al-Qaida. (…) Dans le cas d’Al-Qaida et de sa façon arbitraire et indiscriminée de frapper, ceci aura probablement pour conséquence que l’attrait de l’attentat-suicide va diminuer. On a assisté à un phénomène similaire en Iran après les vagues de kamikazes durant le conflit avec l’Irak: il n’y a plus jamais eu de kamikazes iraniens du fait que la valeur du phénomène a été complètement dévaluée. On peut observer une baisse de l’attrait, mais dans une proportion moindre, dans la société palestienne, où l’on a assisté à d’énormes fluctuations que ce soit au niveau de l’approbation des attentats ou de leur nombre. Par exemple, après le début de la seconde Intifada, les attaques étaient presque quotidiennes, alors que maintenant où l’on assiste à une certaine lassitude, leur nombre a baissé de manière drastique. Dans le cas d’Al-Qaida, cette « réaction à retardement » fonctionne de manière ralentie puisqu’il ne s’agit pas d’un groupe militants limité, mais de ce qu’on pourrait qualifier de « crème de la crème » des ultra-radicaux de toutes les sociétés musulmanes.(…) Il y aura peut-être un problème avec ce qu’on appelle « Al-Qaida », du fait qu’elle opère comme une secte isolée et que malgré son manque de succès, elle trouvera toujours des gens pour se faire sauter, peut-être moins en Irak, mais en Allemagne ou dans des endroits où les mesures de sécurité sont beaucoup plus faibles et que l’on peut facilement se mélanger à des foules nombreuses. En principe, rien ne serait plus facile que de perpétrer un attentat-suicide en Allemagne où dans tous les endroits où il est possible de s’approcher d’une foule avec une camionnette remplie d’explosifs, ce qui est devenu impossible en Irak puisqu’il y a partout ces barrières de béton. (…) La fierté – qui est en fait également très ambivalente puisqu’il s’agit d’une fierté officielle, mais qu’au niveau privé les familles sont souvent accablées – que l’on retrouve dans les familles palestiniennes n’a pas été observé dans les familles irakiennes du fait que les familles ne sont souvent pas au courant et qu’une telle approbation publique n’existe pas en Irak. (…) C’est difficile à dire étant donné que la situation ressemble au jet d’un cocktail Molotov dans une mer de flammes, c’est-à-dire que les attentats-suicides ne constituent qu’une partie de la situation qui perturbe beaucoup la population. A cela s’ajoutent les nettoyages ethniques, c’est-à-dire qu’on assiste à de véritables chasses contre les sunnites, les chiites, les chrétiens. Les escadrons de la mort des groupes de confession sunnite et chiite font la chasse aux membres des autres confessions. Les enlèvements ont atteint un niveau tel que même de pauvres chauffeurs de taxi sont kidnappés, étant donné que tous les gens riches ont déjà été enlevés. Christoph Reuter (2007)
Dans les pays occidentaux, nous avons partout ce système d’allocations sociales qui est à peine utilisé par la population locale. D’un autre côté, il y a cette population immigrante dont les femmes ne peuvent être compétitives sur le marché du travail local. Pour les Danoises et les Allemandes, les allocations sont trop faibles pour être attractives. Pas pour les immigrants. Ce que l’on voit donc en Angleterre, en France, en Allemagne et aux Pays-Bas, ce sont des femmes issues de l’immigration qui complètent leur éventuel petit salaire par les deniers publics. Ce n’est pas un revenu extraordinaire, mais ça leur suffit. Et cela crée un genre de « carrière » réservé aux femmes, un modèle que leurs filles suivront. Mais les fils n’ont pas ce choix. Ils ont grandi dans les basses couches de la société, sans les compétences intellectuelles nécessaires pour améliorer leur position. Ce sont ces garçons qui mettent le feu à Paris, ou dans des quartiers de Brême. Certains d’entre eux parviennent jusqu’à l’université et deviennent des leaders pour les autres – pas des pauvres, mais de jeunes hommes de rang social peu élevé, qui croient être opprimés à cause de leur confession musulmane, alors qu’en réalité c’est le système social qui a créé cette classe de perdants. Gunnar Heinsohn
Le 17 février 2001, un cargo vétuste s’échouait volontairement sur les rochers côtiers, non loin de Saint-Raphaël. À son bord, un millier d’immigrants kurdes, dont près de la moitié étaient des enfants. « Cette pointe rocheuse faisait partie de mon paysage. Certes, ils n’étaient pas un million, ainsi que je les avais imaginés, à bord d’une armada hors d’âge, mais ils n’en avaient pas moins débarqué chez moi, en plein décor du Camp des saints, pour y jouer l’acte I. Le rapport radio de l’hélicoptère de la gendarmerie diffusé par l’AFP semble extrait, mot pour mot, des trois premiers paragraphes du livre. La presse souligna la coïncidence, laquelle apparut, à certains, et à moi, comme ne relevant pas du seul hasard. Jean Raspail
C’est sous la tutelle de Yasser Arafat, le véritable père du terrorisme du Moyen-Orient moderne, les Palestiniens ont appris l’éthique flexible qui permet à des hommes de massacrer des femmes et des enfants et d’appeler cela de la « résistance. » Avec ce type de morale, le respect islamique traditionnel pour le martyre istishhad converti en cri de guerre moderne, l’évolution d’un combattant palestinien armé d’une mitraillette et de grenades en terroriste-suicide homme puis femme semble, rétrospectivement, inévitable. Entendre des mères musulmanes palestiniennes raconter fièrement comment elles avaient envoyé des fils mourir comme terroristes-suicide et se réjouir à présent à l’idée d’envoyer plus de fils ou de filles mourir pour la cause, on réalise la véritable horreur de ce que peut produire l’effacement des cultures traditionnelles par la face cachée de la modernité occidentale. Reuel Marc Gerecht
La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme.  René Girard
Si les convertis jouent un rôle fondamental dans la stratégie islamiste, c’est parce qu’ils se trouvent justement à l’intersection de ces deux versants complémentaires de la stratégie de lutte contre l’Occident : certains deviennent des soldats du djihad, d’autres sont employés à des fonctions de da’wa. » (propagation de la foi) Paul Landau
Aucun nombre de bombes atomiques ne pourra endiguer le raz de marée constitué par les millions d’êtres humains qui partiront un jour de la partie méridionale et pauvre du monde, pour faire irruption dans les espaces relativement ouverts du riche hémisphère septentrional, en quête de survie. Boumediene (mars 1974)
Un jour, des millions d’hommes quitteront le sud pour aller dans le nord. Et ils n’iront pas là-bas en tant qu’amis. Parce qu’ils iront là-bas pour le conquérir. Et ils le conquerront avec leurs fils. Le ventre de nos femmes nous donnera la victoire. Houari Boumediene (ONU, 10.04.74)
Le jihad n’est pas exigé si l’ennemi est deux fois plus puissant que les musulmans. (…) Quel intérêt y a-t-il à détruire un des édifices de votre ennemi si celui-ci anéantit ensuite un de vos pays ? A quoi sert de tuer l’un des siens si, en retour, il élimine un millier des vôtres ? Saïd Imam Al-Sharif alias Dr. Fadl (ex-idéologue d’Al Qaeda)
Je ne crois guère au développement d’un terrorisme de masse. (…) Je ne pense donc pas, contrairement à certains, que nous verrons des actes terroristes entraînant des milliers de victimes. Pascal Boniface (mai 2001)
La liberté d’expression est dans tous les pays occidentaux d’ores et déjà limitée (…) en 2005, l’Eglise catholique de France a obtenu le retrait d’une publicité utilisant la Cène, mais remplaçant les apôtres par des femmes court vêtues. Cela relève exactement de la même démarche qu’entreprennent les associations musulmanes aujourd’hui. (…) Aucun grand journal ne publierait des caricatures se moquant des aveugles, des nains, des homosexuels ou des Tziganes, plus par peur du mauvais goût que de poursuites judiciaires. Mais le mauvais goût passe pour l’islam, parce que l’opinion publique est plus perméable à l’islamophobie (qui très souvent recouvre en fait un rejet de l’immigration). Olivier Roy
Four-in-ten Palestinian Muslims see suicide bombing as often or sometimes justified, while roughly half (49%) take the opposite view. In Egypt, about three-in-ten (29%) consider suicide bombing justified at least sometimes. Elsewhere in the region, fewer Muslims believe such violence is often or sometimes justified, including fewer than one-in-five in Jordan (15%) and about one-in-ten in Tunisia (12%), Morocco (9%) and Iraq (7%). In Afghanistan, a substantial minority of Muslims (39%) say that this form of violence against civilian targets is often or sometimes justifiable in defense of Islam. In Bangladesh, more than a quarter of Muslims (26%) take this view. Support for suicide bombing is lower in Pakistan (13%). Sondage Pew
Les attentats du 11 septembre 2001 constituent l’aboutissement extrême d’une orientation prise par la mouvance islamiste radicale depuis le milieu des années 1980, à l’époque où se rassemblaient en Afghanistan les combattants du jihad contre l’Armée rouge. Sous l’égide des États-Unis et des pétro-monarchies de la péninsule arabique, les activistes les plus déterminés venus d’Égypte, d’Algérie, d’Arabie Saoudite, du Pakistan, du Sud-est asiatique… et parfois des banlieues européennes avaient alors constitué des brigades internationales islamiques. […] Pour les États-Unis et les États musulmans conservateurs alliés à Washington, ce jihad en Afghanistan permettait du même coup de piéger l’Union soviétique […] et d’éviter que l’Iran révolutionnaire ne conquière l’hégémonie sur une mouvance islamiste alors en pleine expansion à travers le monde. Ces deux objectifs ont été atteints.[...] Le 11 septembre 2001, les États-Unis vont subir, pour une large part, le choc en retour du phénomène qu’ils ont contribué à engendrer dans les années 1980. La tuerie des milliersde civils du World Trade Center et du Pentagone est le prix payé, avec une décennie de décalage, pour le « zéro mort » américain du jihad contre l’Armée rouge. Gilles Kepel (2003)
Les groupes salafistes (…) ne sont pas très nombreux mais très déterminés. Surtout, dans un univers où les repères ont disparu, ils donnent une sorte de corset à la société, ce qui est rassurant quand vous êtes paumé. Ils font des pauvres et des laissés-pour-compte des héros. Cela crée, dans les situations de désarroi, un phénomène frappant qui ressemble à ce qu’on voit dans l’extrême-droite. Les salafistes arrivent à récupérer les frustrations sociales, et à les traduire dans l’exigence de l’application des normes les plus strictes. (…) Il y a eu trois phases dans les révolutions. La première : la chute des régimes. La deuxième : la conquête du pouvoir, la plupart par des partis islamistes. La troisième se déroule aujourd’hui : la mise en cause de ces partis islamistes pour leur incompétence et le caractère liberticide de certains. Ces partis sont aujourd’hui débordés à la fois par des éléments de la société civile laïque, dont des jeunes ont qui ont porté la révolution, et par des déshérités qui ont épousé le salafisme radical. Nous sommes dans une période d’incertitude totale. Mais c’est assez normal car ces révolutions n’ont que deux ans. (…) Au début, les monarchies du Golfe étaient très inquiètes. Car les mots d’ordre révolutionnaires – liberté, démocratie, justice sociale – pouvaient être prises comme une remise en cause de ce qu’elles sont. Le cauchemar des émirs c’était que des dizaines de millions d’Egyptiens et autres déferlent sur leurs puits de pétrole. Ils ont donc développé deux stratégies : les Saoudiens ont renforcé leur soutien aux salafistes, qui obéissent aux oulémas saoudiens, et les Qataris ont soutenu les Frères musulmans, y voyant des alliés pour construire leur hégémonie sur le monde arabe sunnite. (…) L’affrontement chiites-sunnites est le clivage principal qui sort des révolutions. Le Qatar a tenté de dévier l’énergie révolutionnaire dans la lutte contre l’Iran, le chiisme et ses alliés. C’est une façon de prendre en otage les aspirations révolutionnaires et démocratiques des peuples dans l’affrontement chiites-sunnites pour le contrôle du gaz et du pétrole du Golfe. ( la Syrie) est dans un état catastrophique. On en est à 100 000 morts, avec des perspectives épouvantables. Les salafistes y montent en puissance grâce à la manne financière des pays du Golfe, et parce que l’occident n’a pas aidé l’armée syrienne libre. (la révolution au Bahreïn) survenue après celle de Tunisie et d’Egypte, a été écrasée par l’Arabie saoudite dans l’indifférence totale du monde des consommateurs de pétrole, qui craignait qu’une révolution au Bahreïn mette le feu au Golfe et fasse grimper le prix du baril.. (le printemps arabe dans les banlieues françaises) a créé un espace plus fluide, décrispé de la citoyenneté. Il n’y a plus le bled et la dictature d’un côté, l’Europe et la démocratie de l’autre. Ça c’est l’aspect favorable. L’autre aspect, défavorable, c’est l’arrestation de ce djihadiste de Haute Savoie originaire d’Algérie arrêté au Mali et, plus largement, la fascination pour les terrains du djihad, que ce soit au Mali ou en Syrie. Des jeunes prennent des charters pour aller combattre. Pour ceux qui n’arrivent pas à s’insérer par le travail dans la société, c’est une manière de se construire une position héroïque. Mais leur retour en France sera très préoccupant. A cet égard, le cas de Mohamed Merah reste dans les mémoires. Gilles Kepel
L’attentat de Boston présente de troublantes similitudes avec la tuerie de Montauban et Toulouse en mars 2012. A une année de distance, deux opérations de « djihad du pauvre » ont été menées en Occident par des jeunes musulmans brusquement radicalisés issus de l’immigration. (…) Ces deux passages à l’acte illustrent en effet les préconisations du « troisième âge du djihad », théorisées par l’idéologue islamiste syrien Moustafa Sitt Mariam Al-Nassar – dit Abou Moussab Al-Souri – dans son volumineux opus Appel à la résistance islamique mondiale. Il fut mis en ligne à partir de 2005, lorsque l’auteur comprit que les opérations centralisées impulsées par Al-Qaida avaient failli, avec l’échec du djihad du « deuxième âge », à instaurer un « califat islamiste » en Irak – le « premier âge » se référait au djihad contre l’Armée rouge en Afghanistan dans la décennie 1980. (…) En septembre 2001, la stratégie de Ben Laden était en avance sur la doctrine militaire américaine : l’arsenal de la « guerre des étoiles » s’avéra futile contre les pirates de l’air de New York et de Washington. Dans la décennie qui suivit, l’Occident rattrapa son retard : la surveillance des transferts de fonds, la réorganisation du renseignement et des forces spéciales, les ravages causés par les drones parmi les imams et les fedayins de l’Irak au Yémen et à l’Afghanistan, portèrent des coups terribles au djihad « organisé » par le haut. L’exécution de Ben Laden, et plus encore le succès militaire français au Mali en 2013 contre une Al-Qaida au Maghreb islamique (AQMI), dont la logique avait été percée, le démontrèrent. C’est en alternative à cette défaite anticipée que Souri prôna une stratégie de djihad « par le bas », déstructuré, qu’il nomma nizam la tanzim (un système et non une organisation). A un terrorisme hâtif de destruction massive devenu impraticable, il oppose la multiplication d’actions quasi « spontanéistes » mises en oeuvre au long cours par des djihadistes autoradicalisés grâce aux sites de partage de vidéos – prolongés par quelques stages de formation in situ – incités à choisir eux-mêmes, dans leur proximité, une cible opportune. Peu ou mal identifiables par le renseignement – Merah comme Tsarnaev avaient été repérés et interrogés, mais leur dangerosité fut sous-estimée –, équipés d’explosifs ou d’armes de fortune, autofinancés par des larcins, ils ne pourront tuer des milliers d’ »impies » comme au 11-Septembre. Mais la répétition de ces actions spectaculaires, leur diffusion et leur glorification sur Internet, leur imprédictibilité, sèmeront à la longue, escompte Souri, la terreur au sein d’un ennemi démoralisé, qui multipliera les réactions « islamophobes », soudant en réaction, autour du djihad défensif, une communauté de croyants immigrés que rejoindront des convertis en nombre croissant. C’est alors, pense l’idéologue du « djihad 3G », qu’adviendra sous les meilleurs auspices l’affrontement qui détruira la civilisation occidentale sur son territoire même. Ce djihad de basse intensité, progressif, mécaniste et eschatologique, n’a guère été pris au sérieux par la communauté du renseignement, requinquée par les succès remportés contre Al-Qaida depuis la seconde moitié de la décennie écoulée. Les « terroristologues de plateau télévisé », généralement ignorants d’une idéologie qui suppose la connaissance de l’arabe et de la culture islamiste radicale, avaient traité en son temps Merah de « loup solitaire » pour masquer leur incompréhension du phénomène. Aux Etats-Unis, on affectionne l’expression stray dogs (chiens errants) pour désigner le passage à l’acte djihadiste depuis 2010 d’une demi-douzaine de résidents ou nationaux américains, qui « mordent où ils peuvent » dans la chair de la société américaine multiculturelle. Mais aucun n’avait, en s’attaquant à une grande communion civique comme le marathon de Boston, arrêtant le peuple américain dans sa course, suscité en contrepartie un traumatisme d’une telle ampleur symbolique – concrétisé par l’immobilisation de plus d’un million d’habitants consignés à domicile pour contempler à la télévision le spectacle hollywoodien de la traque d’un fugitif devenu l’ennemi intérieur par excellence. Ce qui nous frappe, dans les affaires Tsarnaev et Merah, c’est l’énorme retour sur investissement terroriste, le retentissement incommensurable avec les misérables moyens mis en oeuvre – comme si les élucubrations de Souri se traduisaient dans la réalité. Au départ, il y a la divagation sur la planète de destins familiaux ravagés. A Boston, une famille tchétchène anciennement exilée par les persécutions staliniennes au Kirghizistan, ballotée entre la décomposition de l’Homo sovieticus et l’identité nationale ; un père et une mère éduqués qui se projettent dans le rêve américain, où ils se dégradent en mécanicien auto et esthéticienne, avant de s’en revenir dépités au bercail. Un frère aîné, nommé, d’après le terrible empereur mongol, Tamerlan, qui rate une carrière de boxeur, perd ses repères, boit, court les filles, puis découvre une version rigoriste de l’islam, voile sa mère, se nourrit de sites djihadistes tant et si bien que les services russes en informent leurs collègues américains qui interrogent, puis laissent aller le suspect. Un séjour de presque six mois en 2012 dans le Caucase suscitant toutes les spéculations – y compris sur les manipulations ou les ratages du renseignement russe –, d’où il revient si radicalisé qu’il effraie les fidèles de sa mosquée de Boston. Gilles Kepel
Moustapha Sitt Mariam Nassar, plus connu sous le pseudonyme d’Abou Moussab Al-Souri (le Syrien), né à Alep en 1958, a été de tous les combats du djihad depuis qu’il a rejoint en 1976 les rangs de l’Avant-Garde combattante, la branche paramilitaire des Frères musulmans syriens. Etudiant en ingénierie, il assiste au massacre des Frères musulmans par le régime lors du soulèvement de Hama en 1982. Réfugié en France, il se familiarise avec la production tiers-mondiste. En 1985, il se fixe en Espagne, où il épouse une gauchiste athée qui se convertira à l’islam et lui donnera le précieux passeport européen facilitant ses déplacements. Rejoignant le front afghan sur fond de retraite de l’Armée rouge et proche de l’idéologue du djihad « du premier âge », le Palestinien Abdallah Azzam, assassiné en 1989 à Peshawar, il commence à coucher sur le papier ses réflexions en plein conflit civil afghan, puis revient dans son Andalousie en 1992 – où il soutient le djihad du Groupe islamique armé algérien, dont il se fera le relais depuis le « Londonistan » en Angleterre. Il y publie le journal ronéoté Al Ansar, qui exalte faits d’armes et autres massacres d’ »impies ». En 1996, après la victoire des talibans, il revient en Afghanistan, où il organise les rendez-vous de Ben Laden et des doctrinaires du « deuxième âge du djihad », dont Zawahiri, avec la presse internationale. Il est dubitatif envers les actions spectaculaires montées par Al-Qaida et commence à écrire un premier jet de son opus, Appel à la résistance islamique mondiale. Le déluge de feu qui s’abat sur Al-Qaida après le 11-Septembre, l’invasion de l’Afghanistan et la chute des talibans le renforcent dans ses convictions : errant au Pakistan, il achève son livre, rédigé au format d’un e-book, où les conseils de « manuel du djihad » sont téléchargés par les adeptes. Capturé en octobre 2005 à Quetta, il est remis aux Américains et, selon ses avocats, livré par ceux-ci aux Syriens autour de 2007 – à une époque où Bachar Al-Assad est en cour en Occident. Selon des sites islamistes « fiables », il est remis en liberté fin 2011, alors que la révolution syrienne a débuté et que le régime s’emploie à inoculer à celle-ci le virus djihadiste pour lui aliéner le soutien occidental. Gilles Kepel
Où l’on voit que l’éducation à la haine, financée en grande partie avec de l’argent européen (les manuels scolaires de l’AP, dégoulinant de la haine la plus sauvage, sont produits grace à des fonds européens, une bonne partie des médias audiovisuels également) a porté ses fruits : 40% des Palestiniens considèrent totalement ou parfois justifiés les attentats suicide visant une population civile. Seuls les Afghans font presque « aussi bien », avec 39%, le soutien à ce genre d’acte étant bien moindre dans les autres pays musulmans : 29% en Egypte, 15 en Jordanie ou Turquie, 3% en Bosnie et 1% en Azerbaïdjan. Résultat d’autant plus écoeurant que lesdits Palestiniens sont les mieux à même de savoir comment, en comparaison, les Israéliens font de leur mieux pour protéger les civils, entre les envois de tracts, SMS et coup de téléphone prévenant des actions militaires (exclusivité mondiale), les soins apportés même aux pires ordures terroristes, les aides humanitaires diverses… Il suffit de voir comment leurs enfants vont provoquer les soldats pour mesurer à quel point cela est un fait acquis pour cette population qui justifiera pour plus de sa moitié les attaques aveugles visant une population civile. En effet, les réponses possibles opposées étaient « ces attentats sont-ils rarement/jamais justifiés », couvrant donc encore des personnes trouvant des justifications à cette barbarie, et que selon PEW ces 2 réponses ne cumulent que 49% des suffrages. Ari Cohen

Dernier boum, avant le murmure ?

A l’heure où, après le pathétique bricolage mortel (pardon: d’ "épisodes de violence sur le lieu de travail") de Boston et d’Istres d’un terrorisme manifestement à bout de souffle,  nos "terroristologues de plateau télévisé" s’extasient devant "l’énorme retour sur investissement terroriste, le retentissement incommensurable avec les misérables moyens mis en oeuvre" du "jihad 3G du pauvre" …

Et qu’un sondage sur les pays musulmans confirme, en ces temps de perte de repères, tant la demande d’idéologies et d’hommes forts que l’inévitable discrédit que subit ledit jihad en dehors de certaines réserves d’indiens (Syrie, avant nos propres "banlieues", désormais comprise?) entretenues à grands frais par les contribuables européens ou les pétrodollars de monarchies du golfe toujours plus manipulatrices …

Comment ne pas voir l’incroyable aveuglement occidental devant  la "véritable horreur de ce que peut produire", dans lesdites réserves, "l’effacement des cultures traditionnelles par la face cachée de la modernité occidentale"?

Mais aussi la non moins formidable hypocrisie des appels des belles âmes et des faussaires à la Enderlin à imposer, à la seule véritable démocratie du Moyen-Orient, un dialogue avec ceux qui de toute évidence ne peuvent avoir aujourd’hui d’autre souhait que celui de son annihilation ?

Un nouveau sondage confirme que 40% des Palestiniens soutiennent les attentats suicides

Ari Cohen

JSSNews

2 mai 2013

Le dernier sondage du Pew Research Center, réalisé dans 21 pays, met une fois de plus en lumière la barbarie dans laquelle se complait la population palestinienne de Judée Samarie et de Gaza.

Pew Research Suicide Bombing

Le sondage portait sur différents points tel que les droits des femmes, l’application de la sharia, les attentats suicide…

Sans surprise particulière pour toute personne disposant d’informations valides sur la région, les « Palestiniens » (comprendre : ceux vivant en Judée Samarie et à Gaza) se situent en haut de classement sur de nombreux points :

application de la sharia comme législation unique (89%, seulement dépassés par l’Afghanistan (99%) et l’Irak (91%), la Jordanie arrivant bien plus bas à 71%, l’Egypte à 74, le Maroc à 83

la place de la femme dans la famille : 87% des Palestiniens considérant que la femme doit obéir à son mari (ils partagent sur ce point l’opinion de l’écrasante majorité du monde musulman, seul la Bosnie Herzébovine, l’Albanie et le Kosovo obtiennent sur cette question des scores inférieurs à 50% (respectivement 45, 40 et 34), l’Afghanistan montant à 84% et la Malaysie à 96 !), 33% considérant qu’elle n’a aucun droit au divorce (ils sont sur ce point vers le bas du tableau) et 45% considérant les « crimes d’honneur » comme

Les relations inter-confessionnelles : les Palestiniens répondant à 89%, et ce alors qu’ils comptent une minorité chrétienne en leur sein, que seul l’Islam accorde l’accès au paradis (1ers ex-aequo : Egypte et Jordanie, avec 96%), 42% affirmant cependant que l’Islam et le christianisme ont de nombreux points en commun (quand seuls 15% affirment connaitre « un peu » ou « beaucoup » le christianisme…). Notons également que seuls 80% d’entre eux (les chiffres montent jusqu’à 100% en Tunisie par exemple !) affirment n’avoir comme meilleurs amis que, ou pratiquement qu’exclusivement, des musulmans. Cela donne donc au bas mot 7% des sondés qui ont comme dans leur amitié proche des gens qu’ils considèrent voués à l’enfer… Notons également que Pew a décidé de ne pas aborder les relations avec les Juifs, seuls celles avec les chrétiens sont abordées dans le sondage, ainsi que dans une moindre mesure le bouddhisme.

démocratie / dictature : 55% des Palestiniens souhaitent vivre dans un régime démocratique contre 40% préférant être dirigé par un « puissant leader). Les pays sondés varient sur ce point entre l’extrème du Kyrgystan (32%/64%) et celui du Ghana (87%/12%), le Liban n’étant pas loin derrière (81%/19%). Les Palestiniens ne semblent visiblement pas réaliser l’incompatibilité entre la Sharia et la démocratie…

opinions sur les partis religieux : 29% des Palestiniens considèrent que les partis religieux sont pires que les autres. Ils sont sur ce point ceux qui rejettent le plus lesdits partis. Probablement l’effet Hamas. A l’inverse, la triste surprise vient de l’Egypte et surtout de la Tunisie où 55% de la population considèrent les partis religieux comme étant meilleurs, devançant même l’Afghanistan (54).

rejet de l’extrémisme religieux : les Palestiniens se retrouvent dans la moitié supérieure du tableau, avec des réponses amenant cependant des questions : 22% d’entre eux se déclarent concernés par l’existence d’extrémistes musulmans au sein de leur population, mais 9% d’entre eux répondre se sentir concernés uniquement par les extrémistes chrétiens (??????) et 30% par les deux. Réponses assez sidérantes quand on connait les chrétiens vivant dans ces régions, oscillant entre soumission servile voir zelée et fuite vers d’autres cieux plus cléments. Des pays comme l’Indonésie, l’Irak ou la Guinée Bissau présentent des résultats plus cohérents, avec une inquiétude face à l’extrémisme musulman touchant plus ou moins 50% de la population, mais l’inquiétude envers le supposé extrémisme chrétien d’une partie de la population se retrouve dans pratiquement tous les pays musulmans, y compris ceux n’ayant pour ainsi dire aucune population chrétienne.

soutien aux attentats suicide : où l’on voit que l’éducation à la haine, financée en grande partie avec de l’argent européen (les manuels scolaires de l’AP, dégoulinant de la haine la plus sauvage, sont produits grace à des fonds européens, une bonne partie des médias audiovisuels également) a porté ses fruits : 40% des Palestiniens considèrent totalement ou parfois justifiés les attentats suicide visant une population civile. Seuls les Afghans font presque « aussi bien », avec 39%, le soutien à ce genre d’acte étant bien moindre dans les autres pays musulmans : 29% en Egypte, 15 en Jordanie ou Turquie, 3% en Bosnie et 1% en Azerbaïdjan. Résultat d’autant plus écoeurant que lesdits Palestiniens sont les mieux à même de savoir comment, en comparaison, les Israéliens font de leur mieux pour protéger les civils, entre les envois de tracts, SMS et coup de téléphone prévenant des actions militaires (exclusivité mondiale), les soins apportés même aux pires ordures terroristes, les aides humanitaires diverses… Il suffit de voir comment leurs enfants vont provoquer les soldats pour mesurer à quel point cela est un fait acquis pour cette population qui justifiera pour plus de sa moitié les attaques aveugles visant une population civile. En effet, les réponses possibles opposées étaient « ces attentats sont-ils rarement/jamais justifiés », couvrant donc encore des personnes trouvant des justifications à cette barbarie, et que selon PEW ces 2 réponses ne cumulent que 49% des suffrages. Il est de plus assez facile de comprendre ce que peuvent penser les 11% qui ont refusé de répondre…

Faire la paix ? Mais avec qui ?

Voir également:

Une majorité de musulmans se déclare pour la charia

OLJ/AFP

| 01/05/2013

Étude Le sondage montre les différences d’interprétation, plus ou moins souples selon le pays.

Une majorité des musulmans dans le monde veulent que la charia, la loi islamique, devienne la loi de leur pays, tout en montrant des opinions disparates sur ce qu’elle recouvre, indiquait hier une étude de l’institut Pew. Cette vaste étude, réalisée de 2008 à 2012 auprès de 38 000 personnes dans 39 pays, porte sur le thème de « Religion, politique et société » dans la communauté musulmane, forte de 1,6 milliard d’individus, la deuxième religion au monde après la religion chrétienne. Une majorité des musulmans notamment en Asie, Afrique et Moyen-Orient, veulent ainsi l’établissement de la charia, avec toutefois des disparités géographiques – 8 % en Azerbaïdjan, mais 99 % en Afghanistan –, affirme Pew qui l’explique par l’histoire des pays et la séparation de l’Église et de l’État.

L’étude montre que l’application de la charia est surtout souhaitée dans la sphère privée, pour régler les affaires familiales ou foncières, par les musulmans habitant des pays où siègent déjà des cours religieuses de ce type. L’exécution de musulmans convertis à une autre religion ou les supplices des coups de fouet ou des mains coupées pour les voleurs recueillent néanmoins une minorité d’avis favorables, sauf pour une forte majorité en Afghanistan et Pakistan et un peu plus d’une personne sur deux au Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord. Ils sont aussi majoritaires à vouloir accorder la liberté religieuse aux autres religions. Ainsi au Pakistan, 84 % veulent voir la charia inscrite dans la loi du pays et 96 % estiment que la liberté des cultes est « une bonne chose ». La moitié des musulmans sont également préoccupés par l’extrémisme religieux dans leur pays, dont une majorité en Égypte, Tunisie ou Irak. De même, une majorité de femmes comme d’hommes estime que la femme doit obéir au mari, notamment en Irak, Maroc, Tunisie, Indonésie, Afghanistan et Malaisie, mais une majorité aussi estime qu’une femme doit pouvoir décider toute seule de porter ou non le voile. De fait, la plupart des musulmans ne ressentent pas de tensions entre leur religion et la vie moderne, préfèrent un régime démocratique, aiment la musique ou les films occidentaux même s’ils pensent que cette culture sape la moralité.

Également, une très forte majorité considère la prostitution, l’homosexualité, le suicide ou l’alcool immoraux mais le regard sur la polygamie diverge (4 % l’estiment moralement acceptable en Bosnie-Herzégovine, contre 87 % au Niger). Seuls l’Afghanistan et l’Irak excusent majoritairement les « crimes d’honneur ». La violence au nom de l’islam est largement rejetée mais approuvée par des minorités substantielles au Bangladesh, en Égypte, en Afghanistan et dans les territoires palestiniens. 81 % des musulmans américains estiment qu’elle n’est « jamais » justifiée, contre une moyenne médiane de 72 % dans le reste du monde, ajoute l’étude.

Voir encore:

Merah et Tsarnaev, même combat

Gilles Kepel (Politologue et spécialiste de l’islam, professeur à Sciences Po)

Le Monde

28.04.2013

Les auteurs des tueries de Toulouse et Boston incarnent le troisième âge du djihad, celui d’un terrorisme isolé et d’un échec de l’intégration en Occident.

L’attentat de Boston présente de troublantes similitudes avec la tuerie de Montauban et Toulouse en mars 2012. A une année de distance, deux opérations de "djihad du pauvre" ont été menées en Occident par des jeunes musulmans brusquement radicalisés issus de l’immigration.

Les rapports des Etats-Unis à la Tchétchénie ex-soviétique et ceux de la France à l’Algérie ex-coloniale diffèrent. Mais l’attentat à l’autocuiseur piégé qui a tué trois passants dont un enfant et blessé des dizaines de personnes, suivi du meurtre d’un policier, participe de la même logique que l’assassinat des militaires français ainsi que des petits élèves et du professeur de l’école juive Ozar-Hatorah.

Ces deux passages à l’acte illustrent en effet les préconisations du "troisième âge du djihad", théorisées par l’idéologue islamiste syrien Moustafa Sitt Mariam Al-Nassar – dit Abou Moussab Al-Souri – dans son volumineux opus Appel à la résistance islamique mondiale. Il fut mis en ligne à partir de 2005, lorsque l’auteur comprit que les opérations centralisées impulsées par Al-Qaida avaient failli, avec l’échec du djihad du "deuxième âge", à instaurer un "califat islamiste" en Irak – le "premier âge" se référait au djihad contre l’Armée rouge en Afghanistan dans la décennie 1980.

Lire aussi : Al-Souri, le cerveau du djihad des pauvres

En septembre 2001, la stratégie de Ben Laden était en avance sur la doctrine militaire américaine : l’arsenal de la "guerre des étoiles" s’avéra futile contre les pirates de l’air de New York et de Washington. Dans la décennie qui suivit, l’Occident rattrapa son retard : la surveillance des transferts de fonds, la réorganisation du renseignement et des forces spéciales, les ravages causés par les drones parmi les imams et les fedayins de l’Irak au Yémen et à l’Afghanistan, portèrent des coups terribles au djihad "organisé" par le haut.

DJIHAD "PAR LE BAS"

L’exécution de Ben Laden, et plus encore le succès militaire français au Mali en 2013 contre une Al-Qaida au Maghreb islamique (AQMI), dont la logique avait été percée, le démontrèrent. C’est en alternative à cette défaite anticipée que Souri prôna une stratégie de djihad "par le bas", déstructuré, qu’il nomma nizam la tanzim (un système et non une organisation).

A un terrorisme hâtif de destruction massive devenu impraticable, il oppose la multiplication d’actions quasi "spontanéistes" mises en oeuvre au long cours par des djihadistes autoradicalisés grâce aux sites de partage de vidéos – prolongés par quelques stages de formation in situ – incités à choisir eux-mêmes, dans leur proximité, une cible opportune.

Peu ou mal identifiables par le renseignement – Merah comme Tsarnaev avaient été repérés et interrogés, mais leur dangerosité fut sous-estimée –, équipés d’explosifs ou d’armes de fortune, autofinancés par des larcins, ils ne pourront tuer des milliers d’"impies" comme au 11-Septembre.

Mais la répétition de ces actions spectaculaires, leur diffusion et leur glorification sur Internet, leur imprédictibilité, sèmeront à la longue, escompte Souri, la terreur au sein d’un ennemi démoralisé, qui multipliera les réactions "islamophobes", soudant en réaction, autour du djihad défensif, une communauté de croyants immigrés que rejoindront des convertis en nombre croissant. C’est alors, pense l’idéologue du "djihad 3G", qu’adviendra sous les meilleurs auspices l’affrontement qui détruira la civilisation occidentale sur son territoire même.

PEU PRIS AU SÉRIEUX PAR LES RENSEIGNEMENTS

Ce djihad de basse intensité, progressif, mécaniste et eschatologique, n’a guère été pris au sérieux par la communauté du renseignement, requinquée par les succès remportés contre Al-Qaida depuis la seconde moitié de la décennie écoulée. Les "terroristologues de plateau télévisé", généralement ignorants d’une idéologie qui suppose la connaissance de l’arabe et de la culture islamiste radicale, avaient traité en son temps Merah de "loup solitaire" pour masquer leur incompréhension du phénomène.

Aux Etats-Unis, on affectionne l’expression stray dogs (chiens errants) pour désigner le passage à l’acte djihadiste depuis 2010 d’une demi-douzaine de résidents ou nationaux américains, qui "mordent où ils peuvent" dans la chair de la société américaine multiculturelle.

Mais aucun n’avait, en s’attaquant à une grande communion civique comme le marathon de Boston, arrêtant le peuple américain dans sa course, suscité en contrepartie un traumatisme d’une telle ampleur symbolique – concrétisé par l’immobilisation de plus d’un million d’habitants consignés à domicile pour contempler à la télévision le spectacle hollywoodien de la traque d’un fugitif devenu l’ennemi intérieur par excellence.

Ce qui nous frappe, dans les affaires Tsarnaev et Merah, c’est l’énorme retour sur investissement terroriste, le retentissement incommensurable avec les misérables moyens mis en oeuvre – comme si les élucubrations de Souri se traduisaient dans la réalité.

INTÉGRATION RATÉE

Or, ce qui s’est joué à Boston comme à Toulouse dépasse la seule logique du terrorisme : l’immense résonance de ces deux affaires provient du basculement effarant de destins individuels, chez des immigrés ou enfants d’immigrés que l’ingénierie sociale occidentale, par-delà la différence des modalités américaine ou française, avait vocation à intégrer.

Tout au contraire, ils se sont "désintégrés" par rapport aux sociétés d’accueil, au travers du rejet systématique de leurs valeurs au nom d’une norme islamiste exacerbée, exprimant par le paroxysme de la violence leur adhésion à une cybercommunauté imaginaire de djihadistes, héros fantasmatiques de la rédemption de l’humanité face aux kouffar ("impies") occidentaux.

Les deux frères Tsarnaev, suspects de l’attentat de Boston.

Au départ, il y a la divagation sur la planète de destins familiaux ravagés. A Boston, une famille tchétchène anciennement exilée par les persécutions staliniennes au Kirghizistan, ballotée entre la décomposition de l’Homo sovieticus et l’identité nationale ; un père et une mère éduqués qui se projettent dans le rêve américain, où ils se dégradent en mécanicien auto et esthéticienne, avant de s’en revenir dépités au bercail.

Un frère aîné, nommé, d’après le terrible empereur mongol, Tamerlan, qui rate une carrière de boxeur, perd ses repères, boit, court les filles, puis découvre une version rigoriste de l’islam, voile sa mère, se nourrit de sites djihadistes tant et si bien que les services russes en informent leurs collègues américains qui interrogent, puis laissent aller le suspect. Un séjour de presque six mois en 2012 dans le Caucase suscitant toutes les spéculations – y compris sur les manipulations ou les ratages du renseignement russe –, d’où il revient si radicalisé qu’il effraie les fidèles de sa mosquée de Boston.

FRÈRE AÎNÉ DOMINATEUR

Le jeune frère, Dzhokhar (de l’arabe jawhar : joyau), carabin tout empreint des traits de l’enfance, loué pour sa douceur par ses camarades, se définit sur son profil Facebook par la triade "islam, carrière, argent". C’est le visage d’ange, la beauté du diable de ce jeune homme au nom de bijou, si parfaitement américain en apparence et en esprit, qui suscite le plus insondable malaise.

Et même s’il incrimine sur son lit d’hôpital la domination de son aîné, le ressort du basculement dans le djihad va chercher plus loin que la simple adhésion aux thèses d’un Souri dont il ignore probablement tout : dans les tréfonds du malaise de la mondialisation, des traumatismes de l’immigration, qu’a su capter et mobiliser à son profit l’idéologie islamiste radicale.

Merah aussi avait un visage encore enfantin et un sourire charmeur ; et également un aîné dominateur, parti étudier le salafisme en Egypte, une mère et une soeur tombées sous l’emprise d’un islamisme rigoriste, une famille brisée, ballottée entre l’Algérie et la France, un père ayant refait sa vie au bled sans plus se préoccuper des siens, après avoir purgé une condamnation pour trafic de stupéfiants.

Mohamed retrouve en prison une identité en survalorisant un islam exalté qui l’absout des délits commis contre une société "impie" dont les lois sont ipso facto dévalorisées. Il ne parvient pas à construire une vie professionnelle, mais se gave de vidéos exaltant le martyre des croyants et l’exécution des infidèles, puis part au contact de groupes djihadistes au Moyen-Orient et en Afghanistan, et roule la police qui pense pouvoir le retourner.

Les croisements avec le destin de Tamerlan Tsarnaev sont frappants – même si le fils de prolétaire algérien était plus démuni que l’enfant choyé d’un couple de petits-bourgeois tchétchènes.

Et quel incroyable entrelacs de ces destins chaotiques avec la grande Histoire : le djihad de Mohamed Merah a lieu entre le 11 et le 22 mars 2012, cinquante ans après les accords d’Evian du 18 mars 1962, qui scellent l’indépendance d’une Algérie dont tant d’enfants iront s’installer dans le pays qu’ils combattirent pour s’en séparer. Quant à "Bijou" Tsarnaev, il vient d’être naturalisé américain, le 11 septembre 2012, onze ans après les attentats de New York et Washington, l’acte fondateur du djihad en terre d’Occident, dont il a joué une variation qui représente le plus pervers des défis pour la citoyenneté et l’intégration de nos sociétés.

Gilles Kepel (Politologue et spécialiste de l’islam, professeur à Sciences Po)

Voir aussi:

Al-Souri, le cerveau du djihad des pauvres

Gilles Kepel (Politologue et spécialiste de l’islam, professeur à Sciences Po)

Le Monde

28.04.2013

Moustapha Sitt Mariam Nassar, plus connu sous le pseudonyme d’Abou Moussab Al-Souri (le Syrien), né à Alep en 1958, a été de tous les combats du djihad depuis qu’il a rejoint en 1976 les rangs de l’Avant-Garde combattante, la branche paramilitaire des Frères musulmans syriens. Etudiant en ingénierie, il assiste au massacre des Frères musulmans par le régime lors du soulèvement de Hama en 1982.

Réfugié en France, il se familiarise avec la production tiers-mondiste. En 1985, il se fixe en Espagne, où il épouse une gauchiste athée qui se convertira à l’islam et lui donnera le précieux passeport européen facilitant ses déplacements. Rejoignant le front afghan sur fond de retraite de l’Armée rouge et proche de l’idéologue du djihad "du premier âge", le Palestinien Abdallah Azzam, assassiné en 1989 à Peshawar, il commence à coucher sur le papier ses réflexions en plein conflit civil afghan, puis revient dans son Andalousie en 1992 – où il soutient le djihad du Groupe islamique armé algérien, dont il se fera le relais depuis le "Londonistan" en Angleterre. Il y publie le journal ronéoté Al Ansar, qui exalte faits d’armes et autres massacres d’"impies".

Lire aussi : Merah et Tsarnaev, même combat

En 1996, après la victoire des talibans, il revient en Afghanistan, où il organise les rendez-vous de Ben Laden et des doctrinaires du "deuxième âge du djihad", dont Zawahiri, avec la presse internationale. Il est dubitatif envers les actions spectaculaires montées par Al-Qaida et commence à écrire un premier jet de son opus, Appel à la résistance islamique mondiale. Le déluge de feu qui s’abat sur Al-Qaida après le 11-Septembre, l’invasion de l’Afghanistan et la chute des talibans le renforcent dans ses convictions : errant au Pakistan, il achève son livre, rédigé au format d’un e-book, où les conseils de "manuel du djihad" sont téléchargés par les adeptes.

Capturé en octobre 2005 à Quetta, il est remis aux Américains et, selon ses avocats, livré par ceux-ci aux Syriens autour de 2007 – à une époque où Bachar Al-Assad est en cour en Occident. Selon des sites islamistes "fiables", il est remis en liberté fin 2011, alors que la révolution syrienne a débuté et que le régime s’emploie à inoculer à celle-ci le virus djihadiste pour lui aliéner le soutien occidental. Des rumeurs invérifiables font état de son retour dans sa ville natale d’Alep, place forte de l’insurrection, où les milices djihadistes du Jabhat Al-Nousra ont pignon sur rue – sans que l’on puisse mesurer son rôle exact.

Gilles Kepel (Politologue et spécialiste de l’islam, professeur à Sciences Po)

Voir encore:

Révolutions arabes: «Nous sommes dans une période d’incertitude totale»

8 avril 2013

20 minutes

INTERVIEW – Gilles Kepel, professeur à Sciences-Po, publie «Passion arabe», récit de son périple sur les traces du Printemps arabe…

Gilles Kepel, professeur à Sciences-Po et grand connaisseur du monde arabe contemporain, publie Passion arabe (Ed. Gallimard), récit du périple qu’il a effectué pendant deux ans sur les traces du Printemps arabe. 20 Minutes l’a rencontré…

L’enthousiasme qui a accueilli l’éclosion du printemps arabe a laissé place à un discours pessimiste sur «l’hiver islamiste». Que vous inspire cette analyse?

Les deux discours étaient faux : l’enthousiasme naïf du début qui croyait qu’on pouvait faire l’impasse sur l’histoire des sociétés arabes, comme si elles se réduisaient à Facebook et Twitter, et le discours actuel sur l’hiver islamiste, le retour du terrorisme etc. Malgré tous leurs soubresauts, les révolutions ont créé quelque chose de décisif : les arabes se sont emparés de la liberté d’expression, que les régimes avaient confisquée après les indépendances. Quel que soit le devenir de ces révolutions, ils ne vont pas se la laisser reprendre. Cela a complètement modifié le logiciel politique, culturel et mental des sociétés arabes.

Quel regard portez-vous sur leur apprentissage de la démocratie?

La démocratisation est un test pour les gens qui veulent conquérir le pouvoir. La population ne s’en laisse plus conter. Les mouvements islamistes sont aujourd’hui confrontés à la gestion des affaires courantes et s’en sortent mal parce qu’ils ont fait passer l’idéologie avant le pragmatisme. Ils sont en outre en concurrence les uns avec les autres : les salafistes disent que les Frères musulmans sont pourris, et les Frères musulmans disent que salafistes sont des fanatiques. Les islamistes sont considérablement descendus de leur piédestal dans les populations du monde arabe. Les Frères musulmans, qui avaient l’aura des martyrs parce qu’ils avaient été violemment réprimés sous (l’ancien président égyptien) Moubarak, ont désormais davantage l’image de mauvais gestionnaires tentés par la dérive autoritaire que de martyrs.

Où sont passées la liberté et la démocratie pour lesquelles les populations se sont soulevées?

Les mots d’ordre des révolutions c’était : liberté, démocratie, justice sociale. La liberté a été conquise dans beaucoup de cas. La démocratie, plus ou moins. Mais la justice sociale, pas du tout, à cause de problèmes économiques, de la crise, la mauvaise gouvernance, l’absence d’investissements étrangers, la fuite des touristes… Il y a aujourd’hui un appauvrissement général. Du coup, on entend parfois dire que «Moubarak, Kadhafi et Ben Ali étaient des salauds, mais au moins à leur époque il y avait de l’ordre et du travail». Les groupes salafistes bénéficient de ce désenchantement.

Quelle influence ont-ils?

Ils ne sont pas très nombreux mais très déterminés. Surtout, dans un univers où les repères ont disparu, ils donnent une sorte de corset à la société, ce qui est rassurant quand vous êtes paumé. Ils font des pauvres et des laissés-pour-compte des héros. Cela crée, dans les situations de désarroi, un phénomène frappant qui ressemble à ce qu’on voit dans l’extrême-droite. Les salafistes arrivent à récupérer les frustrations sociales, et à les traduire dans l’exigence de l’application des normes les plus strictes.

Sommes-nous dans une spirale : pas de travail, plus de pauvreté, radicalisation?

Il y a eu trois phases dans les révolutions. La première : la chute des régimes. La deuxième : la conquête du pouvoir, la plupart par des partis islamistes. La troisième se déroule aujourd’hui : la mise en cause de ces partis islamistes pour leur incompétence et le caractère liberticide de certains. Ces partis sont aujourd’hui débordés à la fois par des éléments de la société civile laïque, dont des jeunes ont qui ont porté la révolution, et par des déshérités qui ont épousé le salafisme radical. Nous sommes dans une période d’incertitude totale. Mais c’est assez normal car ces révolutions n’ont que deux ans.

Quelle a été l’influence des pétromonarchies du Golfe dans les révolutions, en particulier le Qatar, dont l’influence est controversée en France?

Au début, les monarchies du Golfe étaient très inquiètes. Car les mots d’ordre révolutionnaires – liberté, démocratie, justice sociale – pouvaient être prises comme une remise en cause de ce qu’elles sont. Le cauchemar des émirs c’était que des dizaines de millions d’Egyptiens et autres déferlent sur leurs puits de pétrole. Ils ont donc développé deux stratégies : les Saoudiens ont renforcé leur soutien aux salafistes, qui obéissent aux oulémas saoudiens, et les Qataris ont soutenu les Frères musulmans, y voyant des alliés pour construire leur hégémonie sur le monde arabe sunnite.

C’est-à-dire?

L’affrontement chiites-sunnites est le clivage principal qui sort des révolutions. Le Qatar a tenté de dévier l’énergie révolutionnaire dans la lutte contre l’Iran, le chiisme et ses alliés. C’est une façon de prendre en otage les aspirations révolutionnaires et démocratiques des peuples dans l’affrontement chiites-sunnites pour le contrôle du gaz et du pétrole du Golfe.

Et la Syrie?

Le pays est dans un état catastrophique. On en est à 100 000 morts, avec des perspectives épouvantables. Les salafistes y montent en puissance grâce à la manne financière des pays du Golfe, et parce que l’occident n’a pas aidé l’armée syrienne libre.

Pourquoi la révolution au Bahreïn a-t-elle avorté?

Cette révolution, survenue après celle de Tunisie et d’Egypte, a été écrasée par l’Arabie saoudite dans l’indifférence totale du monde des consommateurs de pétrole, qui craignait qu’une révolution au Bahreïn mette le feu au Golfe et fasse grimper le prix du baril…

Vous avez travaillé sur la place de l’islam dans les banlieues françaises. Quel écho le printemps arabe a-t-il dans ces banlieues?

Ça a créé un espace plus fluide, décrispé de la citoyenneté. Il n’y a plus le bled et la dictature d’un côté, l’Europe et la démocratie de l’autre. Ça c’est l’aspect favorable. L’autre aspect, défavorable, c’est l’arrestation de ce djihadiste de Haute Savoie originaire d’Algérie arrêté au Mali et, plus largement, la fascination pour les terrains du djihad, que ce soit au Mali ou en Syrie. Des jeunes prennent des charters pour aller combattre. Pour ceux qui n’arrivent pas à s’insérer par le travail dans la société, c’est une manière de se construire une position héroïque. Mais leur retour en France sera très préoccupant. A cet égard, le cas de Mohamed Merah reste dans les mémoires.

Propos recueillis par Faustine Vincent

Voir par ailleurs:

Make No Mistake, It Was Jihad

Let’s hope the administration gets over its reluctance to recognize attacks on the U.S. for what they are.

Michael B. Mukasey

The WSJ

April 21, 2013

If your concern about the threat posed by the Tsarnaev brothers is limited to assuring that they will never be in a position to repeat their grisly acts, rest easy.

The elder, Tamerlan—apparently named for the 14th-century Muslim conqueror famous for building pyramids of his victims’ skulls to commemorate his triumphs over infidels—is dead. The younger, Dzhokhar, will stand trial when his wounds heal, in a proceeding where the most likely uncertainty will be the penalty. No doubt there will be some legal swordplay over his interrogation by the FBI’s High-Value Interrogation Group without receiving Miranda warnings. But the only downside for the government in that duel is that his statements may not be used against him at trial. This is not much of a risk when you consider the other available evidence, including photo images of him at the scene of the bombings and his own reported confession to the victim whose car he helped hijack during last week’s terror in Boston.

But if your concern is over the larger threat that inheres in who the Tsarnaev brothers were and are, what they did, and what they represent, then worry—a lot.

For starters, you can worry about how the High-Value Interrogation Group, or HIG, will do its work. That unit was finally put in place by the FBI after so-called underwear bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab tried to blow up the airplane in which he was traveling as it flew over Detroit on Christmas Day in 2009 and was advised of his Miranda rights. The CIA interrogation program that might have handled the interview had by then been dismantled by President Obama.

At the behest of such Muslim Brotherhood-affiliated groups as the Council on American Islamic Relations and the Islamic Society of North America, and other self- proclaimed spokesmen for American Muslims, the FBI has bowdlerized its training materials to exclude references to militant Islamism. Does this delicacy infect the FBI’s interrogation group as well?

Will we see another performance like the Army’s after- action report following Maj. Nidal Hasan’s rampage at Fort Hood in November 2009, preceded by his shout "allahu akhbar"—a report that spoke nothing of militant Islam but referred to the incident as "workplace violence"? If tone is set at the top, recall that the Army chief of staff at the time said the most tragic result of Fort Hood would be if it interfered with the Army’s diversity program.

Presumably the investigation into the Boston terror attack will include inquiry into not only the immediate circumstances of the crimes but also who funded Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s months-long sojourn abroad in 2012 and his comfortable life style. Did he have a support network? What training did he, and perhaps his younger brother, receive in the use of weapons? Where did the elder of the two learn to make the suicide vest he reportedly wore? The investigation should include as well a deep dive into Tamerlan’s radicalization, the Islamist references in the brothers’ social media communications, and the jihadist websites they visited.

Will the investigation probe as well the FBI’s own questioning of Tamerlan two years ago at the behest of an unspecified foreign government, presumably Russia, over his involvement with jihadist websites and other activities? Tamerlan Tsarnaev is the fifth person since 9/11 who has participated in terror attacks after questioning by the FBI. He was preceded by Nidal Hasan; drone casualty Anwar al Awlaki; Abdulhakim Mujahid Muhammad (born Carlos Leon Bledsoe), who murdered an Army recruit in Little Rock in June 2009; and David Coleman Headley, who provided intelligence to the perpetrators of the Mumbai massacre in 2008. That doesn’t count Abdulmutallab, who was the subject of warnings to the CIA that he was a potential terrorist.

If the intelligence yielded by the FBI’s investigation is of value, will that value be compromised when this trial is held, as it almost certainly will be, in a civilian court? Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s lawyers, as they have every right to do, will seek to discover that intelligence and use it to fashion a case in mitigation if nothing else, to show that his late brother was the dominant conspirator who had access to resources and people.

There is also cause for concern in that this was obviously a suicide operation—not in the direct way of a bomber who kills all his victims and himself at the same time by blowing himself up, but in the way of someone who conducts a spree, holding the stage for as long as possible, before he is cut down in a blaze of what he believes is glory. Here, think Mumbai.

Until now, it has been widely accepted in law-enforcement circles that such an attack in the U.S. was less likely because of the difficulty that organizers would have in marshaling the spiritual support to keep the would-be suicide focused on the task. That analysis went out the window when the Tsarnaevs followed up the bombing of the marathon by murdering a police officer in his car—an act certain to precipitate the violent confrontation that followed.

It has been apparent that with al Qaeda unable to mount elaborate attacks like the one it carried out on 9/11, other Islamists have stepped in with smaller and less intricate crimes, but crimes that are nonetheless meant to send a terrorist message. These include Faisal Shahzad, who failed to detonate a device in Times Square in 2010, and would-be subway bomber Najibullah Zazi and his confederates.

Is this, as former CIA Director Michael Hayden put it, the new normal?

There is also cause for concern in the president’s reluctance, soon after the Boston bombing, even to use the "t" word—terrorism—and in his vague musing on Friday about some unspecified agenda of the perpetrators, when by then there was no mystery: the agenda was jihad.

For five years we have heard, principally from those who wield executive power, of a claimed need to make fundamental changes in this country, to change the world’s—particularly the Muslim world’s—perception of us, to press "reset" buttons. We have heard not a word from those sources suggesting any need to understand and confront a totalitarian ideology that has existed since at least the founding of the Muslim Brotherhood in the 1920s.

The ideology has regarded the United States as its principal adversary since the late 1940s, when a Brotherhood principal, Sayid Qutb, visited this country and was aghast at what he saw as its decadence. The first World Trade Center bombing, in 1993, al Qaeda attacks on American embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998, on the USS Cole in 2000, the 9/11 attacks, and those in the dozen years since—all were fueled by Islamist hatred for the U.S. and its values.

There are Muslim organizations in this country, such as the American Islamic Forum for Democracy, headed by Dr. Zuhdi Jasser, that speak out bravely against that totalitarian ideology. They receive no shout-out at presidential speeches; no outreach is extended to them.

One of the Tsarnaev brothers is dead; the other might as well be. But if that is the limit of our concern, there will be others.

Mr. Mukasey served as attorney general of the United States from 2007 to 2009 and as a U.S. district judge for the Southern District of New York from 1988 to 2006.

Voir de plus:

Defining ‘Rights’ in a Terror Case

Michael B. Mukasey

WSJ

May 1, 2013

The new arrests in Boston look like criminal cases. But why was the interrogation of the accused bomber handled like a criminal matter too?

By MICHAEL B. MUKASEY

The three suspects arrested Wednesday in the Boston Marathon bombing case appear to be considered accomplices after the fact. It is likely that they will be treated as common criminals rather than terrorists. Unfortunately, law-enforcement has approached the accused bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev that way as well.

A miasma of conflicting views about Mr. Tsarnaev’s legal status has engulfed the case. The rules and principles that should govern the relevant facts are pretty straightforward, but they alone do not explain the actual outcome thus far, which seems rooted instead in the Obama administration’s gauzy notions about what is required of law informed by morality.

At the time of Mr. Tsarnaev’s April 19 apprehension, no warrant had been issued for his arrest. The case law on warrantless arrests requires the initiation of the court process within 48 hours, with exceptions arguably not relevant here. The reason for the 48-hour requirement, as explained by the Supreme Court in County of Riverside v. McLaughlin (1991), is to prevent secret arrests unsupported by probable cause, as determined by what the law calls a neutral magistrate. Of course, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s arrest was not secret, and the facts surrounding it far surpassed the modest probable-cause standard. All that was missing was the finding by a neutral magistrate.

That gap was filled, when a criminal complaint was filed by federal prosecutors based on an affidavit that established probable cause, and the magistrate judge issued an arrest warrant. Using that warrant, the authorities—if they wished to indulge an exacting taste for formality—could have rearrested Mr. Tsarnaev. No more was required.

At that point his interrogation had already begun, but it was being conducted by the FBI-led High Value Interrogation Group, solely—or so it should have been—for the purpose of gathering intelligence. Recall that the HIG, as the interrogation group is known, wascreated to fill the void left after President Obama, on his second day in office, abolished the CIA’s then-classified interrogation program.

The president limited future use of interrogation techniques to those set forth in the Army Field Manual, a document long available on the Internet and actually used by terrorist groups to train their recruits to resist questioning. Mr. Obama also promised to create a team of specially trained law-enforcement officers and intelligence officials to question captured terrorists. That team had not yet been created when, almost a year later, Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab tried to blow up himself and his fellow passengers aboard an airplane over Detroit on Christmas Day 2009. The opportunity to question him extensively was lost when he stopped talking to the FBI after being advised of his Miranda right to silence.

Didn’t Dzhokhar Tsarnaev have the same right as Abdulmutallab, and weren’t officials legally required to inform him of it? Well, not quite. The right in question is not, strictly speaking, a right to remain silent. Rather, it is derived from the Fifth Amendment, which guarantees that a defendant in a criminal case may not be compelled to be a witness against himself. But if an interrogation is being conducted to gather information, not to build a criminal case, then no right to remain silent exists. Law enforcement already has a surfeit of evidence—including photographs and videos of him at the scene of the bombing. The HIG interrogators weren’t trying to help prosecutors construct their case.

Of course, Mr. Tsarnaev could have chosen not to talk to intelligence interrogators, or chosen to lie to them. But that is what he would have been exercising: a choice, not a right.

Wasn’t there a requirement that Mr. Tsarnaev be brought without delay before a judge? Again, not quite. The rule in question requires that defendants be taken to court without unnecessary delay—but the rule has been interpreted in one case from the judicial circuit that includes Massachusetts to permit even a hiatus of almost four months between arrest and court appearance when a defendant was in state custody during that period. The circuit court found that so long as the delay wasn’t used to obtain a confession, it was not unreasonable.

And what of the right to counsel? Didn’t Mr. Tsarnaev have the right to a lawyer, and to have that lawyer present during any questioning? Once more, not quite. Another amendment, the Sixth, guarantees the right to counsel in a criminal case, but it guarantees no more.

If Mr. Tsarnaev was being questioned by the HIG solely to gather intelligence, and no admission of his or lead from information he disclosed was to be used in his criminal case, then he was no more entitled to a lawyer in connection with such questioning unrelated to his criminal case than he was entitled to a lawyer to close a real-estate transaction. The HIG could have easily ensured that none of the fruits of its questioning could be used in the criminal case.

Ideally, such intelligence questioning would have continued for a long period, probably months, so that interrogators could try to substantiate the information they obtained, then double back and ask more questions based on what they found. Intelligence-gathering is an incremental process, at best.

Would the HIG have run any risks by continuing to question Mr. Tsarnaev outside the presence of a lawyer? Not really. Defense counsel could have filed a habeas corpus petition on his behalf challenging the circumstances of the detention and his continued questioning for intelligence purposes. If the ruling on such a petition, for some reason I cannot now fathom, went against the government, and that ruling were sustained for months all the way through a Supreme Court review, then—and only then—the HIG questioning would have had to stop. No right of Mr. Tsarnaev’s would have been compromised in the interim because, again, none of the fruits of the HIG questioning would be used in the criminal case.

Could all of this legal mumbo-jumbo have been avoided by labeling Mr. Tsarnaev an unlawful enemy combatant? No. As an American citizen, by law he could not be tried before a military commission, and labeling him an unlawful enemy combatant would have had no legal significance when it came to interrogating him.

There is one question about the Tsarnaev legal matter for which no answer readily appears: Why did the Justice Department order U.S. Marshals to bring a magistrate judge to Mr. Tsarnaev’s hospital room on April 22 to advise him of a right he did not have if he was being questioned for intelligence purposes, and to introduce him to a lawyer with no authority to advise him in connection with such questioning?

Why indeed. Regrettably, it appears that here we must fall back to the Obama administration’s frequently articulated concern, always presented in overarching moral terms, that America must prove to a constantly doubting world that the U.S. can follow the law even—especially—when it confers rights on unlovely folk like Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, and even if those rights don’t quite exist. Here, maybe it is time that our hectoring schoolmasters and schoolmarms consider a lesson taught by the philosopher Blaise Pascal: The first rule of morality is to think clearly.

Mr. Mukasey served as U.S. attorney general (2007-09) and as a U.S. district judge for the Southern District of New York (1988-2006).

Voir enfin:

The World’s Muslims: Religion, Politics and Society

POLL
Pewforum
April 30, 2013

Chapter 2: Religion and Politics

Muslims around the world express broad support for democracy and for people of other faiths being able to practice their religion freely. At the same time, many Muslims say religious leaders should influence political matters and see Islamic political parties as just as good or better than other political parties.

Many Muslims express concern about religious extremist groups operating in their country. On balance, more Muslims are concerned about Islamic than Christian extremist groups. And while the vast majority of Muslims in most countries say suicide bombing is rarely or never justified to defend Islam against its enemies, substantial minorities in a few countries consider such violence justifiable in at least some circumstances.

Democracy

gsi2-chp2-1

In 31 of the 37 countries where the question was asked at least half of Muslims believe a democratic government, rather than a leader with a strong hand, is best able to address their country’s problems.

Support for democracy tends to be highest among Muslims in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. In 12 of the 16 countries surveyed in sub-Saharan Africa, roughly two-thirds or more prefer a democratic government, including nearly nine-in-ten (87%) in Ghana. Fewer, though still a majority, prefer democracy over a strong leader in Guinea Bissau (61%), Niger (57%) and Tanzania (57%). In Southeast Asia, more than six-in-ten Muslims in Malaysia (67%), Thailand (64%) and Indonesia (61%) also prefer democracy.

In the Middle East and North Africa, at least three-quarters of Muslims support democracy in Lebanon (81%) and Tunisia (75%). At least half in Egypt (55%), the Palestinian territories (55%) and Iraq (54%) do so as well.

Attitudes vary somewhat in the other regions surveyed. In South Asia, the percentage of Muslims who say a democratic government is better able to solve their country’s problems ranges from 70% in Bangladesh to 29% in Pakistan. In Central Asia, at least half of Muslims in Tajikistan (76%), Turkey (67%), Kazakhstan (52%) and Azerbaijan (51%) prefer democracy over a leader with a strong hand, while far fewer in Kyrgyzstan (32%) say the same.

In Southern and Eastern Europe, support for democracy is much higher among Muslims in Kosovo (76%) and Albania (69%) than in Bosnia-Herzegovina (47%) and Russia (35%), where a majority of Muslims favor a powerful leader.

Views about the better type of government differ little by frequency of prayer, age, gender or education level.

Religious Freedom

Muslims generally say they are very free to practice their religion. Most also believe non-Muslims in their country are very free to practice their faith. And among those who view non-Muslims as very free to practice their faith, the prevailing opinion is that this is a good thing.

gsi2-chp2-2

Muslims in Southeast Asia, South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly likely to say they are “very free” to practice their faith. Roughly seven-in-ten or more Muslims in each country surveyed in these regions hold this view.

gsi2-chp2-3

There is more variation in the Middle East-North Africa region, where Muslims in Iraq (48%) and Egypt (46%) are much less likely than Muslims in Lebanon (90%) and Morocco (88%) to believe they are able to practice Islam very freely. Muslims in Uzbekistan (39%) are the least likely among the Muslim populations surveyed to say they are very free to practice their faith.

In addition to freedom for themselves, most Muslims believe individuals from other religions are able to practice their faith openly. In 33 of the 38 countries where the question was asked at least half say people of other faiths are very free to practice their religion. (This question was not asked in Afghanistan.)

Muslims in Central Asia and the Middle East and North Africa are generally less likely to believe non-Muslims can practice their faith freely. Fewer than half in Kyrgyzstan (48%), Tajikistan (47%) and Uzbekistan (26%), for example, say others are able to practice their faith openly. Similarly, in the Middle East-North Africa region, fewer than four-in-ten Muslims in Iraq (37%) and Egypt (31%) believe non-Muslims are free to practice their religion.

In 15 of the countries surveyed, Muslims are significantly more likely to say they themselves are very free to practice their religion than to say the same about people of other faiths. The gaps are particularly wide in Jordan (-22 percentage points), Kyrgyzstan (-20), Turkey  (-20) and Egypt (-15).

Overall, Muslims broadly support the idea of religious freedom. Among Muslims who say people of different religions are very free to practice their faith, three-quarters or more in each country say this is a good thing.

Religious Leaders’ Role in Politics

gsi2-chp2-4

Compared with support for democracy and religious freedom, sharper regional differences emerge over the question of the role of religious leaders in politics. The prevailing view among Muslims in Southeast Asia, South Asia and the Middle East-North Africa region is that religious leaders should have at least some influence in political matters. By contrast, this is the minority view in most of the countries surveyed in Central Asia and Southern and Eastern Europe. With the notable exception of Afghanistan, fewer than half of Muslims in any country surveyed say religious leaders should have a large influence in politics.

Support for religious leaders having a say in political matters is particularly high in Southeast Asia. At least three-quarters of Muslims in Malaysia (82%) and Indonesia (75%) believe religious leaders should influence political matters, including substantial percentages who say they should play a large role (41% and 30%, respectively).

In South Asia, a large majority in Afghanistan (82%) and Bangladesh (69%) believe religious leaders ought to influence political matters, while 54% of Pakistani Muslims agree. Afghan Muslims are the most likely among the populations surveyed to say religious leaders should have a large influence on politics (53%), while roughly a quarter of Muslims in Pakistan (27%) and Bangladesh (25%) express this view.

In the Middle East-North Africa region, a majority of Muslims in most countries surveyed say religious leaders should play a role in politics. Support is highest among Muslims in Jordan (80%), Egypt (75%) and the Palestinian territories (72%). Roughly six-in-ten in Tunisia (58%) and Iraq (57%) agree. Lebanese Muslims are significantly less supportive; 37% think religious leaders should have at least some role in political matters, while 62% disagree. In each country in the region except Lebanon, about a quarter or more say religious leaders should have a large influence on politics, including 37% in Jordan.

gsi2-chp2-5

Muslims in Southern and Eastern Europe and Central Asia tend to be less supportive of a role for religious leaders in political matters. Only in Russia does a majority (58%) believe religious leaders should have at least some influence. Meanwhile, Muslims in Kyrgyzstan are divided over the issue (46% say religious leaders should have an influence on political matters, 51% disagree). In the other countries surveyed in these two regions, fewer than four-in-ten Muslims believe religious leaders should have a role in politics.

In some countries, Muslims who pray several times a day are more likely than those who pray less often to say religious leaders should influence political matters. The gap is particularly large in Lebanon, where 51% of Muslims who pray several times a day believe religious leaders should have at least some political influence, compared with 13% of those who pray less often.

Islamic Political Parties

gsi2-chp2-6

In most countries where the question was asked at least half of Muslims rate Islamic parties as better than, or about the same, as other political parties.

The percentage of Muslims who say Islamic parties are better than other political parties is highest in Egypt (55%), Tunisia (55%) and Afghanistan (54%), although at least four-in-ten share this view in Jordan (46%), Malaysia (43%) and Bangladesh (41%). By contrast, fewer than a quarter of Muslims view Islamic parties more favorably than other parties in the Palestinian territories (21%), Kosovo (16%), Bosnia-Herzegovina (12%), Azerbaijan (11%) and Kazakhstan (9%).

In all countries where the question was asked, substantial percentages of Muslims rate Islamic parties as the same as other political parties, including at least half in Indonesia (57%) and Lebanon (51%). Elsewhere, at least one-in-five rate Islamic and other political parties the same.

Relatively few Muslims consider Islamic parties to be worse than other political parties. Only in the Palestinian territories (29%), Azerbaijan (27%) and Turkey (26%) do more than a quarter subscribe to this view.

In many countries, favorable assessments of Islamic political parties track with support for religious leaders having an influence on politics. In Lebanon, for example, Muslims who say religious leaders should have at least some political influence are 53 percentage points more likely than those who disagree to say Islamic parties are better (63% vs. 10%). In 15 of the other countries surveyed, similar double-digit gaps emerge over the question of Islamic parties, with those who support a role for religious leaders in politics consistently more favorable toward Islamic political parties.

gsi2-chp2-7

Views on the role of religion in politics may not be the only factor affecting attitudes toward Islamic parties. Local political circumstances may also influence opinions on this question. Both Tunisia and Egypt, for example, experienced major political upheavals in 2011, with Islamic parties emerging as the dominant political blocs. At the time of the surveys in Tunisia and Egypt, Muslims who said they were satisfied with the direction of the country were significantly more likely than those who were dissatisfied to say Islamic political parties are better than other political parties (+24 percentage points in Tunisia and +11 in Egypt).20

Concern About Religious Extremism

gsi2-chp2-8

At least half of Muslims in 22 of the 36 countries where the question was asked say they are at least somewhat concerned about religious extremist groups in their country. In most countries, Muslims are much more worried about Islamic extremists than Christian extremists. Substantial proportions in some countries, including countries surveyed in the Middle East and North Africa, express concern about both Muslim and Christian extremist groups.

The survey finds widespread concern about religious extremism in Southeast Asia, South Asia and the Middle East-North Africa region. In nearly every country surveyed in these regions, at least half of Muslims say they are very concerned or somewhat concerned about extremist groups. In Indonesia, nearly eight-in-ten Muslims say they are worried about religious extremism (78%), including more than half (53%) who are worried about Islamic extremists. In Malaysia, too, a majority of Muslims (63%) are worried about extremist groups; however, more Malaysian Muslims express concerns about Christian than Muslim groups (31% vs. 8%). In the Middle East-North Africa region, on balance, Muslims are more concerned about Islamic than Christian extremist groups, but more than one-in-five in most countries surveyed in the region are worried about both Islamic and Christian groups.

At least half in nine of the 16 countries surveyed in sub-Saharan Africa also say they are concerned about religious extremism. And in most countries, Islamic extremism rather than Christian extremism is the principal worry. For example, in Guinea Bissau, more than half of Muslims (54%) say they are at least somewhat concerned about Islamic extremist groups; in Ghana 45% say the same, as do roughly a third of Muslims in Djibouti (36%), Chad (33%), Kenya (33%) and Niger (32%).

In Southern and Eastern Europe, worries about religious extremism are most widespread in Bosnia-Herzegovina, where more than six-in-ten (63%) are at least somewhat concerned about religious extremist groups, including 27% who are specifically concerned about Islamic extremists. A similar proportion of Muslims (30%) in Bosnia-Herzegovina are worried about both Muslim and Christian groups in the country. Fewer than half say they are very or somewhat concerned about religious extremist groups in Russia (46%), Kosovo (45%) and Albania (21%).

In Central Asia, the percentage of Muslims concerned about religious extremism ranges from roughly six-in-ten in Kazakhstan (63%) and Kyrgyzstan (62%) to fewer than one-in-ten in Azerbaijan (6%). In most of the countries surveyed in the region, worries about Islamic extremists are more common than are concerns about Christian extremists, although one-in-five in Kyrgyzstan are concerned about extremists of both faiths.

Suicide Bombing

gsi2-chp2-9

In most of the 21 countries where the question was asked few Muslims endorse suicide bombing and other forms of violence against civilian targets as a means of defending Islam against its enemies. But in a few countries, substantial minorities believe suicide bombing can be often justified or sometimes justified.

Muslims in some countries surveyed in South Asia and the Middle East-North Africa region are more likely than Muslims elsewhere to consider suicide bombing justified. Four-in-ten Palestinian Muslims see suicide bombing as often or sometimes justified, while roughly half (49%) take the opposite view. In Egypt, about three-in-ten (29%) consider suicide bombing justified at least sometimes. Elsewhere in the region, fewer Muslims believe such violence is often or sometimes justified, including fewer than one-in-five in Jordan (15%) and about one-in-ten in Tunisia (12%), Morocco (9%) and Iraq (7%).

In Afghanistan, a substantial minority of Muslims (39%) say that this form of violence against civilian targets is often or sometimes justifiable in defense of Islam. In Bangladesh, more than a quarter of Muslims (26%) take this view. Support for suicide bombing is lower in Pakistan (13%).

In the countries surveyed in Central Asia and Southern and Eastern Europe, fewer than one-in-six Muslims consider suicide bombing justified in Turkey (15%), Kosovo (11%) and Kyrgyzstan (10%). Elsewhere in these two regions, even fewer say this tactic can be justified.

In Southeast Asia, Malaysian Muslims are more likely than Indonesian Muslims to consider suicide bombing justifiable (18% vs. 7%).


Footnotes:

20 The survey in Egypt was conducted Nov. 14-Dec. 18, 2011. Parliamentary elections were held in November 2011 through January 2012, and the Islamist Freedom and Justice Party was declared the winner of a plurality of seats in January 2012. The survey in Tunisia was conducted Nov. 10-Dec. 7, 2011. The Islamist party Ennahda won a plurality of seats in the Constituent Assembly elections in October 2011, and the Constituent Assembly met for the first time in November 2011.


Tuerie d’Istres: Attention, une balade sauvage peut en cacher une autre (Badlands goes Allahu Akbar: Should the legless Bostonians have agitated more forcefully for federally mandated after-school assimilationist basketball programs ?)

1 mai, 2013
http://images.fan-de-cinema.com/affiches/drame/la_balade_sauvage,2.jpghttp://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m30as9EuiT1r37q3oo1_500.jpghttp://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/07ead-b15.jpg?w=450&h=253http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/19/Starkweather.jpgL’acte surréaliste le plus simple consiste, revolvers au poing, à descendre dans la rue et à tirer, au hasard, tant qu’on peut dans la foule. Breton
Il faut avoir le courage de vouloir le mal et pour cela il faut commencer par rompre avec le comportement grossièrement humanitaire qui fait partie de l’héritage chrétien. (..) Nous sommes avec ceux qui tuent. Breton
Nouvelle réédition pour La Balade sauvage et nouvelle visibilité grâce à la palme remportée à Cannes par le dernier film de Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life). Le premier long-métrage du cinéaste, qui conte la balade meurtrière du couple formé par Holly (Sissy Spacek) et Kit (Martin Sheen) à travers les États-Unis, s’assure d’emblée une certaine carrière en salles. Depuis son âge d’or dans les années 1970, le road-movie a subi de nombreuses mutations. Revenir sur La Balade sauvage, c’est donc revenir au classicisme d’un genre, ce qui n’est pas sans constituer un certain paradoxe étant donné le souffle nouveau que ce film a représenté en son temps. Mais trente-cinq ans plus tard, on est en droit de se demander si La Balade sauvage a conservé toute sa modernité ou s’il ne pâtit pas du passage du temps. Quel écho de la révolte de la jeunesse américaine des années 1970 contre l’autorité (gouvernementale, parentale, etc.) aujourd’hui ? Si l’escapade insouciante de Holly et Kit comme réponse au carcan social paraît aujourd’hui un peu naïve et présente une idée de la liberté un peu vieillotte, mieux vaut y voir le premier maillon d’une œuvre à venir. Le premier long-métrage de Malick pose déjà la question qui hantera toute sa filmographie : comment créer un lieu de vie idéal au sein d’une terre hostile (déclinée dans The Tree of Life en situation hostile : la mort d’un enfant). Le titre original de l’œuvre vaut ainsi qu’on le rappelle : Badlands, ces mauvaises terres que l’on brûle au son d’un chœur religieux (faut-il passer par l’Enfer pour parvenir au Paradis ?) et qu’on brûlera à nouveau dans la plus belle séquence des Moissons du ciel, lors d’une apocalyptique attaque de sauterelles. Si le film de Malick constitue le modèle d’une tendance cinématographique qui émergera dans les années 1990 – les road-movies meurtriers –, ce film-source a ceci de spécifique qu’il se construit toujours dans la distance (particularité dont ses petits rejetons – de Sailor et Lula à Tueurs-nés en passant par True Romance, qui reprend presque littéralement la musique de La Balade sauvage – s’émanciperont pour proclamer un style kitch-hémoglobine). Le recul qu’il prend vis-à-vis de la violence passe essentiellement par le personnage incarné par Sissy Spacek (qui se trouve alors à l’orée d’une période de grands rôles : Carrie, Three Women, etc.), dont l’impassibilité désamorce toujours immédiatement l’agitation de Martin Sheen. On se trouve avec La Balade sauvage devant le portrait d’une jeunesse qui, malgré les cadavres qu’elle laisse sur son chemin, se démarque par sa grande innocence. La mort n’intervient jamais comme un drame mais comme une étape, un relais sur la route de Holly et Kit. Pas de drame, pas de coupable. La singularité de la démarche malickienne est de faire de ce fait-divers une ode à l’innocence plutôt qu’un trip sulfureux (comme s’attacheront à le faire David Lynch, Oliver Stone et Tony Scott), de dépasser l’anecdote, la chronique de départ pour dépeindre un état de fait plus global : la jeunesse, la liberté. Critikat (juin 2011)
Terrence Malick (…) sort d’un long cursus de philo à Harvard, suivi de reportages pour le New Yorker, et soudain le voilà « possédé » par le cinéma. La Balade sauvage, qui suit la piste d’un couple d’amoureux criminels façon Bonnie and Clyde, est un film où les idées fusent, tranchantes, lyriques, baroques. L’univers d’un cinéaste de génie – Palme d’or 2011 pour The Tree of life – s’y déploie avec une précision, une assurance et une liberté stupéfiantes. Tout de l’oeuvre à venir est déjà là : la voix off, pure et mélancolique, flotte depuis un au-delà étrange, surplombant les passions. Filmée avec grâce, la nature vibre, plane et palpite autour de jeunes héros dont les rêves s’abîment à toute vitesse. Télérama
Badlands was inspired by the short, bloody saga of Charles Starkweather who, at age nineteen, in January, 1958, with the apparent cooperation of his fourteen-year-old girlfriend, Caril Fugate, went off on a murder spree that resulted in ten victims. Starkweather was later executed in the electric chair and Miss Fugate given life imprisonment. Badlands inevitably invites comparisons with three other important American films, Arthur Penn’s Bonnie and Clyde and Fritz Lang’s Fury and You Only Live Once, but it has a very different vision of violence and death. Malick spends no great amount of time invoking Freud to explain the behavior of Kit and Holly, nor is there any Depression to be held ultimately responsible. Society is, if anything, benign. This is the haunting truth of Badlands, something that places it very much in the seventies in spite of its carefully re-created period detail. Kit and Holly are directionless creatures, technically literate but uneducated in any real sense, so desensitized that Kit (in Malick’s words at a news conference) can regard the gun with which he shoots people as a kind of magic wand that eliminates small nuisances. Kit and Holly are members of the television generation run amok. They are not ill-housed, ill-clothed, or ill-fed. If they are at all aware of their anger (and I’m not sure they are, since they see only boredom), it’s because of the difference between the way life is and the way it is presented on the small screen, with commercial breaks instead of lasting consequences. Badlands is narrated by Holly in the flat, nasal accents of the Middle West and in the syntax of a story in True Romances. "Little did I realize," she tells us at the beginning of the film, "that what began in the alleys and by-ways of this small town would end in the badlands of Montana." At the end, after half a dozen murders, she resolves never again to "tag around with the hell-bent type." Kit and Holly share with Clyde and Bonnie a fascination with their own press coverage, with their overnight fame ("The whole world was looking for us," says Holly, "for who knew where Kit would strike next?"), but a lack of passion differentiates them from the gaudy desperados of the thirties. Toward the end of their joyride, the bored Holly tells us she passed the time, as she sat in the front seat beside Kit, spelling out complete sentences with her tongue on the roof of her mouth. Malick tries not to romanticize his killers, and he is successful except for one sequence in which Kit and Holly hide out in a tree house as elaborate as anything the M-G-M art department ever designed for Tarzan and Jane. Sheen and Miss Spacek are splendid as the self-absorbed, cruel, possibly psychotic children of our time, as are the members of the supporting cast, including Warren Oates as Holly’s father. One may legitimately debate the validity of Malick’s vision, but not, I think, his immense talent. Badlands is a most important and exciting film. The NYT
Le scénario est inspiré d’une histoire vraie : en 1957, deux amants du Middle West effectuèrent une "balade sauvage" qui coûta la vie à onze personnes. Le jeune homme, Charles Starkweather, finit sur la chaise électrique, et sa compagne, Caril Ann Fugate, fut condamnée à la réclusion criminelle à perpétuité. Wikipedia
Charles Raymond Starkweather (24 novembre 1938 – 25 juin 1959) était un tueur à la chaîne américain qui a assassiné 11 personnes dans le Nebraska et dans le Wyoming lors d’un road trip avec sa copine adolescente, Caril Ann Fugate. Il devint une fascination nationale aux États-Unis, inspirant notamment les films « The Sadist », « La Balade sauvage » , « Starkweather », « Murder in the Heartland », « Fantômes contre Fantômes » et « Tueurs nés ». Il a également inspiré la chanson « Nebraska » de Bruce Springsteen, que Springsteen pensait initialement intituler « Starkweather ». Liza Ward, la petite-fille des victimes C. Lauer et Clara Ward, a écrit un roman, « Outside Valentine », basé sur les événements de la tuerie de Starkweather. (…) Stephen King fut fortement inspiré par les meurtres de Starkweather lorsqu’il était plus jeune, gardant un scrapbook d’eux1 et incorporant plusieurs avatars de Starkweather dans ses œuvres. Par exemple, il est dit que Starkweather était un collègue de classe de Randall Flagg dans « Le Fléau ». King a également affirmé lors d’une interview que son personnage The Kid, qui apparaît dans la version complète de « Le Fléau » se veut être une réincarnation de Charles Starkweather. Le cas Starkweather-Fugate a inspiré, entre autres, les films « La Balade sauvage » (1973, avec Martin Sheen et Sissy Spacek) et « Tueurs nés » (1994, avec Woody Harrelson et Juliette Lewis). Le téléfilm « Murder in the Heartland » (1993) est une description biographique de Starkweather avec Tim Roth dans le rôle principal, alors qu’en 1983, « Stark Raving Mad », un film avec Russell Fast et Marcie Severson, fournit une version fictionnelle des meurtres de Starkweather et Fugate. Le film « Fantômes contre Fantômes », de Peter Jackson, met en scène un couple meurtrier inspiré par Starkweather et Fugate. Après avoir commis leur 12ème meurtre, Bartlett (l’homme) annonce triomphalement : "Un de plus que Starkweather !" (One more than Starkweather!). Wikipedia
Est-ce que l’industrie pense que les armes vont aider à vendre des tickets’ Je ne sais pas… Je crois que la question mérite d’être posée. Robert Redford
Le maire de New York, Michael Bloomberg, affirme que les frères Tsarnaev, suspects dans les attentats du marathon de Boston, prévoyaient déposer des bombes à Times Square. Ils voulaient se rendre à New York dans la soirée de jeudi (18 avril), mais la prise d’otage d’un automobiliste a mal tourné et leur plan a échoué. Dzhokhar, hospitalisé depuis son arrestation, aurait fait cette déclaration. Radio-Canada
Selon ses dires, il a déterré une kalachnikov achetée sur Internet avant de faire feu et de tuer deux voisins, âgés de 35 et 45 ans, dans leurs jardins. Il a ensuite arrêté une voiture et demandé à la conductrice de l’emmener à Paris. Devant son refus, il a fait feu sur le pare-brise du véhicule, blessant légèrement la femme à la main et à l’oreille. Puis il a arrêté une deuxième voiture conduite par un sexagénaire, qu’il a abattu d’une rafale d’arme automatique. Selon les enquêteurs, l’adolescent assure "n’être militant de rien", n’avoir aucune conviction politique ou religieuse et ne se revendique d’aucune idéologie ni d’aucun courant de pensée. Le Monde
La forte concentration d’établissements d’enseignement supérieur et de recherche explique le surnom de Boston, l’ « Athènes de l’Amérique ». L’agglomération compte une centaine d’institutions publiques ou privées qui concourent à sa réputation d’excellence depuis la période coloniale. Parmi elles, les 65 colleges et universités27 font de Boston une ville étudiante. Cependant, le Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) et Harvard ne se trouvent pas dans les limites de la ville, mais sont installés à Cambridge, sur l’autre rive de la Charles River. Le Boston College fut créé en 1827 dans le South End avant de déménager à Chestnut Hill. L’université de Boston, fondée en 1869, est aujourd’hui la quatrième plus grande université du pays avec environ 30 000 étudiants et le second employeur de la ville28. L’université du Massachusetts est un établissement d’enseignement supérieur public situé dans le quartier de Dorchester. Le collège Emerson (3 700 étudiants) est situé non loin du Boston Common et propose des formations dans les arts et la communication. La Northeastern University dispose d’un grand campus sur l’avenue Huntington dans le quartier de Fenway. Le Wentworth Institute of Technology propose plusieurs formations de haut niveau en architecture ou en informatique par exemple. L’université Suffolk (4 600 étudiants) est une école de droit qui garde un campus sur Beacon Hill. Il existe bien d’autres établissements d’enseignement supérieur : le Simmons College (1899), l’Emmanuel College (1919), etc. Boston compte également de nombreux lieux de formation aux arts du spectacle, à la musique (New England Conservatory of Music, Boston Conservatory, Berklee College of Music). Wikipedia
The alleged involvement of two ethnic Chechen brothers in the deadly attack at the Boston Marathon last week should prompt Americans to reflect on whether we do an adequate job assimilating immigrants who arrive in the United States as children or teenagers". Marcello Suarez-Orozco and Carola Suarez-Orozco (UCLA)
It was a blow the immigrant boxer could not withstand: after capturing his second consecutive title as the Golden Gloves heavyweight champion of New England in 2010, Tamerlan Anzorovich Tsarnaev, 23, was barred from the national Tournament of Champions because he was not a United States citizen. The cocksure fighter, a flamboyant dresser partial to white fur and snakeskin, had been looking forward to redeeming the loss he suffered the previous year in the first round, when the judges awarded his opponent the decision, drawing boos from spectators who considered Mr. Tsarnaev dominant. From one year to the next, though, the tournament rules had changed, disqualifying legal permanent residents — not only Mr. Tsarnaev, who was Soviet-born of Chechen and Dagestani heritage, but several other New England contenders, too. His aspirations frustrated, he dropped out of boxing competition entirely, and his life veered in a completely different direction. Mr. Tsarnaev portrayed his quitting as a reflection of the sport’s incompatibility with his growing devotion to Islam. But as dozens of interviews with friends, acquaintances and relatives from Cambridge, Mass., to Dagestan showed, that devotion, and the suspected radicalization that accompanied it, was a path he followed most avidly only after his more secular dreams were dashed in 2010 and he was left adrift. His trajectory eventually led the frustrated athlete and his loyal younger brother, Dzhokhar, to bomb one of the most famous athletic events in this country, killing three and wounding more than 200 at the Boston Marathon, the authorities say. They say it led Mr. Tsarnaev, his application for citizenship stalled, and his brother, a new citizen and a seemingly well-adjusted college student, to attack their American hometown on Patriots’ Day, April 15. The NYT
(…) that personal grievances of some sort must always somehow be responsible (…) is true by definition for individuals who carry out acts of violence for idiosyncratic personal motives, but it misses the point entirely when one is dealing with ideological extremists. It is the adoption of extremist political and religious ideologies that is the primary causal factor in precipitating acts of non-state terrorism. And it should be self-evident that those who formulate or adopt extremist ideologies must necessarily be disgruntled and alienated from the current social or political status quo, whether justifiably or not. Why? Because people who are happy or essentially satisfied with the status quo are neither going to create nor embrace radical worldviews that advocate attacking the existing system in order to establish what they believe will be a better, more just world. Thus there is no mystery at all about why the alleged Boston bombers committed their terrorist atrocity: like the perpetrators of the 9/11 attacks and thousands of other jihadist terrorist attacks throughout the world, they had embraced a radical Islamist ideology that enjoined them to wage armed jihad against the “infidel” enemies of Islam. It hardly matters why the Tsarnaev brothers became disgruntled or angry—people can become disgruntled and angry for a vast array of both legitimate and delusional reasons. What matters is that this underlying emotional attitude made them receptive to and ultimately caused them to embrace Islamist doctrines, which offered them an explicit, coherent, and theologically sanctioned justification for perpetrating violence. Yet that undeniable fact is consistently denied in cases of jihadist terrorism, both in the media and even by government officials. Perhaps the most egregious illustrative example is the case of Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, whose jihadist terrorism at Fort Hood was foolishly ascribed to personal grievances in the U.S. military’s own investigative report. However, the evidence clearly indicates that Hasan had increasingly embraced radical Islamist doctrines, and that in the months before his attack he had extensive email contact with Anwar al-Awlaqi, the al Qaeda  operative who was linked to numerous jihadist plots, became a key figure in al Qaeda’s affiliate in the Arabian peninsula after leaving the United States, helped prepare the group’s English-language magazine Inspire, and was killed in a drone strike in 2011. Here one can observe a blatant double standard at work, since Islamist ideology, uniquely amongst extremist ideologies, is rarely if ever identified—much less highlighted—as the primary motivational factor behind terrorism committed by certain Muslims, even those who proudly proclaim their adherence to that ideology. In contrast, the media have no qualms about rightly emphasizing the role of white supremacist ideologies in precipitating acts of violence or terrorism by neo-Nazis, Klansmen, and certain right-wing militiamen; the impact of extremist interpretations of Christianity in fomenting anti-abortion violence; or the degree to which apocalyptic millennarian doctrines have generated violence by groups like Aum Shinrikyo. Nor do the media customarily refrain from noting the communist ideological agendas of left-wing terrorists, or the underlying beliefs fueling the violent actions of certain eco-radicals. Why, then, is the role of Islamist ideology so often downplayed or denied in connection with acts of jihadist terrorism? Those who are now claiming that the Boston bombers’ actions had nothing to do with their adoption of particular interpretations of Islam are seriously mistaken. And those who are foolishly endeavoring to portray the two Chechen Muslims as the innocent victims of covert manipulation or anti-Muslim prejudice—rather than as brutal victimizers—are either being disingenuous or living in a state of psychological denial, if not in a parallel mental universe. Jeffery M. Bale
But, if I follow correctly, these UCLA profs are arguing that, when some guys go all Allahu Akbar on you and blow up your marathon, that just shows that you lazy complacent Americans need to work even harder at « assimilating immigrants ». After all, Dzhokhar and Tamerlan were raised in Cambridge, Mass., a notorious swamp of redneck bigotry where the two young Chechens no doubt felt « alienated » and « excluded » at being surrounded by NPR-listening liberals cooing, « Oh, your family’s from Chechnya? That’s the one next to Slovakia, right? Would you like to come round for a play date and help Jeremiah finish his diversity quilt? » Assimilation is hell. (…) We’re collapsing our own skulls here” the parameters in which we allow ourselves to think about abortion, welfare, immigration, terrorism, Islam shrink remorselessly, not least at the congressional level. Maybe if we didn’t collapse the skulls of so many black babies in Philadelphia, we wouldn’t need to import so many excitable young Chechens. But that’s thinking outside the box, and the box is getting ever smaller, like a nice, cozy cocoon in which we’re always warm and safe. Mark Steyn

Attention: une balade sauvage peut en cacher une autre !

"Balade sauvage", "balade meurtrière", "souffle nouveau", "réponse au carcan social", "modernité", "révolte de la jeunesse contre l’autorité (gouvernementale, parentale, etc.)",  "escapade insouciante", "naïve" "réponse au carcan social", "modèle" de "road-movies meurtriers", "film-source de Sailor et Lula à Tueurs-nés en passant par True Romance", "portrait d’une jeunesse qui, malgré les cadavres qu’elle laisse sur son chemin, se démarque par sa grande innocence", "mort jamais comme un drame mais comme une étape", "pas de drame, pas de coupable", "ode à l’innocence", "jeunesse", "liberté" …

Alors que la France s’interroge sur le début heureusement avorté de balade sauvage, qui (l’amour en plus, "ode à l’innocence"oblige) avait en son temps tant ému nos cinéphiles, du passionné d’armes et de jeux de guerre en ligne et admirateur de Mérah d’Istres …

Et qu’après l’autre balade sauvage avortée des apprentis et fils de jiahdistes de Boston, l’Amérique bien-pensante a repris son auto-flagellation sur le véritable enfer anti-immigrant qu’est devenu, sous la présidence du premier président non-blanc de l’histoire américaine, l’une des plus grandes concentrations mondiales de matière grise (centaine d’universités, 250 000 étudiants pour 620 000 habitants) …

Pendant que le même Robert Redford qui dit s’interroger sur les tomberaux de violence fournis quotidiennement par son industrie est en ville pour nous vendre sa dernière ode en date sur le bon vieux terrorisme Weathermen des amis de la Maison blanche

Comment ne pas voir, avec l’éditorialiste canadien Mark Steyn, le véritable décervellement qu’est en train de s’auto-administrer l’Occident pour tout ce qui touche, entre avortement, aide sociale, immmigration, terrorisme et islam, les dernières vaches sacrées en date de ses belles âmes ?

No Mystery About the ‘Why’ in Boston
Jeffery M. Bale
USNI News
April 26, 2013

Ever since the two alleged perpetrators of the Boston Marathon bombings were identified as Chechens living in America, the constant refrain in the media—as is almost always the case after terrorist attacks—has been to ask “why?” Apparently, many media pundits simply cannot comprehend how seemingly normal and relatively successful individuals could be motivated to carry out such actions.

Clearly, they have been misled into believing that one must be poor and disenfranchised or mentally disturbed to carry out acts of terrorism, despite a wealth of empirical evidence indicating that terrorists tend to be relatively well-educated, from higher socio-economic strata, and do not exhibit disproportionate levels of psychopathology. Still, the default assumption — at least in cases of jihadist terrorism — is that personal grievances of some sort must always somehow be responsible. That is true by definition for individuals who carry out acts of violence for idiosyncratic personal motives, but it misses the point entirely when one is dealing with ideological extremists.

It is the adoption of extremist political and religious ideologies that is the primary causal factor in precipitating acts of non-state terrorism. And it should be self-evident that those who formulate or adopt extremist ideologies must necessarily be disgruntled and alienated from the current social or political status quo, whether justifiably or not. Why? Because people who are happy or essentially satisfied with the status quo are neither going to create nor embrace radical worldviews that advocate attacking the existing system in order to establish what they believe will be a better, more just world.

Thus there is no mystery at all about why the alleged Boston bombers committed their terrorist atrocity: like the perpetrators of the 9/11 attacks and thousands of other jihadist terrorist attacks throughout the world, they had embraced a radical Islamist ideology that enjoined them to wage armed jihad against the “infidel” enemies of Islam. It hardly matters why the Tsarnaev brothers became disgruntled or angry—people can become disgruntled and angry for a vast array of both legitimate and delusional reasons. What matters is that this underlying emotional attitude made them receptive to and ultimately caused them to embrace Islamist doctrines, which offered them an explicit, coherent, and theologically sanctioned justification for perpetrating violence.

Yet that undeniable fact is consistently denied in cases of jihadist terrorism, both in the media and even by government officials. Perhaps the most egregious illustrative example is the case of Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, whose jihadist terrorism at Fort Hood was foolishly ascribed to personal grievances in the U.S. military’s own investigative report. However, the evidence clearly indicates that Hasan had increasingly embraced radical Islamist doctrines, and that in the months before his attack he had extensive email contact with Anwar al-Awlaqi, the al Qaeda  operative who was linked to numerous jihadist plots, became a key figure in al Qaeda’s affiliate in the Arabian peninsula after leaving the United States, helped prepare the group’s English-language magazine Inspire, and was killed in a drone strike in 2011.

Here one can observe a blatant double standard at work, since Islamist ideology, uniquely amongst extremist ideologies, is rarely if ever identified—much less highlighted—as the primary motivational factor behind terrorism committed by certain Muslims, even those who proudly proclaim their adherence to that ideology. In contrast, the media have no qualms about rightly emphasizing the role of white supremacist ideologies in precipitating acts of violence or terrorism by neo-Nazis, Klansmen, and certain right-wing militiamen; the impact of extremist interpretations of Christianity in fomenting anti-abortion violence; or the degree to which apocalyptic millennarian doctrines have generated violence by groups like Aum Shinrikyo. Nor do the media customarily refrain from noting the communist ideological agendas of left-wing terrorists, or the underlying beliefs fueling the violent actions of certain eco-radicals. Why, then, is the role of Islamist ideology so often downplayed or denied in connection with acts of jihadist terrorism?

Those who are now claiming that the Boston bombers’ actions had nothing to do with their adoption of particular interpretations of Islam are seriously mistaken. And those who are foolishly endeavoring to portray the two Chechen Muslims as the innocent victims of covert manipulation or anti-Muslim prejudice—rather than as brutal victimizers—are either being disingenuous or living in a state of psychological denial, if not in a parallel mental universe.

The main substantive questions still to be answered in the Boston Marathon bombing case are whether the two bombers were part of a larger local cell or had received any tangible logistical or operational assistance from an organized jihadist group or network abroad. But it is all too obvious why they committed the reprehensible acts of terrorism.

Voir aussi:

The Collapsing of the American Skull

The parameters in which we allow ourselves to think about vital issues shrink remorselessly.

Mark Steyn

National  Review online

April 26, 2013

One of the most ingenious and effective strategies of the Left on any number of topics is to frame the debate and co-opt the language so effectively that it becomes all but impossible even to discuss the subject honestly. Take the brothers Tsarnaev, the incendiary end of a Chechen family that in very short time has settled aunts, uncles, sisters, and more across the map of North America from Massachusetts to New Jersey to my own home town of Toronto. Maybe your town has a Tsarnaev, too: There seems to be no shortage of them, except, oddly, back in Chechnya. The Tsarnaevs mom, now relocated from Cambridge to Makhachkala in delightful Dagestan, told a press conference the other day that she regrets ever having gotten mixed up with those crazy Yanks: "I would prefer not to have lived in America", she said.

Not, I’m sure, as much as the Richard family would have preferred it. Eight-year-old Martin was killed; his sister lost a leg; and his mother suffered serious brain injuries. What did the Richards and some 200 other families do to deserve having a great big hole blown in their lives? Well, according to the New York Times, they and you bear collective responsibility. Writing on the op-ed page, Marcello Suarez-Orozco, dean of the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, and Carola Suarez-Orozco, a professor at the same institution, began their ruminations thus:

"The alleged involvement of two ethnic Chechen brothers in the deadly attack at the Boston Marathon last week should prompt Americans to reflect on whether we do an adequate job assimilating immigrants who arrive in the United States as children or teenagers".

Maybe. Alternatively, the above opening sentence should "prompt Americans to reflect" on whether whoever’s editing America’s newspaper of record these days ‘does an adequate job’ in choosing which pseudo-credentialed experts it farms out its principal analysis on terrorist atrocities to. But, if I follow correctly, these UCLA profs are arguing that, when some guys go all Allahu Akbar on you and blow up your marathon, that just shows that you lazy complacent Americans need to work even harder at "assimilating immigrants". After all, Dzhokhar and Tamerlan were raised in Cambridge, Mass., a notorious swamp of redneck bigotry where the two young Chechens no doubt felt "alienated" and "excluded" at being surrounded by NPR-listening liberals cooing, "Oh, your family’s from Chechnya? That’s the one next to Slovakia, right? Would you like to come round for a play date and help Jeremiah finish his diversity quilt?" Assimilation is hell.

How hard would it be for Americans to be less inadequate when it comes to assimilating otherwise well-adjusted immigrant children? Let us turn once again to Mrs. Tsarnaev:

"They are going to kill him. I don’t care", she told reporters. "My oldest son is killed, so I don’t care. …  I don’t care if my youngest son is going to be killed today. … I don’t care if I am going to get killed, too and I will say Allahu Akbar!"

You can say it all you want, madam, but everyone knows that "Allahu Akbar" is Arabic for "Nothing to see here". So, once you’ve cleared the streets of body parts, you inadequate Americans need to redouble your efforts.

There is a stupidity to this, but also a kind of decadence. Until the 1960s, it was assumed by all sovereign states that they had the right to choose which non-nationals were admitted within their borders. Now, to suggest such a thing risks the charge of "nativism" and to propose that, say, Swedes are easier to assimilate than Chechens is to invite cries of "Racist!" So, when the morgues and emergency rooms are piled high, the only discussion acceptable in polite society is to wonder whether those legless Bostonians should have agitated more forcefully for federally mandated after-school assimilationist basketball programs.

As Ma Tsarnaev’s effusions suggest, at the sharp end of Islamic imperialism, there’s a certain glorying in sacrifice. We’re more fatalistic about it: After Major Hasan gunned down 13 of his comrades and an unborn baby, General Casey, the Army’s chief of staff, assured us that it could have been a whole lot worse:

‘What happened at Fort Hood was a tragedy, but I believe it would be an even greater tragedy if our diversity becomes a casualty here".

What happened at Boston was a "tragedy", but it would be an even greater tragedy if there were to be any honest discussion of immigration policy, or Islam, or anything else that matters.

Speaking of glorying in blood, in Philadelphia the Kermit Gosnell defense rested, without calling either the defendant or any witness to the stand. As I wrote last week, "Doctor" Gosnell is accused of cutting the spinal columns and suctioning out the brains of fully delivered babies. The blogger Pundette listed some questions she would have liked the "doctor" to be asked:

"Why did you chop off and preserve baby hands and feet and display them in jars?"

There seems to be no compelling medical reason for Gosnell’s extensive collection, but bottled baby feet certainly make a novelty paperweight or doorstop. "I think we already know the answer", wrote the Pundette. "He enjoyed it".

Unlike the Boston bombings, even the New York Times op-ed team can’t figure out a line on this. Better to look away, and ignore the story. America is the abortion mill of the developed world. In Western Europe, the state is yet squeamish enough to insist that the act be confined to twelve weeks (France) or 13 (Italy), with mandatory counseling (Germany), or up to 18 if approved by a government "commission" (Norway). Granted, many of these "safeguards" are pro forma and honored in the breach, but that’s preferable to America where they’re honored in the breech and the distinction between abortion and infanticide depends on whether the ‘doctor’ gets to the baby’s skull before it’s cleared the cervix. The Washington Examiner’s Timothy Carney sat in on a conference call with Dr. Tracy Weitz of the University of California, San Francisco:

"When a procedure that usually involves the collapsing of the skull is done, it’s usually done when the fetus is still in the uterus, not when the fetus has been delivered." So, in terms of thinking about the difference between the way abortion providers who do later abortions in the United States practice, and this particular practice, they are completely worlds apart".

Technically, they’re only inches apart. So what’s the big deal? The skull is collapsed in order to make it easier to clear the cervix. Once a healthy baby is out on the table and you cut his spinal column, there’s no need to suck out his brains and cave in his skull. But Dr. Gosnell seems to have got a kick out of it, so why not?

You can understand why American progressivism would rather avert its gaze. Out there among the abortion absolutists, they’re happy to chit-chat about the acceptable parameters of the "collapsing of the skull", but the informed general-interest reader would rather it all stayed at the woozy, blurry "woman’s right to choose’ level.

We’re collapsing our own skulls here” the parameters in which we allow ourselves to think about abortion, welfare, immigration, terrorism, Islam shrink remorselessly, not least at the congressional level. Maybe if we didn’t collapse the skulls of so many black babies in Philadelphia, we wouldn’t need to import so many excitable young Chechens. But that’s thinking outside the box, and the box is getting ever smaller, like a nice, cozy cocoon in which we’re always warm and safe. Like ” what’s the word?” a womb.

Mark Steyn, a National Review columnist, is the author of After America: Get Ready for Armageddon.

Voir encore:

A Battered Dream, Then a Violent Path

Deborah Sontag, David M. Herszenhorn and Serge F. Kovaleski

The New York Times

April 27, 2013

BOSTON — It was a blow the immigrant boxer could not withstand: after capturing his second consecutive title as the Golden Gloves heavyweight champion of New England in 2010, Tamerlan Anzorovich Tsarnaev, 23, was barred from the national Tournament of Champions because he was not a United States citizen.

The cocksure fighter, a flamboyant dresser partial to white fur and snakeskin, had been looking forward to redeeming the loss he suffered the previous year in the first round, when the judges awarded his opponent the decision, drawing boos from spectators who considered Mr. Tsarnaev dominant.

From one year to the next, though, the tournament rules had changed, disqualifying legal permanent residents — not only Mr. Tsarnaev, who was Soviet-born of Chechen and Dagestani heritage, but several other New England contenders, too. His aspirations frustrated, he dropped out of boxing competition entirely, and his life veered in a completely different direction.

Mr. Tsarnaev portrayed his quitting as a reflection of the sport’s incompatibility with his growing devotion to Islam. But as dozens of interviews with friends, acquaintances and relatives from Cambridge, Mass., to Dagestan showed, that devotion, and the suspected radicalization that accompanied it, was a path he followed most avidly only after his more secular dreams were dashed in 2010 and he was left adrift.

His trajectory eventually led the frustrated athlete and his loyal younger brother, Dzhokhar, to bomb one of the most famous athletic events in this country, killing three and wounding more than 200 at the Boston Marathon, the authorities say. They say it led Mr. Tsarnaev, his application for citizenship stalled, and his brother, a new citizen and a seemingly well-adjusted college student, to attack their American hometown on Patriots’ Day, April 15.

Mr. Tsarnaev now lies in the state medical examiner’s office, his body riddled with bullets after a confrontation with the police four days after the bombings. He left behind an American-born wife who had converted to Islam, a 3-year-old daughter with curly hair, a 19-year-old brother charged with using a weapon of mass destruction, and a puzzle: Why did these two young men seemingly turn on the country that had granted them asylum?

Examining their lives for clues, the authorities have focused on Mr. Tsarnaev’s six-month trip to the Russian republics of Chechnya and Dagestan last year. But in Cambridge, sitting on the front steps of the ramshackle, brown-shingled house where the Tsarnaev family lived for a decade, their 79-year-old landlady urged a longer lens.

“He certainly wasn’t radicalized in Dagestan,” the landlady, Joanna Herlihy, said.

Ms. Herlihy, who speaks Russian and was friends with the Tsarnaevs, said she told law enforcement officials that his trip clearly merited scrutiny. But she said that Mr. Tsarnaev’s embrace of Islam had grown more intense before that.

As his religious identification grew fiercer, Mr. Tsarnaev seemed to abandon his once avid pursuit of the American dream. He dropped out of community college and lost interest not just in boxing but also in music; he used to play piano and violin, classical music and rap, and his e-mail address was a clue to how he once saw himself: The_Professor@real-hiphop.com. He worked only sporadically, sometimes as a pizza deliverer, and he grew first a close-cropped beard and then a flowing one.

He seemed isolated, too. Since his return from Dagestan, he, his wife and his child were the only Tsarnaevs living full time in the three-bedroom apartment on Ms. Herlihy’s third floor.

Mr. Tsarnaev’s two younger sisters had long since married and moved out; his parents, now separated, had returned to Dagestan, his mother soon after a felony arrest on shoplifting charges; and his brother had left for the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, returning home only on the occasional weekend, as he did recently after damaging his 1999 green Honda Civic by texting while driving.

“When Dzhokhar used to come home on Friday night from the dormitory, Tamerlan used to hug him and kiss him — hold him, like, because he was a big, big boy, Tamerlan,” their mother, Zubeidat, 45, said last week, adding that her older son had been “handsome like Hercules.”

Not long after he gave up his boxing career, Mr. Tsarnaev married Katherine Russell of Rhode Island in a brief Islamic ceremony at a Dorchester mosque in June 2010. She has declined to speak publicly since the attacks.

His wife primarily supported the family through her job as a home health aide, scraping together about $1,200 a month to pay the rent. While she worked, Mr. Tsarnaev looked after their daughter, Zahira, who was learning to ride the tricycle still parked beside the house, neighbors said. The family’s income was supplemented by public assistance and food stamps from September 2011 to November 2012, state officials said.

It was probably not the life that Anzor Tsarnaev had imagined for his oldest child, who, even as a boy, before he developed the broad-shouldered physique that his mother described as “a masterpiece,” dreamed of becoming a famous boxer.

But then the father’s life had not gone as planned, either. Once an official in the prosecutor’s office in Kyrgyzstan, he had been reduced to working as an unlicensed mechanic in the back lot of a rug store in Cambridge.

“He was out there in the snow and cold, freezing his hands to do this work on people’s cars,” said Chris Walter, owner of the store, Yayla Tribal Rug. “I did not charge him for the space because he was a poor, struggling guy with a good heart.”

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was born on Oct. 21, 1986, five years before the dissolution of the Soviet Union, in Kalmykia, a barren stretch of Russian territory by the Caspian Sea. A photograph of him as a baby shows a cherubic child wearing a knit cap with a pompom, perched on the lap of his unsmiling mother, who has spiky black bangs and an artful pile of hair. Strikingly, she did not cover her head then, as she does now; she began wearing a hijab only a few years ago, in the United States, prodded by her son just as she was prodding him, too, to deepen his faith.

When he was still little, his parents moved from Kalmykia to Kyrgyzstan, a former Soviet republic, where their other three children were born. They left there during the economic crisis of the late 1990s and spent a few brief months in Chechnya, then fled before the full-scale Russian military invasion in 1999. They sought shelter next in his mother’s native Dagestan.

In an interview there, Patimat Suleimanova, her sister-in-law, said the family had repeatedly been on the run from war and hardship in those days. “In search of peace, they kept moving,” she said.

Finally, Anzor Tsarnaev sought political asylum in the United States. He arrived first, with his younger son, in the spring of 2002. His older son, a young man of 16, followed with the rest of the family in July 2003.

Their neighborhood in Cambridge was run-down, with car repair lots where condominiums have since arisen. But the city has long been especially welcoming to immigrants and refugees; its high school has students from 75 countries.

The schools superintendent, Jeffrey Young, described Cambridge as “beyond tolerant.”

“How is it that someone could grow up in a place like this and end up in a place like that?” he said of the Tsarnaevs.

Unlike his little brother, who was well integrated into the community by the time he started high school, Mr. Tsarnaev was a genuine newcomer when he entered the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School, from which he graduated in 2006. Enrolled in the large English as a Second Language program, he made friends mostly with other international students, and his demeanor was reserved, one former classmate, Luis Vasquez, said.

“The view on him was that he was a boxer and you would not want to mess with him,” Mr. Vasquez, now 25 and a candidate for the Cambridge City Council, said. “He told me that he wanted to represent the U.S. in boxing. He wanted to do the Olympics and then turn pro.”

Jumping right into boxing after his arrival in the United States, he called attention to himself immediately in more ways than one. During registration for a tournament in Lowell, he sat down at a piano and lost himself for 20 minutes in a piece of classical music. The impromptu performance, so out of place in that world, finished to a burst of applause from surprised onlookers.

“He just walked over from the line and started playing like he was in the Boston Pops,” his trainer at the time, Gene McCarthy, 77, recalled.

Having trained in Dagestan, where sport fighting has an impassioned following, Mr. Tsarnaev boxed straight-legged like a European and not crouched, American-style. He also incorporated showy gymnastics into his training and fighting, walking on his hands, falling into splits, tumbling into corners. So as he started working out in Boston-area clubs — and winning novice tournament fights — he made an impression, although not an entirely positive one.

“For a big man, he was very agile,” said Tom Lee, president of the South Boston Boxing Club. “He moved like a gazelle and was strong like a horse. He was a big puncher. But he was an underachiever because he did not dedicate himself to the proper training regimen.”

In 2009, Mr. Tsarnaev won the New England Golden Gloves championship in the 201-pound division, which qualified him for the national tournament in Salt Lake City in May. Introducing what would become his signature style, he showed up overdressed, wearing a white silk scarf, black leather pants and mirrored sunglasses.

Stepping into the ring, as The Lowell Sun described it, Mr. Tsarnaev floored Lamar Fenner of Chicago with an explosive punch that required an eight-count from the referee, and then he seemed to control the rest of the fight.

Bob Russo, then the coach of the New England team, said: “We thought he won. The crowd thought he won. But he didn’t.”

Mr. Fenner’s mother, Marsha, said her son had called her the night of his “bout with the bomber,” thrilled to have defeated an opponent he described as unnervingly strong. Her son, who died of heart problems last year at 29, ended up coming in second in the tournament and turning professional, she said.

If Mr. Tsarnaev was chastened by the defeat, it did not temper his behavior. During a preliminary round of the New England Golden Gloves in 2010, in a breach of boxing etiquette, he entered the locker room to taunt not only the fighter he was about to face but also the fighter’s trainer. Wearing a cowboy hat and alligator-skin cowboy boots, he gave the two men a disdainful once-over and said: “You’re nothing. I’m taking you down.”

The trainer, Hector Torres, was furious and subsequently lodged a complaint, arguing that Mr. Tsarnaev should not be allowed to participate in the competition because he was not a citizen.

As it happened, Golden Gloves of America was just then changing its policy. It used to permit legal immigrants to compete in its national tournament three out of every four years, barring them only during Olympic qualifying years, James Beasley, the executive director, said. But it decided in 2010 that the policy was confusing and moved to end all participation by noncitizens in the Tournament of Champions.

So Mr. Tsarnaev, New England heavyweight champion for the second year in a row, was stymied. The immigrant champions in three other weight classes in New England were blocked from advancing, too, Mr. Russo said.

Mr. Tsarnaev was devastated. He was not getting any younger. And he was more than a year away from being even eligible to apply for American citizenship, and there appeared to be a potential obstacle in his path.

The previous summer, Mr. Tsarnaev had been arrested after a report of domestic violence.

His girlfriend at the time had called 911, “hysterically crying,” to say he had beaten her up, according to the Cambridge police report. Mr. Tsarnaev told the officers that he had slapped her face because she had been yelling at him about “another girl.”

Eventually, charges against him would be dismissed, the records show, so the episode would not have endangered his eventual citizenship application.

But his life was changing. He married. He had a child. And he largely withdrew from Cambridge social life, and from many of the friendships he had enjoyed. “He had liked to party,” said Elmirza Khozhugov, 26, his former brother-in-law, who lost touch with him in 2010. “But there was always the sense that he felt a little guilty that he was having too much fun, maybe.”

In 2011, the Russian security service cautioned the F.B.I., and later the C.I.A., that “since 2010” Mr. Tsarnaev had “changed drastically,” becoming “a follower of radical Islam.” The Russians said he was planning a trip to his homeland to connect with underground militant groups. An F.B.I. investigation turned up no ties to extremists, the bureau has said.

In early 2012, Mr. Tsarnaev left his wife and child for a six-month visit to Russia. His parents, speaking in Dagestan, portrayed it as an innocuous visit to reconnect with family and to replace his nearly expired passport from the Republic of Kyrgyzstan with a Russian one. His father said he had kept his son close by his side as they visited relatives, including in Chechnya, and renovated a storefront into a perfume shop.

But American officials say Mr. Tsarnaev arrived in Russia months before his father returned to Dagestan and so did not have the continuous tight supervision described by his father.

Also, Mr. Tsarnaev, with no apparent sense of urgency about his travel documents, waited months to apply for a Russian passport, and returned to the United States before the passport was ready for him.

After his return, Mr. Tsarnaev applied for American citizenship, a year after he was eligible to do so. But the F.B.I. investigation, though closed, had caused his application to be stalled. Underscoring how detached he had become, he no longer had any valid passport, or international travel document, and Cambridge, to which he had a hard time readapting, was now his de facto home more than ever.

He grew a five-inch beard, which he shaved off before the bombings, and interrupted prayers at his mosque on two occasions with outbursts denouncing the idea that Muslims should observe American secular holidays. He engaged neighbors in affable conversations about skiing one week and heated ones about American imperialism the next.

At a neighborhood pizzeria, wearing a head covering that matched his jacket, he explained to Albrecht Ammon, 18, that “the Koran is great and flawless, and the Bible is ripped off from the Koran, and the U.S. used the Bible as an excuse to invade different countries.”

“I asked him about radical Muslims that blow themselves up and say, ‘It’s for Allah,’ ” Mr. Ammon said. “And he said he wasn’t one of those Muslims.”

Deborah Sontag and Serge F. Kovaleski reported from Boston, and David M. Herszenhorn from Makhachkala, Russia. Reporting was contributed by Michael Schwirtz, John Eligon, Ian Lovett and Dina Kraft from Boston; Andrew Roth from Makhachkala; Richard A. Oppel Jr. and Julia Preston from New York; and Andrew E. Kramer from Moscow. Kitty Bennett and Sheelagh McNeill contributed research.

Voir également:

Coup d’essai d’un palmé

La Balade sauvage

réalisé par Terrence Malick

Julia Allouache

Critikat.com

14 juin 2011

critique du film La Balade sauvage, réalisé par Terrence Malick

Nouvelle réédition pour La Balade sauvage et nouvelle visibilité grâce à la palme remportée à Cannes par le dernier film de Terrence Malick (The Tree of Life). Le premier long-métrage du cinéaste, qui conte la balade meurtrière du couple formé par Holly (Sissy Spacek) et Kit (Martin Sheen) à travers les États-Unis, s’assure d’emblée une certaine carrière en salles.

Depuis son âge d’or dans les années 1970, le road-movie a subi de nombreuses mutations. Revenir sur La Balade sauvage, c’est donc revenir au classicisme d’un genre, ce qui n’est pas sans constituer un certain paradoxe étant donné le souffle nouveau que ce film a représenté en son temps. Mais trente-cinq ans plus tard, on est en droit de se demander si La Balade sauvage a conservé toute sa modernité ou s’il ne pâtit pas du passage du temps. Quel écho de la révolte de la jeunesse américaine des années 1970 contre l’autorité (gouvernementale, parentale, etc.) aujourd’hui ? Si l’escapade insouciante de Holly et Kit comme réponse au carcan social paraît aujourd’hui un peu naïve et présente une idée de la liberté un peu vieillotte, mieux vaut y voir le premier maillon d’une œuvre à venir. Le premier long-métrage de Malick pose déjà la question qui hantera toute sa filmographie : comment créer un lieu de vie idéal au sein d’une terre hostile (déclinée dans The Tree of Life en situation hostile : la mort d’un enfant). Le titre original de l’œuvre vaut ainsi qu’on le rappelle : Badlands, ces mauvaises terres que l’on brûle au son d’un chœur religieux (faut-il passer par l’Enfer pour parvenir au Paradis ?) et qu’on brûlera à nouveau dans la plus belle séquence des Moissons du ciel, lors d’une apocalyptique attaque de sauterelles.

Si le film de Malick constitue le modèle d’une tendance cinématographique qui émergera dans les années 1990 – les road-movies meurtriers –, ce film-source a ceci de spécifique qu’il se construit toujours dans la distance (particularité dont ses petits rejetons – de Sailor et Lula à Tueurs-nés en passant par True Romance, qui reprend presque littéralement la musique de La Balade sauvage – s’émanciperont pour proclamer un style kitch-hémoglobine). Le recul qu’il prend vis-à-vis de la violence passe essentiellement par le personnage incarné par Sissy Spacek (qui se trouve alors à l’orée d’une période de grands rôles : Carrie, Three Women, etc.), dont l’impassibilité désamorce toujours immédiatement l’agitation de Martin Sheen. On se trouve avec La Balade sauvage devant le portrait d’une jeunesse qui, malgré les cadavres qu’elle laisse sur son chemin, se démarque par sa grande innocence. La mort n’intervient jamais comme un drame mais comme une étape, un relais sur la route de Holly et Kit. Pas de drame, pas de coupable. La singularité de la démarche malickienne est de faire de ce fait-divers une ode à l’innocence plutôt qu’un trip sulfureux (comme s’attacheront à le faire David Lynch, Oliver Stone et Tony Scott), de dépasser l’anecdote, la chronique de départ pour dépeindre un état de fait plus global : la jeunesse, la liberté.

En résulte un film mat et flegmatique, auquel on peut toutefois reprocher de faire tendre la sobriété de son style vers une certaine banalité. Cet équilibre incertain entre la fine mise à distance du propos et le peu d’innovation du style rejoint le débat qui s’est construit autour de l’œuvre de Malick, entre génie et imposteur, et ce jusqu’à son dernier né The Tree of Life, qui alterne moments intimes prodigieux et envolées cosmiques grotesques. On touche là ce qui constitue peut-être la signature d’un réalisateur qui, même à travers cette inégalité qui lui est propre, prouve qu’il est un auteur.

Voir de plus:

5 raisons de (re)voir La balade sauvage de Terrence Malick

Thomas Baurez (Studio Ciné Live)

L’Express

08/06/2011

Alors que tout le monde parle de Terrence Malick et de son The Tree of Life, récemment palmé à Cannes, son premier long-métrage ressort judicieusement en salles. 38 ans déjà, et pas une ride!

5 raisons de (re)voir La balade sauvage de Terrence Malick

1 – Une leçon de road-movie

Ce n’est plus un secret pour personne. A partir de la fin des sixties, Hollywood opère sa mue et l’espace d’une grosse décennie va déborder d’indépendance. C’est dans ce contexte qu’explose réellement le road-movie sur grand écran, un genre synonyme d’espace, de liberté et de tragédie. Easy Rider de Dennis Hopper en 1969, Macadam à deux voies de Monte Hellman en 1971, L’épouvantail de Jerry Schatzberg en 1973 et donc cette Balade sauvageen 1974, premier long d’un étudiant de l’American Film Institute passé par Harvard et Oxford, Terrence Malick.

2 – Société, je vous hais !

Alors que le républicain Nixon s’apprête bientôt à faire ses valises à cause du Watergate et que le Vietnam brûle de ses derniers feux au napalm, la société nord-américaine est en crise. La jeunesse a besoin d’air. La balade sauvage, traduit cet état d’esprit. Nous suivons ici la fuite en avant du psychopathe Kit (Martin Sheen) et de la pure Holly (Sissy Spacek), jeunes et pas franchement innocents, pourchassés par une foule vengeresse.

3 -L’éternel combat entre l’Homme et la Nature

Dans les films de Terrence Malick, les hommes finissent toujours par saccager la nature qui les entoure. Les soldats de la Ligne rouge après avoir nagé dans le jardin d’Eden tombent sauvagement sur le champ de bataille, les amoureux des Moissons du ciel envoient en fumée des champs à perte de vue, le beau colon du Nouveau Monde, lui, souille malgré lui la belle indigène en l’arrachant à sa terre natale. Dans La balade sauvage, si la forêt sert de refuge pour le couple en fuite, elle sera finalement le lieu de leur perte.

4- Sheen-Spacek, un duo de rêve

Si le Nouvel Hollywood a vu l’émergence de jeunes cinéastes (Scorsese, de Palma, Spielberg…), de nouveaux visages se sont également imposés devant l’objectif. Faye Dunaway, Mia Farrow, Jack Nicholson, Al Pacino, de Niro… Sissy Spacek et Martin Sheen, le duo de cette Balade sauvage, s’imposent immédiatement. Elle, 25 ans, tout en tâche de rousseur, incarne pureté et innocence. Sissy sera bientôt Carrie pour de Palma et l’une des trois femmes de Robert Altman. Lui, 34 ans déjà, réincarnation de James Dean, porte beau le jean et le t-shirt blanc. Bientôt il connaîtra l’Apocalypse pour Coppola.

5 – Pénultième film avant la disparition

Aussitôt apparu, aussitôt disparu ! A l’instar, des protagonistes de La balade sauvage, Terrence Malick était condamné à disparaitre. Ainsi après Les moissons du ciel, tourné 4 ans plus tard, l’homme ne va plus donner de nouvelles pendant 20 longues années. Tel Martin Sheen levant les bras en l’air devant l’objectif, Malick sait qu’il faut parfois se rendre pour mieux frapper un grand coup. 38 ans séparent aujourd’hui La balade sauvage de The Tree of Life. Il est intéressant de voir le chemin parcouru.

Voir encore:

BADLANDS

Vincent Canby

The New York Times

October 15, 1973

The time is late summer at the end of the 1950′s and the place a small, placid town in South Dakota. The streets are lined with oak and maple trees in full leaf. The lawns are so neat, so close-cropped, they look crew-cut. Kit Carruthers (Martin Sheen) is twenty-five, a garbage collector who fancies his cowboy boots and his faint resemblance to James Dean. Holly Sargis (Sissy Spacek) is fifteen. Until she meets Kit, she hasn’t much interest in anything except her dog and her baton, which she practices twirling in her front yard.

In Terrence Malick’s cool, sometimes brilliant, always ferociously American film, Badlands, which marks Malick’s debut as a director, Kit and Holly take an all-American joyride across the upper Middle West, at the end of which more than half a dozen people have been shot to death by Kit, usually at point-blank range.

Badlands was presented twice at Alice Tully Hall Saturday night, the closing feature of the 11th New York Film Festival that began so auspiciously with François Truffaut’s Day for Night. In between there were a lot of other films, good and bad, but none as provocative as this first feature by Malick, a twenty-nine-year-old former Rhodes Scholar and philosophy student whose only other film credit is as the author of the screenplay for last year’s nicely idiosyncratic Pocket Money.

Badlands was inspired by the short, bloody saga of Charles Starkweather who, at age nineteen, in January, 1958, with the apparent cooperation of his fourteen-year-old girlfriend, Caril Fugate, went off on a murder spree that resulted in ten victims. Starkweather was later executed in the electric chair and Miss Fugate given life imprisonment.

Badlands inevitably invites comparisons with three other important American films, Arthur Penn’s Bonnie and Clyde and Fritz Lang’s Fury and You Only Live Once, but it has a very different vision of violence and death. Malick spends no great amount of time invoking Freud to explain the behavior of Kit and Holly, nor is there any Depression to be held ultimately responsible. Society is, if anything, benign.

This is the haunting truth of Badlands, something that places it very much in the seventies in spite of its carefully re-created period detail. Kit and Holly are directionless creatures, technically literate but uneducated in any real sense, so desensitized that Kit (in Malick’s words at a news conference) can regard the gun with which he shoots people as a kind of magic wand that eliminates small nuisances. Kit and Holly are members of the television generation run amok.

They are not ill-housed, ill-clothed, or ill-fed. If they are at all aware of their anger (and I’m not sure they are, since they see only boredom), it’s because of the difference between the way life is and the way it is presented on the small screen, with commercial breaks instead of lasting consequences.

Badlands is narrated by Holly in the flat, nasal accents of the Middle West and in the syntax of a story in True Romances. "Little did I realize," she tells us at the beginning of the film, "that what began in the alleys and by-ways of this small town would end in the badlands of Montana." At the end, after half a dozen murders, she resolves never again to "tag around with the hell-bent type."

Kit and Holly share with Clyde and Bonnie a fascination with their own press coverage, with their overnight fame ("The whole world was looking for us," says Holly, "for who knew where Kit would strike next?"), but a lack of passion differentiates them from the gaudy desperados of the thirties. Toward the end of their joyride, the bored Holly tells us she passed the time, as she sat in the front seat beside Kit, spelling out complete sentences with her tongue on the roof of her mouth.

Malick tries not to romanticize his killers, and he is successful except for one sequence in which Kit and Holly hide out in a tree house as elaborate as anything the M-G-M art department ever designed for Tarzan and Jane. Sheen and Miss Spacek are splendid as the self-absorbed, cruel, possibly psychotic children of our time, as are the members of the supporting cast, including Warren Oates as Holly’s father.

One may legitimately debate the validity of Malick’s vision, but not, I think, his immense talent. Badlands is a most important and exciting film.

BADLANDS (MOVIE)

Produced, written, and directed by Terrence Malick; cinematographers, Brian Probyn, Tak Fujimoto, and Stevan Larner; edited by Robert Estrin; music by George Tipton; art designer, Jack Fisk; released by Warner Brothers. Running time: 95 minutes.

With: Martin Sheen (Kit), Sissy Spacek (Holly), Warren Oates (Holly’s Father), Ramon Bieri (Cato), and Alan Vint (Deputy).

Voir enfin:

Riots Create Irrational Behavior

Apr. 30, 2013 — Participants of group riots have since the end of the 1960s been viewed as rational individuals driven by a sense of injustice. But in today’s world this is misleading, concludes sociologist and PhD Christian Borch in a newly published doctoral thesis, and he encourages the police to take the destructive behaviour of some participants into account when dealing with groups of rioters.

During the so-called ‘UK Riots’ in the summer of 2011, discontented young people set the streets of London alight and looted shopping centres. The initial strategy of the police which was to communicate with rioters soon failed. Instead they resorted to using batons and containment. Within a Danish context, the violent reactions to the clearance of ‘Ungdomshuset’ in 2007 show that a revolt can develop into serious criminal actions.

According to Christian Borch, these examples illustrate that group rioting are not solely based on righteous indignation and considered planning:

"The notion of the 1960s that social movements happened as a legitimate response to social injustice created the impression of riots as being rational. Crowds however do not have to be rational entities," says Christian Borch.

In a new doctoral thesis "The Politics of Crowds: An Alternative History of Sociology" from University of Copenhagen, Christian Borch analyses the historical development of the concept of crowds in a sociological context.

"The riots in London demonstrate the existence of a lack of rational thought processes as the events had an entirely spontaneous and irrational character. People looted for the sake of looting, for many this was not necessarily born out of a sense of injustice," says Christian Borch who has analysed the strategies of the Metropolitan police in connection with the London riots.

Danish riots attracted violent supporters

The riots surrounding the clerance of "Ungdomshuset" at Jagtvej 69 in Denmark illustrate that demonstrations are capable of creating a self-perpetuating sense of dynamics which accenture the irrational elements. Thus, setting cars alight and breaking windows became part of the rioting.

"During the Danish riots there existed on the one hand a sense of rationality within the young people’s protests, in so far as they were drive by a political motivated interest. However, other people who were normally not affiliated with ‘Ungdomshuset’ became a part of the conflict and participated in the riots without any shared purpose. They were having fun and the adrenalin kicked in," says Christian Borch.

It is inner group dynamics which fuel pointless bahaviour.

"Riots can assume self-perpetuating dynamics which is not driven by rational motives. When individuals form a crowd they can become irrational and driven by emotion which occur as part of the rioting," says Christian Borch.

Inspiration to police tactics

Thinking of crowds as rational entities has since 2000 affected the way in which the British police have handled riots. The UK Riots serve as an example of this. The police worked on the promise that they were dealing with rational individuals with sensible objectives which is why their plan of action was based on communication rather than containment. This however, did not work in practice.

"The interesting aspect of the London riots was to ascertain that it was pointless to address the crowds through a communication strategy. The rational way of regarding the crowds came to nothing whereas the traditional form of containment did. This shows that at certain times a successful solution is not to handle crowds based on dialogue-orientated efforts," says Christian Borch.

In addition to the police, Christian Borch encourages town planners, sociologists and economists to apply a more critical approach when dealing with the concept of crowds.


Tuerie d’Istres: C’est l’imitation et les médias, imbécile ! (When monkey see monkey do meets have gun will travel)

27 avril, 2013
http://www.mondespersistants.com/images/screenshots/World_of_Warcraft-56977.jpgJe suis et demeure un combattant révolutionnaire. Et la Révolution aujourd’hui est, avant tout, islamique. Illich Ramirez Sanchez (dit Carlos)
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Il s’est mis à tirer comme dans un jeu video. Enquêteurs
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la "différence", alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la "concurrence", la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde "différent" du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette "différence" qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. (…) Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme. René Girard
More ink equals more blood,  newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents". Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers ». Bruno S. Frey (University of Zurich) et Dominic Rohner (Cambridge)
Les images violentes accroissent (…) la vulnérabilité des enfants à la violence des groupes dans la mesure où ceux qui les ont vues éprouvent de sensations, des émotions et des états du corps difficiles à maîtriser et donc angoissants, et qu’ils sont donc particulièrement tentés d’adopter les repères que leur propose leur groupe d’appartenance, voire le leader de ce groupe. Serge Tisseron
Ces meurtriers sont fascinés par des jeux vidéo violents. Ces jeux consommés à haute dose provoquent une désensibilisation par rapport à l’acte criminel. Dans certains jeux, pour franchir les différents niveaux, il faut parfois tuer un policier ou une femme enceinte. Celui qui joue est par définition acteur, il n’est pas passif. Certains jeux japonais, accessibles gratuitement en ligne, permettent d’incarner un violeur en série. Le joueur devient un participant actif et exprime ses fantasmes. Là, c’est le véritable danger. (…) Le tueur de masse avance toujours de faux prétextes religieux, politiques, ce qui semble être le cas ici. Cet homme s’est défini comme un fondamentaliste chrétien. Depuis la tragédie de Columbine aux Etats-Unis en 1999, le crime de masse est devenu un crime d’imitation. Les tueurs sont souvent habillés de noir, vêtus d’un treillis ou d’un costume de l’autorité. Ils postent de nombreux messages sur des forums Internet annonçant leurs actes. Le réseau Internet où ils se mettent en scène est l’occasion pour eux de laisser un testament numérique. Stéphane Bourgoin
Le tueur de masse, et c’est important, commet un crime d’imitation. On le voit dans le cas de Breivik puisqu’il pompe des centaines de pages du manifeste de Théodor Kaczynski, Unabomber. Il se contente à certains endroits de remplacer le marxisme par multiculturalisme ou par islamisme. Il copie, c’est frappant. Pourtant, idéologiquement, ils sont à l’opposé puisque Unabomber est un terroriste écologique. Autre imitation, pour sa bombe, il utilise exactement la même recette de fabrication que Timothy McVeigh dans l’attentat de l’immeuble fédéral d’Oklahoma City, en 1995. Il a trouvé la recette sur Internet, sur des sites suprématistes blancs et de survivalistes américains. (…)  J’estime à 10 % d’entre eux ceux qui manifestent des revendications idéologiques. Mais ce ne sont pas uniquement ces revendications idéologiques qui poussent Anders Breivik ou Timothy McVeigh à commettre de tels attentats meurtriers. C’est aussi une véritable haine de la société. Ils s’estiment victimes de la société parce qu’elle ne les a pas reconnus à leur juste valeur. Et ils souffrent de troubles psychologiques voire psychiatriques profond. Là, ce n’est pas le cas pour Breivik qui ne souffre pas de troubles psychiatriques, puisqu’une personne délirante et irresponsable n’est pas capable d’organiser des attentats d’une telle envergure et avec une telle minutie. (…)  Il a choisi deux cibles qui cristallisent, l’une et l’autre, ses haines. Des immeubles du gouvernement norvégien qu’il juge responsable de l’immigration massive en Norvège et sa haine des marxistes avec le rassemblement des jeunes du Parti travailliste, qu’il savait sur une île isolée, où il pourrait commettre un carnage sans être dérangé. (…) C’est un long processus. Il commence à écrire son manifeste en 2002. En 2007, il quitte le Parti du progrès, parti populiste d’extrême droite norvégien, et indique dans plusieurs forums que l’action politique et démocratique mène à une impasse et qu’il est temps de créer un choc et mener une révolution au sein de la société norvégienne. Sans parler ouvertement de son acte. En 2008, voire 2007, il pense déjà à commettre un tel attentat. Il a loué cette ferme voici deux ans, uniquement pour qu’elle lui serve de couverture. Nullement pour subvenir à ses besoins, mais pour lui permettre d’acheter des engrais chimiques sans attirer l’attention. On sait par son journal intime qu’il avait terminé de fabriquer les engins explosifs vers le mois de mai. Il a alors attendu le moment favorable, cette réunion des jeunes du Parti travailliste où devait se rendre, avant finalement d’annuler, le Premier ministre. (…) Le phénomène est amplifié par les nouvelles technologies, notamment Internet. Depuis Columbine, les tueurs laissent tous un testament numérique. On a retrouvé de nombreuses vidéos où ils se mettent en scène, apprennent à tirer. Où ils tiennent un journal de bord. Idem pour le massacre de Virginia Tech, qui a fait une trentaine de victimes en 2007. Idem avec les deux tueurs allemands dans deux écoles (Erfurt en 2002, Winnenden en 2009, ndlr). Idem pour le tueur finlandais de Kauhajoki en 2008, etc. Depuis le massacre de Colombine, c’est pareil pour tous les tueurs de masse : on laisse un testament en vidéo ou un long post sur un blog. C’est assez frappant. C’est un crime d’imitation. D’ailleurs, j’ajoute que les médias sont également un peu responsables de la prolifération de ce type d’acte criminel en raison de la place qu’ils accordent à ces criminels. Si, par exemple, les médias décidaient de ne jamais publier l’identité des auteurs ni leur texte ou leur vidéo, je pense qu’on verrait une réduction de ce type d’actes criminels. Ce que veulent ces individus, c’est passer à la postérité, or si on ne publie pas leur identité, la frustration sera extrême. La mégalomanie et le narcissisme d’un personnage comme Anders Breivik est éloquent ! Il voulait apparaître en uniforme lors d’un procès public, pour montrer au monde entier sa puissance. Ils savent ce qui va se passer après les meurtres et s’en délectent à l’avance, comme se délecte Anders Breivik à l’idée de son procès, qui devrait se tenir d’ici un an et demi. (…) Une agence de presse a quelque peu exagéré et déformé mes propos. Ce que j’ai exactement dit sur le profil-type du tueur de masse, c’est que sur les 113 cas en vingt ans, 108 s’adonnaient quotidiennement voire parfois des heures entières à des jeux vidéo violents. Mais j’ajoutais, bien sûr, que ce n’est pas le fait de jouer à des jeux vidéo violents qui fait qu’on devient un tueur de masse. Comme pour les tueurs en série, on retrouve la plupart du temps des cas de maltraitances physiques ou psychologiques et d’abandon parental, mais ce n’est parce qu’on est un enfant abandonné qui subit des maltraitances qu’on est un serial killer. Il y en aurait malheureusement des milliers. J’ajoutais aussi que pour un adolescent qui souffre de troubles psychiatriques ou psychologiques, le fait de s’adonner de manière frénétique à des jeux vidéo violents pouvait le mener à une désensibilisation à la violence. Stéphane Bourgoin
On est dans le crime d’imitation. Ces tueurs savent qu’ils vont avoir une importante résonance médiatique. (…) On peut imaginer qu’ils s’estimaient persécutés et avaient des comptes à régler avec la société. En tuant des personnes qu’ils ne connaissaient pas, ils plongeaient dans un monde virtuel. Comme dans un jeu vidéo … Stéphane Bourgoin

Attention: un tueur peut en cacher beaucoup d’autres !

Au lendemain d’un nouvel épisode de fusillade meurtrière encore inexpliqué cette fois sur notre propre Côte d’azur …

Comment ne pas deviner, avec l’écrivain spécialisé Stéphane Bourgoin, cette forte dimension mimétique de la chose y compris d’ailleurs chez les pros de naguère à la Carlos?

Mais aussi hélas cette vague de tueurs de masse qui vient ou est en fait déjà (potentiellement) là

Qui, entre ressentiment personnel, recherche de visibilité médiatique, entrainement/conditionnement quotidien et massif à la tuerie en ligne et accessibilité en ligne des matériels et modes d’emplois, n’attendent que l’occasion propice pour passer à l’acte?

D’où la double contrainte inextricable du phénomène: si on n’en parle pas, on risque de passer à côté de quelque chose de peut-être bien plus grave (voir les frères Tsarnaev) et si on en parle, on fait le jeu du tueur en question et de ses futurs imitateurs toujours prêts à raccrocher leur wagon de ressentiment personnel à tout mouvement de haine du moment à forte valeur ajoutée médiatique …

Fusillade d’Istres : le profil psy et guerrier d’un individu nommé Rose

La Provence

26 avril 2013

Le tueur se nommerait Karl Rose, son profil Facebook donne quelques indications sur sa personnalité

Il s’appelle Karl Rose. Il a 19 ans. Il est né à Istres, habite Istres et lors de sa dernière comparution en justice, il se disait "ouvrier". Pour l’heure, il était hier encore sans profession, précise-t-on de source proche de l’enquête.

Il est connu des services de police pour port d’armes prohibées, au moins à deux reprises, ce qui témoigne à tout le moins d’un certain goût pour elles. Jusqu’aux faits qui l’ont traîné hier à la Une des gazettes, il était aussi connu pour escroquerie et falsification de documents. Il est manifestement sujet à des problèmes psychiatriques, a prétendu répondre aux "préceptes" d’al-Qaïda.

Un individu dans son univers

Quand il a été interpellé, il a fait état aussitôt d’une "connaissance" qui s’apprêterait à agir à sa manière, dans une gare, en région parisienne… Cet homme a été arrêté plus tard dans la soirée. Pour le reste, le profil Facebook de Karl Rose est aussi éloquent que crypté.

Il y dit travailler à "braqueur de fourgon". Il aime aussi les arts martiaux, la musculation et l’informatique. Toujours selon son profil Facebook, il étudie à "Paris Tramway Ligne 3". Comprenne qui pourra. "La TV dirige la nation", peut-on entendre, en anglais, sur la seule chanson présente sur son profil en ligne.

Un individu manifestement dans son univers, qui, au chapitre des livres, affiche : "Le judaïsme est une escroquerie de 4 000 ans", semble faire de l’affaire Mérah un "complot" et s’autodécerne la "médaille d’honneur" du "combattant de guerre" sur un jeu vidéo qui permet, au moins virtuellement, de tuer plus facilement son prochain que de l’aimer.

Les 3 questions à Stéphane Bourgoin auteur du livre "99 ans de serial killer" (Edition Ring)

1. La Provence a jusqu’ici été épargnée par les tueurs de masse. L’hyper médiatisation de l’affaire Merah et des attentats de Boston a-t-elle pu favoriser le passage à l’acte ?

Stéphane Bourgoin : Oui, on est dans le crime d’imitation. Ces tueurs savent qu’ils vont avoir une importante résonance médiatique.

2. Ont-ils un profil psychologique similaire ?

S.B : Ils sont souvent très jeunes et fascinés par les armes à feu. Si eux agissent sur la voie publique, les plus vieux passent généralement à l’acte sur leur lieu de travail. Dans la plupart des cas, ce sont des paranoïaques qui ont pu avoir des antécédents psychiatriques ou souffrent de troubles psychologiques.

3. Généralement, ces tueurs se suicident ou se font abattre. À Istres, il s’est rendu sans problème…

S.B : 70 % de ces tueurs ne survivent pas, c’est vrai. Mais ce n’était pas le cas du tueur d’Aurora ou de Anders Breivik en Norvège. On peut imaginer qu’ils s’estimaient persécutés et avaient des comptes à régler avec la société. En tuant des personnes qu’ils ne connaissaient pas, ils plongeaient dans un monde virtuel. Comme dans un jeu vidéo.

Denis Trossero et Frédéric Cheutin, propos recueillis par Laetitia Sariroglou

Voir aussi:

Norvège : «Ces tueurs veulent laisser une trace dans l’histoire»

Stéphane Bourgoin

Le Parisien

24.07.2011

STÉPHANE BOURGOIN spécialiste des tueurs de masse*. Ecrivain, Stéphane Bourgoin, 58 ans, est surtout un spécialiste reconnu des tueurs de masse et tueurs en série.

Peut-on considérer le suspect arrêté comme un tueur de masse?

STÉPHANE BOURGOIN. Il appartient à l’évidence à la catégorie des tueurs de masse. Il s’agit souvent d’hommes solitaires souffrant de troubles suicidaires.

Ce sont des désespérés extravertis et très narcissiques. Ils ont un désir de toute-puissance et sont souvent fascinés par les armes à feu et aussi l’autorité. Ils aiment incarner des militaires ou des policiers.

Quels sont leurs autres traits communs?

Ils ont peu de relations sociales, voire pas du tout. Leur univers amoureux est réduit à néant. Mais, surtout, ils veulent tous laisser une trace dans l’histoire pour qu’on se souvienne d’eux. Ils tuent pour qu’on ne les oublie pas. A la différence des tueurs en série, qui, eux, sont des psychopathes responsables de leurs actes qui font tout pour échapper à la police, les tueurs de masse cherchent à revendiquer leurs actes. Ils vont à la rencontre des enquêteurs, ils font face et cherchent même à se faire tuer par les policiers.

Les jeux vidéo ont-t-ils une influence dans leur passage à l’acte?

Là aussi, c’est un trait dominant chez ces meurtriers. Ils sont fascinés par des jeux vidéo violents comme World of Warcraft. Ces jeux consommés à haute dose provoquent une désensibilisation par rapport à l’acte criminel. Dans d’autres jeux, pour franchir les différents niveaux, il faut parfois tuer un policier ou une femme enceinte. Celui qui joue est par définition acteur, il n’est pas passif. Certains jeux japonais, accessibles gratuitement en ligne, permettent d’incarner un violeur en série. Le joueur devient un participant actif et exprime ses fantasmes. Là, c’est le véritable danger.

Comment analyser ce qui vient de se passer en Norvège?

Le tueur de masse avance toujours de faux prétextes religieux, politiques, ce qui semble être le cas ici. Cet homme s’est défini comme un fondamentaliste chrétien. Depuis la tragédie de Columbine aux Etats-Unis en 1999, le crime de masse est devenu un crime d’imitation. Les tueurs sont souvent habillés de noir, vêtus d’un treillis ou d’un costume de l’autorité. Ils postent de nombreux messages sur des forums Internet annonçant leurs actes. Le réseau Internet où ils se mettent en scène est l’occasion pour eux de laisser un testament numérique.

Il vient de publier « Enquête mondiale sur les tueurs en série » aux Editions Grasset.

Voir encore:

Profil de tueur

Dorothée Duchemin

Citazine

28 juill. 2011

Anders Breivik, principal suspect de la tuerie survenue en Norvège le 22 juillet dernier, possède-t-il le profil typique d’un tueur de masse ? Qui sont ces criminels ? Stéphane Bourgoin, spécialiste des tueurs en série et tueurs de masse, répond à Citazine.

Peut-on parler d’un profil-type du tueur de masse ?

Le profil d’un tueur de masse, auquel répond tout à fait Anders Breivik, est quelqu’un qui tue un grand nombre de personnes en un laps de temps très court. Peu lui importe l’âge, le sexe ou l’ethnie des victimes, contrairement au tueur en série qui tue sur des années et ne cherche pas à se faire prendre. Alors que le tueur de masse, dans 75 % des cas, va chercher soit à se suicider, soit à être abattu par les forces de l’ordre après avoir commis son acte.

Cette personne est généralement isolée de la société, marginalisée. Elle a peu d’amis, pas de relation sentimentale, est passionnée d’armes à feu et est fascinée par la chasse ainsi que par toutes formes d’autorité. Elle s’adonne à des jeux vidéo violents, est marquée par une lourde tendance suicidaire mais ne se suicidera pas seule dans son coin. Elle veut marquer l’histoire et laisser une marque indélébile en se suicidant et en emportant le plus de victimes avec elle.

Alors, puisqu’il ne s’est pas suicidé, Andres Breivik fait-il figure d’exception ?

Un gros pourcentage d’entre eux, entre 25 et 30 %, ne se suicident pas au moment où ils commettent leurs actes. Andres Breivik l’annonce, dans la partie du journal intime, à la fin de son manifeste. Il n’avait pas l’intention de se suicider et veut témoigner à son procès.

Un code, depuis Columbine

Anders Breivik est âgé de 32 ans. N’est-il pas bien plus vieux que la majorité des tueurs de masse ?

Il y a eu des tueurs de masse bien plus âgés qu’Anders Breivik. Cela n’a rien à voir avec l’âge. Les tueries de masse ont existé avant Columbine (Tuerie du lycée de Columbine, en 1999, perpétrée par Eric Harris et Dylan Klebold, ndlr). Mais depuis, un code et une imitation s’installent. Un code vestimentaire : les tueurs sont revêtus de noir, de treillis militaire ou uniforme de police. Avec ces vêtements, ils expriment le désir de toute puissance et la fascination des armes à feu. Ils s’imaginent être des héros dans une réalité virtuelle. Alors qu’ils savent que dans la réalité, ils sont des types qui n’ont jamais rien concrétisé dans leur existence. Le tueur de masse, et c’est important, commet un crime d’imitation. On le voit dans le cas de Breivik puisqu’il pompe des centaines de pages du manifeste de Théodor Kaczynski, Unabomber. Il se contente à certains endroits de remplacer le marxisme par multiculturalisme ou par islamisme. Il copie, c’est frappant. Pourtant, idéologiquement, ils sont à l’opposé puisque Unabomber est un terroriste écologique. Autre imitation, pour sa bombe, il utilise exactement la même recette de fabrication que Timothy McVeigh dans l’attentat de l’immeuble fédéral d’Oklahoma City, en 1995. Il a trouvé la recette sur Internet, sur des sites suprématistes blancs et de survivalistes américains.

Il se nourrit ça et là des tueries de masse de ses prédécesseurs.

Oui, tout à fait.

La majorité des ces tueurs agit-elle par revendications idéologiques ?

Non. Un certain nombre d’entre eux en ont, mais ils sont assez rares. J’estime à 10 % d’entre eux ceux qui manifestent des revendications idéologiques. Mais ce ne sont pas uniquement ces revendications idéologiques qui poussent Anders Breivik ou Timothy McVeigh à commettre de tels attentats meurtriers. C’est aussi une véritable haine de la société. Ils s’estiment victimes de la société parce qu’elle ne les a pas reconnus à leur juste valeur. Et ils souffrent de troubles psychologiques voire psychiatriques profond. Là, ce n’est pas le cas pour Breivik qui ne souffre pas de troubles psychiatriques, puisqu’une personne délirante et irresponsable n’est pas capable d’organiser des attentats d’une telle envergure et avec une telle minutie.

Deux lieux, deux armes

N’est-ce pas étonnant d’agir avec une bombe puis une arme à feu ?

Oui, c’est assez rare. En règle général, le crime se déroule en un lieu unique pour les tueurs de masse. Là, c’est un cas assez inhabituel. Il a choisi deux cibles qui cristallisent, l’une et l’autre, ses haines. Des immeubles du gouvernement norvégien qu’il juge responsable de l’immigration massive en Norvège et sa haine des marxistes avec le rassemblement des jeunes du Parti travailliste, qu’il savait sur une île isolée, où il pourrait commettre un carnage sans être dérangé.

Peut-il ressentir de la pitié, de la compassion et des remords ?

Absolument pas. Au moment où il commet son acte, on voit qu’il rit sur certaines images en abattant ses victimes. Il est à ce moment dans une transe et agit comme un robot. Lors de ses interrogatoires, il insiste sur le fait qu’il a effectivement commis « des actes cruels mais nécessaires » et plaide non coupable car il ne se sent pas responsable de ce qu’il a commis. Il n’éprouvera jamais de remords.

Est-il arrivé à commettre de tels actes après un long processus qui s’est mis en place petit à petit ou s’agit-il d’un déclic soudain ?

C’est un long processus. Il commence à écrire son manifeste en 2002. En 2007, il quitte le Parti du progrès, parti populiste d’extrême droite norvégien, et indique dans plusieurs forums que l’action politique et démocratique mène à une impasse et qu’il est temps de créer un choc et mener une révolution au sein de la société norvégienne. Sans parler ouvertement de son acte. En 2008, voire 2007, il pense déjà à commettre un tel attentat.

Il a loué cette ferme voici deux ans, uniquement pour qu’elle lui serve de couverture. Nullement pour subvenir à ses besoins, mais pour lui permettre d’acheter des engrais chimiques sans attirer l’attention. On sait par son journal intime qu’il avait terminé de fabriquer les engins explosifs vers le mois de mai. Il a alors attendu le moment favorable, cette réunion des jeunes du Parti travailliste où devait se rendre, avant finalement d’annuler, le Premier ministre.

Un phénomène contemporain ?

Pensez-vous que les meurtres de masse sont des phénomènes de notre époque ?

Tout à fait. Le phénomène est amplifié par les nouvelles technologies, notamment Internet. Depuis Columbine, les tueurs laissent tous un testament numérique. On a retrouvé de nombreuses vidéos où ils se mettent en scène, apprennent à tirer. Où ils tiennent un journal de bord. Idem pour le massacre de Virginia Tech, qui a fait une trentaine de victimes en 2007. Idem avec les deux tueurs allemands dans deux écoles (Erfurt en 2002, Winnenden en 2009, ndlr). Idem pour le tueur finlandais de Kauhajoki en 2008, etc.

Depuis le massacre de Colombine, c’est pareil pour tous les tueurs de masse : on laisse un testament en vidéo ou un long post sur un blog. C’est assez frappant. C’est un crime d’imitation. D’ailleurs, j’ajoute que les médias sont également un peu responsables de la prolifération de ce type d’acte criminel en raison de la place qu’ils accordent à ces criminels. Si, par exemple, les médias décidaient de ne jamais publier l’identité des auteurs ni leur texte ou leur vidéo, je pense qu’on verrait une réduction de ce type d’actes criminels. Ce que veulent ces individus, c’est passer à la postérité, or si on ne publie pas leur identité, la frustration sera extrême. La mégalomanie et le narcissisme d’un personnage comme Anders Breivik est éloquent ! Il voulait apparaître en uniforme lors d’un procès public, pour montrer au monde entier sa puissance.

Ils savent ce qui va se passer après les meurtres et s’en délectent à l’avance, comme se délecte Anders Breivik à l’idée de son procès, qui devrait se tenir d’ici un an et demi.

Ne peut-on pas y avoir une délectation d’ordre sexuel ?

Si, sans doute. J’ai interrogé quelques tueurs de masse survivants qui m’ont dit que quand ils abattaient leurs victimes, ils agissaient comme des sortes de robots et qu’ils en ressentaient une poussée d’adrénaline mais aussi une jouissance immense. Donc, on peut penser que ces meurtres peuvent avoir une connotation sexuelle. De toute façon, c’est un désir de toute puissance. Celle-ci peut s’obtenir par le sexe ou d’autres moyens.

De la même façon, les tueurs en série ne sont pas intéressés par le sexe en lui-même mais par l’envie d’humilier, de dominer leurs victimes.

Et pourquoi seuls des hommes sont-ils concernés ?

Sur 113 cas en vingt ans, il n’y a que deux femmes. Parce que les femmes ne sont pas fascinées par les armes à feu, ne vont pas ou peu s’adonner à des jeux vidéo violents, ne vont pas s’amuser à se déguiser en policier ou en soldat. Et il y a aussi fort peu de femmes tueuses en série.

Je me permets de revenir sur les jeux vidéo. La polémique rejaillit, comme à chaque fois en pareil cas, autour de la responsabilité des jeux vidéo. J’ai cru comprendre que vous les jugiez responsables ?

Une agence de presse a quelque peu exagéré et déformé mes propos. Ce que j’ai exactement dit sur le profil-type du tueur de masse, c’est que sur les 113 cas en vingt ans, 108 s’adonnaient quotidiennement voire parfois des heures entières à des jeux vidéo violents. Mais j’ajoutais, bien sûr, que ce n’est pas le fait de jouer à des jeux vidéo violents qui fait qu’on devient un tueur de masse.

Comme pour les tueurs en série, on retrouve la plupart du temps des cas de maltraitances physiques ou psychologiques et d’abandon parental, mais ce n’est parce qu’on est un enfant abandonné qui subit des maltraitances qu’on est un serial killer. Il y en aurait malheureusement des milliers. J’ajoutais aussi que pour un adolescent qui souffre de troubles psychiatriques ou psychologiques, le fait de s’adonner de manière frénétique à des jeux vidéo violents pouvait le mener à une désensibilisation à la violence. C’est exactement ce que j’ai dit.

> Stéphane Bourgoin est analyste au Centre international de sciences criminelles et pénales. Auteur de nombreux ouvrages sur les tueurs, il vient de publier aux éditions Grasset Serial Killers, enquête mondiale sur les tueurs en série. Il est également libraire et tient la librairie Au 3ème oeil.


Attentats de Boston: C’est l’islam, imbécile ! (Have Koran, will kill: Muslims of the world, unite!)

24 avril, 2013
http://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/3df0c-death252520to252520america.jpg?w=450&h=237http://www.weeklystandard.com/sites/all/files/images/bh-2013-04-24-E-A001.preview.jpgL’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. (…) Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme. René Girard
While it is critical that we don’t jump to conclusions by associating religious affiliation with militancy, there is no doubt that embracing an ideology of Islam that promotes extremism and violence has been a motivator for terrorism, from assassinated al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden to Army Major Nidal Hasan. Did such an ideology influence the Tsarnaev brothers? Who or what compelled them to violence? What role does Muslim culture play in this type of radicalization? Rather than worrying about being politically correct, we have to be comfortable asking these difficult questions. And the collectivist-minded Muslim community needs to learn an important lesson from Tsarni: It’s time to acknowledge the dishonor of terrorism within our communities, not to deny it because of shame. As we negotiate critical issues of ethnicity, religious ideology and identity as potential motivators for conflict, we have to establish basic facts. (…) The bombing suspects, "put a shame on the entire Chechnyan ethnicity,” he said. (…) To me, the answer lies inside a culture shift where we honestly acknowledge the radicalization problems within our communities … Asra Q. Nomani
Nous ne savons pas si Hitler est sur le point de fonder un nouvel islam. Il est d’ores et déjà sur la voie; il ressemble à Mahomet. L’émotion en Allemagne est islamique, guerrière et islamique. Ils sont tous ivres d’un dieu farouche. Jung (1939)
Notre lutte est une lutte à mort. Ernesto Guevara (décembre 1964)
Il faut mener la guerre jusqu’où l’ennemi la mène: chez lui, dans ses lieux d’amusement; il faut la faire totalement. Ernesto Guevara (avril 1967)
Kidnapper des personnages célèbres pour leurs activités artistiques, sportives ou autres et qui n’ont pas exprimé d’opinions politiques peut vraisemblablement constituer une forme de propagande favorable aux révolutionnaires. ( …) Les médias modernes, par le simple fait qu’ils publient ce que font les révolutionnaires, sont d’importants instruments de propagande. La guerre des nerfs, ou guerre psychologique, est une technique de combat reposant sur l’emploi direct ou indirect des médias de masse. (…) Les attaques de banques, les embuscades, les désertions et les détournements d’armes, l’aide à l’évasion de prisonniers, les exécutions, les enlèvements, les sabotages, les actes terroristes et la guerre des nerfs sont des exemples. Les détournements d’avions en vol, les attaques et les prises de navires et de trains par les guérilleros peuvent également ne viser qu’à des effets de propagande. Carlos Marighela (Minimanuel de guerilla urbaine, 1969)
Je suis et demeure un combattant révolutionnaire. Et la Révolution aujourd’hui est, avant tout, islamique. Illich Ramirez Sanchez (dit Carlos, 2004)
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Comme au bon vieux temps de la Terreur, quand les gens venaient assister aux exécutions à la guillotine sur la place publique. Maintenant, c’est par médias interposés que la mort fait vibrer les émotions (…) Les médias filment la mort comme les réalisateurs de X filment les ébats sexuels. Bernard Dugué
Il est malheureux que le Moyen-Orient ait rencontré pour la première fois la modernité occidentale à travers les échos de la Révolution française. Progressistes, égalitaristes et opposés à l’Eglise, Robespierre et les jacobins étaient des héros à même d’inspirer les radicaux arabes. Les modèles ultérieurs — Italie mussolinienne, Allemagne nazie, Union soviétique — furent encore plus désastreux. Ce qui rend l’entreprise terroriste des islamistes aussi dangereuse, ce n’est pas tant la haine religieuse qu’ils puisent dans des textes anciens — souvent au prix de distorsions grossières —, mais la synthèse qu’ils font entre fanatisme religieux et idéologie moderne. Ian Buruma et Avishai Margalit
Hors de la Première guerre mondiale est venue une série de révoltes contre la civilisation libérale. Ces révoltes accusaient la civilisation libérale d’être non seulement hypocrite ou en faillite, mais d’être en fait la grande source du mal ou de la souffrance dans le monde. (…) [Avec] une fascination pathologique pour la mort de masse [qui] était elle-même le fait principal de la Première guerre mondiale, dans laquelle 9 ou 10 millions de personnes ont été tués sur une base industrielle. Et chacun des nouveaux mouvements s’est mis à reproduire cet événement au nom de leur opposition utopique aux complexités et aux incertitudes de la civilisation libérale. Les noms de ces mouvements ont changé comme les traits qu’ils ont manifestés – l’un s’est appelé bolchévisme, et un autre s’est appelé fascisme, un autre s’est appelé nazisme. (…) De même que les progressistes européens et américains doutaient des menaces de Hitler et de Staline, les Occidentaux éclairés sont aujourd’hui en danger de manquer l’urgence des idéologies violentes issues du monde musulman. Paul Berman
Comme jadis avec le communisme, l’Occident se retrouve sous surveillance idéologique. L’islam se présente, à l’image du défunt communisme, comme une alternative au monde occidental. À l’instar du communisme d’autrefois, l’islam, pour conquérir les esprits, joue sur une corde sensible. Il se targue d’une légitimité qui trouble la conscience occidentale, attentive à autrui : être la voix des pauvres de la planète. Hier, la voix des pauvres prétendait venir de Moscou, aujourd’hui elle viendrait de La Mecque ! (…) Aujourd’hui à nouveau, des intellectuels incarnent cet oeil du Coran, comme ils incarnaient l’oeil de Moscou hier. Ils excommunient pour islamophobie, comme hier pour anticommunisme. À l’identique de feu le communisme, l’islam tient la générosité, l’ouverture d’esprit, la tolérance, la douceur, la liberté de la femme et des moeurs, les valeurs démocratiques, pour des marques de décadence. Ce sont des faiblesses qu’il veut exploiter au moyen «d’idiots utiles», les bonnes consciences imbues de bons sentiments, afin d’imposer l’ordre coranique au monde occidental lui-même. Robert Redeker
Des millions de Faisal Shahzad sont déstabilisés par un monde moderne qu’ils ne peuvent ni maîtriser ni rejeter. (…) Le jeune homme qui avait fait tous ses efforts pour acquérir la meilleure éducation que pouvait lui offrir l’Amérique avant de succomber à l’appel du jihad a fait place au plus atteint des schizophrènes. Les villes surpeuplées de l’Islam – de Karachi et Casablanca au Caire – et ces villes d’Europe et d’Amérique du Nord où la diaspora islamique est maintenant présente en force ont des multitudes incalculables d’hommes comme Faisal Shahzad. C’est une longue guerre crépusculaire, la lutte contre l’Islamisme radical. Nul vœu pieu, nulle stratégie de « gain des coeurs et des esprits », nulle grande campagne d’information n’en viendront facilement à bout. L’Amérique ne peut apaiser cette fureur accumulée. Ces hommes de nulle part – Shahzad Faisal, Malik Nidal Hasan, l’émir renégat né en Amérique Anwar Awlaki qui se terre actuellement au Yémen et ceux qui leur ressemblent – sont une race de combattants particulièrement dangereux dans ce nouveau genre de guerre. La modernité les attire et les ébranle à la fois. L’Amérique est tout en même temps l’objet de leurs rêves et le bouc émissaire sur lequel ils projettent leurs malignités les plus profondes. Fouad Ajami
Le problème de fond, c’est qu’aujourd’hui, en sus de cette crise d’identité des minorités hybrides, il existe une crise d’identité plus générale de l’Europe et des États-Unis. Une forme d’anxiété profonde face à l’afflux d’immigrants. En Amérique, un pays qui s’est bâti sur l’immigration, le sentiment général à l’égard des immigrés est en train de changer, se rapprochant de ce qu’il est en Europe. Depuis le 11 Septembre, les musulmans américains deviennent une minorité qui fait peur. Cette peur est le résultat de notre ère globalisée. Dans les pays musulmans, la peur de l’hybride croît également. De la même manière que l’Europe et l’Amérique se sentent physiquement menacées par une invasion musulmane, les populations conservatrices du Pakistan se sentent, elles, menacées par l’invasion du mode de pensée et de vie américain et européen. C’est la raison pour laquelle, l’an dernier, 3 000 personnes ont été tuées par les terroristes en terre pakistanaise. N’oublions jamais que la vraie bataille entre l’islam radical et le reste du monde se déroule là-bas. Mohsin Hamid
Humanity makes the gravest of errors and risks losing its account of morals, if it makes America its example. Sayyid Qutb
This is the very spirit in which the crowds visit the art museums, passing rapidly through the halls and the exhibits in a way that does not suggest any enjoyment or love of these works [of art]. In just the same way they go (individually and in groups) to get a rapid view of natural spectacles. Passing by places and spectacles at the cars’ top speed, they collect conversational material and also comply with the natural American inclination toward collection and enumeration. At the beginning of my stay in America, I would hear that one of them had visited X cities and countries and sights and spectacles and had gone X miles in his tourist journeys and knew X friends, so that I was astonished at this capacity for producing such things and wished that I were capable of any of it! Then I discovered afterward how all these marvels took place… One of them drives his car on a journey, alone or with his family or friends. He races it at top speed, taking it through cities and over distances, passing by sights and spectacles, while recording in his notebook the names and the mileage… Then he returns, and see! he has seen all of it, and he has the right to converse about it! As for friends, it is enough that one be invited to get-acquainted parties. There he encounters their faces for the first time, and the host acquaints him with the attendees one by one (men as well as women), and he asks whoever of them wish to do so to write down their names and addresses, and so they in turn do with him. After some time, his notebook is full of names and addresses. And see! he has a great number of friends (men and women), and perhaps he is even victorious in the competition undertaken in pursuit of this goal. How great, how strange are the competitions here! Thus your knowledge and your culture are often measured by how much you have read and watched and heard. It is the same as the way that your material riches are calculated by the quantity and amount of the cash and real property that you own: without any distinctions!
The only art in which the Americans are proficient—although there are other [peoples] who still surpass them in it as far as artistry goes—is the art of the cinema. This is natural and logical given the phenomenon that makes the American unique: the height of industrial proficiency combined with primitiveness of artistic feelings. In the cinema this phenomenon is very much manifest. By its nature, the cinematic art does not rise to the loftiest regions of the arts—music, drawing, sculpture, and poetry—nor for that matter to the [level of the] art of the theater, although in the cinema the possibilities for artistic craft and the possibilities of production are much greater. And in terms of originality, the art of production in the cinema has gotten only as far as the farthest point reached by the art of photography. Moreover, some distance remains between it and (for example) the art of the theater, just as some distance remains too between depiction by photography and depiction by a [painter’s] brush. In the latter is expressed genius of feelings; in the former, expertise of craft. The cinema is the popular art of the multitudes, so it is the art in which one finds expertise, proficiency, magnification, and approximation. By its nature it relies more on expertise than on the artistic spirit… in it the American genius can exercise creativity… yet despite this, English, French, Russian, and German film all remain superior to American film, although they are inferior to it in craft and expertise. In the great majority of American films, one sees manifestly primitive subjects and primitive excitement; this is true of police/crime films and cowboy films. As for high, skillful films, such as “Gone with the Wind,” “Wuthering Heights,” “The Song of Bernadette,” and such, they are few in comparison with what America produces. Such American film as does reach Egypt or the Arab countries does not resemble this family, since the majority of it comes from among the superior, rare American films. And those people who visit the regions of the land in America are those who reach that tiny family of valuable films. Sayyid Qutb
The core problem with the United States, for Qutb, was not something Americans did, but simply what America was—“the New World…is spellbinding.” It was more than a land of pleasures without limit. In America, unlike in Egypt, dreams could come true. Qutb understood the danger this posed: America’s dazzle had the power to blind people to the real zenith of civilization, which for Qutb began with Muhammad in the seventh century and reached its apex in the Middle Ages, carried triumphantly by Muslim armies. David Von Drehle
Qutb (…)  judges Americans on a range of social and moral characteristics—including their sexual mores, their political history, and their attitudes towards religion, sports, art, and death—and generally finds them wanting. Most striking about the article is Qutb’s adherence to a standard of “human values” rather than specifically “Islamic values.” Qutb never elaborates this standard explicitly, but in general his theme seems to be that human beings should strive to attain high-minded, civilized, and spiritual values rather than bestial, primitive, and sensual ones. American society, in Qutb’s view, tends toward the latter. Daniel Burns
Ils ont tué des gens parce que l’Islam leur donne l’autorisation théologique d’utiliser la violence contre les infidèles dont l’existence menace l’hégémonie islamique légitimée par Allah. (…) Le manque d’éducation et d’opportunité économique existe dans le monde entier, mais les chrétiens africains et les animistes ou les hindous indiens, et les Bouddhistes ne commettent pas d’actes terroristes n’importe où et à la même fréquence que les musulmans. Beaucoup de personnes dans le monde vivent sous des dictateurs oppressifs qui violent régulièrement les droits de l’homme, et ils ne se tournent pas pour autant vers le terrorisme contre les étrangers, en réponse. Les Tibétains n’enfilent pas des gilets pour kamikazes et ne bombardent pas des marathoniens. Il y a des millions et des millions de pauvres partout dans le monde, ils ne tuent pas aveuglément des gens innocents dans les pays éloignés de leur domicile. Bruce Thornton

Alors qu’au lendemain de l’attentat aveugle et purement anti-civils de Boston suivi ou précédé, de la France à l’Espagne et au Canada, par plusieurs autres tentatives déjouées (dont une, signe encourageant, avec l’aide d’un imam) …

Comment ne pas voir, avec le chroniqueur américain Bruce Thornton, l’incroyable aveuglement de nos belles âmes devant l’évidence …

De ce nouveau ciment de toutes les violences (plus de 20.000 depuis le 11 Septembre) qu’est devenu, remplaçant le marxisme d’hier, l’islam ?

Et, depuis le voyage en Amérique d’un de leurs premièrs théoriciens, l’Egyptien  Sayyid Qutb dans les années 50, de cette haine pure et simple, tout en profitant de ses largesses, de la civilisation occidentale incarnée par l’Amérique ?

llusions sur la raison pour laquelle des frères musulmans tuent

Bruce Thornton

Middle East and Terrorism

Adapté en français par Hanna Lévy

israel-chronique-en-ligne.over-blog.com

21 Avril 2013

Malgré les vœux fervents des médias progressistes et du fantaisiste David Sirota, qui espérait que le coupable soit un « homme blanc », il s’avère que les terroristes qui ont bombardé le Marathon de Boston, n’étaient pas blancs, ni le Tea Party, ni des frondeurs amers haïssant les impôts, mais des Musulmans tchéchènes. Quelle surprise ! Comme disent les Français. Nous allons maintenant, commencer à entendre toutes les interprétations de justification pour leur acte, dont peu exposeront l’évidence : Ils ont tué des gens parce que l’Islam leur donne l’autorisation théologique d’utiliser la violence contre les infidèles dont l’existence menace l’hégémonie islamique légitimée par Allah.

Bien sûr, pour les matérialistes laïques et les experts de gauche, dont les esprits sont pourvus d’idées, de clichés banals, tels que le fait de dire, que c’est un discours de haine islamophobe. Que seul le christianisme et le judaïsme mènent à la violence, aux croisades et au sionisme. Que l’Islam est « la religion de paix et de tolérance », qui a créé la Renaissance et a traité les Juifs et les Chrétiens avec bonté. Que si les Musulmans agissent avec violence – plus de 20.000 attaques violentes depuis le 11 Septembre – c’est parce qu’ils doivent avoir été provoqué par le mauvais comportement de l’Occident : le colonialisme, l’impérialisme, l’avidité pour le pétrole, le soutien à Israël, le non-respect de l’Islam et de Mohammed, la guerre contre le terrorisme qui a diabolisé les Musulmans. Ou, parce que les terroristes sont créés par les inégalités et les coûts du capitalisme mondial, qui ne donnent que peu de possibilités éducatives ou économiques aux jeunes gens musulmans, créant chez eux frustration et désespoir, ce qui les poussent à se tourner vers un schisme déformé de l’Islam en soulagement. Ou, parce qu’ils sont les produits de régimes politiques oppressifs qui limitent leur liberté, violent leurs droits de l’homme et étouffent leurs aspirations.

Nous avons entendu toutes ces explications venant de gauche comme de droite depuis plus d’une décennie. Ce que nous n’avons pas vu, c’est la preuve que cela soit réellement le cas. L’histoire ne fournit aucune preuve que les prétendus péchés de la politique étrangère américaine prédominent sur les avantages tangibles démontrables de nos actions aux Musulmans. L’Amérique n’a jamais eu de colonie dans les terres musulmanes, et en effet,  après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, a résisté aux tentatives françaises et britanniques de réaffirmer leur autorité sur leurs anciennes colonies, plus manifestement dans la crise de Suez de 1956. Depuis lors, les États-Unis ont armé les Afghans et les ont aidé à chasser les Soviétiques, ils ont sauvé le Koweït et l’Arabie Saoudite des griffes du sadique psychopathe Saddam Hussein, ils ont bombardé les Serbes chrétiens pour sauver les Kosovars et les Bosniaques musulmans, ils ont libéré les Chiites irakiens des mains de Saddam Hussein, ils ont libéré les Afghans de la brutalité des Talibans, ils ont versé des milliards de dollars d’aide à des régimes terroristes palestiniens, ils ont utilisé leurs avions pour aidé les Musulmans en Libye afin de les libérer du psychotique Kadhafi, et ils ont soutenu la parole et les inventions des djihadistes, des Frères musulmans d’Égypte, antisémites et haïssant l’Amérique, afin que les Musulmans puissent jouir de la « liberté et la démocratie ».

Et ce n’est pas tout ! Nous avons sans cesse manifesté notre respect pour la merveilleuse foi islamique, nous avons censuré nos communications officielles et nos programmes de formation pour supprimer toute référence au djihadisme ou à la théologie islamique qui justifie la guerre sainte, nous avons parlé avec pudeur des attaques djihadistes comme pour les meurtres de Fort Hood « violence en milieu du travail », nous avons invité de modestes Imams à prier à la Maison Blanche, nous avons rempli nos écoles avec des programmes faisant l’éloge de l’Islam et de ses contributions à la civilisation, nous avons sermonné et poursuivi des auteurs ou dessinateurs qui exerçaient leur droit au premier amendement, critiquer l’Islam, nous avons abandonné le « profilage » en tant que technique permettant d’identifier d’éventuels terroristes tentant de monter dans un avion ou entrer dans le pays, nous avons employé comme conseillers auprès du FBI, du Pentagone et de la CIA, des Musulmans apologistes, qui recyclent des mensonges éhontés et déforment les faits – nous avons fait tout ceci pour cette libération musulmane, pour eux, pour leur foi, et ils ne nous aiment toujours pas, ils veulent toujours nous tuer !

Cette déconnexion entre notre prétendu mauvais comportement et les motivations des djihadistes est particulièrement évidente dans le cas des terroristes de Boston. Si les Musulmans tchéchènes ont quelque chose à reprocher à quelqu’un, c’est aux Russes. Quand le terrorisme djihadiste est devenu un problème en Tchéchènie, il n’y a eu ni « cœurs, ni esprits » pour des campagnes de sensibilisation, aucune sollicitude, aucune aide de l’étranger, aucune excuse pour ses péchés passés, aucun respect scrupuleux des lois de la guerre, des conventions de Genève ou des droits de l’homme, aucun tribunal d’Imam pour donner un aperçu de la magnificence de l’Islam. Les Russes ont employé la torture, l’assassinat, les représailles collectives, et pour finir ont encerclé Grozny avec l’artillerie et l’ont laissé en ruines. Au cours des deux guerres de Tchétchénie, les Russes ont tué environ 150.000 personnes. En fait, la Russie a tué des Musulmans depuis le 18ème siècle et ont occupé des terres musulmanes en Asie centrale pendant 80 ans sous l’Union soviétique. Alors, dites-moi, M. le Sénateur Rand Paul ou M. le Secrétaire à la Défense Chuck Hagel, si notre mauvaise conduite de politique étrangère explique la haine djihadiste, comment se fait-il que deux siècles de violence russe contre les Musulmans soient ignorés, que tout notre sang et notre argent dépensé pour libérer et aider les Musulmans n’aient aucune importance ?

Les autres justifications de la violence musulmane ne sont pas plus convaincantes. Le manque d’éducation et d’opportunité économique existe dans le monde entier, mais les chrétiens africains et les animistes ou les Hindous indiens, et les Bouddhistes ne commettent pas d’actes terroristes n’importe où et à la même fréquence que les Musulmans. Beaucoup de personnes dans le monde vivent sous des dictateurs oppressifs qui violent régulièrement les droits de l’homme, et ils ne se tournent pas pour autant vers le terrorisme contre les étrangers, en réponse. Les Tibétains n’enfilent pas des gilets pour kamikazes et ne bombardent pas des marathoniens. Il y a des millions et des millions de pauvres partout dans le monde, ils ne tuent pas aveuglément des gens innocents dans les pays éloignés de leur domicile. Chaque excuse à la violence musulmane s’effondre sous le poids de ces faits. Pendant ce temps, la cause commune à tous ces tueurs – riches ou pauvres, instruits ou pas, politiquement opprimés ou non – est l’Islam, et préventivement le rejet de l’explication de la violence.

Cet « aveuglement volontaire », comme l’appelle Andy McCarthy, est devenu dangereux. Il reflète l’arrogance du matérialisme laïc, qui a écarté la religion comme un simple choix de style de vie, d’habitude bénin – à moins que vous ne parliez d’un criminel armé, d’un raciste, d’un misogyne, d’un chrétien évangélique homophobe ou raciste, de l’accaparement de terres par des Juifs sionistes. Non, il s’agit d’un traumatisme psychologique causé par la mondialisation ou l’islamophobie ou des insultes insensibles à Mohammed ou l’oppression des Palestiniens par Israël ou quoique ce soit d’autre que les passages dans le Coran, les hadiths et 14 siècles de jurisprudence islamique et de théologie, qui clairement et systématiquement définissent la doctrine du djihad violent contre les infidèles.

Attendez-vous donc, dans les prochaines semaines au même retour de flamme du vieux commentaire sur la politique étrangère ou à un soupçon d’analyses psychologiques personnelles ou des commentaires sur les péchés d’Israël et les guerres de Bush ou des commentaires sur l’intolérance et la xénophobie américaine ou sur notre besoin de « tendre la main » et  de « s’engager » et de « respecter » et de « comprendre » les fanatiques qui ne veulent pas de notre aide, de notre tolérance ou de notre respect, mais nos morts. En bref, il faut s’attendre à ce que les djihadistes pensent que nous sommes faibles et corrompus et que nous méritons donc de mourir.

Voir aussi:

Muslims have a problem. Uncle Ruslan may have the answer.

Asra Nomani

Washington post

April 23

In Reef flip flops, blue jeans and a Calvin Klein polo shirt, Ruslan Tsarni, an uncle of the alleged Boston Marathon bombers, strode down the driveway of his Federalist-style home last week in Montgomery Village, Md., an upper middle-class Washington, D.C. suburb, past a ground cover of purple wisteria blooming in his front yard and pink tulips across the street.

In the next few minutes, the uncle to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, the alleged Boston Marathon bombers, accomplished something that 11 years of post-9/11 press releases, news conferences and soundbites by too many American Muslim leaders has failed to do on the issue of radicalization and terrorism: with raw, unfettered emotion, he owned up to the problem within.

Instead of being silenced by what they did, he openly said that his nephews had brought “shame” on the family with their actions. This is the same kind of “shame off,” as one admirer later called it, that protesters to the gang rape in India have to win: Are we shamed into silence? Or do we confront the serious issues that shame us?

Hands clasped tightly in front of him, Uncle Ruslan faced off against a pack of about 30 journalists, cameras pointing at him, microphones stuck in front of him, questions about his nephews thrown at him:

“When was the last time you saw them?” He answered: December 2005. Another journalist asked: “What do you think provoked this?” “Umm, being losers! Hatred to those who were able to settle themselves!” he shouted. “These are the only reasons I can imagine. Anything else to do with religion, to do with Islam, is a fraud, is a fake.”

As an American Muslim who has watched the radicalization of Muslims from Louisville, Ky., to Chatanooga, Tenn., to Chechnya, the ancestral ethnicity of the alleged bombers, over the last three decades, I had one question on my mind.

I asked softly: “Is your family Muslim?”

The uncle didn’t hear me well: “Huh?”

I repeated my question: “Is your family Muslim?”

The question was one other journalists later admitted to me that they wondered but didn’t dare ask, the proverbial elephant in the room, only at that moment, on a cul-de-sac with manicured lawns, playground sets and helicopters and Canadian geese overhead. In Washington, D.C., leaders of national American Muslim organizations filled a room at the National Press Club and issued their flat, blanket rebuttals: Islam doesn’t sanction violence, and it doesn’t allow terrorism. When the New York Post made the mistake of writing that a Saudi witness was actually a suspect, bloggers and others took advantage of the opportunity to chortle over the mistake as just one more horrible example of stereotyping.

While it is critical that we don’t jump to conclusions by associating religious affiliation with militancy, there is no doubt that embracing an ideology of Islam that promotes extremism and violence has been a motivator for terrorism, from assassinated al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden to Army Major Nidal Hasan.

Did such an ideology influence the Tsarnaev brothers? Who or what compelled them to violence? What role does Muslim culture play in this type of radicalization?

Rather than worrying about being politically correct, we have to be comfortable asking these difficult questions. And the collectivist-minded Muslim community needs to learn an important lesson from Tsarni: It’s time to acknowledge the dishonor of terrorism within our communities, not to deny it because of shame. As we negotiate critical issues of ethnicity, religious ideology and identity as potential motivators for conflict, we have to establish basic facts.

So when I asked about his faith, Tsarni heard me. And he did something remarkable. He didn’t flinch.

“We are Muslims,” he answered clearly and steely-eyed. “We are Chechnyans. We are ethnic Chechnyans.”

Had the boys gotten radicalized, I wondered. The stories of so many—from Richard Reid, the “shoebomber,” to Faisal Shahzad, the alleged Time Square bomber–have included radicalization. The Boston area mosques haven’t been immune. “Do you think that they got radicalized in the mosques in that area?” I asked.

What I heard I couldn’t believe, I’ve become so used to the tactics of deflection. He looked me straight in the eye, and he said, “…most likely somebody radicalized them. But it’s not my brother, who just moved back to Russia, who spent his life bringing bread to their table, fixing cars, fixing cars.”

What happened when this Muslim American looked us in the eye and admitted the problem?

Tsarni became “Uncle Ruslan” to millions of Americans watching him on TV and later online, winning their respect, first, with apologies and then, with his hands clenched, fierce indignation, outrage and anger over the suspected role of his nephews as the Boston Marathon bombers. And there was his color too: Still using AOL when most don’t even know it still exits, scolding Dzhokhar to turn himself in.

The uncle stunned seasoned reporters, some of them veterans of the trials in Guantanamo Bay and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, with his straight talk. First, he expressed his condolences to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings and, then, declared loud and clear that his nephews brought “shame” on his family and the people of Chechnya, the family’s ethnicity: “Yes, of course, we’re ashamed. We’re ashamed. They’re children of my brother, who had little influence of them!” Later on Dzhokhar: “He put a shame on the entire Chechnyan ethnicity!” According to public records, Uncle Ruslan shared the same last name as his nephews but shortened it .

With close-cropped hair, a strong jawline and fit physique, the attorney became an accidental spokesman, instilling confidence as a truth-teller.

Admirers have created memes, or images, of his face, contorted in rage, revealing just how effective he has been in instilling confidence.

One meme headline: “Uncle Ruslan. Mosque Board Chairman 2013.”

His effectiveness reveals that the best crisis management doesn’t require intellectual gymnastic but just plain, honest talk: We have a problem. We know it. And we want to do right. Another “Uncle Ruslan” meme reads, “If you can believe it I have had no media training.” Yet another, “First time public speaking. Nailed it.”

“Uncle Ruslan” proved that folks can handle nuance. “It was wild, dramatic, angry, over-the-top,” wrote Washington Post blogger Alexandra Petri. She added: “People like Uncle Ruslan remind us that it’s the apples, not the barrel.”

She concluded: “Thank you. This was a moment we all needed.”

In this family lies the dichotomy of cross-cultural communication patterns confronting Muslim communities, just like other traditional societies. Many parts of Muslim society hold to traditional cultures which are shame-based; people “save face” to hide “shameful” acts. That’s what we heard from the brothers’ parents and aunt, Patemat Sulemanova.

While her brother said the nephews had shamed their family, Sulemanova, in Canada, told reporters she didn’t believe her nephews were involved in the bombings: “Convince me,” she said.

In Russia, Zubeidat Tsarnaev said her older son got involved in “religious politics” five years ago, but she refused to believe her sons were involved in the bombings, saying the FBI had visited her years earlier, troubled about Tamerlan’s activities, but that the FBI was in “the control” her older son’s activities. “He never told me he would be on the side of jihad,” she said. Typical of the failure of this posture of denial and conspiracy theories, a CNN reporter called it “a rant.”

Also in Russia, the alleged bombers’ father, Anzor Tsarnaev, called his brother “a great attorney,” but said he couldn’t believe his sons were involved. “I’m always telling them study, study, study,” he said. “Someone framed them.”

But back in America, Uncle Ruslan was winning in the court of public opinion.

And it was stunning to see how he acknowledged the shame openly but didn’t allow it to silence his criticism.

The bombing suspects, "put a shame on the entire Chechnyan ethnicity,” he said.

Earlier, Tsarni had told the Associated Press: “When I was speaking to the older one, he started all this religious talk, ‘Insh’allah’ and all that, and I asked him, ‘Where is all that coming from?’” Insh’allah is the Arabic phrase that means “God willing.”

What Tsarni is admitting is something true but politically incorrect to talk about: the increasing use of these phrases of religiosity are code inside the community for someone who is becoming hardcore. It doesn’t mean that they’re becoming violent or criminal, but it’s a red flag. In 2004, when I spoke about women’s rights at mosques at the Islamic Society of North America conference in Chicago, a young Muslim man stood at the microphone during the Q&A and scolded me for not saying an honorific, “Peace be upon him,” whenever I mentioned the name of the prophet Muhammad. He later sent me an electronic death threat I turned over to the FBI. It’s a game of trying to out-Muslim a Muslim.

Instead of playing that game, Uncle Ruslan did something remarkable. He put his hands together as if in prayer, and he showed humility, not defensive arrogance, saying he’d prostrate himself before the victims of the Boston bombings.

Ameen, as “amen” is said in Arabic and Muslim culture, to Uncle Ruslan. I believe it’s time for us American Muslims to take collective responsibility, rather than issue collective denial. That’s the attitude that cultivates confidence and fosters safety—for all.

With his passions expressed, Uncle Ruslan begged his goodbyes. Journalists remained in formation on the street outside the house, one eating a quick Subway sandwich on the lawn outside, another dragging a wicker chair from a neighbor’s garbage, before a cop reprimanded him. Suddenly, Tsarni emerged. Coming down the stairs onto the driveway he turned to walk toward the end of the cul-de-sac. Reporters and camera crews hustled to catch up. He pleaded with them: “What are you expecting from me? I’m just going to my neighbors to apologize to them for the discomfort my family has caused them.”

Rather than waiting for an invitation to RSVP to a superfluous “interfaith” dinner, Uncle Ruslan did something simple but crucial: He extended an invitation, was a good neighbor and took responsibility for the trouble that emerged in his front yard. In short, he owned up.

Surely, the Tsaernev family story is complicated, and there is nobody without flaw.

But Uncle Ruslan showed us where to begin.

With reporters still camped out , he emerged from his neighbor’s porch, his arm around the older music teacher who lived there, leading her warmly into his house. Hundreds of miles away, Boston Police drew close to bringing his nephew into custody, leaving Uncle Ruslan, the rest of Tsaernev family and our Muslim communities to do some real soul-searching about how we lost these boys to the ideology of terrorism.

To me, the answer lies inside a culture shift where we honestly acknowledge the radicalization problems within our communities—so that no Uncle Ruslan has to step outside his home, confessing to something gone very, very wrong.

Asra Q. Nomani, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, is a mother and the author of “Standing Alone: A Muslim Woman’s Struggle for the Soul of Islam.”

Voir également:

A Lesson In Hate

How an Egyptian student came to study 1950s America and left determined to wage holy war

David Von Drehle

Smithsonian magazine

February 2006,

Before Sayyid Qutb became a leading theorist of violent jihad, he was a little-known Egyptian writer sojourning in the United States, where he attended a small teachers college on the Great Plains. Greeley, Colorado, circa 1950 was the last place one might think to look for signs of American decadence. Its wide streets were dotted with churches, and there wasn’t a bar in the whole temperate town. But the courtly Qutb (COO-tub) saw things that others did not. He seethed at the brutishness of the people around him: the way they salted their watermelon and drank their tea unsweetened and watered their lawns. He found the muscular football players appalling and despaired of finding a barber who could give a proper haircut. As for the music: “The American’s enjoyment of jazz does not fully begin until he couples it with singing like crude screaming,” Qutb wrote when he returned to Egypt. “It is this music that the savage bushmen created to satisfy their primitive desires.”

Such grumbling by an unhappy crank would be almost comical but for one fact: a direct line of influence runs from Sayyid Qutb to Osama bin Laden, and to bin Laden’s Egyptian partner in terror, Ayman al-Zawahiri. From them, the line continues to another quietly seething Egyptian sojourning in the United States—the 9/11 hijacker Mohammed Atta. Qutb’s gripes about America require serious attention because they cast light on a question that has been nagging since the fall of the World Trade Center: Why do they hate us?

Born in 1906 in the northern Egyptian village of Musha and raised in a devout Muslim home, Qutb memorized the Koran as a boy. Later he moved to Cairo and found work as a teacher and writer. His novels made no great impression, but he earned a reputation as an astute literary critic. Qutb was among the first champions of Naguib Mahfouz, a young, modern novelist who, in 1988, would win the Nobel Prize in Literature. As Qutb matured, his mind took on a more political cast. Even by the standards of Egypt, those were chaotic, corrupt times: World War I had completed the destruction of the Ottoman Empire, and the Western powers were creating, with absolute colonial confidence, new maps and governments for the Middle East. For a proud man like Sayyid Qutb, the humiliation of his country at the hands of secular leaders and Western puppets was galling. His writing drew unfavorable attention from the Egyptian government, and by 1948, Mahfouz has said, Qutb’s friends in the Ministry of Education were sufficiently worried about his situation that they contrived to send him abroad to the safety of the United States.

Some biographical sketches suggest that Qutb arrived with a benign view of America, but if that’s true it didn’t last long. During a short stay in Washington, D.C., he witnessed the commotion surrounding an elevator accident and was stunned to hear other onlookers making a joke of the victim’s appearance. From this and a few offhand remarks in other settings, Qutb concluded that Americans suffered from “a drought of sentimental sympathy” and that “Americans intentionally deride what people in the Old World hold sacred.”

This became the lens through which Qutb read nearly every American encounter—a clash of New World versus Old. Qutb easily satisfied the requirements at the graduate school of the Colorado State College of Education (now known as the University of Northern Colorado) and devoted the rest of his time to his true interest—the American soul, if such a thing existed. “This great America: What is its worth in the scale of human values?” Qutb wondered. “And what does it add to the moral account of humanity?” His answer: nothing.

Still, Qutb’s contempt for America was not as simple as some people might now imagine. He did not recoil from political freedom and democracy, as, say, President Bush might expect from a jihadi theorist, nor did he complain about shades of imperial ambition in American foreign policy, as writers on the left might suppose. Regarding the excesses of American culture—vulgarity, materialism and promiscuity—Qutb expressed shock, but it rang a bit hollow. “The American girl is well acquainted with her body’s seductive capacity,” he wrote. “She knows seductiveness lies in the round breasts, the full buttocks, and in the shapely thighs, sleek legs and she shows all this and does not hide it.” These curvy jezebels pursued boys with “wide, strapping chest[s]” and “ox muscles,” Qutb added with disgust. Yet no matter how lascivious his adjectives, the fastidious, unmarried Egyptian could not convincingly portray the church dances and Look magazines he encountered in sleepy Greeley as constituting a genuine sexual “jungle.”

The core problem with the United States, for Qutb, was not something Americans did, but simply what America was—“the New World…is spellbinding.” It was more than a land of pleasures without limit. In America, unlike in Egypt, dreams could come true. Qutb understood the danger this posed: America’s dazzle had the power to blind people to the real zenith of civilization, which for Qutb began with Muhammad in the seventh century and reached its apex in the Middle Ages, carried triumphantly by Muslim armies.

Qutb rejected the idea that “new” was also “improved.” The Enlightenment, the Industrial Age—modernity itself—were not progress. “The true value of every civilization…lies not in the tools man has invented or in how much power he wields,” Qutb wrote. “The value of civilizations lay in what universal truths and worldviews they have attained.” The modern obsession with science and invention was a moral regression to the primitive condition of the first toolmakers. Qutb’s America was bursting with raw energy and appetite, but utterly without higher virtues. In his eyes, its “interminable, incalculable expanses of virgin land” were settled by “groups of adventurers and groups of criminals” who lacked the time and reflection required for a civilized life. Qutb’s Americans “faced the uncharted forests, the tortuous mountain mazes, the fields of ice, the thundering hurricanes, and the beasts, serpents and vermin of the forest” in a struggle that left them numb to “faith in religion, faith in art and faith in spiritual values altogether.”

This portrait likely would have surprised the people of mid-century Greeley, had they somehow become aware of the unspoken opinions of their somewhat frosty neighbor. Theirs was a friendly town best known for the unpretentious college and for the cattle feedlots sprawling pungently on its outskirts. The founding of Greeley in the 1870s involved no ice fields, hurricanes or serpents. Instead, it began with a simple newspaper column written by Nathan Meeker, agricultural editor of the New York Tribune. On December 14, 1869, Meeker appealed to literate readers of high moral character to join him in building a utopian community by the South Platte River near the foot of the Rocky Mountains. More than 3,000 readers applied; from this list Meeker selected the 700 best qualified to realize his vision of a sober, godly, cooperative community. The town was dubbed Greeley in honor of Meeker’s boss at the Tribune, the quixotic publisher Horace Greeley, who died within weeks of his failed run for president in 1872, just as the project was gathering steam.

Poet and journalist Sara Lippincott was an early visitor to the frontier outpost, and later wrote about it under her pen name, Grace Greenwood. “You’ll die of dullness in less than five hours,” another traveler had warned her about Greeley. “There is nothing there but irrigation. Your host will invite you out to see him irrigate his potato-patch…there is not a billiard-saloon in the whole camp, nor a drink of whiskey to be had for love or money.” None of that made any difference to Qutb, who saw only what he already believed, and wrote not facts, but his own truth, in his 1951 essay, “The America I Have Seen.”

Sayyid Qutb cut short his stay in America and returned to Egypt in 1951 after the assassination of Hassan al-Banna, founder of the nationalist, religious and militant movement known as the Muslim Brotherhood. Over the next decade and a half, often writing from prison, Qutb refined a violent political theology from the raw anti-modernism of his American interlude. Virtually the entire modern world, Qutb theorized, is jahiliyya, that barbarous state that existed before Muhammad. Only the strict, unchanging law of the prophet can redeem this uncivilized condition. Nearly a millennium of history became, to the radicalized Qutb, an offense wrought by the violence of jahili “Crusaders” and the supposed perfidy of the Jews. And Muslim leaders allied with the West were no better than the Crusaders themselves. Therefore, Qutb called all true Muslims to jihad, or Holy War, against jahiliyya—which is to say, against modernity, which America so powerfully represents.

This philosophy led to Qutb’s execution in 1966. Proud to the end, he refused to accept the secular Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser’s offer of mercy in exchange for Qutb’s repudiation of his jihad. Nasser may have silenced a critic, but the martyrdom of Sayyid Qutb accelerated his movement. The same year the philosopher was hanged, according to journalist Lawrence Wright, the teenage al-Zawahiri formed his first violent cell, dedicated to the overthrow of the Egyptian government and the creation of an Islamist state. Meanwhile, Qutb’s brother Muhammad went into exile in Saudi Arabia, where he taught at King Abdul Aziz University. One of his students, an heir to the country’s largest construction fortune, was Osama bin Laden.

Others have taken Qutb’s ideas in less apocalyptic directions, so that M.A. Muqtedar Khan of the Brookings Institution can rank him alongside the Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran as “one of the major architects and ‘strategists’ of contemporary Islamic revival.” But the last paragraphs of Qutb’s American memoir suggest just how far outside normal discourse his mind was wont to stray. After noting the stupidity of his Greeley neighbors, who failed to understand his dry and cutting jokes, Qutb writes: “In summary, anything that requires a touch of elegance is not for the American, even haircuts! For there was not one instance in which I had a haircut there when I did not return home to even with my own hands what the barber had wrought.” This culminating example of inescapable barbarism led directly to his conclusion. “Humanity makes the gravest of errors and risks losing its account of morals, if it makes America its example.”

Turning a haircut into a matter of grave moral significance is the work of a fanatic. That’s the light ultimately cast by Qutb’s American experience on the question of why his disciples might hate us. Hating America for its haircuts cannot be distinguished from hating for no sane reason at all.

Voir encore:

Said Qutb on the Arts in America

Daniel Burns, Translator

November 18, 2009

Current Trends in Islamist Ideology vol. 9

Translator’s note[1]

The Egyptian Said Qutb was one of the leading intellectual lights of 20th Century Islamic radicalism when he was executed in 1966 for his involvement with the illegal Muslim Brotherhood. He is best known for his lengthy Quranic commentary In the Shade of the Qur’an and his book Milestones, in which he makes the case that allegedly Muslim regimes like that of Egypt should be understood as jahiliy (pagan) and therefore the proper target of military jihad.

Years before writing these radical works, Qutb spent two years studying in America (1948-1950). Upon his return to Egypt, he published the three-part article “The America That I Have Seen: In the Scale of Human Values” in the Egyptian journal Al-Risala (Vol. 19 [1951]; no. 957, 959, 961; pp. 1245-7, 1301-6, 1357-1360). A translation of this article appears in the anthology America in an Arab Mirror (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000), but that translation is missing a considerable block of text for no reason that I can see. Here I have translated the section of the article’s third part that contains that missing block. All but the first three and the last three paragraphs below are therefore appearing in English for the first time.

The article as a whole contains Qutb’s observations on American life and chiefly on how American citizens rank “in the scale of human values.” He judges Americans on a range of social and moral characteristics—including their sexual mores, their political history, and their attitudes towards religion, sports, art, and death—and generally finds them wanting. Most striking about the article is Qutb’s adherence to a standard of “human values” rather than specifically “Islamic values.” Qutb never elaborates this standard explicitly, but in general his theme seems to be that human beings should strive to attain high-minded, civilized, and spiritual values rather than bestial, primitive, and sensual ones. American society, in Qutb’s view, tends toward the latter.

Wherever possible, I have translated a single Arabic word with a single English word. Words in [square brackets] are my additions or clarifications. I have used Qutb’s punctuation as a guideline but have not been able to reproduce it fully in English; in particular, I have used parentheses, long dashes, sentence breaks, and other means to translate the versatile Arabic particle wa. I have however retained the author’s strange use of quotation marks and ellipses.

Said Qutb: On the Arts in America

The American is primitive in his artistic taste, both in what he enjoys as art and in his own artistic works.

“Jazz” music is his music of choice. This is that music that the Negroes invented to satisfy their primitive inclinations, as well as their desire to be noisy on the one hand and to excite bestial tendencies on the other. The American’s intoxication in “jazz” music does not reach its full completion until the music is accompanied by singing that is just as coarse and obnoxious as the music itself. Meanwhile, the noise of the instruments and the voices mounts, and it rings in the ears to an unbearable degree… The agitation of the multitude[2] increases, and the voices of approval mount, and their palms ring out in vehement, continuous applause that all but deafens the ears.

But despite this, the American multitude attends the opera, listens to symphonies, crowds together for the “ballet,” and watches “classic” plays—so much so that you will hardly find an empty seat. It will happen sometimes that you do not find a place unless you reserve your seat days beforehand, and that at the high price of the fares for these performances.

This phenomenon misled me at first; I even rejoiced at it, down to the depths of my soul. For I had been feeling constantly “begrudging” at the fact that this people, which produces marvels in the world of industry and of science and of research, should have no store of the other human values. I had also been terribly afraid on behalf of humanity that its leadership will pass into the hands of this people that is altogether poor in those values.

Therefore I rejoiced when I saw this phenomenon. For the public that takes an interest in refined art is not to be despaired of no matter what its faults may be, and when this window on its feelings has been opened, there is great hope that many other rays may diffuse from it.

The importance of this phenomenon pushed me to investigate everything about it, in different surroundings and in numerous cities. But when I tracked the expressions on faces, and conversed with a great many of the men and women[3] who visit these places (those I knew and those I did not know), all this revealed to me—with regret—how wide a chasm still separates the spirit of such humane art from the spirit of the Americans. Indeed, their feelings about it[4] are even concealed in all but rare cases; they only look at the matter from a purely social angle. For the cultured American must of necessity see these sorts [of shows] and go to these places in case there should be a conversation about them in any group of people taking part in conversation together. For it is a matter of the greatest shame in America that anyone should fail to take part in the conversation—especially in the case of young women, since what is demanded of them is that they should always find subjects for conversation. So if young women visit these places, they add new subjects to the perpetual American subjects [of conversation], i.e., ball games, names of films and of actors and actresses, cases of divorce and marriage, markings and prices of cars…

This is the very spirit in which the crowds visit the art museums, passing rapidly through the halls and the exhibits in a way that does not suggest any enjoyment or love of these works [of art]. In just the same way they go (individually and in groups) to get a rapid view of natural spectacles. Passing by places and spectacles at the cars’ top speed, they collect conversational material and also comply with the natural American inclination toward collection and enumeration.

At the beginning of my stay in America, I would hear that one of them had visited X cities and countries and sights and spectacles and had gone X miles in his tourist journeys and knew X friends, so that I was astonished at this capacity for producing such things and wished that I were capable of any of it! Then I discovered afterward how all these marvels took place… One of them drives his car on a journey, alone or with his family or friends. He races it at top speed, taking it through cities and over distances, passing by sights and spectacles, while recording in his notebook the names and the mileage… Then he returns, and see! he has seen all of it, and he has the right to converse about it! As for friends, it is enough that one be invited to get-acquainted parties. There he encounters their faces for the first time, and the host acquaints him with the attendees one by one (men as well as women)[5], and he asks whoever of them wish to do so to write down their names and addresses, and so they in turn do with him. After some time, his notebook is full of names and addresses. And see! he has a great number of friends (men and women)[6], and perhaps he is even victorious in the competition undertaken in pursuit of this goal. How great, how strange are the competitions here!

Thus your knowledge and your culture[7] are often measured by how much you have read and watched and heard. It is the same as the way that your material riches are calculated by the quantity and amount of the cash and real property that you own: without any distinctions!

And this is not the mentality of the multitudes only, but it is also very much the mentality of the thinkers and the researchers. For it had occurred to the thinkers in America that it was not right that their country should be the richest country in the world, and their people the greatest people on earth in terms of industrial civilization and scientific civilization, while they should have no artistic wealth like that of poorer peoples such as the Italians and the Germans.

They have money—and money works wonders—so it was only a matter of years before they had museums of drawing and sculpture more magnificent and larger than those other peoples’. These museums have accumulated for themselves works of art from everywhere and have filled up with the rare and the costly among these works, which they[8] have not been stingy about buying with money. These are all foreign works save a few, since American works are primitive and plain to the point of being laughable next to those splendid worldly treasures.

Likewise, [it was only a matter of years before] they had some performing orchestras and some dance troupes of the “ballet,” most of which [demonstrate] expertise and proficiency. And most of the conductors of these orchestras and the directors of these troupes [demonstrate] genius and originality…and all of them[9] save a few are foreigners.

Thus there emerged[10] precise enumerations that indicate what America possesses in the way of great artistic riches, purchased by money. But there remained one little matter: Does the American soul have any share in these riches? Does she even have mere artistic enjoyment of this costly human inheritance!

It occurred to me to examine these points in the art museums just as I examined them at the opera houses and such.

I went for the tenth time to the museum of art in San Francisco and made one of the picture halls of French art the subject of my examination. I distributed my attention over all the pictures inside it, but I concentrated on one outstanding picture named “Fox in the Chicken House.”[11] There are no words that could relate to the reader the beauty of this ingenious picture, in which the artist depicted several profound, complex feelings in a painting where there is no human face to make it easy for the artist to depict those feelings… A fox is in the chicken house, the sky is suffocatingly dark, and the fox has just attacked a chicken, a nesting mother, who appears in distress and exhausted in the claws of the wild beast baring his teeth; her little ones are terrified and the eggs remaining beneath her are scattered; her fellow hens meanwhile are scattered throughout the space of the painting, and the rooster—the man of the house—stands helpless, at a loss to find any salvation for his spouse in distress, although he is her guardian! As for the other hens, one is anxious and taken by surprise, another is despairing and disgusted that there should be all this atrocity in life, while a third is at a loss, asking: “How did this happen?” And the entire sky and the colors in this ingenious painting depict that which words cannot grasp.

I took a rest on one of the seats that the halls do provide with singular[12] courtesy for those visitors who are tired of looking and of walking around to rest on, and I rested, inspecting the features and expressions [of faces] and listening to the remarks and comments.

Four full hours passed over me in my seat, during which 109 persons passed by me, singles and couples and groups, of whom the majority were among the [many] young women and young men[13] who make appointments to spend some time in the museum’s garden and then in the museum itself, since it is proper for the social young woman to share in conversation and to find subjects for conversation.

On [the faces of] how many of these 109 did it appear that they were feeling anything of what they were seeing? Only one lingered for about two minutes in front of the picture I had selected, and he lingered in the whole hall for about five minutes…then he flew off.

I repeated the experiment in the other halls of the museum, and then repeated it in other museums in several cities. Again I arrived at the point where [I could say that], out of the great mass of visitors comprised in my enumerations, only a rare minority comprehended anything of these tremendous artistic riches that the dollar has gathered from all the places on earth; all that remained for the dollar to do was to create artistic sensation, but apparently that does not respond to the dollar’s charms!

The only art in which the Americans are proficient—although there are other [peoples] who still surpass them in it as far as artistry goes—is the art of the cinema. This is natural and logical given the phenomenon that makes the American unique: the height of industrial proficiency combined with primitiveness of artistic feelings. In the cinema this phenomenon is very much manifest.

By its nature, the cinematic art does not rise to the loftiest regions of the arts—music, drawing, sculpture, and poetry—nor for that matter to the [level of the] art of the theater, although in the cinema the possibilities for artistic craft[14] and the possibilities of production are much greater. And in terms of originality, the art of production in the cinema has gotten only as far as the farthest point reached by the art of photography. Moreover, some distance remains between it and (for example) the art of the theater, just as some distance remains too between depiction by photography and depiction by a [painter’s] brush. In the latter is expressed genius of feelings; in the former, expertise of craft.

The cinema is the popular art of the multitudes, so it is the art in which one finds expertise, proficiency, magnification, and approximation. By its nature it relies more on expertise than on the artistic spirit… in it the American genius[15] can exercise creativity… yet despite this, English, French, Russian, and German film all remain superior to American film, although they are inferior to it in craft and expertise.

In the great majority of American films, one sees manifestly primitive subjects and primitive excitement; this is true of police/crime films and cowboy films. As for high, skillful films, such as “Gone with the Wind,” “Wuthering Heights,” “The Song of Bernadette,” and such, they are few in comparison with what America produces. Such American film as does reach Egypt or the Arab countries does not resemble this family, since the majority of it comes from among the superior, rare American films.[16] And those people who visit the regions of the land in America are those who reach that tiny family of valuable films.

There is another art in which the Americans are skillful, because in it there is more of expertise in craft and production than there is of high, genuine art… It is the art of depicting natural spectacles in color as if [the depictions] were photographic, true and exact[17]. This can be seen in the museums of land and water animals, since these animals or their embalmed bodies are displayed [there] in the likeness of their natural habitats, just as if they were real. The artist’s brush is skillful in depicting these habitats in cooperation with the spectacle’s artistic design; it reaches the point of creativity.

This translation of Qutb’s article appeared in Volume 9 of Current Trends in Islamist Ideology published by Hudson Institute.

Keywords: Qutb, Muslim Brotherhood, American Arts, jahiliy

Notes

[1] I am grateful to the Ernest Fortin Memorial Foundation for a summer grant that allowed me to work on this translation, to Michael Montalbano for his relentless editing, and to Prof. Martha Bayles, Prof. Nasser Behnegar, Dr. Hillel Fradkin, Prof. Dennis Hale, Prof. James Nolan, and Zander Baron for reading drafts.

[2] The word consistently translated “multitude” (jamhour) appears a few times in this passage and has political connotations: it is the root of the Arabic word for “republic.” It means something like hoi polloi.

[3] Here and elsewhere Qutb uses two forms, a masculine and a feminine, where Arabic grammar only requires one (since the masculine is taken to include both sexes). Literally this passage says “a great many [m.] and a great many [f.] of those who visit these places.” Qutb seems to want to emphasize that both sexes are included, perhaps because he finds this immodest or perhaps because his audience would not otherwise know whether the social events being described were single-sex.

[4] The nearest possible antecedent is “spirit,” but the earlier “this phenomenon” seems likelier. The gender of the pronoun makes it impossible that it could be “art”.

[5] Literally “one by one and one (f.) by one (f.).” See note 3.

[6] Literally “male-friends and female-friends,” or “friends and female friends.” See note 3.

[7] In the sense of “the state of being cultured,” not “cultural identity.”

[8] The gender of the pronoun means that it most likely refers to, not “museums,” but the antecedent from earlier in the paragraph: “Americans,” or possibly “the thinkers in America.”

[9] Since the entire paragraph is one sentence in Arabic, it is not clear whether this word refers only to the conductors and directors or to the performing groups’ members as a whole.

[10] This is a bit obscure, but Qutb seems to mean that these enumerations became easily available in the course of his own investigations.

[11] Jean-Baptiste Huet’s Fox in the Chicken Yard (1766) meets most of Qutb’s description. I can only see two “other hens,” though.

[12] The ambiguity is present in Arabic as in English: this may be a backhanded compliment.

[13] Literally “female-youths and male-youths,” or “female-youths and youths.” See note 3.

[14] The word is a recurrent theme in the entire article and has been translated “industry” or (as an adjective) “industrial.” From here on it will be translated “craft.”

[15] This phrase does not refer to particular American people that we would call “geniuses,” but to something more abstract, like the previous “artistic spirit.”

[16] The antecedents are hard to follow in this sentence, but the sense seems to me to require: “Such American film as does reach us in Egypt or the Arab countries does not resemble the (generally low-quality) family of American films as a whole, since the majority of what does reach us consists in those high-quality films that make up only a tiny minority of the whole family.”

[17] Qutb seems to mean this as something of a compliment, but on the other hand, that meaning would seem to be at odds with his disparagement of photography three paragraphs earlier.

Voir enfin:

Column One: Moral relativism and jihad

Caroline B. Glick

The Jerusalem Post

11/04/2013

It is the dominance of moral relativism in liberal institutions like the New York Times that make even the most apologetic expose of the Muslim Brotherhood a major event.

Two events happened on Wednesday which should send a shiver down the spine of everyone concerned about the future of the American Jewish community. But to understand their importance it is important to consider the context in which they occurred.

On January 13, The New York Times reported on a series of virulently anti-Jewish comments Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi made in speeches given in 2010. Among other things, Morsi said, “We must never forget, brothers, to nurse our children and our grandchildren on hatred for them: for Zionists, for Jews.” He said that Egyptian children “must feed on hatred; hatred must continue. The hatred must go on for God and as a form of worshiping him.”

In another speech, he called Jews “bloodsuckers,” and “the descendants of apes and pigs.”

Two weeks after the Times ran the story, the Obama administration sent four F-16 fighter jets to Egypt as part of a military aid package announced in December 2012 entailing the provision of 20 F-16s and 200 M1-A1 Abrams tanks.

The Anti-Defamation League, AIPAC, the Jewish Council for Public Affairs and other prominent American Jewish groups did not oppose the weapons transfer.

With the American Jewish leadership silent on the issue, Israel found its national security championed by Sen. Rand Paul. He attached an amendment to a budget bill that would bar the US from transferring the advanced weapons platforms to Egypt.

Paul explained, “Egypt is currently governed by a religious zealot… who said recently that Jews were bloodsuckers and descendants of apes and pigs. This doesn’t sound like the kind of stable personality we [sh]ould be sending our most sophisticated weapons to.”

Paul’s amendment was overwhelmingly defeated, due in large part to the silence of the American Jewish leadership.

The Times noted that Morsi’s castigation of Jews as “apes and pigs” was “a slur for Jews that is familiar across the Muslim world.”

Significantly the Times failed to note that the reason it is familiar is because it comes from both the Koran and the hadith. The scripturally based denigration of Jews as apes and pigs is legion among leading clerics of both Sunni and Shi’ite Islam.

It was not a coincidence that the Times failed to mention why Morsi’s castigation of Jews as apes and pigs was so familiar to Muslim audiences.

The Islamic sources of Muslim Brotherhood Jew hatred, and indeed, hatred of Jews by Islamic leaders from both the Sunni and Shi’ite worlds, is largely overlooked by the liberal ideological camp. And the overwhelming majority of the American Jewish leadership is associated with the liberal ideological camp.

If the Times acknowledged that the Jew hatred espoused by Morsi and his colleagues in the Muslim Brotherhood, as well as by their Shi’ite colleagues in the Iranian regime and Hezbollah is based on the Koran, they would have to acknowledge that Islamic Jew hatred and other bigotry is not necessarily antithetical to mainstream Islamic teaching. And that is something that the Times, like its fellow liberal institutions, is not capable of acknowledging.

They are incapable of acknowledging this possibility because considering it would implicitly require a critical study of jihadist doctrine. And a critical study of jihadist doctrine would show that the doctrine of jihad, or Islamic holy war, subscribed to by the Muslim Brotherhood and its affiliates, as well as by the Iranian regime and Hezbollah and their affiliates, is widely supported, violent, bigoted, evil and dangerous to the free world.

And that isn’t even the biggest problem with studying the doctrine of jihad. The biggest problem is that a critical study of the doctrine of jihad would force liberal institutions like the New York Times and the institutional leadership of the American Jewish community alike to abandon the reigning dogma of the liberal ideological camp – moral relativism.

Moral relativism is based on a refusal to call evil evil and a concomitant willingness to denigrate truth if truth requires you to notice evil.

Since pointing out the reality of the danger the jihadist doctrines propagated by the likes of the Muslim Brotherhood involves the implicit demand that people make distinctions between good and evil and side with good against evil, moral relativists – that is most liberals – cannot contend with jihad.

This is why the American Jewish leadership refused to join Rand Paul and his conservative Republican colleagues in the Senate and demand an immediate cessation of US military aid to the Muslim Brotherhood-controlled Egyptian military even after the evidence of the Brotherhood’s genocidal Jew hatred was splashed across the front page of the Times.

It is the dominance of moral relativism in liberal institutions like the New York Times that make even the most apologetic expose of the Muslim Brotherhood a major event. And it is the dominance of liberal orthodoxies in the mainstream Jewish community that makes it all but impossible for Jewish leaders to speak up against the Muslim Brotherhood, despite the manifest danger its genocidal hatred of Jews poses not only for Israel, but for Jews everywhere.

It is bad enough that liberal Jewish leaders won’t speak out against the Koranic-inspired evil that characterizes the ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood. What is worse is what their own morally relative blindness causes them to do.

On Wednesday, we saw two distressing examples of the consequences of this self-imposed embrace of ideological fantasies.

First, on Wednesday, Yeshiva University’s Cardozo Law School’s Journal of Conflict Resolution gave its annual International Advocate of Peace Award to former president Jimmy Carter.

Carter’s long record of anti-Israel, and indeed anti-Semitic, actions and behavior made the decision to bestow him with the honor an affront not only to the cause of peace, but to the cause of Jewish legal rights. As an advocate of Hamas and a man who castigates Israel as an illegal “apartheid” state, Carter has a long record of outspoken opposition to both Jewish human rights and to viable peace between Israel and its neighbors.

For outsiders, the Orthodox Jewish university’s law school’s law journal’s decision to honor Carter was shocking, but as it works out, the Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution confers its prize almost exclusively on people active in pressuring Israel to make concessions to Palestinian terrorists who reject Israel’s right to exist. Past winners include Dennis Ross, Bill Clinton, Richard Holbrooke, George Mitchell, John Wallach and Seeds of Peace and, perhaps most astoundingly, the outspoken Jew hater Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

In other words, Carter wasn’t chosen for the honor despite his anti-Israel record. He was selected because of his anti-Israel record.

In a similar fashion, New York’s 92nd Street Y invited virulent Israel hater Roger Waters to perform a concert on April 30. Given Waters’s outspoken opposition to Israel, his call for total economic and cultural warfare against the Jewish state and his leading role in the BDS movement, it is not possible that the 92nd Street Y was unaware of his radical, anti-Semitic sentiments.

And so, the only reasonable explanation for his invitation to perform at the Jewish institution is that the Y wanted to invite this openly anti- Semitic musician to perform. A public outcry by pro-Israel activists forced the Y to cancel his performance.

The day that Carter was embraced by the Orthodox Jewish establishment, Jewish author and activist Pamela Geller was silenced. Geller is the nightmare of the liberal Jewish establishment.

She is a beautiful and articulate speaker and writer who has risen to prominence in the US for her steadfast commitment to exposing the deadly pathologies of Jew hatred, misogyny and other prejudices inherent to jihadist ideology.

Geller’s website, Atlas Shrugs, is a clearinghouse for information on Islamic persecution of women, Christians and apostates and hatred of Jews. She also showcases the documented ties between mainstream American Islamic groups and the Muslim Brotherhood.

An indefatigable defender of Israel, Geller recently ran a highly controversial, and successful ad campaign in the New York and San Francisco public transportation systems in response to an anti-Israel ad campaign. Her billboards read, “In any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man. Support Israel, Defeat Jihad.”

Geller was scheduled to speak on April 13 at the Great Neck Synagogue in Great Neck, New York. The topic of her talk was “The Imposition of Shari’a in America.”

Last month, after learning of her talk, a consortium of Islamic and leftist activists in Nassau County led by Habeed Ahmed from the Islamic Center of Long Island launched a pressure campaign to coerce the synagogue into cancelling her speech. Members of the group telephoned the synagogue and castigated Geller as a bigot, and likened her to the Nazis in the 1930s.

In short order liberal rabbis Michael White and Jerome Davidson took over the opposition to Geller and launched a media campaign attacking her as a bigot and demanding that the Great Neck Synagogue cancel her speech.

Rejecting the distinction Geller makes between jihadists and their victims – Muslim and non- Muslim alike, White and Davidson claimed that she opposes all Muslims and so her speech must be canceled. By hosting her, they intoned, the Great Neck Synagogue would be guilty of propagating hate speech. Liberal Christian and Jewish activists and their Muslim associates threatened to protest the speech.

On Wednesday the synagogue caved in to their massive pressure. Citing “security concerns” the synagogue board released a statement saying that while “these important issues must be discussed, the synagogue is unable to bear the burden” of the pressure campaign surrounding Geller’s planned speech. Her event was canceled.

Surveys of the American Jewish community taken in recent years by the American Jewish Committee demonstrate that the vast majority of American Jews are deeply supportive of Israel, and their views tend toward the Right side of the political spectrum in issues related to Israel, the Palestinians and the wider Islamic conflict with the Jewish state.

On the other hand, the AJC’s surveys show that for the vast majority of American Jews, Israel is not a voting issue. This state of affairs was reflected by a comment that Yeshiva University student Ben Winter made to the media regarding the absence of student protest against Carter on Wednesday. In Winter’s words, “While many students at YU feel strongly about their Zionism, few have the courage to publicly express their opinions.”

The danger exposed by the cancellation of Geller’s speech and the conferral of honors on the likes of Carter and Waters by mainstream Jewish institutions is daunting. If moral relativism remains the dominant dogma of the American Jewish establishment, the already weakly defended, but still strongly rooted, support for Israel among the rank and file of the American Jewish community will dissipate.


Attentats de Boston: La surveillance pour tous ! (Why should Muslims and leftists be less deserving of surveillance than right-wing extremist groups ?)

21 avril, 2013
http://tundratabloids.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/fbi-interviewed-dead-olderbrother-tsarnaev-could-have-deported-him-20.4.2013.pngL’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. (…) Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme. René Girard
The Tsarnaev brothers pulled off their terrorist attack with great skill but made a fatal mistake in letting their faces and bodies be seen at a heavily photographed international sporting event. This meant that multiple images of them were available for a massive law enforcement squad to comb over and, after three days, identify them by name and appearance. This rapid identification was not unprecedented – the London police had done likewise in the July 2005 suicide bombings but because none of the four perpetrators survived that attack, that was more a theoretical achievement than a practical one. To the best of my knowledge, the Tsarnaevs were the first terrorists to be tracked down via still and video pictures. (…) But how to avoid doing so? Hoodies leave the face exposed. Ski masks arouse suspicion in temperate weather, as do Halloween masks all but one night a year, and stocking masks at any time. Obviously, they should have put on Islamic full body covers that show only the eyes (niqabs) or nothing at all (burqas). These garments have multiple and unique virtues, totally hiding the wearers identity; being legitimate attire in any weather and in any place; permitting the discreet transport of weapons; giving off the helpfully false impression of being worn by women, which both reduces suspicion and misleads witnesses; usefully creating a social barrier; maximizing personal prerogatives; and being ideologically appropriate, sending an unmistakable Islamist signal. (…) One must expect future non-suicide bombers to turn to niqabs or burqas. (As many terrorists and criminals repeatedly have done so.). But why wait for them to engage in more murders? Why close the barn door only after the horse has run away? Far smarter would be to ban the niqab and burqa in public places now, before tragedy occurs. Daniel Pipes
L’attaque de Bourgas était une attaque sur le sol européen contre un Etat membre de l’Union européenne. Nous espérons que les Européens vont tirer les conclusions qui s’imposent. Les conclusions annoncées par la Bulgarie aujourd’hui sont claires: le Hezbollah était directement responsable de cette atrocité. Il n’y a qu’un seul Hezbollah, c’est une organisation unique avec un commandement unique. C’est une nouvelle confirmation de ce que nous savions déjà: que le Hezbollah et son parrain l’Iran orchestrent une campagne terroriste à travers les pays et les continents. Benjamin Netanyahou
Il y a des informations concernant des financements et une appartenance au Hezbollah de deux personnes, dont l’auteur de l’attentat. (Ces personnes) possédaient des passeports de l’Australie et du Canada" et "vivaient sur le territoire libanais depuis 2006 et 2010. Tsvetan Tsvetanov (ministre bulgare de l’Intérieur)
Tamerlan Tsarnaev a été entendu en 2011 par la police américaine après l’avertissement d’un pays étranger, a confirmé vendredi le FBI, qui pourrait ainsi être placé dans l’embarras. Les autorités du pays en question, qui n’a pas été précisé, le soupçonnaient d’être «un adepte de l’islam radical» sur le point de quitter les Etats-Unis pour rejoindre un mouvement armé, a précisé le FBI vendredi soir. L’audition de Tamerlan Tsarnaev et de sa famille n’a pas permis «de découvrir une quelconque activité terroriste», pas plus que les recherches concernant leurs déplacements, leurs activités sur internet ou leur entourage, ajoute l’agence. 20 minutes
A l’été 1996, le monde avait les yeux rivés sur Atlanta pour les Jeux olympiques. Sous la protection et les auspices du régime de Washington, des millions de personnes étaient venues pour célébrer les idéaux du monde socialiste. Les multinationales ont dépensé des milliards de dollars et Washington avait mis en place une armée de sécurité pour protéger le meilleur de ces jeux. (…) L’objectif de l’attaque du 27 juillet était de confondre, de mettre en colère et dans l’embarras le gouvernement de Washington aux yeux du monde pour son abominable autorisation de l’avortement à la demande. Le plan était de forcer l’annulation des Jeux, ou au moins de créer un état d’insécurité, pour vider les rues autour des lieux et ainsi rendre inutiles les vastes sommes d’argent investies. Le plan sur lequel je me suis finalement rabattu était d’utiliser cinq explosifs chronométrés low-tech à placer un à la fois et en des jours successifs tout au long du calendrier olympique, chacun précédé d’un avertissement de quarante à cinquante minutes sur le 911. Les lieu et heure de la détonation devaient être donnés, et l’intention était de ce fait de faire évacuer chacune des zones visées, laissant seuls exposés au risque potentiel de blessure les forces de l’ordre en uniforme et armées. « Les attaques devaient commencer dès le début des Jeux olympiques, mais en raison d’un manque de planification, cela a été reporté d’une semaine. J’avais espéré sincèrement atteindre ces objectifs sans nuire à des civils innocents. Eric Randolph
Aux Etats-Unis, les musulmans sont plus résistants, mais pas à l’abri du message radical. Malgré les perspectives économiques, la puissante force d’attraction des racines religieuses des individus et de l’identité peut parfois prendre le dessus sur la nature assimilatrice de la société américaine, faite de réussite professionnelle, stabilité financière et confort matériel. Mitchell Silber et Arvin Bhatt
Certains utiliseront cette menace comme un argument contre l’immigration, mais cela serait punir tout le monde pour les péchés de quelques uns. La menace radicale intérieure est vraiment un argument à la vigilance, notamment au sein de communautés enclines à produire des terroristes. Autrement dit, surveiller les groupes d’étudiants étrangers aux États-Unis, certaines communautés d’immigrants qui ont produit des jihadistes et, oui, même les mosquées et d’autres lieux musulmans. L’important est d’être assez familier avec ces communautés, pour connaître et être suffisamment en confance avec leurs dirigeants de sorte que ces hommes et ces femmes alertent les forces de l’ordre lorsque que l’un de leurs membres semble s’être radicalisé. Cela offense certains défenseurs des libertés civiles et l’Associated Press qui s’en sont pris à la police de New York pour la pratique dans une série d’histoires en 2011. Dans le sillage de Boston, cela semble particulièrement peu judicieux. Les policiers de New York disent qu’ils ont poursuivi leur surveillance, en vertu de garanties juridiques appropriées, et nous espérons qu’ils continueront. Le gouvernement américain surveille des groupes extrémistes de droite, parce que nous savons qu’ils sont dangereux. La police ne devrait pas s’abstenir de faire la même chose pour les groupes musulmans ou immigrés simplement parce que cela serait jugé moins politiquement correct. Comme le montrent les événements de la semaine à Boston, ne pas le faire serait bien trop coûteux. Le Wall Street Journal

Attention: un scandale peut en cacher un autre !

Responsable de l’attentat des Jeux d’Atlanta accusé d’attaque indiscriminée de civils alors qu’en alertant la police 45 minutes auparavant il avait tout fait pour l’éviter, groupe suprémaciste texan faussement soupçonné d’avoir tué un juge et son épouse, organisation terroriste libanaise et ses commanditaires iraniens contraints de déployer leurs actions jusqu’en Bulgarie devant le refus indu de l’Europe de toute reconnaissance digne de ce nom …

Alors qu’au lendemain de la mort et de la capture des Mérah américains responsables de la dernière tuerie islamiste en date …

Une opinion et des médias obsédés par les groupes extrémistes de droite continuent comme si de rien n’était leur refus de voir l’évidence …

Pendant qu’après la Maison Blanche, Hollywood se décide enfin à reconnaitre leur dû aux Weathermen et les parlementaires français comme néo-zélandais l’avancée incommensurable du mariage pour tous

Comment ne pas voir avec le WSJ…

Sous prétexte de correction politique et face aux efforts toujours plus méritants des musulmans et de leurs soutiens d’extrême-gauche se tuant littéralement à prouver leur bonne volonté meurtrière

La scandaleuse injustice d’une surveillance policière réservée aux seuls groupes extémistes de droite ?

The Brothers Tsarnaev

Mohsin Hamid

The WSJ

April 20, 2013

The terrorist suspects next door.

Events in Boston were moving so quickly on Friday that it’s impossible to draw too many conclusions. But the emergence of Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev as the chief terror suspects who paralyzed a great American city deserves at least some reflection.

One consoling thought is the admirable behavior of the citizens of greater Boston and its law enforcers. The point may seem banal, but it’s no small matter that the public largely heeded the government’s orders to stay off the streets and take the day off so police could track down the younger brother, 19-year-old Dzhokhar, who was captured Friday night after a day-long manhunt.

Bostonians have endured enormous disruption this week, but the city has shown a remarkable civility and calm throughout it all. Many lives were saved because of the rapid triage work by volunteers at the bomb scene. Bloomberg News reports that one of the marathon bombing’s victims also helped the FBI identify a suspect after he awoke from surgery at the hospital. The suspect had dropped a bag at Jeff Bauman’s feet and looked him in the eye minutes before it exploded. Mr. Bauman lost both legs below the knee but got his man.

As for the brothers, we will learn more about their motives, their training and whether they acted alone or as part of a network. What we have already learned is that they are immigrants from Chechnya, of the Muslim faith, and that 26-year old Tamerlan was uncomfortable in American society despite having lived here for about a decade.

The Associated Press reported that he was quoted in a Boston University student magazine in 2010 as saying, "I don’t have a single American friend. I don’t understand them." Mother Jones reported that a video attributed to a Tamerlan Tsarnaev extolled an extremist religious prophecy associated with al Qaeda. None of this is definitive but it might be illustrative.

If such alienation turned to jihad, it would not be the first time. The radicalization of young Muslims in the West, in particular children of the well-off, is by now a familiar story. The London bombers of 2005 were middle-class Pakistani immigrants from Birmingham. Faisal Shahzad, the failed Times Square bomber, was a naturalized citizen from Pakistan.

After the London bombings, many Americans took comfort in the belief that immigrants to the U.S. are better assimilated than they are in Europe. But that may be more conceit than fact, at least in regard to some young men. "My Son the Fanatic" is a novella by Hanif Kureishi that speaks to the difficulties of acculturation of second-generation Muslims. The recent Pulitzer Prize- winning play, "Disgraced," covers related ground.

Mitchell Silber and Arvin Bhatt explained how this can evolve into a threat in an instructive paper for the New York Police Department in 2007,

"Radicalization in the West: The Homegrown Threat." The intelligence analysts looked at several cases here and abroad and described the process by which otherwise "unremarkable" men leading regular lives become jihadists.

"Muslims in the U.S. are more resistant, but not immune to the radical message," they wrote. "Despite the economic opportunities in the United States, the powerful gravitational pull of individuals’ religious roots and identity sometimes supersedes the assimilating nature of American society which includes pursuit of a professional career, financial stability and material comforts." The Tsarnaev brothers may be an example.

Some will use this threat as an argument against immigration, but that would punish everyone for the sins of a few. The "homegrown" radical threat is really an argument for vigilance, especially within communities prone to producing terrorists.

This means surveilling foreign student groups in the U.S., certain immigrant communities that have produced jihadists, and, yes, even mosques and other Muslim venues. The key is to be familiar enough with these communities, to know and be trusted enough by their leaders, so those man and women will alert law enforcers when someone appears to have become radicalized.

This offends some civil libertarians, and the Associated Press excoriated the NYPD for the practice in a series of stories in 2011. In the wake of Boston, this looks notably misguided. New York’s police say they’ve kept at it, under appropriate legal safeguards, and we hope they will continue.

The U.S. government watches right-wing extremist groups because we know they are dangerous. The police shouldn’t refrain from doing the same to Muslim or immigrant groups merely because that is deemed less politically correct. As the week’s events in Boston show, the costs of doing otherwise are too high.

Voir aussi:

Tamerlan Tsarnaev a été entendu en 2011 par le FBI

20 minutes

20/04/2013

ETATS-UNIS – Le FBI l’a confirmé. Il pourrait ainsi être placé dans l’embarras…

Tamerlan Tsarnaev a été entendu en 2011 par la police américaine après l’avertissement d’un pays étranger, a confirmé vendredi le FBI, qui pourrait ainsi être placé dans l’embarras. Les autorités du pays en question, qui n’a pas été précisé, le soupçonnaient d’être «un adepte de l’islam radical» sur le point de quitter les Etats-Unis pour rejoindre un mouvement armé, a précisé le FBI vendredi soir. L’audition de Tamerlan Tsarnaev et de sa famille n’a pas permis «de découvrir une quelconque activité terroriste», pas plus que les recherches concernant leurs déplacements, leurs activités sur internet ou leur entourage, ajoute l’agence.

«Un coup monté», selon la mère des deux suspects

Interrogée par le service en langue anglaise de la chaîne de télévision Russia Today, la mère des deux suspects a pour sa part affirmé que son fils aîné était surveillé par le FBI depuis au moins trois ans et que la police fédérale américaine était parfaitement au courant de ses activités. «Il était contrôlé par le FBI depuis quelque chose comme trois à cinq ans», a dit Zoubeidat Tsarnaeva, employant en anglais le faux-ami du mot russe signifiant «surveiller». «Ils savaient ce que mon fils était en train de faire, ils savaient quels sites il consultait sur internet» a-t-elle ajouté.

D’après Russia Today, qui l’a interrogée au téléphone, Zoubeidat Tsarnaeva se trouvait à Makhachkala, la ville du Daguestan où elle réside. Comme Anzor, leur père interrogé vendredi par les médias, Zoubeidat Tsarnaeva pense que ses enfants ont été manipulés. «C’est vraiment, vraiment difficile à entendre. Et en tant que mère, tout ce que je peux dire, c’est que je suis vraiment convaincue, je suis sûre à 100% qu’il s’agit d’un coup monté» a-t-elle dit. On ignore donc d’où provenait l’avertissement mentionné par le FBI mais Tamerlan Tsarnaev aurait effectué un voyage en Russie l’année dernière.

«Très perturbant de savoir qu’il était sur les écrans radar du FBI»

Les deux suspects, originaires de Tchétchénie, sont nés au Kirghizistan et vivaient depuis une dizaine d’années aux Etats-Unis, où rien ne pouvait laisser croire qu’il s’agissait d’extrémistes. Le cadet a la nationalité américaine Rien n’indiquait jusqu’ici que les frères Tsarnaev étaient connus des services de police.

«C’est une information nouvelle pour moi et c’est très perturbant de savoir qu’il était sur les écrans radar du FBI» a réagi Michael McCaul, député républicain du Texas et président de la commission Sécurité de la Chambre des représentants. Les services de sécurité américains avaient auparavant indiqué ne disposer d’aucune information permettant d’établir un lien entre les frères Tsarnaev et un mouvement islamiste tel qu’Al Qaïda.

Voir également:

Procureurs assassinés au Texas : un ex-juge et sa femme incriminés

France info

18 Avril 2013

Deux procureurs ont été tués dans l’Etat du Texas, en janvier puis fin mars dernier. Après avoir soupçonné un groupe de défense de la suprémacie de la race blanche, l’enquête a connu un rebondissement ces derniers jours. Un ancien juge de paix et sa femme ont été mis en accusation.

L’affaire avait suscité beaucoup d’émoi au Texas le mois dernier. Non seulement le procureur du comté de Kaufman, près de Dallas et sa femme avaient été retrouvés morts chez eux. Mais en plus, il ne s’agissait pas du premier crime. Un autre procureur travaillant dans le même bureau avait été assassiné deux mois plus tôt.

De quoi envisager aussitôt un lien entre les deux affaires. Les enquêteurs avaient même poussé le raisonnement jusqu’à relier ces deux meurtres, à un troisième, celui du directeur d’une prison dans le Colorado le 19 mars. Dans leur ligne de mire : un groupe de "suprémacistes", la Fraternité aryenne.

De la fausse piste aux arrestations

Mais la piste s’est avérée fausse. Car les recherches ont éloigné les enquêteurs de cette piste d’extrême droite, pour les conduire à un email anonyme annonçant d’autres attaques, et à un ancien juge de paix, renvoyé pour avoir été confondu dans une affaire de vol. Tout est alors allé très vite.

L’ancien magistrat a été arrêté samedi, et accusé de "menace à caractère terroriste", pour avoir rédigé cet email. Quand à sa femme, elle a "avoué son implication dans la planification et la mise à exécution des meurtres par balle", indique son mandat d’arrestation. Mise en accusation mercredi, elle a néanmoins affirmé que c’est son mari qui avait appuyé sur la gâchette.

Voir encore:

Deux procureurs assassinés au Texas, les "suprémacistes" suspectés

France info

1 Avril 2013

Un procureur a été retrouvé mort samedi dans le comté de Kaufman, près de Dallas au Texas. Deux mois après le meurtre de son adjoint et deux semaines après celui d’un directeur de prison. Coïncidences ? Les autorités locales en doutent et soupçonnent un groupe de défenseurs de la race blanche.

Le FBI, les Texas Rangers et d’autres services judiciaires participent à l’enquête sur le meurtre du procureur et sa femme © Reuters – Shannon Stapleton

Il y a deux mois, le procureur de Kaufman Mike McLelland, ancien GI’s de l’opération Tempête du désert en Irak jouait les fier-à-bras, promettant une traque sans fin à la "racaille" qui venait d’assassiner son adjoint, Franck Hasse. Il ne quittait jamais son arme, "même pour promener son chien", disait-il, se décrivant comme "un soldat". Pourtant, il a été retrouvé mort samedi, chez lui, à quelques kilomètres de Dallas, avec son épouse, le corps criblé de balles. Selon les témoignages, le couple aurait été abattu par un ou deux hommes, visages masqués.

"Une attaque ciblée", affirme la police qui refuse de tirer des conclusions trop hâtives, mais estime tout de même que deux meurtres de procureurs à deux mois d’intervalle, dans une ville de 106.000 habitants, c’est un peu trop pour n’être qu’une coïncidence.

Sur les traces de la Fraternité aryenne

Dans le viseur des autorités, la Fraternité aryenne, prônant la défense de la suprématie blanche. Un premier lien avait été établi après le meurtre de Franck Hasse, meurtre perpétré le 19 janvier, jour où le département de la Justice avait annoncé par communiqué l’ouverture d’une enquête par le bureau du procureur de Kaufman contre ce groupe d’extrême droite pour une affaire de racket.

Mais l’affaire ne s’arrêterait pas là. Car le FBI s’est déjà intéressé aux liens entre le meurtre de Franck Hasse et celui du directeur d’une prison du Colorado le 19 mars. Le suspect principal de ce dernier assassinat, mort dans une course-poursuite avec la police deux jours plus tard, faisait précisément partie de la Fraternité aryenne et portait des tatouages de croix gammées.

>>> Si vous avez du mal à suivre, le New York Times a tenté de remonter le temps pour illustrer les possibles connections entre ces différentes affaires.

La branche texane de la Fraternité aryenne est présentée comme un gang responsable de meurtres, d’incendies criminels, d’agressions et autres crimes. Il est décrit comme "enclin à la violence et aux menaces violentes pour maintenir une discipline interne ainsi qu’à des représailles contre les personnes soupçonnées de collaborer avec les forces de l’ordre". La Fraternité aryenne ("Aryan brotherhood") fait partie de la mouvance suprémaciste, qui comme son nom l’indique, revendique la suprématie de la race blanche. Des groupuscules surveillés de près par la SLPC aux États-Unis.

Voir encore:

Hezbollah : les révélations des enquêteurs bulgares

Alexandre Lévy

Le Figaro

07/02/2013

Le Figaro a recueilli des confidences sur le rapport top secret de la Commission nationale de sécurité bulgare qui a conclu à la responsabilité du Hezbollah dans l’attentat de Burgas contre un bus israélien en 2012.

Jacque Filipe Martin, Ralph William Rico et Brian Jameson. Deux jeunes Canadiens et un Australien sur les bords de la mer Noire à l’été 2012. Des touristes en goguette? Non, pour les autorités bulgares, ces trois hommes sont les responsables de l’attentat anti-israélien du 18 juillet 2012 qui a fait six morts et une trentaine de blessés à l’aéroport de Burgas, à l’est du pays.

Le premier y a laissé sa peau, déchiqueté par la charge explosive de plus de 3 kg qu’il transportait dans son sac à dos; ses deux complices sont repartis, via un autre pays européen, vers le Liban dont ils sont tous originaires. Des binationaux, le «cauchemar» des services de sécurité.

«Toutes les pistes mènent à Beyrouth»

«Toutes les pistes mènent à Beyrouth», résume un responsable policier au lendemain de la session extraordinaire du Conseil de sécurité, le 5 février, à l’issue duquel Sofia a officiellement mis en cause le Hezbollah dans cet acte sans précédent sur le sol bulgare. «Il y a des informations concernant des financements et une appartenance au Hezbollah de deux personnes», a affirmé le ministre de l’Intérieur Tsvetan Tsvetanov, après six heures de débats à huis clos pendant lesquels les membres du Conseil ont pris connaissance du rapport préliminaire établi par les services de sécurité bulgares et leurs partenaires occidentaux sur cette affaire – un texte classé «secret-défense».

Grâce aux confidences de certains des membres du Conseil, on peut néanmoins établir les éléments qui ont permis cette mise en cause tant attendue par Washington et Tel-Aviv qui se sont empressés de remettre la pression sur l’Union européenne pour qu’elle reconnaisse le Hezbollah comme «organisation terroriste».

Les terroristes voulaient faire un maximum de victimes

Les transferts d’argent en provenance du Liban tout d’abord. Ils avaient pour destinataire le porteur du passeport australien du trio, que les enquêteurs considèrent comme l’artificier du groupe. Les faux permis de conduire américains retrouvés en Bulgarie étaient tous fabriqués dans le même atelier libanais – un lieu «connu» des services de renseignement occidentaux.

Les enquêteurs bulgares disposeraient également d’une photo sur laquelle figureraient des proches parents de l’un des présumés terroristes aux côtés de membres du Hezbollah. Enfin, les policiers ont également établi avec exactitude le timing des déplacements du trio. Ils sont arrivés par avion en Bulgarie munis de leurs véritables passeports, après avoir transité par trois autres pays européens. Mais leur point de départ était Beyrouth, où, selon, le patron de l’antigang de Sofia, Stanimir Florov, les deux survivants se trouvent aujourd’hui.

Autre conclusion importante: l’explosion sur le parking de l’aéroport de Burgas, présentée comme un attentat suicide au début, est aujourd’hui considérée comme «accidentelle». «Les terroristes voulaient faire exploser la bombe à distance dans le bus en mouvement, faisant ainsi le maximum de victimes tout en effaçant leurs traces. Mais soit le porteur de la bombe a fait une mauvaise manipulation, soit il s’est fait avoir par ses coéquipiers», affirme une source policière.

Ayant reconstitué le parcours des trois hommes en Bulgarie, les enquêteurs sont également persuadés qu’ils n’avaient pas un comportement de fanatiques islamiques mais plutôt de «James Bond en herbe». Et ils n’ont boudé les plaisirs de la vie. «Ils ont fréquenté des hôtels de charme et des restaurants fins, souvent joliment accompagnés», disent-ils.

Ottawa a confirmé que l’un de ses ressortissants est bien impliqué dans cet attentat, précisant qu’il a quitté le sol canadien à l’âge de 12 ans. Les autorités australiennes sont également à la recherche de «Brian», alors que le gouvernement libanais s’est engagé à «coopérer» avec les enquêteurs bulgares. La véritable identité du troisième terroriste, mort dans l’attentat, reste en revanche un mystère. «Force est de constater que les organisateurs de cet attentat ont trouvé un homme que personne ne pleure, ni ne regrette», conclut un policier occidental spécialisé dans la lutte antiterroriste.

Voir enfin:

The Homegrown Terrorist Threat to the US Homeland (ARI)

Lorenzo Vidino

ARI 171/2009

18/12/2009

Theme: Radicalisation into violence affects some small segments of the American Muslim population and recent events show that a threat from homegrown terrorism of jihadist inspiration does exist in the US.

Summary: The wave of arrests and thwarted plots recently seen in the US has severely undermined the long-held assumption that American Muslims, unlike their European counterparts, are virtually immune to radicalisation. In reality, as argued in this ARI, evidence also existed before the autumn of 2009, highlighting how radicalisation affected some small segments of the American Muslim population exactly like it affects some fringe pockets of the Muslim population of each European country. After putting forth this argument, this paper analyses the five concurring reasons traditionally used to explain the divergence between the levels of radicalisation in Europe and the US: better economic conditions, lack of urban ghettoes, lower presence of recruiting networks, different demographics and a more inclusive sense of citizenship. While all these characteristics still hold true, they no longer represent a guarantee, as other factors such as perception of discrimination and frustration at US foreign policies could lead to radicalisation. Finally, the paper looks at the post-9/11 evolution of the homegrown terrorist threat to the US homeland and examines possible future scenarios.[1]

Analysis: The American authorities and public have been shocked by the tragic events of 5 November 2009, when Army Major Nidal Malik Hasan allegedly opened fire against fellow soldiers inside the Fort Hood military base, killing 13 people and wounding 30 others. The shooting triggered a heated debate over Major Hasan’s motives. Earlier analyses focused on personal and psychological factors, such as his alleged distress towards his forthcoming deployment to Iraq and the abuses he had reportedly suffered from other soldiers. As the days went by, more and more evidence surfaced pointing to Major Hasan’s radical Islamist sympathies. Colleagues and acquaintances described many instances in which the Virginia-born Army psychiatrist had expressed extremely negative feelings towards the US and praised acts of violence against it. Reports also indicated that the FBI had investigated Major Hasan’s e-mail conversations with Anwar al Awlaqi, a US-born Yemeni-based cleric known for his fiery rhetoric and links to two of the 9/11 hijackers.

Authorities have so far been reluctant to officially label the Fort Hood shooting an act of terrorism and, at the time of writing, various investigations are exploring all angles of this tragic event. While it might be premature, if ever possible, to identify the full spectrum of motives behind Major Hasan’s actions, it is fair to say that radical Islamist ideology had an influence on his worldview. In any case, the Fort Hood shooting comes at the tail end of two months that have challenged many of the assumptions on terrorism and radicalisation in the US that have shaped the debate for more than a decade. Since September 2009, in fact, a staggering series of arrests has taken place on US soil:

On 20 September, FBI agents arrested two Afghan immigrants in Colorado and one in New York.[2] According to the authorities, one of the men, Najibullah Zazi, had trained in an al-Qaeda training camp in Pakistan and, once back in the US, had purchased large quantities of chemical substances in various beauty supply stores. Zazi allegedly intended to mix the substances and detonate them against targets throughout the New York metropolitan area. The authorities described Zazi’s plot as the most serious threat against the US homeland uncovered since 9/11.[3]

On 24 September, a 19-year-old Jordanian immigrant was arrested for having parked what he believed to be a car bomb in the car park of a 60-story skyscraper in downtown Dallas, Texas.4 Before driving the car to the site, Hosam Hamer Husein Smadi had made a video which he believed would have been sent to Osama bin Laden.[5]

On the same day but in an unrelated plot, Michael C. Finton, a 29-year-old American-born convert to Islam, parked a car that he also believed laden with explosives outside a federal courthouse in Springfield, Illinois.[6] In both the Finton and the Smadi cases, federal agents had approached the two men after unearthing information about their desire to commit acts of violence, led them to believe they were affiliated to al-Qaeda and supplied them with explosives that the men wrongly believed to be active.

On 21 October, the authorities indicted two Boston-area natives, Tarek Mehanna and Ahmad Abousamra, with various conspiracy charges.[7] According to the indictment, the men, who had been extremely active in online jihadist forums, had been trying to join various al-Qaeda affiliates since 2001 and had also planned attacks inside the US (reportedly targeting a local shopping mall and various US government officials).

On 27 October, the authorities arrested two long-time Chicago residents of Pakistani descent and charged them with conspiracy to provide material support and/or to commit terrorist acts against overseas targets.[8] According to the charges the two men had been in close contact with senior leaders of Pakistani jihadist groups Lashkar e Taiba and Harakat ul Jihad Islami and one of them, Daood Gilani, had travelled to Denmark to conduct surveillance of the facilities of the Danish newspaper Jyllands Posten for a possible attack against it. On 7 December the authorities charged Gilani also with conducting surveillance of various targets in Mumbai in the two years preceding the deadly November 2008 attack on the Indian city. According to the indictment, upon accepting the task Gilani changed his name to David Headley and travelled at least five times to Mumbai, confident that his new name and American passport would not attract the attention of the Indian authorities. After each trip he travelled to Pakistan, where he shared the pictures, videotapes and notes he had taken with senior Lashkar e Taiba operatives.[9]

On 28 October, the federal authorities in Detroit proceeded to arrest 11 members of Ummah, a group of mostly African-American converts to Islam, on charges that ranged from mail fraud to illegal possession and sale of firearms. Most suspects were arrested without opposing resistance, but Luqman Ameen Abdullah (alias Christopher Thomas), the group’s leader, fired at agents and was subsequently killed. While the case cannot be considered a full-fledged terrorism investigation, it nevertheless involves a US-based radical Islamist network. Ummah, in fact, is a group that, according to authorities, ‘seeks to establish a separate Sharia-law governed state within the United States’ and whose members have been involved in violent acts in the past.[10]

Finally, in early December, the Pakistani authorities arrested five American Muslims in the city of Sargodha. The five, all US citizens in their late teens and early 20s who had gone missing from their northern Virginia homes a few days earlier, had reportedly been in touch via the Internet with senior militants of various al-Qaeda-affiliated organisations and allegedly intended to train with local outfits to fight against US forces.[11]

All these plots are very diverse in their origin, degree of sophistication and characteristics of the individuals involved. Yet they all contribute to paint the picture of the complex and rapidly changing reality of terrorism of Islamist inspiration in the US. Moreover, they smash or, at least, severely undermine an assumption that has been widely held by policymakers and analysts over the last 15 years. The common wisdom, in fact, has traditionally been that American Muslims, unlike their European counterparts, were virtually immune to radicalisation. Europeans, argued this narrative, have been unable to integrate their immigrant Muslim population and radicalisation is the inevitable by-product of the discrimination and socio-economic disparity suffered by European Muslims. America, on the other hand, is more open to its immigrants and has been able to integrate its Muslims, making them impervious to radicalisation.

The wave of arrests of the last months of 2009 has contributed to shedding light on a reality that is significantly more nuanced, showing that radicalisation affects some small segments of the American Muslim population exactly like it affects some fringe pockets of the Muslim population of each European country. Evidence supporting this view has been available for a long time, as the cases of American Muslims joining radical Islamist groups date back to the 1970s.[12] According to data collected by the NYU Center on Law and Security, for example, more than 500 individuals have been convicted by the American authorities for terrorism-related charges since 9/11.[13] Most of them are US citizens or long-time US residents who underwent radicalisation inside the US. While making a numerically accurate comparison is not easy, it is fair to say that the number of American Muslims involved in violent activities is either equal or only slightly lower than that of any European country with a comparable Muslim population.

Yet, despite this evidence, for a long time the American authorities and commentators seemed unable to acknowledge the existence of radicalisation among small segments of the American Muslim population. In the FBI’s parlance, for example, until 2005, the term ‘homegrown terrorism’ was still reserved for domestic organisations such as anti-government militias, white supremacists and eco-terrorist groups such as the Earth Liberation Front. Such groups were termed ‘homegrown’ to distinguish them from jihadist terrorist networks, even though some of the latter possessed some of the very same characteristics (membership born and raised in the US and a focus on US targets). Since the cause of the jihadists was perceived to be foreign, the US government did not label them as ‘homegrown’, despite the typically homegrown characteristics of many of them.

The July 2005 attacks in London led the US authorities to look at the homegrown issue with renewed attention. As an increasing number of cells that clearly possessed homegrown characteristics were uncovered throughout the country, the authorities began to re-assess the definition of homegrown. By 2006 top FBI and DHS officials began to openly speak of homegrown terrorism of jihadist inspiration inside the US, even describing it as a threat ‘as dangerous as groups like al-Qaeda, if not more so’.[14] As a consequence of this reassessment, the US authorities began to ask themselves if the emergence of relatively large numbers of radicalised second-generation Muslims that had been observed in Europe could also take place in the US. This fear led to an increased attention on the dynamics and causes of radicalisation among Muslims in both Europe and North America.

Comparing Radicalisation in Europe and America

Five concurring reasons have traditionally been used to explain the divergence between the levels of radicalisation in Europe and the US. The first one is related to the significantly better economic conditions of American Muslims. While European Muslims generally languish at the bottom of most rankings that measure economic integration, American Muslims fare significantly better, and the average American Muslim household’s income is equal to, if not higher, than the average American’s.[15] As the many cases of militants who came from privileged backgrounds have proved, economic integration is not always an antidote to radicalisation, but it is undeniable that radical ideas find a fertile environment among unemployed and disenfranchised youth. A direct consequence of economic integration is the lack of Muslim ghettoes in the US. Areas of large European cities with a high concentration of poor Muslim immigrants have been ideological sanctuaries where radicals could freely spread their message and where radical Islam has become a sort of counterculture. The American Muslim community’s economic conditions have prevented the formation of such enclaves in the US.

Geographic dispersion, immigration patterns and tougher immigration policies have also prevented the formation of extensive recruiting and propaganda networks as those that have sprung up in Europe. While places such as Brooklyn’s al-Farooq mosque or Tucson’s Islamic Center saw extensive jihadist activities in the 1990s, they pale in comparison to recruiting headquarters such as London’s Finsbury Park, Hamburg’s al-Quds mosque or Milan’s Islamic Cultural Institute. Moreover, the fact that large segments of the American Muslim population belong to ethnicities that have traditionally espoused moderate interpretations of Islam has been cited as another reason for America’s lower levels of radicalism. In fact, Muslims from the Iranian and Indian American communities, which account for vast segments of America’s Muslim population, have traditionally embraced moderate forms of Islam and have been, to varying degrees, almost impervious to radicalisation.

Finally, commentators have often pointed out that America is a country built on immigration, traditionally accepting immigrants of all races and religions as citizens. European countries, on the other hand, have been unable to develop a sense of citizenship not linked to century-long identifying factors such as ethnicity and religious affiliation. In a nutshell, it is easy to become American, while it is very difficult for immigrants, particularly if they are not white and Christian, to be accepted as full-fledged Germans, Frenchmen or Spaniards. This sense of exclusion is traditionally cited as one of the factors driving some European Muslims to radicalisation, while the more inclusive nature of American society would prevent American Muslims from undergoing the same process.

While all these characteristics still hold true, they no longer represent a guarantee. Factors such as perception of discrimination and frustration at US foreign policies could lead to radicalisation, irrespective of favourable economic conditions. Experts and community leaders have repeatedly warned about the growing alienation of American Muslims, particularly among those of the second generation. These frustrations could produce what Steven Simon refers to as ‘a rejectionist generation’, which could embrace radical interpretations of Islam.[16] The same conclusion has been reached by a widely publicised report released by the New York Police Department Intelligence Division in 2007. ‘Despite the economic opportunities in the United States’, reads the report, ‘the powerful gravitational pull of individuals’ religious roots and identity sometimes supersedes the assimilating nature of American society which includes pursuit of a professional career, financial stability and material comforts’.[17]

Future Scenarios

The terrorist threat to the US homeland has evolved significantly over the last eight years. Until mid-2003 virtually all of the terrorist conspiracies intended to strike against American soil had been planned, albeit with varying degrees of involvement, by Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (KSM) and al-Qaeda’s central leadership. The arrest of KSM and many of his top lieutenants, al-Qaeda’s loss of the Afghan sanctuary and the significant improvement in homeland security measures triggered a shift that began to materialise in late 2003. With the exception of the 2006 Transatlantic Plot, a plot hatched by UK-based militants apparently directed by al-Qaeda members in Pakistan to detonate liquid explosives on board several US-bound flights, every single attack against the American homeland thwarted by US authorities since then appears to have been conceived by individuals acting independently from al-Qaeda’s leadership.[19]

The individuals involved in these plots have been an odd mix of low-ranking al-Qaeda affiliates and jihad enthusiasts who had never had any contact with al-Qaeda or other established organisations. And most of them have been characterised by the absolute operational independence of the planners. The result of this shift from leader-led to homegrown has been a remarkable decrease in the sophistication of the operations planned, as most of the plotters were amateurish if not embarrassingly clumsy, lacking the basic tradecraft and capabilities to operate undetected or mount any sort of sophisticated attack.

While this was true until a few months ago, there are indications that things are changing. Recent investigations have shown that a small yet increasing number of American Muslims have been travelling to Pakistan to acquire operational skills and establish contacts with various jihadist outfits. One well known case is that of Bryant Neal Vinas, a 26 year-old Long Island native who was captured in Pakistan and brought back to the US in November 2008.[20] Vinas, who had allegedly participated in a rocket attack against a US military base in Afghanistan, decided to cooperate with American interrogators and has since provided ‘an intelligence gold mine’.[21] Thanks to Vinas’ information the authorities have been able to identify and arrest several American and European militants who had also trained with al-Qaeda and affiliated groups in the Afghanistan/Pakistan region.

While this ‘Pakistan connection’ is not new to the European authorities, it is a disturbing new development for their American counterparts. To be sure, Americans had trained with various Afghanistan/Pakistan-based jihadist outfits before and after 9/11. In 2003, for example, the US authorities dismantled the so-called ‘paintball jihad’ network in northern Virginia.[22] The network was formed by a dozen young men from the Washington suburbs who had travelled to Pakistan immediately after 9/11, where they trained with Lashkar-e-Taiba. But what seemed to be isolated cases are increasingly becoming the norm. Moreover, in the case of Vinas and at least two of the cases from the fall of 2009 (the Najibullah Zazi/New York plot and the Chicago/Denmark plot) authorities have noticed with apprehension that American militants returning from Pakistan were significantly better trained and organised than the homegrown jihadists who had been operating in the US over the last few years. The ‘Pakistan connection’, that operational link to organised outfits in the Afghanistan/Pakistan area that makes amateurish homegrown networks graduate into more professional terrorist clusters, has been crucial in the development of jihadist networks in Europe over the last five years and it now appears to have become a significant factor also in the US.

Given these dynamics, one of the scenarios that the US authorities take into particular consideration is the case of a homegrown cluster that, thanks to the directions and skills obtained from al-Qaeda or various al-Qaeda-affiliated networks in Afghanistan/Pakistan, manages to reach sufficient operational sophistication to carry out a significant attack against the American homeland.[23] And if traditionally authorities estimated that al-Qaeda’s leadership intended to strike inside the US only with a mass-casualty attack that would at least rival the actions of 9/11, lately this assessment has been revised.[24] Recent cases have shown that not only independent clusters but also American networks operating in cooperation with Afghanistan/Pakistan-based groups are focusing on less grandiose plans, considering that even a less ambitious attack –on the scale of the 2004 Madrid or 2005 London bombings– would be a success.

If Afghanistan/Pakistan is a major source of concerns, the authorities have also been monitoring the possible impact of the Somali conflict on American domestic security. Over the last few years, in fact, a few dozen young American Muslims have travelled to Somalia to fight and train alongside al-Shabaab, the local Islamist militia battling the Somali government and African Union troops. Most of them have been ethnic Somalis, sons of the large Somali diaspora community present in Minneapolis, Seattle and other American cities. One of them, 27-year-old Minneapolis college student Shirwa Ahmed, reportedly blew himself up in a suicide bombing in northern Somalia in October 2008.[25] Another four Minneapolis residents have been reported killed in the African country since then. A few non-ethnic Somali Americans have also reportedly joined al-Shabaab. While the New Jersey native of Egyptian descent Amir Mohamed Meshal and Massachusetts-born convert Daniel Maldonado have been arrested after leaving Somalia, Alabama native Omar Hammami is still very much active inside the country, starring in several English language al-Shabaab propaganda videos under the nom de guerre Abu Mansour al Amriki.

While there are no indications that al-Shabaab is planning an attack within the US, its increased focus on global issues and public support for al-Qaeda make the hypothesis not that far-fetched. Moreover, while many of the foreign fighters joining al-Shabaab, whether from the US, Europe or other regions, are Somalis driven by some sort of nationalist sentiment, others are aspiring jihadists whose interest in the African country is mostly tactical and temporary. It is safe to assume that many of them, given the opportunity, would use the skills acquired in Somalia against other targets. Questioned by American interrogators after his arrest, in fact, Daniel Maldonado described his experience in the African country with these words: ‘I would be fighting the Somali militia, and that turned into fighting the Ethiopians, and if Americans came, I would fight them too’.[26] The fact that Maldonado was in close contact with the individuals arrested in Boston in October 2009 provides additional evidence as to why the ‘Somalia connection’ is considered a serious threat.

Conclusion: Since 9/11 the American counterterrorism posture has been extraordinarily aggressive, both domestically and globally. Extensive overseas military and intelligence gathering actions, the introduction of enhanced investigative powers, a significantly improved inter-agency coordination and, in general, a constant high level of vigilance have allowed the authorities to keep the country safe from terrorist attacks. While some civil libertarians might have a point in questioning some of the tools used to do so, the achievement is nevertheless remarkable. At the same time, though, the US seems to be lacking a long-term strategy to confront the threat of radicalisation on the domestic front. The authorities have in fact been unable to conceive a policy that would pre-emptively tackle the issue of radicalisation, preventing young American Muslims from embracing extremist ideas in the first place.

Various intelligence and law enforcement agencies have reached out to the academic community to better understand the social, political and psychological causes of radicalisation. But the limited understanding of the issue, coupled with the overlap of jurisdiction between often competing federal, state and local authorities, has prevented the implementation of a systematic, nationwide programme to combat radicalisation. Solutions are, to be sure, hard to find. Europeans, who experienced the problem of radicalisation of segments of their own Muslim communities well before the US, are still struggling with the same issue and are only now attempting to put in place coherent anti-radicalisation programmes, the success of which must still be verified. Equally challenging have been the efforts, on both sides of the Atlantic, to find reliable and representative organisations within various Muslim communities to be employed as partners in anti-radicalisation activities. Clearly, more attention and analysis should be devoted to the issue. But the awareness that homegrown terrorism of jihadist inspiration does exist in the US is a necessary starting point. The events of the fall of 2009 provided, if needed, additional evidence to suggest so.

Lorenzo Vidino

Fellow at the Initiative on Religion in International Affairs, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and a Peace Scholar at the US Institute of Peace

[1] It goes without saying that various forms of homegrown terrorism have long threatened the US, some of them well before those of jihadist inspiration. Right-wing militias, radical environmentalist groups and, to a lesser degree, some fringe left-wing and anarchist groups are very much active inside the country and have occasionally carried out violent acts over the last few years. Yet it is undeniable that, in terms of magnitude, frequency and sophistication, homegrown terrorism of jihadist inspiration currently represents the most immediate threat against the US and is therefore the subject of this analysis.

[2]http://www.fbi.gov/pressrel/pressrel09/zazi_092009.htm.

[3] Kevin Johnson, ‘Alleged terror threat seen as “most serious” since 9/11 attacks’, USA Today, 25/IX/2009.

[4]http://dallas.fbi.gov/dojpressrel/pressrel09/dl092409.htm.

[5] Jon Nielsen, ‘FBI says Dallas terror plot suspect made video to send to Osama bin Laden’, Dallas Morning News, 5/X/ 2009.

[6] http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/ilc/press/2009/09September/24Finton.html.

[7] http://boston.fbi.gov/dojpressrel/pressrel09/bs102109a.htm.

[8] http://www.justice.gov/usao/iln/pr/chicago/2009/pr1027_01.pdf.

[9] http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2009/December/09-nsd-1304.html.

[10] http://detroit.fbi.gov/dojpressrel/pressrel09/de102809.htm.

[11] Waqar Gilani & Jane Perlez, ‘5 US Men Arrested Said to Plan Jihad Training’, New York Times, 11/XII/2009.

[12] For an overview, see Lorenzo Vidino, ‘Homegrown Jihadist Terrorism in the United States: A New and Occasional Phenomenon?’, Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, vol. 32, 1/I/2009, p. 1-17.

[13] http://www.lawandsecurity.org/publications/TTRCHighlightsSept25th.pdf.

[14] Remarks of FBI Director Robert Muller, City Club of Cleveland, 23/VI/2006.

[15] Muslim Americans: Middle Class and Mostly Mainstream, Pew Research Center, 22/V/2007, p. 24-5.

[16] Steven Simon, Statement before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, 12/IX/2006.

[17] Report by Mitchell D. Silber and Arvin Bhatt, New York Police Department Intelligence Division, Radicalization in the West: The Homegrown Threat, August 2007, p. 8.

[18] Bruce Hoffman, ‘The Use of the Internet by Islamic Extremists’, Testimony before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, 4/V/2006.

[19] Vidino, ‘Homegrown Jihadist Terrorism in the United States’.

[20] US v. Bryant Neal Vinas, Superseding Indictment, US District Court, Eastern District of New York, 08-823 (NGG) (S-1), 28/I/2009.

[21] ‘Man Was “Gold Mine” of Terror Intel’, Associated Press, 31/VII/2009.

[22] Terrorism in the United States, 2002-2005, unclassified report by the Federal Bureau of Investigation,http://www.fbi.gov/publications/terror/terrorism2002_2005.htm.

[23] Interview with various FBI officials, September/October 2009, Boston and Washington DC.

[24] David Johnston & Eric Schmitt, ‘Smaller-Scale Terrorism Plots Pose New and Worrisome Threats, Officials Say’, New York Times, 31/X/2009.

[25] http://minneapolis.fbi.gov/dojpressrel/pressrel09/mp112309.htm.

[26] Affidavit of FBI Special Agent Jeremiah A. George in US v. Daniel Joseph Maldonado, US District Court, Southern District of Texas, H-07-125M, 13/II/2007.


Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Joignez-vous à 275 followers

%d bloggers like this: