Gaza: Pas de deuxième Syrie à Gaza ! (We see what Qatar’s and Turkey’s meddling in Syria has led to: Palestinian human rights activist denounces Hamas and Qatari-Turkish interference in Gaza)

15 août, 2014
Ce que le kamikaze humanitaire guette, ce n’est pas les dégâts qu’il va faire, mais les dégâts qu’on va lui faire. Et ce sont ces dégâts inversés qui sont censés faire des dégâts. Le kamikaze humanitaire est un kamikaze d’un genre mutant, tout à fait neuf, parfaitement inédit : c’est un kamikaze oxymore. C’est l’idée que les dégâts seront extrêmement collatéraux, diffus, les explications très confuses, les analyses rendues très compliquées puisque le mot humanitaire, lâché comme une bombe, est brandi comme l’arme à laquelle on ne peut rien rétorquer : on ne fait pas la guerre à la paix. Le mot humanitaire est un mot qui a tout dit. Son drapeau est intouchable, son pavillon est insouillable. C’est l’idée que, déguisé en pacifiste, le terroriste aura de son côté, tout blotti contre la coque de son navire naïf rempli de gentillesse gentille et d’idéaux grands, d’ambitions fraternelles, la communauté internationale. Car c’est le monde entier qui, tout à coup, forme une communauté. Le mot humanitaire, forcément inoffensif, ne saurait être offensé, attaqué : c’est une paix qui avance sur les flots, on ne bombarde pas une paix, on ne crible pas de flèches, de balles, une colombe qui passe, même si cette colombe est pilotée par Mohammed Atta, je veux dire ses avatars paisibles, ses avatars innocents, ses avatars gentils, ses avatars qui avancent avec des sentiments plein les poches et la rage entre les dents, et la haine dans les yeux au moment même du sourire. Il y avait les kamikazes volants, voici les kamikazes flottants. Les kamikazes de la vitesse du son ? Démodées. Voici les kamikazes, déguisés en bonnes fées, de la langueur des flots, voici les kamikazes de la vitesse de croisière. Les kamikazes comme des poissons sur les flots, dont l’aide qu’ils apportent est un costume, une panoplie, un déguisement. Ils attendent qu’Israël riposte, autrement se donne tort. Kamikazes qui voudraient non seulement nous faire accroire qu’ils sont pacifistes, mais qu’ils sont passifs. Kamikazes déclencheurs de bavures officielles, au fil de l’eau. Non plus descendant des nuages, s’abattant comme autant de foudres, mais des kamikazes bien lents, bien tranquilles, bien plaisanciers. Des kamikazes bercés par la vague, et qui savent ce qu’ils viennent récolter : des coups, et par conséquent de la publicité. Des kamikazes au long cours qui viennent, innocemment, fabriquer de la culpabilité israélienne. Yann Moix
In a post-imperial, post-colonial world, Israel’s behaviour troubled and jarred. The spread of television and then the internet, beamed endless pictures of Israeli infantrymen beating stone-throwers and, later, Israeli tanks and aircraft taking on Kalashnikov-wielding guerrillas. It looked like a brutal and unequal struggle. Liberal hearts went out to the underdog – and anti-Semites and opportunists of various sorts joined in the anti-Israeli chorus. Israelis might argue that the (relatively) lightly armed Hamasniks in Gaza want to drive the Jews into the sea; that the struggle isn’t really between Israel and the Palestinians but between little Israel and the vast Arab and Muslim worlds, which long for Israel’s demise ; even that Israel isn’t the issue, that Islamists seek the demise of the West itself, and that Israel is merely an outpost of the far larger civilisation that they find abhorrent and seek to topple. But television doesn’t show this bigger picture; images can’t elucidate ideas. It shows mighty Israel crushing bedraggled Gaza. Western TV screens never show Hamas – not a gunman, or a rocket launched at Tel Aviv, not a fighter shelling a nearby kibbutz. In these past few weeks, it has seemed as if Israel’s F-16s and Merkava tanks and 155mm artillery have been fighting only wailing mothers, mangled children, run-down concrete slums. Not Hamasniks. Not the 3,000 rockets reaching out for Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Beersheba. Not mortar bombs crashing into kibbutz dining halls. Not rockets fired at Israel from Gaza hospitals and schools, designed to provoke Israeli counterfire that could then be screened as an atrocity. In the shambles of this war, a few basic facts about the contenders have been lost: Israel is a Western liberal democracy, where Arabs have the vote and, like Jews, are not detained in the middle of the night for what they think or say. While there is a violent, Right-wing fringe, Israelis remains basically tolerant, even in wartime, even under terrorist provocation. Their country is a scientific, technological and artistic powerhouse, in large measure because it is an open society. On the other side are a range of fanatical Muslim organisations that are totalitarian. Hamas holds Gaza’s population as a hostage in an iron grip and is intolerant of all “others” – Jews, homosexuals, socialists. How many Christians have remained in Gaza since the violent 2007 Hamas takeover? The Palestinians have been treated badly, there is no doubt about that. Britain, America, fellow Arabs, Zionists – all are to blame. But so are they, having rejected two-state compromises offered in 1937, 1947, 2000 and 2008. They should have a state of their own, in the West Bank, East Jerusalem and Gaza. This is fair, this would constitute a modicum of justice. But this is not what Hamas wants. Like Isis in Iraq and Syria, like al Qaeda, the Shabab in Somalia and Boko Haram in Nigeria, it seeks to destroy Western neighbours. And the Nick Cleggs of this world, who call on Britain to suspend arms sales to Israel, are their accomplices. It’s as if they really don’t understand the world they live in, like those liberals in Britain and France who called for disarmament and pro-German treaty revision in the Thirties. But the message is clear. The barbarians truly are at the gates.  Benny Morris
It is by now no secret that Qatar has emerged as Hamas’ home away from home and ATM. Shaikh Tamim’s father, Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, visited Gaza in 2012 when he was still the ruler of Qatar, pledging $400 million in economic aid. Most recently, Doha tried to transfer millions of dollars via Jordan’s Arab Bank to help pay the salaries of Hamas civil servants in Gaza, but the transfer was apparently blocked at Washington’s request. Since 2011, Qatar has been the home of the aforementioned Khaled Meshal, who runs Hamas’s leadership. During a recent appearance on Qatar’s media network Al Jazeera Arabic, Meshal blessed the individuals who kidnapped and ultimately murdered three Israeli teenagers. He boasted that Hamas was a unified movement and that its military wing reports to him and his associates in the political bureau. American officials have revealed that Qatar also hosts several other Hamas leaders. Israeli authorities reportedly intercepted an individual in April on his way back from meeting a member of Hamas’s military wing in Qatar who gave him money and directives intended for Hamas cells in the West Bank. Israeli and Egyptian officials report that Qatar is so eager for a political win at Cairo’s expense that it actually urged Hamas to reject the Egyptian cease-fire initiative last week. Doha is also using its vast petroleum wealth to striking diplomatic effect: one UN official source suggests that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon would not have made it to Doha for cease-fire talks on Sunday if the Qataris hadn’t chartered him a plane out of their own pocket.  Turkey, for its part, has emerged as one of the most strident supporters of Hamas on the world stage. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vociferously advocated for Hamas while his government has found ways to donate hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Hamas, mostly through infrastructure projects, but also through materials and reportedly even direct financial support. Turkey is also home to Salah Al-Arouri, founder of the West Bank branch of the Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’ military wing. He reportedly has been given “sole control” of Hamas’s military operations in the West Bank, and two Palestinians arrested last year for smuggling money for Hamas into the West Bank admitted they were doing so on Al-Arouri’s orders. He is also suspected of being behind a recent surge in kidnapping plots from the West Bank. An Israeli security official recently noted, “I have no doubt that Al-Arouri was connected to the act” of kidnapping that helped set off the latest round of violence between the parties, which has seen hundreds killed and thousands wounded, nearly all of them Palestinians. Al-Arouri, it should be noted, was among the high-level Hamas officials who met with the amir of Kuwait on Monday to discuss cease-fire terms (…). So as Washington considers cutting a deal brokered by Qatar and Turkey for an end to the latest round of hostilities, it bears pointing out why these two countries are so influential with Hamas in the first place: because they empower the terrorist movement and provide it with a free hand for operations. A cease-fire is obviously desirable, but not if the cost is honoring terror sponsors. There must be others who can mediate. Interestingly, both Ankara and Doha count themselves among America’s friends. But their support for terrorist entities—not just Hamas—has become so obvious that U.S. legislators began to send concerned letters to officials from both countries last year. This alone is a sign that America must set the bar higher for the behavior of its allies and not reward them for bad behaviorDavid Andrew Weinberg and Jonathan Schanzer
Lorsque Ban Ki Moon s’est rendu à Jérusalem, le 22 juillet, pour faire pression en vue d’un cessez-le-feu à Gaza et d’en revenir à des discussions sur les causes fondamentales du conflit palestino-israélien, Netanyahu a littéralement « explosé » de colère : « Vous ne pouvez pas parler au Hamas. Ce sont des extrémistes islamistes au même titre qu’Al Qaïda, l’Etat Islamique, les Taliban ou Boko Haram ! Passant inaperçues pour lui, ses paroles ne sont pas tombées dans l’oreille d’un sourd, dans le monde islamiste. Là  les observateurs suivaient à la trace chaque stade du conflit à Gaza, dès qu’on a compris qu’il s’élevait à un niveau comparable à la guerre contre Al Qaïda. Aussi, après avoir freiné l’opération contre le Hamas, Israël pourrait bien se rendre compte qu’il a mis la main dans un nouveau nid de frelons. En ce moment-même, l’Etat Islamique et le Front Al Nosra combattent pour étendre leurs avant-postes syriens et irakiens par une poussée au Liban même. Et ils ne s’arrêtront sans doute pas en si bon chemin. Si les Jihadistes en mouvement ont eu la possibilité d’évaluer que Tsahal est incapable de vaincre le Hamas, ils pourraient bien se retourner contre Israël et lui poser une nouvelle menace extrêmement dangereuse. 4. L’Iran aura bien pris note, de son côté, du fait que, deux fois de suite en deux ans, les dirigeants israéliens ont préféré s’abstenir d’apporter une conclusion victorieuse à une guerre débutée par des forces paramilitaires que Téhéran a préalablement renforcées, entraînées et financées – d’abord le Hezbollah, dans la Guerre du Liban en 2006, qui s’est terminée par un tracé de zone gérée par la FINUL, et actuellement , un conflit avec les Islamistes palestiniens qui semble se terminer de la même façon. Debka
Faisant état de sources fiables, Rafik Chelly a ajouté que « Des avions sont arrivés en Libye à partir du Qatar, et elles étaient pleines de djihadistes, ce qui explique les succès d’Ansar al-charia, notamment leur occupation d’une base militaire à Benghazi… Le nombre de ces éléments terroristes qui viennent de l’EIIL, dont beaucoup de tunisiens, oscille entre 4000 et 5000. Leur objectif, imposer leur domination sur la capitale, ensuite occuper Zentan , auquel cas, le danger sur la Tunisie n’en sera que plus grand avec le franchissement des frontières….. ». Contacté par le correspondant de Tunisie-Secret à Tunis, Rafik Chelly a indiqué que parmi ces 5000 djihadistes, il y a près de 200 éléments de nationalité française. Autrement dit, des binationaux. On rappellera ici que, déjà en janvier 2014, Rafik Chelly a déclaré que au quotidien Attounisia (17 janvier), que « 4500 djihadistes tunisiens appartenant au mouvement d’Ansar al-charia, sont actuellement dans des camps d’entrainement en Libye ». Les 5000 djihadistes en question reviennent donc à leur point de départ, la Libye, où ils ont été entrainés et d’où les services qataris les ont transportés vers la Syrie, dès la fin de l’année 2011. On précisera enfin que, sur la base de rapports de renseignement parvenus au journal algérien « Al-Bilad al-Jazairiya », celui-ci a révélé, dans son édition du 4 juillet dernier que des djihadistes libyens appartenant à Ansar al-charia, ainsi que des éléments de l’EIIL, se sont rencontrés dans une ville en Turquie pour conclure un accord consistant à transférer les djihadistes d’origine maghrébine présents en Irak, à les transférer vers la Libye pour renforcer les rangs d’Ansar al-charia dans ce pays ainsi qu’en Tunisie. Le même rapport de renseignement indique que l’EIIL a décidé d’élargir son djihad au Maghreb arabe et dans le Sahel, loin d’un Moyen-Orient déjà partiellement conquisNebil Ben Yahmed
From Hamas’s point of view, it must be a source of immense delight to witness the strains, and practical fallout, in the relationship between Washington and Jerusalem. It wins an election in which the US insisted it be allowed to take part, even though it has never renounced terrorism. It murders its way to control of Gaza. It diverts Gaza’s resources to turn the Strip into one great big terrorist bunker. It hits Israel, over and over and over again. It intimidates international journalists to not report on and film its attack methods. And the international community condemns Israel, the UN sets up inquiries into Israeli war crimes, and Israel’s allies limit its arms supplies. Times of Israel
Les missiles qui sont aujourd’hui lancés contre Israël sont, pour chacun d’entre eux, un crime contre l’humanité, qu’il frappe ou manque [sa cible], car il vise une cible civile. Les agissements d’Israël contre des civils palestiniens constituent aussi des crimes contre l’humanité. S’agissant des crimes de guerre sous la Quatrième Convention de Genève – colonies, judaïsation, points de contrôle, arrestations et ainsi de suite, ils nous confèrent une assise très solide. Toutefois, les Palestiniens sont en mauvaise posture en ce qui concerne l’autre problème. Car viser des civils, que ce soit un ou mille, est considéré comme un crime contre l’humanité. (…) Faire appel à la CPI [Cour pénale internationale] nécessite un consensus écrit, de toutes les factions palestiniennes. Ainsi, quand un Palestinien est arrêté pour son implication dans le meurtre d’un citoyen israélien, on ne nous reprochera pas de l’extrader. Veuillez noter que parmi les nôtres, plusieurs à Gaza sont apparus à la télévision pour dire que l’armée israélienne les avait avertis d’évacuer leurs maisons avant les explosions. Dans un tel cas de figure, s’il y a des victimes, la loi considère que c’est le fait d’une erreur plutôt qu’un meurtre intentionnel, [les Israéliens] ayant suivi la procédure légale. En ce qui concerne les missiles lancés de notre côté… Nous n’avertissons jamais personne de l’endroit où ces missiles vont tomber, ou des opérations que nous effectuons. Ainsi, il faudrait s’informer avant de parler de faire appel à la CPI, sous le coup de l’émotion. Ibrahim Khreisheh (émissaire palestinien au CDHNU, télévision de l’Autorité palestinienne, 9 juillet 2014)
La Palestine n’est pas un État partie au Statut de Rome. La Cour n’a reçu de la Palestine aucun document officiel faisant état de son acceptation de sa compétence ou demandant au Procureur d’ouvrir une enquête au sujet des crimes allégués, suite à l’adoption de la résolution (67/19) de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies en date du 29 novembre 2012, qui accorde à la Palestine le statut d’État non membre observateur. Par conséquent, la CPI n’est pas compétente pour connaître des crimes qui auraient été commis sur le territoire palestinien. CPI
When the Palestinian Authority (PA) was established 1994, I noticed that most Palestinian and Israeli human rights organizations continued monitoring the Israeli occupation, but that nobody wanted to pay any attention to the PA’s violations. In a meeting held in March 1996, the board members of B’Tselem decided that they would not concern themselves with PA abuses. That’s why I left. I wanted to fill a role that I thought was very important, but that was empty. (…) I think that if the Palestinians want to form a successful civil society, live in a democracy, and respect human rights, we will have to build institutions with our own hands. We should not lay our fate in other people’s hands. We have done so quite enough over the past sixty years. We are still demanding a state from the international community instead of building it ourselves. I think that it is the time for the Palestinians to start building their own democracy right now. I believe that democracy has never been offered by leaders or governments. Democracy is determined by the people themselves. (…) Creating a human rights organization under an Arab regime is like committing suicide. Yasser Arafat was used to doing whatever he wanted without being criticized or monitored. When I started watching, investigating, criticizing, he started to look at me in a very bad light. The Palestinian Authority defamed us and slandered us. Among other accusations, they said that we serve the enemy’s interests. When we started to publish reports on PA human rights violations, the reports became sexy news material for the international community. They were particularly well-reported by the Israeli media. The issue was especially sexy because, as you know, I had spent the past seven and a half years criticizing only Israel. Arafat saw me as a traitor. (…) In my opinion, the establishment of a Palestinian state is not only related to the Israelis. It concerns the Palestinians. We have had a very bad experience with building a state, developing it, and keeping it alive. That brings me to the September 2005 Israeli disengagement from Gaza. Everybody thought that the Israeli disengagement would be a kind of test for the Palestinians. It would test whether we are really able to build our own state and manage our daily lives ourselves. In my opinion, we totally failed to manage Gaza, develop it, and build infrastructure. Today, fewer and fewer Palestinian voices speak up in favor of es-tablishing a state. Everybody has his own horrible troubles. The only people calling for a state right now are the politicians. Politicians around the world are buying and selling blood. This is the only income that they have. And that’s exactly what Arafat practiced with the Palestinians. I remember with great sadness what happened when he started creating an Intifada and threatening the Israelis. Palestinian security workers went to the schools, ordered the schoolmasters to close the schools, and then sent the schoolchildren to throw stones at the Israelis. That was a very horrible thing to do. Politicians sacrifice their people to achieve their political interests. This is unfortunately the Palestinian attitude. (…) Gaza is a big problem for the Palestinians, Israelis, and Egyptians. The international community becomes more and more afraid of the Palestinians because Hamas reflects such a negative side of Palestinian politics. I don’t think that Hamas will ever offer Gaza back to Abbas. The question is: Who is going to control Hamas? Hamas right now oppresses the Gazan people. But who will contain Hamas? I don’t think that dialogue will solve the problem. We will all be watching whether Hamas can manage Gaza and keep it functioning. The Arab countries should put more effort into solving the conflict between Hamas and Fatah. The problem is that the Arab countries are so divided, some supporting Hamas against Fatah and some supporting Fatah against Hamas. This won’t help the situation. (…) I think there is a lack of good will and leadership on both sides. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict also tends to become a commercial conflict. Everybody is making something off this conflict. There are countries that have an interest in perpetuating the fighting. The Iranians, for example, are trying to provoke a regional war using Hezbollah and Hamas. I don’t think the Palestinians will have the same opportunities for peace that we were offered between 1947 and July 2000. Palestinian violence has probably caused some countries to want not to get involved anymore. ‘…) Don’t forget that we are living under a Taliban regime in the Gaza Strip. Our fieldworker hesitates before investigating cases there. The situation for human rights organizations sometimes reminds me of the Saddam Hussein regime. We can’t monitor the Gaza Strip the way we used to monitor it when it was PA territory. We are trying to collect data from newspapers and other organizations that operate in the area. We are in touch with some journalists there. But we face serious opposition and danger. (…) The best opportunity for us to make peace with Israel was probably in 1978 or 1979 when Egyptian president Anwar Sadat visited Israel. He suggested that Yasser Arafat join him, but Arafat refused. The most important thing for us to do now is learn from the mis-takes we made between 1947 and today so that we don’t repeat them. We should put these mistakes on the table and study them well. After studying our mistakes, I think the solution will be very easy to createBassem Eid
There is no doubt there’s an atmosphere of fear and terror in Gaza. Others were executed in various gatherings under the pretext of their being collaborators with Israel. Hamas has a physical presence in almost every house in Gaza and can listen to what’s being said. It’s a Stasi regime par excellence. The population is much more scared of Hamas than it is of the Israeli soldiers,” Eid said. Hamas, for its part, is more worried about the possible return of control of the Gaza Strip to the Palestinian Authority than it is of an Israeli military incursion. In my opinion, Hamas is willing to pay its last drop of blood to prevent Abbas and his PA from setting foot in Gaza. These people (Hamas) are fighting for their existence. Bassem Eid
En tant que Palestinien, je dois avouer : je suis responsable d’une partie de ce qui s’est passé. En tant que Palestinien, je ne peux pas nier ma responsabilité dans la mort de mon propre peuple. La majorité des Palestiniens s’est opposée aux tirs de roquettes contre Israël. Les Palestiniens ont compris que ces missiles ne servaient à rien. Les Palestiniens ont appelé le Hamas à cesser les tirs et à essayer de négocier avec l’occupation israélienne. Mais le Hamas n’a jamais considéré les besoins des Palestiniens. Seulement ses propres intérêts politiques. Et ils ont continué à tirer des roquettes sur Israël, en sachant très bien quel serait le résultat: le Hamas a ouvert la route de la mort sur notre peuple. Nous savions que le Hamas creusait des tunnels qui mèneraient à notre destruction. Nous savons tous que trois personnes vivent sur ​​chaque mètre carré de la bande de Gaza et le Hamas sait que toute attaque par Israël conduirait à une mort massive. Mais les dirigeants du Hamas sont plus intéressés par leurs victoires que par la vie de leurs victimes. En effet, le Hamas a besoin de ces décès afin de prétendre à la victoire. La mort de son propre peuple donne au Hamas ce pouvoir qui lui permet d’accumuler plus d’argent et plus de bras. Le Hamas n’a jamais été intéressé par la libération du peuple palestinien de l’occupation. Et Israël ne pourrait jamais détruire l’infrastructure mise en place par le Hamas. Seulement, nous, le peuple palestinien, pourrions le démanteler. Qu’aurions-nous pu faire? Les habitants de la bande de Gaza avaient la responsabilité de se rebeller contre le pouvoir du Hamas. Oui, le contrôle du Hamas est mortel et les gens ont eu peur d’exprimer leur mécontentement face à son règne et sa mauvaise gestion. Et pourtant, nous avons abdiqué, nous en portons la responsabilité. Nous le savions, et nous avons laissé faire. Ces décès (plus de 1.800 à ce jour, près de 0,1% de la population de la bande de Gaza) pourront-ils nous enseigner une leçon que nous n’oublierons jamais? L’idée que nous devons nous débarrasser du Hamas et complètement démilitariser Gaza. Ensuite, nous allons ouvrir les points de passage frontaliers. Je dis cela en tant que Palestinien fidèle et parce que je m’inquiète pour mon propre peuple. Je n’ai aucune confiance dans les initiatives européennes et américaines. Il n’y a qu’une seule initiative à laquelle je peux croire et en laquelle j’ai confiance: une initiative trilatérale qui comprend l’Egypte, les Palestiniens et Israël. Sinon, il n’y aura pas de calme ou d’apaisement dans la bande de Gaza ou en Israël. Nous ne devons pas permettre à la bande de Gaza de devenir la victime des complots et des intrigues arabes. L’Egypte a toujours été le médiateur légitime, et si on avait écouté un peu plus l’Egypte de nombreuses vies auraient été sauvées. Le Qatar et la Turquie n’ont aucun rapport avec le peuple palestinien, et nous n’avons rien en commun. Ces deux Etats ont tenté de saboter chaque tentative de cessez-le-feu. À mon avis, au moins deux tiers des morts palestiniens sont victimes du complot turco-qatari. Nous voyons ce à quoi a conduit l’ingérence du Qatar et de la Turquie en Syrie. Je ne veux pas les voir établir une « deuxième Syrie » dans la bande de Gaza. Bassem Eid
Personnellement je ne vois pas l’origine des problèmes actuels dans  »l’occupation ». Non pas parce que ce terme est impropre pour caractériser le rapport entre Israël et les Palestiniens, car alors les Palestiniens devraient aussi utiliser ce terme  »occupation » lorsque la Jordanie et l’Egypte occupaient la  »Cisjordanie » (appellation de la Jordanie) et Gaza… Mais surtout parce que la belligérance entre les Juifs et les Arabes n’a pas commencé en 1967. Si l’on veut une vraie paix, une paix définitive, c’est à cet état de belligérance qu’il faut mettre fin. Je n’ai personnellement pas de recette magique, mais il me semble qu’il faut désamorcer la cause de cette belligérance. Depuis 1921, toutes les guerres déclenchées par les Arabes contre les Juifs, puis contre Israël, sont fondées sur le refus arabe de considérer : – que les Juifs ont un droit historique d’appartenance à cette région, au nom d’une histoire de 3000 ans d’attachement à cette région. – que les Juifs tout comme les Arabes ont le droit de se constituer en Etat-Nation et de disposer d’eux mêmes, au moins sur une partie de ce que fut leur patrie. Je suis peut-être naïf, mais il me semble que si le monde arabo-musulman dont font partie les Palestiniens, reconnaissait ce droit, (et non pas seulement Israël comme  »fait accompli »), alors disparaîtrait la cause de la belligérance, et alors toutes les questions soi-disant  »litigieuses », liées au territoire et aux frontières, seraient résolues en un tour de main. Jean-Pierre Lledo
Remember that when President Sadat made peace with Israel in 1979 he got back all of his country’s land from the Israelis, without shedding any blood. This is a real peace. Arafat rejected Sadat’s offer to join him in Israel but imagine if he had accepted. Think how many settlements would never have been created in the occupied territories and think that Palestine could have been established all that time ago. I want to move forward and to look to our children’s future. In my opinion, history should be dismissed and people like us should look ahead. Palestinian leaders continue to demand that Israel remove more than 160 checkpoints in the occupied territories, evacuate so-called "the illegal settlements", allow Palestinian workers to enter Israel to work, and demolish the wall that separates Palestinians from Israelis (and other Palestinians). But to what end? After the last six years of Intifada, we Palestinians have lost so much – not least more than 4,000 of our people killed by the Israelis. Consider also that since Israel left Gaza in September of 2005, the Palestinians have created chaos. So who will make this right of return applicable? In January 2007 there were 17 Palestinians killed by Israelis, but there were 35 Palestinians killed by Palestinians, so, right or return of right to live? (…) Three years ago, I went to visit the Palestinian village of Qariut, located between Ramalla and Nablus. The Israeli occupation confiscated their land and established a settlement called Eli. When I left the people in Qariut I asked them once specific question: if the Israelis were to evacuate Eli settlements tomorrow, would you agree to give the land and the houses for your brothers, the refugees? And nobody agreed… So, if even the Palestinians are not willing to accept this right of return, how can we expect Israelis will do it? All of the peace accords and initiatives since 1993 talk about the return of the Palestinian refugees to the Palestinian state, and all of these peace accords and initiatives got the blessing of the Palestinian leaders, but all of these initiatives have been rejected by the Palestinians refugees themselves. There is no common ground or status between the Palestinian refugees and their leaders. And for the lack of the common ground, we are loosing, land, property and lives.  Bassem Eid

Attention: une Syrie peut en cacher une autre !

Alors qu’après l’assaut terroristo-médiatique contre Israël  …

Et l’annonce turque d’une énième "flottille de la paix" contre le blocus de Gaza …

Le Hamas et ses idiots utiles médiatiques s’apprêtent, pour continuer à "fabriquer de la culpabilité israélienne" mais contre toute évidence, à nous refaire le coup du tribunal international …

Comment ne pas voir avec le bien improbable et solitaire fondateur d’une ONG qui s’intéresse aux violations palestiniennes des droits de l’homme Bassem Eid …

Et à l’instar de ces images recyclées du conflit syrien lui-même …

La véritable menace qui pointe derrière tout cela …

A savoir, avec les appuis des suspects habituels de Doha et d‘Istanbul, la syrianisation du conflit de Gaza en particulier et de la Palestine en général ?

Le Hamas a besoin des morts palestiniens pour crier victoire
Bassem Eid

I24news

10 août 2014

Depuis plus de 26 ans, je consacre ma vie à la défense des droits de l’Homme. J’ai assisté à des guerres, à la terreur et la violence. Pourtant, le mois dernier (de l’enlèvement suivi du meurtre de trois adolescents juifs, à l’assassinat du jeune Mohammed abu Khdeir, puis la guerre à Gaza) a été la période de ma vie la plus difficile politiquement et émotionnellement.

Je vis à Jérusalem-Est et j’ai été témoin de la dévastation de la vie dans ma ville. Une fois de plus, la Route 1 est devenue la ligne de démarcation entre l’Est et l’Ouest. Juifs et Arabes ont peur des ombres de l’un et de l’autre. Des résidents palestiniens de Jérusalem ont attaqué les infrastructures publiques de Beit Hanina et Shuhafat, causant d’énormes dégâts aux feux de circulation, au tramway, et aux sources de courant électrique. Je ne peux pas accepter cela comme signe de protestation civique: il s’agit de pure vengeance. Et la coexistence pour laquelle j’ai lutté toute ma vie a été pendue, exécutée sur la place publique.

J’ai mal.

Il ne fait aucun doute que la mort et la destruction dans la bande de Gaza est un tsunami. Les deux peuples sont en difficulté, mais chaque côté nient la douleur de l’autre… ce qui ne fait que l’empirer.

Et pourtant, en tant que Palestinien, je dois avouer : je suis responsable d’une partie de ce qui s’est passé. En tant que Palestinien, je ne peux pas nier ma responsabilité dans la mort de mon propre peuple.

La majorité des Palestiniens s’est opposée aux tirs de roquettes contre Israël. Les Palestiniens ont compris que ces missiles ne servaient à rien. Les Palestiniens ont appelé le Hamas à cesser les tirs et à essayer de négocier avec l’occupation israélienne. Mais le Hamas n’a jamais considéré les besoins des Palestiniens. Seulement ses propres intérêts politiques. Et ils ont continué à tirer des roquettes sur Israël, en sachant très bien quel serait le résultat: le Hamas a ouvert la route de la mort sur notre peuple.

Nous savions que le Hamas creusait des tunnels qui mèneraient à notre destruction.

Nous savons tous que trois personnes vivent sur ​​chaque mètre carré de la bande de Gaza et le Hamas sait que toute attaque par Israël conduirait à une mort massive. Mais les dirigeants du Hamas sont plus intéressés par leurs victoires que par la vie de leurs victimes.

En effet, le Hamas a besoin de ces décès afin de prétendre à la victoire. La mort de son propre peuple donne au Hamas ce pouvoir qui lui permet d’accumuler plus d’argent et plus de bras.

Le Hamas n’a jamais été intéressé par la libération du peuple palestinien de l’occupation. Et Israël ne pourrait jamais détruire l’infrastructure mise en place par le Hamas. Seulement, nous, le peuple palestinien, pourrions le démanteler.

Qu’aurions-nous pu faire? Les habitants de la bande de Gaza avaient la responsabilité de se rebeller contre le pouvoir du Hamas. Oui, le contrôle du Hamas est mortel et les gens ont eu peur d’exprimer leur mécontentement face à son règne et sa mauvaise gestion. Et pourtant, nous avons abdiqué, nous en portons la responsabilité.

Nous le savions, et nous avons laissé faire.

Ces décès (plus de 1.800 à ce jour, près de 0,1% de la population de la bande de Gaza) pourront-ils nous enseigner une leçon que nous n’oublierons jamais? L’idée que nous devons nous débarrasser du Hamas et complètement démilitariser Gaza. Ensuite, nous allons ouvrir les points de passage frontaliers. Je dis cela en tant que Palestinien fidèle et parce que je m’inquiète pour mon propre peuple.

Je n’ai aucune confiance dans les initiatives européennes et américaines. Il n’y a qu’une seule initiative à laquelle je peux croire et en laquelle j’ai confiance: une initiative trilatérale qui comprend l’Egypte, les Palestiniens et Israël. Sinon, il n’y aura pas de calme ou d’apaisement dans la bande de Gaza ou en Israël.

Nous ne devons pas permettre à la bande de Gaza de devenir la victime des complots et des intrigues arabes. L’Egypte a toujours été le médiateur légitime, et si on avait écouté un peu plus l’Egypte de nombreuses vies auraient été sauvées.

Le Qatar et la Turquie n’ont aucun rapport avec le peuple palestinien, et nous n’avons rien en commun. Ces deux Etats ont tenté de saboter chaque tentative de cessez-le-feu. À mon avis, au moins deux tiers des morts palestiniens sont victimes du complot turco-qatari.

Nous voyons ce à quoi a conduit l’ingérence du Qatar et de la Turquie en Syrie. Je ne veux pas les voir établir une « deuxième Syrie » dans la bande de Gaza.

L’Egypte sait que ces complots sont aussi dirigés contre son régime. Nous ne pouvons qu’espérer que le président égyptien, Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, ne se perdra pas dans l’épaisse confusion entourant la région, et qu’il parviendra à sortir son propre peuple et nous les Palestiniens, de ce bourbier islamique et religieux.

Il est grand temps pour les Israéliens et les Palestiniens de trouver une alternative à la guerre. Et oui, c’est véritablement possible avec l’aide de l’Egypte.

Bassem Eid est un activiste des droits de l’homme et un commentateur politique

Voir également:

Réponse de Jean-Pierre Lledo, cinéaste et essayiste 

Bien cher Bassem,

Avec cette nouvelle guerre, je pensais beaucoup à vous, depuis que nous avions en Juin, de la même tribune à Jérusalem, parlé  »de la culture de la honte et de l’honneur » dans les sociétés arabes, et je dois dire que j’avais été impressionné par votre franchise, osant parler devant un public juif de ce fléau du crimes d’honneur plus fort dans la société palestinienne, que partout ailleurs, dont sont principalement victimes les femmes, .

En lisant cette tribune, je suis tout autant touché par la liberté de pensée qui est la vôtre. C’est pour ma part la première fois que je lis un texte d’un Palestinien qui n’accuse pas l’Autre, mais soi-même.

J’espère que nous aurons l’occasion très bientôt de nous revoir pour approfondir nos pensées.

En attendant, je voudrais quand même vous dire que personnellement je ne vois pas l’origine des problèmes actuels dans  »l’occupation ».

Non pas parce que ce terme est impropre pour caractériser le rapport entre Israël et les Palestiniens, car alors les Palestiniens devraient aussi utiliser ce terme  »occupation » lorsque la Jordanie et l’Egypte occupaient la  »Cisjordanie » (appellation de la Jordanie) et Gaza…

Mais surtout parce que la belligérance entre les Juifs et les Arabes n’a pas commencé en 1967.

Si l’on veut une vraie paix, une paix définitive, c’est à cet état de belligérance qu’il faut mettre fin.

Je n’ai personnellement pas de recette magique, mais il me semble qu’il faut désamorcer la cause de cette belligérance.

Depuis 1921, toutes les guerres déclenchées par les Arabes contre les Juifs, puis contre Israël, sont fondées sur le refus arabe de considérer :

- que les Juifs ont un droit historique d’appartenance à cette région, au nom d’une histoire de 3000 ans d’attachement à cette région.

- que les Juifs tout comme les Arabes ont le droit de se constituer en Etat-Nation et de disposer d’eux mêmes, au moins sur une partie de ce que fut leur patrie.

Je suis peut-être naïf, mais il me semble que si le monde arabo-musulman dont font partie les Palestiniens, reconnaissait ce droit, (et non pas seulement Israël comme  »fait accompli »), alors disparaîtrait la cause de la belligérance, et alors toutes les questions soi-disant  »litigieuses », liées au territoire et aux frontières, seraient résolues en un tour de main.

Voila ce que je tenais à vous dire, tout en vous remerciant pour la franchise de votre point de vue.

(petite remarque encore : 1800 victimes représentent 0,1% – et non  »1% » de la population gazaoui. comme vous l’avez écrit. Parmi lesquels les 3/4 sont sans doute des combattants Hamas déguisés en  »civils »).

Jean-Pierre Lledo

Voir aussi:

Explosif : le Qatar a transporté 5000 terroristes de l’EIIL en Libye

Nebil Ben Yahmed

Tunisie secret

9 Août 2014

C’est Rafik Chelly, ex directeur de la sécurité présidentielle (1984-1987), ancien haut responsable des services de renseignement tunisien et actuel secrétaire général du « Centre Tunisien des Etudes de Sécurité Globale », qui vient de l’affirmer dans une interview au quotidien arabophone Attounissia. Cela signifie qu’après avoir activement contribué à l’embrasement de la Syrie et de l’Irak, le Qatar veut déplacer le feu de la guerre civile et de la barbarie en Libye, c’est-à-dire, inévitablement, en Tunisie et en Algérie.

D’abord une précision : contrairement à ce qui a été dit dans certains médias tunisiens, l’interview de Rafik Chelly n’a pas été publiée dans le quotidien algérien « Al-Khabar », mais dans le journal tunisien Al-Tounissia, le 4 août 2014.

Par son mutisme, la troïka a boosté Abou Iyadh

A la question « Est-il vrai que l’occupation de la Tunisie –comme le pensent certains observateurs pessimistes- par des organisations terroristes n’est qu’une question de temps, et que nous allons vivre le scénario libyen, syrien et irakien ? », l’ancien haut responsable au ministère de l’Intérieur, Rafik Chelly, a répondu : « On doit d’abord revenir à l’historique des événements qui nous ont mené à la situation actuelle. Aussi, depuis l’annonce par Abou Iyadh de la création d’Ansar al-charia, en avril 2011, après avoir bénéficié de l’amnistie générale, il a fait une démonstration de force en mai 2012, en sortant à Kairouan avec 5000 de ses adeptes. Malgré la menace que ces derniers constituaient sur la sécurité nationale, la troïka a observé le mutisme, ce qui a encouragé Abou Iyadh et ses troupes de réapparaitre l’année suivante, en déclarant qu’il est capable de mobiliser 50 000 personnes. Son intention était de profiter de la situation pour déclarer la ville de Kairouan émirat islamiste, ce qui a inquiété Ennahda, qui a interdit cette manifestation pour préserver son image auprès de l’opinion publique tunisienne et internationale… ».

Selon Rafik Chelly, c’est après l’assassinat de Chokri Belaïd et Mohamed Brahmi qu’Ali Larayedh a été contraint de classer Ansar al-charia comme une organisation terroriste, en dépit de l’opposition radicale de certains hauts responsables d’Ennahda. Et c’est à la suite de cette décision tardive que les dirigeants d’Ansar al-charia ont fui la Tunisie vers la Libye, où ils ont rejoint Abou Iyadh pour constituer, des camps d’entrainement à Sebrata et à Derna.

C’est le Qatar qui a rapatrié les djihadistes de l’EIIL

A la seconde question, «Ne pensez vous pas que c’est l’échec des islamistes en Libye qui a mis toute la région en danger imminent ? », Rafik Chelly a répondu que « L’échec cuisant des islamistes après les dernières élections du Conseil National a constitué un tournant périlleux. Il y a eu l’opération de l’aéroport (Libye), ensuite les déplacements d’Abdelhakim Belhadj, de Belkaïd et d’Ali Sallabi en Turquie, au Qatar et en Irak pour rencontrer l’EIIL, et ce pour deux raisons : primo, rapatrier les djihadistes maghrébins en Libye, secundo, conclure des contrats de vente d’armes modernes, avec l’accord de certains pays. L’aéroport de Syrte a été aménagé pour accueillir les cargos d’armes, de même que l’aéroport de Miitika ».

Faisant état de sources fiables, Rafik Chelly a ajouté que « Des avions sont arrivés en Libye à partir du Qatar, et elles étaient pleines de djihadistes, ce qui explique les succès d’Ansar al-charia, notamment leur occupation d’une base militaire à Benghazi… Le nombre de ces éléments terroristes qui viennent de l’EIIL, dont beaucoup de tunisiens, oscille entre 4000 et 5000. Leur objectif, imposer leur domination sur la capitale, ensuite occuper Zentan , auquel cas, le danger sur la Tunisie n’en sera que plus grand avec le franchissement des frontières….. ». Contacté par le correspondant de Tunisie-Secret à Tunis, Rafik Chelly a indiqué que parmi ces 5000 djihadistes, il y a près de 200 éléments de nationalité française. Autrement dit, des binationaux.

Rencontre secrète dans une ville turque

On rappellera ici que, déjà en janvier 2014, Rafik Chelly a déclaré que au quotidien Attounisia (17 janvier), que « 4500 djihadistes tunisiens appartenant au mouvement d’Ansar al-charia, sont actuellement dans des camps d’entrainement en Libye ». Les 5000 djihadistes en question reviennent donc à leur point de départ, la Libye, où ils ont été entrainés et d’où les services qataris les ont transportés vers la Syrie, dès la fin de l’année 2011.

On précisera enfin que, sur la base de rapports de renseignement parvenus au journal algérien « Al-Bilad al-Jazairiya », celui-ci a révélé, dans son édition du 4 juillet dernier que des djihadistes libyens appartenant à Ansar al-charia, ainsi que des éléments de l’EIIL, se sont rencontrés dans une ville en Turquie pour conclure un accord consistant à transférer les djihadistes d’origine maghrébine présents en Irak, à les transférer vers la Libye pour renforcer les rangs d’Ansar al-charia dans ce pays ainsi qu’en Tunisie. Le même rapport de renseignement indique que l’EIIL a décidé d’élargir son djihad au Maghreb arabe et dans le Sahel, loin d’un Moyen-Orient déjà partiellement conquis.

 Voir également:

Tsahal Peut-Elle Se Contenter De Demi-Victoires ?
Debka files

Jerusalem plus

L’Iran et Al Qaïda prennent bonne note de la victoire limitée d’Israël sur le Hamas, noyau dur d’un embryon d’armée palestinienne.

Alors que la délégation israélienne est arrivée au Caire pour des pourparlers indirects avec le Hamas, à la fin des premières 24h d’un cessez-le-feu de 3 jours dans la guerre à Gaza, les porte-parole du gouvernement israélien ont produit d’énormes efforts, mardi soir 5 août, pour convaincre le public que la guerre à Gaza était en voie de se terminer et que l’ennemi avait subi d’énormes dégradations de ses capacités d’agression.

Le chef d’Etat-Major le Lieutenant-Général Benny Gantz a continué, jusqu’à présent, à déclarer : « Nous nous acheminons maintenant, vers une période de reconstruction ». Ce n’est pas exactement le message que les soldats voulaient entendre de la part de leur Commandant en chef, alors qu’ils se retiraient des champs de bataille de Gaza, après 28 jours d’âpres combats et de lourdes pertes (64 tués dans Tsahal). Mais les artistes en relations publiques du gouvernement étaient déjà en train d’exposer toute l’horreur d’un scénario de simulation décrivant une opération théorique devant aboutir à la conquête de la totalité de la Bande de Gaza.

Ce scenario, qu’on dit avoir été présenté au Cabinet de sécurité, la semaine dernière, au cours du débat sur les tactiques à employer lors de la prochaine phase d’opération, aurait coûté des centaines de vies humaines parmi les soldats israéliens et mené à une réoccupation d’une durée de cinq ans, afin de purger le territoire des 20.000 terroristes présents et de démanteler leur machine de guerre.

Ce scénario a été imaginé pour faire taire les mécontents, à commencer par les citoyens vivant à portée étroite de la Bande de Gaza, qui refusaient de retourner dans leurs maisons, à cause du danger qui n’est pas totalement éliminé.

Les alternatives que le Cabinet a examinées n’ont jamais contenu l’occupation totale de la Bande de Gaza. L’option la plus sérieuse envisagée par les Ministres et qui a été rejetée dès la première semaine de guerre, consistait à envoyer des troupes pour une frappe-éclair, afin de détruire les centres de commandement du Hamas et le noyau dur de sa structure militaire et de ressortir rapidement. Si cette option avait été appliquée à un stade précoce du conflit, plutôt que de prolonger dix jours de frappes ininterrompues et sans réels résultats probants, cela aurait permis de sauver des pertes lourdes du côté palestinien et la dévastation de leurs propriétés, d’une étendue qui trouble aussi pas mal d’ Israéliens.

Et cette semaine encore, les hommes politiques dirigeant la guerre, ont décidé de l’écourter, sans prêter le moindre égard aux avis concernant l faisabilité des opérations, pouvant conduire cette mission anti-terroriste vers une conclusion victorieuse, pour la population vivant sous la menace terroriste du Hamas depuis plus d’une décennie.

La décision d’en venir plutôt à un cessez-le-feu et à des discussions indirectes avec le Hamas a été coûteuse pour le Premier Ministre Binyamin Netanyahu, qui lui a valu le plus de critiques à l’intérieur. Au premier jour du cessez-le-feu, mardi, la côte de popularité de Binyamin Netanyahu a subi une perte sèche autour de 60%, ce qui équivaut au niveau des sondages juste avant la guerre, après avoir crever des plafonds frôlant les 80% au pic de l’opération.

La façon dont les dirigeants israéliens ont géré et conclu la guerre à Gaza a quatre conséquences qui dépassent sa sphère immédiate :

1. Le fait qu’après avoir subi un coup sévère, le Hamas tient encore le choc et conserve indemne l’essentiel de son infrastructure militaire, lui apportant le prestige du noyau dur d’une sorte d’armée régulière palestinienne, dont ne disposaient pas les Islamistes avant le lancement de l’Opération Bordure Défensive, le 7 juillet.

Ce noyau dur est déjà une force combattante active, dote d’un bon entraînement au combat et d’une certaine popularité nationale – non seulement à Gaza, mais aussi sur les domaines de l’Autorité Palestinienne dans les territoires cisjordaniens.

Aussi voit-on le Hamas arriver au Caire à la table des négociations, avec cette carte d’une réputation militaire fraîchement refaite.

2. Les perspectives d’un accommodement d’après-guerre qui puisse changer le paysage global du terrorisme dans la Bande de Gaza sont assez faibles. Les tacticiens du gouvernement israélien ont fait allusion au fait que Mahmoud Abbas pourrait convenir en tant que personnalité aux commandes d’un tel accommodement. C’est, proprement, une chimère. La branche armée du Hamas n’envisagerait pas cinq minutes de laisser les mains libres à un tel rival sur leur chasse gardée. Et, quoi qu’il en soit, Abbas ne montre pas d’inclination particulière à se conformer à aucun schéma directeur israélien de nouvelle gouvernance à Gaza.

3. Lorsque Ban Ki Moon s’est rendu à Jérusalem, le 22 juillet, pour faire pression en vue d’un cessez-le-feu à Gaza et d’en revenir à des discussions sur les causes fondamentales du conflit palestino-israélien, Netanyahu a littéralement « explosé » de colère : « Vous ne pouvez pas parler au Hamas. Ce sont des extrémistes islamistes au même titre qu’Al Qaïda, l’Etat Islamique, les Taliban ou Boko Haram !

Passant inaperçues pour lui, ses paroles ne sont pas tombées dans l’oreille d’un sourd, dans le monde islamiste. Là  les observateurs suivaient à la trace chaque stade du conflit à Gaza, dès qu’on a compris qu’il s’élevait à un niveau comparable à la guerre contre Al Qaïda. Aussi, après avoir freiné l’opération contre le Hamas, Israël pourrait bien se rendre compte qu’il a mis la main dans un nouveau nid de frelons. En ce moment-même, l’Etat Islamique et le Front Al Nosra combattent pour étendre leurs avant-postes syriens et irakiens par une poussée au Liban même. Et ils ne s’arrêtront sans doute pas en si bon chemin.

Si les Jihadistes en mouvement ont eu la possibilité d’évaluer que Tsahal est incapable de vaincre le Hamas, ils pourraient bien se retourner contre Israël et lui poser une nouvelle menace extrêmement dangereuse.

4. L’Iran aura bien pris note, de son côté, du fait que, deux fois de suite en deux ans, les dirigeants israéliens ont préféré s’abstenir d’apporter une conclusion victorieuse à une guerre débutée par des forces paramilitaires que Téhéran a préalablement renforcées, entraînées et financées – d’abord le Hezbollah, dans la Guerre du Liban en 2006, qui s’est terminée par un tracé de zone gérée par la FINUL, et actuellement , un conflit avec les Islamistes palestiniens qui semble se terminer de la même façon.

DEBKAfile Analyse Exclusive :debka.com

Adaptation : Marc Brzustowski.

Voir encore:

International media failed professionally and ethically in Gaza
Op-ed: According to civilian death toll measure, Nazi Germany – which had one million dead civilians in World War II – was a victim of the aggressive US, which lost ‘only’ 12,000 civilians.
Eytan Gilboa
Ynet news

08.13.14

The media coverage of wars affects the global public opinion, leaders and decision making. Its trends can determine the results just as much as what it achieved in the battlefield.

The main problem presented in the media during all of Israel’s wars and operations in the past decade is proportionality and the number of civilian casualties. The media is the main source of information on the extent, type and source of losses.

The coverage of Operation Protective Edge and the civilian casualties in the global media, mainly in the West, was characterized by an anti-Israel bias and serious professional and ethical failures. They appeared in all components of the journalistic coverage: Pictures, headlines, reports, editorials and cartoons.

The images from Gaza showed only what Hamas permitted the media to broadcast and describe. Hamas terrorized and censored journalists. It only allowed them to broadcast images of destruction and killing of civilians, particularly women and children, and staged situations on the ground.

There were no images of rockets launched from populated areas and from within UNRWA schools, mosques and hospitals. There were only images of civilians’ bodies and funerals and very few images of Hamas fighters, if any.

Media outlets around the world failed to mention the restricting conditions they had operated under in Gaza, which unavoidably led to false and misleading reports.

Only after they left Gaza, few journalists like the Italian Gabriele Barbati and the French Gallagher Fenwick dared to expose the way Hamas terrorized journalists, its use of civilians as human shields and its failed launches which resulted in the killing of children, like at the Shati refugee camp on July 28. This is an ethical failure.

The media have turned the civilian death toll into the only measure of the justness of the Israeli warfare. The New York Times and Haaretz, for instance, published the Gaza death toll on their front pages every day. The message is clear: The higher the number of civilian casualties, the more "war crimes" Israel is committing.

This measure is groundless. According to its distorted logic, Nazi Germany – which had one million dead civilians in World War II – was the victim of the aggressiveness of the United States, which lost "only" 12,000 civilians, and Britain, which lost "only" 67,000 civilians. This is a logic and ethical failure.

The media knew that the reports published by the Palestinians, the United Nations and the Red Cross about civilian victims in all the conflicts since the first Lebanon War until today were false. In Operation Protective Edge as well, the claims of 75-80% civilian casualties are false.

The New York Times and the BBC, which emphasized the "victim competition," are now admitting that the reported number of civilian deaths contradicts statistical tests. This is a professional failure.

China and India’s broadcast networks exposed the missing context of Israel’s efforts to avoid harming civilians and Hamas’ counteractions. Who would have thought that communist China’s international broadcast network (CCTV) would cover the Gaza conflict in a much more accurate and balanced way than the British BBC?

This surprising fact points more than anything to the anti-Israel bias and perhaps anti-Semitism of Western media outlets. The biased and misleading coverage contributed to the hasty calls to prosecute Israel for war crimes, to mass protests against Israel and to anti-Semitic incidents in Europe.

The Western media must report to their consumers about their professional and ethical failures in Gaza. I seriously doubt they have the courage to probe their own failures as they often demand from governments and organizations.

Prof. Eytan Gilboa is the director of the School of Communication and a senior research associate at the BESA Center for Strategic Studies at Bar-Ilan University.

Des journalistes d’Al-Jazeera utilisent leurs comptes Facebook et Twitter comme outils de propagande au service du Hamas

hamas

Par Y. Yehoshua, B. Chernitsky et Y. Graff *

La couverture du conflit de Gaza par la chaîne qatarie Al-Jazeera révèle le soutien absolu de l’émir qatari, Cheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, accordé au Hamas. Avec le conflit,  la chaîne est devenue un puissant organe de propagande du Hamas. Elle a transmis les messages du mouvement, sa couverture du conflit était partiale, au point que les intervenants des émissions en direct de la chaîne qui osaient émettre des critiques, même légères, du Hamas, rencontraient censure et opprobre. Le fait est que les partisans du Hamas ont lancé la campagne « Un million de mercis à Al-Jazeera » sur Twitter, pour exprimer leur gratitude envers la chaîne qui « penchait en faveur de la résistance ». [1]

« Un million de mercis à Al-Jazeera »

La position pro-Hamas de la chaîne est également perceptible dans l’activité en ligne de ses journalistes, animateurs et présentateurs sur les médias sociaux. Leurs pages Facebook et Twitter sont inondées d’éloges de la branche militaire du Hamas, des Brigades Izz al-Din al-Qassam, pour leur guerre contre Israël, y compris pour les tirs de roquettes, l’utilisation de tunnels et les prétendus enlèvements de soldats israéliens. Dans la lignée de la politique étrangère qatarie, ils fustigent l’Egypte et son président, Abd Al-Fattah Al-Sissi, pour la couverture médiatique égyptienne du conflit.

Un article paru dans le quotidien qatari Al-Quds Al-Arabi explique le phénomène : « La douleur et l’angoisse des journalistes d’Al-Jazeera devant la tragédie des Palestiniens dans la bande [de Gaza], en Cisjordanie et dans la Jérusalem occupée, a incité un grand nombre d’entre eux à renforcer leur activité sur les médias sociaux, dès la minute où ils quittaient la salle de rédaction… » La présentatrice d’Al-Jazeera Khadija Benguenna a confié au quotidien : « Cette fois, les médias sociaux ont joué un rôle plus important, plus actif et plus fervent que les médias traditionnels. Les images et les articles parvenaient aux internautes en temps réel, au moment du bombardement, [et] chacun pouvait voir les roquettes de la résistance voler dans le ciel des villes israéliennes… » [2]

Extraits de messages des journalistes et présentateurs d’Al-Jazeera sur les médias sociaux :

Soutien aux tirs de roquettes sur Israël

Les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera se sont montrés solidaires de l’action militaire du Hamas contre Israël et ont salué ses succès. Dans une série de tweets en date du 9 juillet, [3] le correspondant Amer Al-Kubaisi a exprimé son soutien aux tirs de roquettes du Hamas sur Israël : « Malgré le siège [du président égyptien] Al-Sissi de Gaza et l’élimination des tunnels, le Hamas améliore ses roquettes à la fois en qualité et en quantité, terrorise et surprend Israël à Tel-Aviv, Haïfa et Jérusalem ».

Plus tard le même jour, il tweete : « Le Hamas ne renoncera à aucun missile de longue portée. Il les a développés lui-même et les a envoyés sur Haïfa et Jérusalem. C’est ce qui terrifie le renseignement israélien. Etre armé signifie être en vie. »

Dans un autre tweet, il ajoute : « Les dispositifs d’armement chimique se trouvent à Haïfa. Un coup asséné sur l’un d’eux revient à rayer un quart des Israéliens de la Palestine historique. Israël lutte pour ne pas être évacué… »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Le 17 juillet, Al-Kubaisi tweetait un poster montrant diverses roquettes du Hamas, avec des détails sur la portée de chacune, et demandait aux followers de retweeter. Il écrit : « Ici, en une image, vous pouvez apprendre à connaître les roquettes d’Al-Qassam, leur portée, et les villes qu’elles peuvent atteindre. Si vous aimez cette image, retweetez-la. »

Poster tweeté par Al-Kubaisi

Ahmed Mansour, présentateur de l’émission Without Borders d’Al-Jazeera, s’est également solidarisé des tirs de roquettes du Hamas. Le 9 juillet, Mansour écrit sur sa page Facebook : « Israël est stupéfait et déconcerté par les roquettes de la résistance palestinienne qui l’ont frappé en profondeur, atteignant Tel Aviv, Jérusalem et Haïfa, malgré le siège de Gaza par Al-Sissi et son gouvernement…  Si la résistance reçoit les armes qui lui permettront de s’occuper du lâche Israël, stupéfait et pétrifié, alors les Israéliens vivront dans des abris ou fuiront le pays. » [4]

Le post d’Ahmed Mansour

Le présentateur Jalal Chahda a tweeté, le 15 juillet : « Le système du Dôme de fer israélien est un tigre de papier, plus faible qu’une toile d’araignée, un échec, inutile contre les roquettes de la noble résistance, qui défend l’honneur de la oumma. » [5]

Tweet de Jalal Chahda

Un autre journaliste d’Al-Jazeera s’est montré solidaire des tirs de roquettes par le Hamas : le présentateur d’In Depth, Ali Al-Zafiri, a tweeté le 12 juillet : « Al-Ja’bari [6] vous bombarde depuis la tombe. » Il a ajouté le hashtag #Praise_Qassam à son tweet. [7]

Tweet d’Ali Al-Zafiri

Dans un tweet du 29 juillet, le correspondant d’Al-Jazeera au Pakistan, Ahmad Mowaffagh Zaidan, a fait l’éloge de la branche militaire du Hamas, les Brigades Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam, et de leur chef Mohammed Deif. Il a tweeté : « Ils ont relevé nos têtes » avec leurs tirs de roquettes sur Israël. Le lendemain, il demandait à Allah de les protéger. [8]

Les tweets d’Ahmad Zaidan

Soutien aux incursions en Israël et aux enlèvements de soldats

Les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera ont exprimé leur soutien aux autres actions du Hamas contre Israël et contre les soldats israéliens. Le 17 juillet, Ahmed Mansour postait un statut Facebook louant l’incursion du Hamas par un tunnel près du kibboutz de Sufa, disant qu’elle
« devrait être enseignée dans les plus grandes académies militaires comme l’une des opérations de résistance les plus remarquables contre de grandes armées. C’est une opération qui surpasse tous les films hollywoodiens, une réalité qui dépasse la fiction ». Il a ajouté : « Les Brigades Al-Qassam et la résistance palestinienne battent le record de la gloire et de l’héroïsme de la oumma. »

Le post d’Ahmed Mansour

Jalal Chahda a soutenu la construction de tunnels par le Hamas, tweetant : « Les tunnels de Gaza sont le cimetière des sionistes. » Il a également salué la résistance armée en général : « Dans le passé, je croyais que la résistance armée en Palestine occupée était l’une des méthodes de libération, et aujourd’hui, je suis convaincu que la résistance armée est la seule méthode. »

Les tweets de Jalal Chahda

Des reporters se sont réjouis lorsque le Hamas a affirmé avoir capturé le soldat israélien « Shaul Aaron » ; Israël a plus tard statué que le Sgt Oron Shaul avait été tué dans l’action, et que son lieu d’inhumation était inconnu. Juste avant l’annonce de la capture par le Hamas, Amer Al-Kubaisi a tweeté : « Dans 10 minutes, le Hamas fera une annonce importante. Personnellement, je hume un [Gilad] Shalit. » Al-Kubaisi s’est plus tard vanté d’être « le premier journaliste au monde à avoir parlé de la capture d’un ‘nouveau Shalit’, avant même l’annonce d’Al-Qassam. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

La présentatrice Salma Al-Jamal s’est également réjouie de l’annonce de l’enlèvement du Hamas sur Facebook. [9] Le 20 juillet, elle a partagé l’annonce du Hamas et écrit : « Allah Akbar, un nouveau Gilad Shalit a été capturé. » La présentatrice Khadija Benguenna a également acclamé l’annonce, tweetant : « Allah Akbar et Allah soit loué pour la capture d’un soldat sioniste » [10]

Le post de Salma Al-Jamal

Tweet de Khadija Benguenna

Diffuser la propagande du Hamas

En plus de glorifier et de soutenir l’aile militaire du Hamas, les journalistes d’Al-Jazeera ont diffusé les messages du mouvement via leurs comptes de médias sociaux, partageant et retweetant des déclarations de responsables du Hamas, des vidéos du Hamas et des URL de sites web et de comptes du Hamas, de ses partisans et affiliés.

Par exemple, le 18 juillet, suite à la fermeture du compte Twitter d’Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam, [11] Ali Al-Zafiri a tweeté sur le nouveau compte d’Al-Qassam, appelant ses partisans à le suivre. Il écrit : « [C’est] le nouveau compte des Brigades Al-Qassam, l’aile de notre oumma – puisque Twitter a fermé leur compte d’origine. Vous êtes priés de le soutenir, le suivre et le partager. C’est le moins [qu’on puisse faire]. »

Tweet d’Ali Al-Zafiri

Khadija Benguenna a également partagé des informations d’un autre organe d’information au service du Hamas, Al-Risala Radio, sur sa page Facebook. Le 28 juillet, elle a posté un lien accompagné du commentaire suivant : « La couverture se poursuit sur la radio Al-Risala. »

Le post de Khadija Benguenna

Jalal Chahda a tweeté une citation de l’ancien dirigeant spirituel du Hamas, le cheikh Ahmed Yassine, éliminé par Israël en 2004 : « Je demeurerai un combattant du jihad jusqu’à ce que mon pays soit libéré, car je ne crains pas la mort. »

Tweet de Jalal Chahda

Critique de l’Egypte, de son président, de ses médias et de son armée

Dans le contexte de l’animosité égyptienne envers le Hamas et son principal bailleur de fonds, le Qatar, les journalistes, invités et présentateurs d’Al-Jazeera ont également utilisé leurs comptes de médias sociaux pour attaquer l’Egypte et le président Abd Al-Fattah Al-Sissi. Ils ont également fustigé la couverture médiatique égyptienne du conflit actuel, et critiqué l’armée égyptienne pour son inaction.

Dans ses tweets du 26 juillet, Amer Al-Kubaisi s’en est plus particulièrement pris à Al-Sissi : « Connaissez-vous Sisinyahu ? » a-t-il tweeté, avec une photo d’un Al-Sissi déguisé en juif. Le lendemain, il a tweeté : « Al-Sissi soutient [Khalifa] Haftar, Al-Sissi soutient Bachar [Al-Assad], Al-Sissi soutient [Nouri] Al-Maliki, Al-Sissi soutient [Benjamin] Netanyahu. Il soutient l’église avant la mosquée, les chiites avant les sunnites, et les juifs avant les musulmans. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Ahmed Mansour a critiqué l’armée égyptienne sur Facebook ; le 19 juillet, il écrit : « L’armée qui ferme le passage de Rafah et empêche les convois humanitaires et médicaux d’arriver jusqu’à la population de Gaza, en proie à une guerre d’extermination, n’est pas l’armée égyptienne ; c’est l’armée d’Al-Sissi, qui tue le peuple égyptien et assiège la population de Gaza – car la [vraie] armée égyptienne est l’armée de soutien à Gaza et de défense du peuple égyptien. Quand l’armée égyptienne reviendra-t-elle ? » Dans un autre post, il qualifie le président Al-Sissi, et l’émir des Émirats arabes unis, le cheikh Al-Nahyan, de « sionistes arabes ».

Le 21 juillet, Mansour écrit : « Chaque jour, les Brigades Al-Qassam soulignent que ce sont elles qui opèrent et mènent la bataille de Gaza, sur le plan militaire et en matière de renseignement, de politique et d’information, tandis que Netanyahou, les dirigeants israéliens et leurs alliés arabes sionistes, dirigés par Al-Sissi et [le président des Emirats arabes unis Khalifa] bin Zayed, s’enfoncent dans le mensonge, le brouillard et la défaite mentale, militaire et politique. »

Les posts d’Ahmed Mansour

Jamal Chahda a tweeté : « L’armée égyptienne a annoncé que 13 nouveaux tunnels dans la bande de Gaza ont été détruits. C’est ainsi qu’[ils] expriment leur solidarité avec Gaza et sa population assiégée. »

Tweet de Jamal Chahda

Le présentateur d’Al-Jazeera Jamal Rayyan a maudit les médias égyptiens, les qualifant d’« ordures ». [12] Il a également tweeté des vidéos de personnalités médiatiques égyptiennes attaquant Al-Jazeera et lui-même personnellement, pour ses déclarations anti-égyptiennes, ajoutant : « Un ami m’a suggéré d’organiser des ateliers avec des personnalités des médias égyptiens. Je lui ai dit : ‘Impossible. Ce sont des ordures. On ne peut les changer. Il serait plus facile de recréer les Egyptiens à partir de zéro’. »

Les tweets de Jamal Rayyan

Le 20 juillet, la présentatrice Ghada Owais a posté une image accompagnée d’une déclaration soulignant que l’Egypte avait empêché les délégations médicales d’entrer dans la bande de Gaza, sous la légende : « Libre à vous d’interpréter. » [13]

Le post de Ghada Owais

Critique de l’Autorité palestinienne et de ses dirigeants

Les journalistes ont également sévèrement critiqué l’Autorité palestinienne et ses dirigeants. Le 23 juillet, Amer Al-Kubaisi a publié un avis moqueur, « Porté disparu », du chef du gouvernement de réconciliation Rami Hamdallah, pour son inaction dans la crise de Gaza. L’avis appelle à le livrer au peuple palestinien pour qu’il puisse présenter sa démission.

Dans un autre tweet, le 21 juillet, Al-Kubaisi écrit : « L’Intifada est la mère des Palestiniens, et la résistance est leur père. Le père oeuvre à Gaza et la mère, en Cisjordanie, va bientôt se manifester. »

Les tweets d’Al-Kubaisi

Khadija Benguenna écrit, le 26 juillet : « Pourquoi Abu Mazen traîne-t-il des pieds face à l’éventualité d’une adhésion au Traité de Rome, qui permettrait à la Palestine de devenir membre de la Cour pénale internationale ? C’est le meilleur moyen d’assiéger Netanyahu et de le piéger en Israël. »

Tweet de Khadija Benguenna

Pour la disparition d’Israël et des régimes arabes

En plus de soutenir le Hamas, certains journalistes ont aussi évoqué en filigrane leur espoir de voir Israël disparaître. Le 20 juillet, Ahmed Mansour a tweeté une vidéo du cheikh Ahmad Yassin prédisant qu’Israël allait disparaître d’ici à 2027.

Le 20 juillet, Salma Al-Jamal a cité l’imam égyptien pro-Frères musulmans Mohammad Al-Ghazali (décédé en 1996), qui a annoncé qu’après la chute des régimes arabes viendrait celle d’Israël. Elle a ajouté : « Bientôt, avec l’aide d’Allah. »

Tweet d’Ahmed Mansour
 

Tweet de Salma Al-Jamal

Post de Khadija Benguenna du 28 juillet montrant un drapeau israélien brûlé dans une récente manifestation en Algérie

* Y. Yehoshua est vice-président des recherches et directrice de MEMRI Israël ; B. Chernitsky et Y. Graff sont chargés de recherche au MEMRI.

Notes :
[1] Palinfo.com, 23 juillet 2014.
[2] Al-Quds Al-Arabi (Londres), le 14 juillet 2014.
[3] Twitter.com/amer_alkubaisi.
[4] Facebook.com/ahmed.mansour.1276487.
[5] Twitter.com/ChahdaJalal.
[6] Le chef de l’aile militaire du Hamas tué par Israël en novembre 2012.
[7] Twitter.com/AliAldafiri.
[8] Twitter.com/Ahmadmuaffaq.
[9] Facebook.com/SalmaAljamal.NewsPresenter
[10] Twitter.com/khadijabenguen.
[11] Voir MEMRI Dépêche spéciale n ° 5813, « Following Twitter Shutdown Of Hamas’ Al-Qassam Brigades Account – One Week Later, A New Account Is Active, »  du 31 juillet 2014.
[12] Twitter.com/jamalrayyan.
[13] Facebook.com/1ghada.owais.

Le "siège israélien de Gaza" : un mythe savamment exploité

Dr Zvi Tenney
Ambassador of Israel (ret)
http://www.zvitenney.info

La bande de Gaza a une frontière commune non seulement avec Israël mais aussi avec l’Egypte. Les 13 kilomètres de cette frontière sont contrôlés par l’Egypte et non par Israël. Le point de passage de Rafah sur cette frontière permet le passage de personnes désirant voyager de par le monde après être passées par Egypte.

Mais plus important encore est le fait que toute marchandise peut passer d’Israël à la bande de Gaza à l’exception d’armes et d’une courte liste de matériaux pouvant être utilisés à des fin de terrorisme .N’oublions pas que Gaza est gouverné depuis 2007 par le Hamas, une organisation terroriste, condamnée par tous les pays occidentaux, qui affiche ouvertement son refus de l’existence d’Israël qu’il a comme objectif de détruire.

Les marchandises qui passent d’Israël à la bande de Gaza sont de toute sorte, produits de consommation courante, équipements et produits médicaux, fuel et courant électrique…..Les super marchés, les centres commerciaux, les hôtels, les restaurants y sont donc abondamment achalandés. Les témoignages sur ce fait ne manquent pas et les photos des lieux étonnent toujours car on croierait
voir les photos d’une ville ocidentale florissante.

Rappelons à ce propos que durant les premiers cinq mois de 2014 ,18 000 camions de marchandises ont passé d’Israël à la bande de Gaza transportant plus de 228 000 tonnes de marchandises, commandés par des commerçants et des hommes d’affaires locaux qui entrent constamment en Israël pour y faire leurs achats. Ceci sans parler de quantités importantes d’eau et de l’approvisionnement de plus de la moitié de la consommation d’électricité de toute la bande de Gaza.

Par ailleurs durant les cinq premiers mois de 2014 plus de 60 000 habitants de la bande de Gaza sont rentrés en Israël dont évidemment ceux qui avaient besoin de soins médicaux et d’hospitalisation.

Il est donc clair qu’il n’y a absolument pas de siège ou de blocus terrestre qu’Israël impose à la bande de Gaza .Le seul blocus qu’Israël surveille de près et qui est le prétexte pour les anti israéliens de parler "de blocus total de Gaza par Israël", est le blocus maritime. Un blocus qui dans les conditions d’hostilité extrême du Hamas contre Israël est tout à fait compréhensible pour éviter l’importation d’armes dangereuses comme par exemple des missiles de longue portée en provenance de l’Iran.

Ce genre de blocus est d’ailleurs permis par les législations internationales et a en effet été accepté comme étant légitime par une Commission spéciale convoquée en 2011 par le Secrétaire général de l’ONU pour examiner ce blocus maritime qu’Israël est obligé d’imposer compte tenu du constant comportement agressif du Hamas contre Israël qui subit depuis de nombreuses années déjà des tirs de roquettes du Hamas ayant pour cible les populations civiles en Israël….Et cela bien qu’Israël ait complètement évacué la bande de Gaza en 2005.
Cette commission avait conclu que l’approvisionnement de Gaza devait être assurée, comme c’est le cas depuis toujours, par les passages frontaliers terrestres.

Les vociférations du Hamas et de ses supporters affirmant que les tirs de roquettes sur Israël sont "un acte de résistance à l’occupation israélienne" de Gaza ou qu’ils ont comme objectif de mettre fin au "siège israélien", ne sont donc que prétexte bancal pour justifier la mise en action de l’idéologie du Hamas de mettre fin, pour raison religieuse, à l’existence d’Israël comme inscrit dans sa convention….Il est navrant que nombreux anti israéliens de par le monde tombent dan ce panneau tendu par le Hamas et ses supporters.

Voir de même:

The international media’s hypocrisy – the Hamas case
Op-ed: Most of the international media have decided for you in advance that Israel is the bad guy in the story. It focuses on every Gaza casualty while ignoring civilian deaths in Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Libya and Kenya.
Yossi Levy
Ynet news

08.09.14

In the summer of 1999 more than 2,000 civilians were killed by NATO air forces which bombed cities and villages in what was the former Yugoslavia. As Ambassador to Belgrade, I still feel the pain and the agony of that horrible summer. It wasn’t only Serbian military bases that were bombed but also, albeit unintentionally, hospitals, schools, libraries, and even a train over a bridge. Serbia, as you all know, had not launched even a single missile towards any NATO capital city.

The media in the countries that were involved in the military operation did not, however, start their daily broadcasting with updates on the number of civilian dead; they didn’t mention the death toll every 30 minutes and, actually, did not even send camera crews to show their shocked viewers in London and Hamburg the horrors and bloodshed of demolished streets and hospitals.

Losing Hasbara
‘Smashing a peanut with a hammer': Foreign journalists on int’l coverage of Gaza fighting / Polina Garaev
Since Gaza op started, IDF released scores of videos of pilots calling off strikes and Israel urging Gazans to evacuate, but foreign reporters tell Ynet that in Europe a photo of dead Palestinians is worth more than a thousand Israeli words.

As far as Western media were concerned, the Serbian civilian victims had no names and no faces. It is the same today with regards to the women and children killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, who have been killed in massive numbers over the past decade or more, who were the tragic victims of Western air forces bombing terrorist targets in both countries.

Does anyone know how many innocents have been victims of Western pilots in the last decade? Nobody bothers to count them because the European media knows full well that war has its own cruel rules – that in war, yes, innocent people do unfortunately die.

With one exception. The war between Israel and Hamas with its Jihadi Islamic terror. When it comes to this war, European media has different standards. The tragic innocent victims who have been killed by the Israeli Defence Forces dominate practically every news outlet and their deaths have been reported in the most dramatic way time and time again. Meanwhile, as we speak, innocents are dying in Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Libya, and Kenya, usually on a vaster scale than in Gaza, but the media is uninterested in people who die in those countries who have had an extra piece of bad luck – Israel didn’t kill them, so the world doesn’t care.

The death of innocent people is always a tragedy. But I do not know any other army in the world that is as careful as one can be in wartime as the IDF is. Very often IDF units even cancel operations because of fears for civilian safety. Only the IDF actually warns in advance where and when it is going to hit, giving civilians time to leave specific areas. Hamas is the party here that forces Palestinian civilians to stay in their homes and thus endanger their lives. In the midst of this, Israeli pilots face a cruel dilemma: if they fire at a rocket launcher near a hospital or a mosque they may kill civilians; if they do not, the rocket, once it is fired, may kill Israelis near a hospital or a synagogue.

It is very easy to judge young men on such desperate missions from the comfort of a couch in a safe city far away. Israel fights for its life against an organization which, all too often merely described in the media as “militants”, is the actual government in Gaza, an organisation that calls not only for the destruction of the State of Israel but for the murder of all Jews wherever they are. The Hamas charter is a barbaric, anti-semitic and medieval document which calls openly to murder Jews. After it accuses the Jews for all the calamities of the humanity, article 7 simply says: if a Jew hides behind a rock or a tree, the rock and the tree will shout to the Moslems, come and kill him. This is a clear anti-Semitic rhetoric you can find on daily basis among Hamas leaders (Osama Hamdan, Fauzi Barhum and many others) preaching to their crowds in Arabic. Did you read about it in the media? I believe you did not.

Has the media in Europe also forgotten that Hamas, which fires rockets at civilians all over Israel, are the same people that a decade ago during the Second Intifada murdered hundreds of Israeli civilians by blowing them up in restaurants, bars and night clubs? Surely not. The media knows the facts, but in too many cases does not report the truth. It knowingly betrays its duty to tell the world what is really happening in the Gaza Strip.

The media knows as well that Hamas opposes all and any political solutions between Israel and the Palestinian people. In fact, a two-state solution, which we still hope to achieve, would be the worst nightmare for Hamas because what it wants is a single Islamic Greater Palestine ruled by Sharia Law in which people will be beheaded, the hands of thieves chopped off, and city squares turned into fairgrounds of public torture and execution, including stoning women for adultery and homosexuals for, well, being homosexual.

Hamas is the dystopian nightmare that Israel is fighting. Europe has known for a long time that Hamas, which is essentially a localized version of Al Qaeda, is a mortal enemy of Israel, but first and foremost it is the enemy of the Palestinian people because of its blindness and fanaticism. Hamas prevents the Palestinian people from attaining the freedom, prosperity and independence they deserve.

Even Egypt, the most important Arab country, accuses Hamas of war crimes against its own people, and puts the responsibility on Hamas for the escalation of the current conflict. Egypt offered a ceasefire two weeks ago; Israel accepted, Hamas did not. Since then Israel has agreed to several truces while Hamas has violated all of them.

In spite of that, anyone who listens to some European media would think Israel somehow wants to conquer Gaza. This is probably the biggest lie of all. Israel left Gaza in 2005, evacuating all its bases and uprooting all Jewish communities. For the first time since the beginning of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Palestinians were given full control over a territory on which they could have built a good economy and thriving society. Instead, they chose an Islamist terrorist organization to control their lives. Gaza became an armed base for escalated, indiscriminate attacks on Israel. In the last nine years, 15,000 missiles have been fired into Israel from Gaza with no provocation or justification. What would you do if a terrorist organization dedicated to your annihilation bombarded you for nearly a decade?

Violence and killing is the raison d’etre of Hamas. Unfortunately, despite the plain facts, many in the media and the international community are not listening. The claim that Israel is always “guilty” is only the latest echo of the old cry that “the Jews” are guilty. This is truly a miserable hour for Europe’s media, which is attacking, often viciously, not the terrorist Islamic Hamas, but its victim – Israel, a fellow democracy which fights for its survival in a region that is becoming more and more chaotic by the day.

One could understand such perverse instincts from the media in the Arab world, perhaps, but one expects better from the European media towards a fellow democracy which is fighting Jihadi madness on its own doorstep.

Most of the international media have decided for you in advance that Israel is the bad guy in the story. This biased approach is not a beautiful chapter in the history of the world media, and perhaps in the loaded history between European nations and the Jewish people.

Yossi Levy is the Israeli ambassador to Serbia and Montenegro

Voir encore:

 

Why Qatar and Turkey Can’t Solve the Crisis in Gaza
A bad idea
David Andrew Weinberg and Jonathan Schanzer
National Interest
July 23, 2014

With Washington desperate for a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas, and with Egypt having flamed out as a broker of calm, two of Hamas’s top patrons are about to be rewarded with a high-profile diplomatic victory. U.S. and Israeli media are now reporting that the White House may be looking to Qatar and Turkey to help negotiate an end to the hostilities. Qatar, in fact, held a high-profile cease-fire summit in Doha on Sunday that included Palestinian Authority president Mahmoud Abbas, UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon, the Norwegian foreign minister, and Hamas leader Khaled Meshal.

No progress was reported on Sunday. But using the good offices of Qatar is a huge mistake. The same goes for Turkey. In exchange for fleeting calm, the United States will have effectively given approval to these allies-cum-frenemies to continue their respective roles as sponsors of Hamas, which is a designated terrorist group in the United States.
Since a visit to Turkey by Qatar’s ruler Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, and amidst reports that Meshal has been shuttling between the two countries, Doha and Ankara have been floating terms of a joint cease-fire proposal that would reportedly grant Hamas significant benefits. Specifically, the deal would grant Hamas an open border in Gaza that would allow the group to continue to smuggle rockets and other advanced weaponry at an ever alarming pace.

The Israelis see this as a nonstarter. But the White House is nevertheless working the phones with Qatar and Turkey to see if a deal can be struck.

Since the war broke out in early July, Secretary of State John Kerry has reached out at least three times by phone to Turkey’s Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu and six times to his Qatari counterpart, Khalid Al Attiyah (Kerry’s Mideast chief boasted last month that the secretary of state “is in very constant contact” with FM Al-Attiyah and even “keeps his number on his own cell phone”). Kerry was also expected to visit Qatar before Egypt’s aborted cease-fire proposal.

It is by now no secret that Qatar has emerged as Hamas’ home away from home and ATM. Shaikh Tamim’s father, Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, visited Gaza in 2012 when he was still the ruler of Qatar, pledging $400 million in economic aid. Most recently, Doha tried to transfer millions of dollars via Jordan’s Arab Bank to help pay the salaries of Hamas civil servants in Gaza, but the transfer was apparently blocked at Washington’s request.

Since 2011, Qatar has been the home of the aforementioned Khaled Meshal, who runs Hamas’s leadership. During a recent appearance on Qatar’s media network Al Jazeera Arabic, Meshal blessed the individuals who kidnapped and ultimately murdered three Israeli teenagers. He boasted that Hamas was a unified movement and that its military wing reports to him and his associates in the political bureau. American officials have revealed that Qatar also hosts several other Hamas leaders. Israeli authorities reportedly intercepted an individual in April on his way back from meeting a member of Hamas’s military wing in Qatar who gave him money and directives intended for Hamas cells in the West Bank.

Israeli and Egyptian officials report that Qatar is so eager for a political win at Cairo’s expense that it actually urged Hamas to reject the Egyptian cease-fire initiative last week. Doha is also using its vast petroleum wealth to striking diplomatic effect: one UN official source suggests that UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon would not have made it to Doha for cease-fire talks on Sunday if the Qataris hadn’t chartered him a plane out of their own pocket.

Turkey, for its part, has emerged as one of the most strident supporters of Hamas on the world stage. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has vociferously advocated for Hamas while his government has found ways to donate hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Hamas, mostly through infrastructure projects, but also through materials and reportedly even direct financial support.

Turkey is also home to Salah Al-Arouri, founder of the West Bank branch of the Izz Al-Din Al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’ military wing. He reportedly has been given “sole control” of Hamas’s military operations in the West Bank, and two Palestinians arrested last year for smuggling money for Hamas into the West Bank admitted they were doing so on Al-Arouri’s orders. He is also suspected of being behind a recent surge in kidnapping plots from the West Bank. An Israeli security official recently noted, “I have no doubt that Al-Arouri was connected to the act” of kidnapping that helped set off the latest round of violence between the parties, which has seen hundreds killed and thousands wounded, nearly all of them Palestinians.

Al-Arouri, it should be noted, was among the high-level Hamas officials who met with the amir of Kuwait on Monday to discuss cease-fire terms (he is pictured in the middle of the couch here).

So as Washington considers cutting a deal brokered by Qatar and Turkey for an end to the latest round of hostilities, it bears pointing out why these two countries are so influential with Hamas in the first place: because they empower the terrorist movement and provide it with a free hand for operations. A cease-fire is obviously desirable, but not if the cost is honoring terror sponsors. There must be others who can mediate.

Interestingly, both Ankara and Doha count themselves among America’s friends. But their support for terrorist entities—not just Hamas—has become so obvious that U.S. legislators began to send concerned letters to officials from both countries last year. This alone is a sign that America must set the bar higher for the behavior of its allies and not reward them for bad behavior.

David Andrew Weinberg, a former Democratic Professional Staff Member at the House Foreign Affairs Committee, is a Senior Fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Jonathan Schanzer is Vice President for Research at the Foundation and a former intelligence analyst at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Voir aussi:

Bientôt une nouvelle flottille contre le blocus de Gaza
Le Point

12/08/2014

Des navires devraient appareiller avant la fin de l’année. La précédente tentative, en 2010, s’était soldée par la mort de 10 activistes turcs.

Une coalition internationale d’activistes a annoncé mardi son intention de faire appareiller, avant la fin de l’année, une nouvelle flottille pour briser le blocus maritime imposé par Israël à la bande de Gaza. "Nous voulons envoyer cette flottille en 2014", a déclaré à la presse cette coalition, dont fait partie l’ONG islamique turque IHH à l’origine d’une précédente tentative équivalente qui s’était soldée par la mort de dix activistes turcs en mai 2010. Les organisateurs n’ont pas précisé le calendrier de l’opération lors de leur conférence presse, organisée dans les locaux de la Fondation pour l’aide humanitaire (IHH), à Istanbul.

"C’est une réaction à la solidarité croissante avec le peuple palestinien qui se manifeste à travers le monde", a justifié le groupe un mois après le début de la nouvelle offensive lancée par l’armée israélienne sur la bande de Gaza. Les navires qui composeront cette nouvelle flottille partiront de plusieurs ports du monde entier pour transporter de l’aide humanitaire à destination des Palestiniens. "Nous allons former cette flottille avec l’objectif de montrer que la communauté internationale ne peut pas croiser les bras lorsqu’on attaque des civils et que sont commis des crimes contre l’humanité", a expliqué l’activiste canadien Ehab Lotayef.

Une ONG proche des autorités

Le blocus de Gaza a été imposé en 2007 afin, selon l’État hébreu, d’empêcher la livraison d’armes aux Palestiniens des islamistes duHamas qui contrôlent ce territoire. En mai 2010, l’assaut des commandos israéliens contre le navire amiral de la première flottille, le Mavi Marmara, avait provoqué la mort de 10 citoyens turcs et généré une grave crise diplomatique entre les gouvernements israélien et turc. La justice turque a ouvert en 2012 un procès par contumace contre quatre anciens responsables de l’armée israélienne. Des négociations ont débuté entre les deux pays pour l’indemnisation des victimes turques, mais elles n’ont pour l’heure pas abouti.

Élu dimanche président dès le premier tour de scrutin, le Premier ministre islamo-conservateur turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan a multiplié ces dernières semaines les violentes attaques contre la nouvelle intervention militaire de l’État hébreu à Gaza. L’ONG IHH est considérée comme proche des autorités d’Ankara. Le Mavi Marmarafera partie de la nouvelle expédition qui, a indiqué Durmus Aydin, un responsable d’IHH, "n’est d’aucune façon soutenue par le gouvernement turc".

Voir encore:

Echec du blocus de Gaza ?

Les restrictions imposées à la bande de Gaza, en place depuis la prise de contrôle par le Hamas en 2007, sont au cœur des négociations pour un accord à long terme. Le Hamas déclare vouloir la liberté pour Gaza, mais utilisera très probablement un accès facilité pour faire entrer des armes

Mitch Ginsburg

The Times of Israel

15 août 2014

Mitch Ginsburg est le correspondant des questions militaires du Times of Israel

Les négociations au Caire, apparemment renouvelées pour cinq jours mercredi, avec des tirs de roquettes et les ripostes à minuit, ont été menées à huis clos.

Il y a de nombreux sujets à débattre, le rôle, désormais de l’Autorité palestinienne à Gaza, le retour des dépouilles des deux soldats israéliens, l’avenir des hommes armés palestiniens arrêtés lors de l’opération, la notion, peut-être, de démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza, la durée du cessez-le-feu.

Pourtant, au cœur de la discussion, se trouve très probablement le blocus, le mécanisme qui restreint, à un petit filet, les marchandises entrant dans Gaza, et dans une plus grande mesure, tout ce qui laisse l’enclave de 362 kilomètres carrés coincée entre Israël, l’Egypte et la mer.

Une rapide observation des différents points de passage, pour les personnes et les biens, peut aider à brosser un tableau de la situation actuelle, de son évolution au cours des années passées et où tout cela pourrait conduire à la fin de la campagne actuelle.

Kerem Shalom est ajourd’hui l’unique passage d’entrée et de sortie pour les marchandises à Gaza. En 2005, avant l’arrivée du Hamas au pouvoir, une moyenne mensuelle de 10 400 camions de vivres entrait à Gaza depuis Israël. Après que le Hamas, une organisation terroriste ouvertement engagée à la destruction d’Israël, ait gagné une élection populaire et, avec une efficacité brutale, ait renversé le pouvoir de l’Autorité palestinienne à Gaza en 2007, Israël a imposé un blocus sur la bande de Gaza.

Pour les trois premières années, de juin 2007 à juin 2010, au cours desquelles seules les « vivres vitales » étaient autorisées à entrer dans la bande, une moyenne mensuelle de 2 400 camions passait dans Gaza, selon les statistiques fournies par l’organisation Gisha qui milite pour une circulation plus libre des marchandises vers et depuis Gaza.

Le blocus, empêchant tout de l’essence au bœuf, a été fortement modifié après l’incident du Mavi Marmara en mai 2010 au cours duquel des commandos de marine israéliens, attaqués, ont tué 10 activistes turcs sur un navire cherchant à briser le blocus. En réponse, Israël a facilité le blocus en permettant à presque toutes les marchandises d’entrer dans Gaza.

La question épineuse était, pourtant, et continue à être, les restrictions sur les ravitaillements à double utilisation, ceux qui ont le potentiel d’être utilisés pour des objectifs néfastes.

Le premier d’entre eux est le ciment. La population civile de Gaza a besoin de matériels de construction. Gisha estime que Gaza manque de 75 000 maisons et de 259 écoles.

En outre, 10 000 maisons ont été détruites pendant l’opération Bordure protectrice, à la fois par les tirs israéliens et les bombes palestiniennes. L’industrie de construction à Gaza emploie 70 000 travailleurs, déclare la cofondatrice de Gisha,Sari Bashi, et représentait à une époque jusqu’à 28 % du PIB.

Pourtant, les priorités du Hamas à Gaza sont évidemment différentes et le ciment est utilisé à des fins militaires.

Khaled Meshaal, le chef du bureau politique du Hamas, a admis cela au cours d’une conférence tenue à Damas plusieurs mois après l’opération Plomb durci en 2008-2009, selon des éléments du Centre de Renseignement et d’Information Meir Amit. « En apparence, les images visibles sont des négociations au sujet de la réconciliation et de la construction. Pourtant, les images cachées sont qu’une grande partie de l’argent et de l’effort est investie dans la résistance et dans les préparations militaires », explique Meshaal.

Tout cela était nulle part plus évident que dans les arches uniformes faites en ciment qui ont été trouvées pour soutenir le réseau de tunnels d’attaque du Hamas creusé sous la frontière vers Israël.

Le général de Brigade Michael Edelstein, le commandant de la Division Gaza, a déclaré durant une réunion à proximité de la frontière de Gaza il y a deux semaines, que le Hamas avait créé un « métro de terreur » à Gaza, en utilisant des dizaines de millions de dollars et « des milliers de tonnes de ciment ».

Les sites de lancement de roquettes, les tunnels internes, les bunkers ont tous été fortifiés avec du ciment.

Selon le Centre Meir Amit, une organisation dirigée par d’anciens officiers israéliens des renseignements, le ciment passait vers Gaza par des souterrains très tranquillement avant l’arrivée au pouvoir en Egypte d’Abdel Fatah el-Sissi. Il a réduit le flot des marchandises depuis son territoire à travers les tunnels.

Aujourd’hui, un rapport récent suggère que le ciment est soit produit à Gaza à partir de matériel brut, comme des cendres et du sable de mer, ou pris à des organisations internationales, qui demandent l’importation de ciment ou soumettent des plans et des rapports d’information aux autorités israéliennes afin de recevoir une autorisation pour importer du ciment dans Gaza.

Bashi a également déclaré que le carburant était à une époque considéré comme une substance à double emploi, puisqu’il est utilisé pour les roquettes, et, qu’aujourd’hui, il est autorisé à entrer librement dans Gaza.

Le Coordinateur des activités du gouvernement dans les tTerritoires (COGAT) pour l’armée a envoyé environ 7,6 millions de litres de carburant et de benzène dans Gaza pendant le seul mois mois de guerre. (Un total de 3 324 camions de ravitaillement sont entrés dans Gaza via Israël depuis le début de l’opération Bordure protectrice le 8 juillet, selon les chiffres de COGAT).

Mentionnant un taux de chômage de 45 % dans Gaza, alors qu’il était de 18 % l’an passé, Bashi a déclaré que les restrictions ont échoué à empêcher la construction de tunnels et ont, au lieu de cela, puni les habitants, créant une situation économique qui est totalement néfaste à la stabilité. « C’est une erreur de voir cela comme un jeu sans effets », a-t-elle déclaré.

Pourtant, le prix en sang payé par les Israéliens pour (au moins temporairement) se débarasser de la menace des tunnels, couplé à l’insécurité perturbant la vie des résidents des régions à la frontière, rend très improbable qu’Israël autorisera le transport libre et ouvert du ciment vers Gaza à cette période. Et particulièrement maintenant que les tunnels sous Rafah ont été fermés.

Très probablement, cela sera confié à des acteurs responsables et supervisé au maximum (Israël a perdu 64 soldats pendant le premier mois de combat, onze ont été tués par des hommes armés du Hamas sortis des tunnels vers Israël, et beaucoup plus au cours des recherches et de la démolition des tunnels à l’intérieur de Gaza).

Les marchandises sortant peuvent, elles aussi, passer uniquement à travers Kerem Shalom. Le point de passage vers l’Egypte, à Rafah, est totalement fermé aux marchandises.

Et tandis que les Gazaouis peuvent exporter peu de produits, les entreprises israéliennes profitent des ventes d’import des commodités,comme les mangues ou le bœuf vers Gaza.

Udi Tamir, un des propriétaires de Egli Tal, une des plus importants importateurs de bétail, a déclaré que l’industrie envoie environ 35 000 têtes de bétail à Gaza chaque année par exemple. Il déclaré avec malice au cours d’une conversation, il y a quelques années, que certains éleveurs de bétail israéliens pourraient vouloir offrir au nouveau président élu Recep Tayyip Erdogan une récompense pour l’ensemble de sa carrière.

De janvier à juin 1014, une moyenne mensuelle de 17 camions de produits est sortie de Gaza, 2 % de la moyenne avant 2007, selon les chiffres de Gisha, et tandis qu’à une époque Gaza exportait 85 % de ses marchandises vers la Cisjordanie et Israël, aujourd’hui, sur la base d’une politique israélienne de séparation entre la Cisjordanie contrôlée par l’Autorité palestinienne et la bande de Gaza contrôlée par le Hamas, théoriquement aucune marchandise n’est autorisée à voyager de Gaza, à travers Israël, vers la Cisjordanie.

Selon Gisha, un total de 49 camions pour une organisation internationale, quatre camions de bureaux d’écoles pour l’Autorité palestinienne et deux camions de feuilles de palmiers pour Israël sont tout ce qui a passé vers Israël et la Cisjordanie depuis mars 2012.

Dans ce domaine, très probablement, un progrès pourrait être atteint en prenant relativement peu de risque pour la sécurité et avec un bénéfice palpable.

Les points de passages pour piétons

Le passage d’Erez est la voie pour les personnes entre Israël, Gaza et la Cisjordanie. Le point de passage de Rafah, ouvert et fermé par intermittence au cours des dernières années et très minutieusement surveillé par l’Egypte, est la voie principale depuis la bande de Gaza pour le voyage international.

Ainsi, de janvier à juin de cette année, une moyenne mensuelle de 6 445 personnes ont quitté Gaza par Rafah, un chiffre qui représente environ 16 % de la moyenne durant ces mêmes mois en 2013, lorsque l’Egypte était aux mains du prédécesseur de Sissi, Mohammed Morsi. Depuis le début de la guerre, le passage a été fermé presque complètement.

Sur la même période, les chiffres de Gisha montrent qu’une moyenne mensuelle de
5 920 Palestiniens ont quitté Gaza à travers Erez. La plupart étaient des patients médicaux et leurs compagnons et des hommes d’affaires.

Selon Gisha, des personnes en deuil d’un proche de premier degré sont autorisés à voyager en Cisjordanie, comme le sont les chrétiens qui souhaitent visiter les lieux saints, les proches au premier degré souhaitant participer à un mariage, les étudiants en voyage vers l’étranger, les orphelins sans liens de premier degré à Gaza. Ceux qui souhaitent se marier en Cisjordanie ou les étudiants souhaitant y étudier, par exemple, ne sont pas autorisés à quitter Gaza par Erez.

Bashi a noté que 31 % des personnes dans Gaza ont des proches en Cisjordanie. Elle appelle à une plus grande liberté de mouvement, comme c’est autorisé par les évaluations sécuritaires.

Le Shin Bet a pourtant, au cours des années passées, intercepté à de nombreuses reprises des messages entre Gaza et la Cisjordanie et a averti, même avant l’enlèvement du 12 juin de trois adolescents israéliens puis leur meurtre, apparemment organisé depuis Gaza, que le Hamas a constamment cherché à dynamiser les vieilles cellules terroristes en Cisjordanie.

Des armes

Sans aéroports et sans ports, les voies réelles et employées pour introduire en contrebande des armes professionnelles à Gaza, a déclaré un ancien officer des renseignement au cours de la campagne actuelle, étaient depuis « l’axe de résistance », l’Iran le Hezbollah et la Syrie, vers le Soudan et, de là, vers le nord, via la péninsule du Sinaï en direction des tunnels de Rafah et Gaza.

Peut-être parce que le flot d’idéologie terroriste et de matériel n’est pas seulement allé au nord-ouest vers Gaza, mais aussi au sud-est vers Rafah, la péninsule du Sinaï, et le reste de l’Egypte, en y alimentant la violence, le président egyptien Sissi a largement éradiqué les tunnels de Rafah qui étaient utilisés pour transporter tout, des voitures et du ciment aux roquettes M-302.

Comme le trafic de drogue, la circulation d’armes ne peut pourtant jamais être pleinement arrêtée.

En mars dernier, des commandos de marine israéliens sont montés à bord du navire Klos-C enregistré au Panama et ont trouvé 40 roquettes M-302 et 180 cartouches de mortiers de 120 mm sous des tonnes de ciment. Un rapport des Nations unies a trouvé que les armes étaient en réalité envoyées depuis l’Iran mais a contesté l’affirmation israélienne qu’elles étaient destinées à Gaza.

Ni les officiels israéliens ni ceux des Nations unies n’ont fourni de preuves tangibles quant à la destination finale des armes. Il serait pourtant difficile d’expliquer pourquoi les troupes israéliennes intercepteraient pas un navire à plus de 1 800 kilomètres nautiques de ses eaux territoriales, à moins que le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu et d’autres croient vraiment que les armes auraient pu être tirées sur les citoyens israéliens.

Le Hamas exige la levée du blocus et l’ouverture du port, une réussite tangible qui pourrait être présentée aux habitants de Gaza comme un signe d’autonomie et de liberté.

De telles exigences sont pourtant contrebalancées par ses efforts incessants d’importer le type d’armes qui a fait du Hezbollah une force de combat si terrifiante dans la région.

Mercredi soir, peu avant la fin du cessez-le-feu prolongé, le Hamas a montré des images de roquettes M-75 fabriquées sur place, nettoyées avec amour et exposées comme des planches de surf. Les métaux qui les composent, et les explosives dans l’ogive, doivent être attrapées dans les filets adaptés du blocus israéliens.

A la fin de cette campagne, comme après l’incident du Mavi Marmara, de nombreux éléments du blocus seront mis sur la table des négociations.

Israël, sur une base pragmatique, sera relativement flexible pour des concessions qui renforcent l’économie comme, par exemple, l’export de fraises ou d’autres produits. Mais il sera beaucoup plus strict sur l’importation de marchandises à double utilisation qui permettent notamment la construction de M-75.

La difficulté sera de trouver la formule qui élargit les trous du filet pour soutenir les Gazaouis ordinaires, accorder des réussites à l’Autorité palestinienne plutôt qu’au Hamas, et permette à Israël de s’assurer que le Hamas, avec son allégeance jurée au djihad, sera restreint dans son intention de suivre l’exemple du groupe terroriste libanais, le Hezbollah.

STOP QATAR’S TERROR FUNDING

Qatar is the largest supplier of finance to Hamas in Gaza. The weapons that Qatar financed were used to launch indiscriminate attacks on civilians in the last few weeks and led to Operation Protective Edge.

Qatar and its leader are pouring billions of dollars into an organisation defined as terrorist by the majority of the world and are hosting its leader Khaled Mashal, in prosperous safety in Doha as he plots to wage a religious war against the “infidels”. We citizens of London, Israelis and Jews alike, would like to show the world the significance of Qatar in this conflict. Qatar fuels religious wars all over the world and especially in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon.

We believe that directing the world’s attention to Qatar, especially when their hosting of the World Cup is questionable due to the possibility of bribery and slave labour, will pressure it and its leaders and may cause them to reconsider their stance towards funding terrorism. This is the start of a relentless and continuous campaign that we are intending to initiate against Qatar.

As part of this campaign we will demonstrate and protest in front of the Qatari embassies, Al Jazeera’s centres, Harrods (one of their most recent and prestigious purchases) and all associated parties. Your signature on this petition will give the emphasis and assurance for our struggle and efforts to sever the roots of global terrorism by cutting off its funding. The Israeli and Jewish organisations will be those who will deliver the message to the Emir of Qatar via his embassies and to the media.

This petition is written in English, Hebrew, Arabic and Spanish and we are hoping that it will be translated to as many languages as possible. Thank you for your assistance, please sign and share the petitions with all lovers of peace and stability.

To: Mr. Shaikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar
We write this open letter in protest at the growing support that the Qatari government affords to Hamas. Hamas is designated as a terrorist organisation by the European Union, the United States of America, Canada, Australia, Japan and many countries in the Middle East. Qatar is the only country in the Arab World that supports and funds Hamas, the terrorist organisation that initiated the war in Gaza.

We are aware of Qatar’s claim that it contributes generously toward the people of Gaza but the results prove different. Your Highness’ and Qatar’s financial contribution was not used to set up hospitals, housing and schools, nor was it used to build bomb shelters and install warning systems for the Gazan people. It was used and is being used to acquire and produce missiles, build terror tunnels and to train children as fighters. Hamas also endlessly promotes Shahada meaning death for a religious cause while killing as many “infidels” as possible may it be men, women or children.

It is a shame that Your Highness and Qatar’s government did not use its influence over Hamas to persuade them to accept the Egyptian ceasefires. Hamas has consistently rejected them time after time while Israel has accepted them unconditionally. Your Highness’ real concern for the Gazans’ wellbeing could have saved hundreds if not thousands of lives and prevented the wounding and displacement of tens of thousands if the influence over Hamas has been exercised to force them to stop shooting and accept the truce.

Al Jazeera, the Television Network owned, funded and broadcast from Qatar has become a propaganda tool for a terrorist organisation promoting a deceptive and inaccurate picture of the conflict. Al Jazeera’s journalists failed to report on the launching pads, booby-trapped facilities and housing of rockets in UNRWA and other UN facilities. They also didn’t report on the schools, kindergartens, mosques and other public buildings used by Hamas for attacking the citizens of Israel through the firing of thousands of rockets indiscriminately. But worst of all they failed to report on the thousands used as human shields (men, women and children) as a despicable tool of media manipulation while putting those innocent lives at risk. Al Jazeera, especially the Arabic language channel, has become a news agency promoting Hamas. Its broadcasting incites the Arab world to follow the terrorist path and in the process damages its reputation as a respectable and impartial independent news network. In case Qatar wants to plead ignorance to the above, we will be able to enlighten them with facts.

Your Highness, the Qatari financial wealth is able to buy you assets around the world. Qatar’s opportunity to host the World Cup in 2022 will place it in the centre of world attention. However Qatar’s association with Hamas, other terrorist groups and the support that is offered to them casts doubts on Qatar’s position as a nation committed to peace and counter-terrorism despite being a member of the International Treaty for Counter-Terrorism of 1999. According to the treaty all member states are obligated to refrain from funding terror and to punish any known body or person who does so.

Qatar has clearly abused the Treaty by funding modern terrorism and especially the Hamas. To the dismay of the Arab World and its allies, the fighting in Gaza has exposed Doha as a centre for terrorism and a haven forterrorists. A clear example is the hospitality afforded by Qatar toKhaled Mashal, a notorious arch-terrorist and the leader of the Hamas. Mr Mashal terrorises Israel and ordering his people to die for “a religious cause” while he lives in luxury far from harm.
Note to forward to your friends:

Hi!

I just signed the petition "Emir of Qatar: Stop Qatar’s Terror Funding" on Change.org.

It’s important. Will you sign it too? Here’s the link:

http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/emir-of-qatar-stop-qatar-s-terror-funding?recruiter=140784870&utm_campaign=signature_receipt&utm_medium=email&utm_source=share_petition

Thanks!

A Plea for Realism

Bassem Eid

Common grounds
The time has come for the Palestinian public to acknowledge the reality in which they live. A century of national struggle and 34 years spent resisting the occupation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem has not yet brought us peace, and the right of Palestinian self-determination has yet to be actualized. The largely ineffectual “peace process” has been characterized by the expansion of illegal Israeli settlements in the Occupied territories, numerous closures, and the constant humiliation of a frustrated Palestinian public. The al-Aqsa intifada grew from decades of injustice and discontent and did not erupt in a vacuum.

The reality in which we now live is that of an uneven struggle where Palestinian fighters, despite all their bravery, do not stand a chance against Israel’s military might. It is a reality of fruitless appeals to the international community and the Arab world, whom the Palestinians still rely upon to defend their cause. The international community does show some sympathy for the Palestinian struggle, but in the realm of international politics and diplomacy, sympathy holds little weight in the face of the economic, political and military power of Israel and its allies.

I believe that the violent path chosen by Palestinians in the al-Aqsa intifada has failed. This violence achieved little beyond an overwhelming Israeli military response, and the Palestinians, who have no means to win a military victory, pay a very high price in the confrontation. The use of firearms by Palestinians clouds the issue and provides the Israelis and their foreign sympathizers with a means of justifying the disproportionate “response” of the Israeli military. Moreover, violence diverts the attention of the world from the real issue – the injustice endured by the Palestinian people – and Palestinians are consequently portrayed as a fundamentally violent and irresponsible people, a people with whom it is not possible to make peace.

The violence characterizing the al-Aqsa Intifada prompted the demise of the Israeli liberal left, and a concurrent swing to the right of the Israeli political spectrum, empowering the current government under Ariel Sharon to reject any concessions or compromises.

It is time for the Palestinian people to accept this reality and to direct their struggle into a more pragmatic strategy. This does not mean that the struggle has to end. On the contrary, while a violent struggle seems unlikely to achieve the liberation of the Palestinian territories and the establishment of a Palestinian state, a sudden halt of the intifada would be perceived as a victory for Sharon’s government, thereby seemingly confirming that the brutal suppression of the intifada was well founded.

In my opinion, non-violent resistance is the best possible means of ending the current deadlock. Non-violence does not imply passivity in the face of the occupation. On the contrary, it can be a very powerful means of resistance, one that requires as much bravery and heroism as any armed operation.

Several non-violent actions have been successfully orchestrated recently, most notably those at Birzeit University, demonstrating that the Israeli army is helpless in confronting this kind of resistance. Non-violent resistance can include all segments of the Palestinian people, with a very important role to be played by women and children.

Non-violence will also enable the Palestinian people to communicate their message much more effectively in clearly articulated demands. Take the old city of Hebron, for example, where 40,000 Palestinians have lived under a strict curfew for a large part of the al-Aqsa intifada. What if every day at 4 pm, Palestinians sat outside their doorstep for an hour, drinking tea or smoking narguilah, without the use of stones or slogans. They would be in blatant disregard of the curfew imposed upon them, and there is no guarantee that the response of the Israeli army would be non-violent, but the message would be clear and powerful: it is unacceptable to lock 40,000 people indoors for the security of 400 Israeli settlers.

Non-violence would be a more pragmatic way of resisting the occupation. However, just as the Palestinians have to display pragmatism in how they resist the occupation, they have to be equally realistic in the goals they seek to achieve through resistance. Even though the PLO recognized the existence of Israel in 1988, many Palestinians still cannot bring it upon themselves to openly acknowledge Israel’s right to exist. I believe that a future with Israel is better than no future at all. Palestinians need to state very clearly and unequivocally that they do not question the existence of the State of Israel in its pre-1967 borders, and that the singular goal of the al-Aqsa intifada is the liberation of the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Future negotiations on questions such as the right to return will have to take Israel’s concerns into consideration. Embracing such an attitude is obviously painful for us Palestinians, who have already conceded so much, but the time has come to face reality.

# # #

Bassem Eid is Director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group in Jerusalem (www.phrmg.org).

Voir de plus:

An Interview with Bassem Eid of Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group
Abram Shanedling

Hasbara fellowships

Jun 24, 2011

The Executive Director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group explains why he sees little progress in Palestinian-Israeli negotiations.
The Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG) was established in 1996 in response to the deteriorating state of human rights under the newly established Palestinian Authority (PA). Today, PHRMG, based in Jerusalem, monitors human rights abuse against Palestinians in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and East Jerusalem. Founder and Executive Director of PHRMG Bassem Eid shared his opinion on the Arab Spring, Israeli-Palestinian relations, and the Obama administration.

What is your view of the current state of the "Arab Spring?”

Bassem Eid (BE): I don’t believe that in the days of Obama we are going to see any peace in the Middle East. It looks like everything is moving backward. Islamism is increasing and it’s not only putting Israel under pressure but also the Arab democrats under pressure. Egypt in my opinion is going to be completely occupied by an Islamist brotherhood, and Syria will likely go down the same path.

How do you see this impacting Israeli-Palestinian relations?

BE: To make peace, I don’t think the Palestinians and Israelis are ready. Palestinians don’t want to be considered Muslim and don’t want to establish an Islamist state. When [Palestinians] want to make peace with Israel, no Arab country will support us. So we have a difficulty on how to present our ideas.

How about Israel?

BE: Israel is in a very difficult situation. Everybody is worried and everybody completely has the feeling that danger surrounds us.

How do you see the issue of Palestinian refugees seriously factoring in on future negotiations?

BE: It’s a very strong card that the PA is holding, but nobody believes that the Palestinians will all be back, especially those descendents. I think it is an issue that is already agreed between the Palestinians and Israelis.

Everybody talks about right of return within the Palestinian state only. The majority of Palestinians in the Diaspora prefer to get financial compensation instead of coming back, especially to a Palestinian state under the PA.

How does Hamas and Gaza fit into everything, especially with the recent reconciliation deal struck between the PA and Hamas?

BE: Today Gaza is not just a problem for Israel, but for the Palestinians in the West Bank as well as the Arab World. In the past few years, [PA President] Mahmoud Abbas has failed to build any strategy for the peace process, so he went and made the reconciliation deal.

Do you think the reconciliation deal will amount to anything?

BE: Past agreements between the PA and Hamas have usually failed. Even though the PA and Hamas signed this deal, to this day, they have not figured out a new prime minister. I am a person who believes that if any election takes place among the Palestinians, Hamas will win. This would be a big disaster for the Palestinians, the Israelis, and the world.

You sound quite pessimistic, but is there anything the the U.S. can do?

BE: With Islamism spreading in the region, I think we have a window this year for peace, but after a year, the gates of peace will unfortunately close.

This article was adapted from an original published June 24, 2011 by Abram Shanedling on PolicyMic.com

Voir de même:

An Israeli and a Palestinian scathed by South Africa apartheid rhetoric
Despite their limited knowledge of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, South Africans have many prejudices that are being fueled by anti-Israel groups
Benjamin Pogrund and Bassem Eid

Haaretz

May 4, 2012

The two of us, an Israeli and a Palestinian, went to South Africa recently to speak about the Middle East. For understandable reasons, South Africa is a major source for the "Israel is apartheid" accusation; it stems from the fact that many South Africans, especially blacks, relate Israel’s treatment of Palestinians to their own history of racial discrimination.

And indeed, in the several dozen meetings we addressed, we repeatedly heard the apartheid accusation. No, we replied: Apartheid does not exist inside Israel; there’s discrimination against Arabs but it’s not South African apartheid. On the West Bank, there is military occupation and repression, but it is not apartheid. The apartheid comparison is false and confuses the real problems.

As we traveled around the country, it became clear to us that South Africans generally have limited knowledge about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. But they hold many prejudices and these are fed and manipulated by organizations that are vehemently anti-Israel – to the extent of calling for destruction of the Jewish state, as the Palestinian Solidarity Campaign, the Muslim Judicial Council and the Russell Tribunal have done. Black trade unions join in the attacks and so do some people of Jewish origin.

Our host was the South African Jewish Board of Deputies. During 10 days we spoke on five university campuses, at several public meetings and to journalists, and were on radio programs, including one aired by a Muslim station.

We were shown an e-mail calling for protests against our visit: It seemed that the anti-Israel hard-liners were upset by an Israeli and a Palestinian speaking on the same platform and promoting peace. But there were no protests: The worst we experienced was a knot of about six people standing quietly outside one meeting. We were also warned to expect "tough questions," but we didn’t hear any. Instead, the large audiences – people of all colors, and mainly non-Jews – were attentive and wanted information about the current state of play in the conflict.

There were some hostile comments such as the silly sneer that Israel is "terrified of a few suicide bombers" and that it is "hogwash" to call Hamas a terrorist organization. In a more serious vein were repeated references to the Palestinian "right of return." It cannot be said whether those who spoke were genuinely responding to the plight of the refugees, or were cynically using it as a reasonable-sounding slogan although it in effect calls for elimination of the Jewish state.

Nelson Mandela’s words in support of Palestinian freedom were flung at us (and also appear in propaganda leaflets issued by Palestinian-supporting organizations ). He was quoted as saying: "But we know too well that our freedom is incomplete without the freedom of the Palestinians." Mandela did indeed say that, on December 9, 1997, on the occasion of Palestinian Solidarity Day, and it still resonates strongly among South Africans. But it’s actually half of what he said in the context of a call for freedom for all people. He also explained the greater context and the dishonesty of the propagandists in singling out Israel: "… without the resolution of conflicts in East Timor, the Sudan and other parts of the world."

Other falsities we heard were that only Jews are allowed to own or rent 93 percent of the land in Israel, and that Israel’s restrictions on marriage (which in actuality derive from Jewish, Muslim and Christian religious authorities ) are the same as apartheid South Africa’s prohibition of marriage – or sex – across color lines.

There was also an earlier statement by the South African Council of Churches in support of Israel Apartheid Week in which it claimed that "Israel remained the single supporter of apartheid when the rest of the world implemented economic sanctions, boycotts and divestment to force change in South Africa." That, of course, is nonsense: Israel did trade with apartheid South Africa – but so did the entire world, starting with oil sales by Arab states, and including the United States, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, the Soviet Union and many in Africa.

BDS, the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, is noisily vocal and gets publicity in South African media. While we were there it ran Israel Apartheid Week programs on several university campuses. But the movement did not garner wide support; some scheduled speakers did not even turn up. Its boast that more than 100 universities worldwide took part in the week doesn’t amount to much: Apartheid weeks have been going on for eight years and out of the 100 this year, 60 were held on American campuses (out of 4,000 universities and colleges in that country ). Not much progress there.

We did not pre-plan what we were going to say. But a consensus emerged: First, we both spoke in bleak terms about peace prospects in the near future; second, we each castigated our own leaderships for double-talk and pretense, and for their lack of boldness and vision, and we pointed to the growth of Jewish settlements on the West Bank as undermining the chances for an agreement.

We stressed that we welcomed interest in our part of the world – but warned that some members of Palestinian solidarity movements have never visited the occupied territories, and they damage the Palestinian cause abroad because they act out of ignorance, and foster division and hatred between Arabs and Jews. They do not help to bring peace.

Our strangest meeting was with scores of Congolese who asked us to explain why their conflict – ongoing since 1960 with a toll of perhaps more than 7 million people dead – receives less attention in South African and other media than does the Israeli-Palestinian struggle. It was painful listening to their recital of mass rapes and murders. But it was difficult to empathize with them when one speaker blamed the Jews, whom he said controlled the world and the media, and when a former army officer asked us for money to go and fight the Congolese government.

Bassem Eid is director of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group and a former researcher for B’Tselem. Benjamin Pogrund, South African-born, was founder of Yakar’s Center for Social Concern in Jerusalem.

Voir aussi:

LIFE IS BETTER THAN DEATH: INTERVIEW WITH BASSEM EID
Interviewed by Joel B. Pollak

New Society (Harvard college Middle East Journal)

January 29, 2008

Joel B. Pollak ’99 is a graduate of Harvard College and the University of Cape Town. He was a political speechwriter for the Leader of the Opposition in South Africa from 2002 to 2006 and is a second-year student at Harvard Law School.

***

Bassem Eid is the Executive Director and co-founder of the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG), which tracks human rights violations against Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza, regardless of who commits them. He is a former fieldworker for B’Tselem, the Israeli human rights organization focusing on the occupied territories. Eid’s work at PHRMG has concentrated on documenting violations by the Palestin-ian Authority against its own citizens. In recent years he has also moni-tored abuses committed by the Fatah and Hamas factions in their internec-ine struggles. Eid has received numerous human rights awards and frequently addresses Israeli and foreign audiences about the human rights problems facing Palestinians. Earlier this year, he teamed up with left-wing Israeli politician Yossi Beilin at the Doha Debates, arguing that Palestinians should abandon the right of return for the sake of peace with Israel.
New Society: Tell me about your life—where you are from, and how you came to be where you are today.
Bassem Eid: I am Palestinian and I was born in the Old City in East Jerusalem. I lived there for eight years, but then in 1966, for no reason, the Jorda-nian government established a refugee camp called Shuefat Refugee Camp near the French Hill in Jerusalem. The Jordanian government removed 500 families from the Old City, mainly from the Jewish Quarter. It was exactly one year before the 1967 war. I lived in the refugee camp for 32 years from 1966 until 1999. For the past four years, I have been living in Jericho.

I finished secondary school in one of the municipality schools in East Jerusalem. Then I attended Hebrew University for two years and studied journalism, but I couldn’t continue for financial reasons. After leaving the university, I worked as a freelance journalist for Palestin-ian and Israeli newspapers until 1988 before joining B’Tselem, an Israeli human rights organization that investigates rights violations in the occupied territories. In mid-1996, I resigned from B’Tselem and founded the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group (PHRMG), which is where I still am today.

NS: Why did you leave B’Tselem?

Eid: When the Palestinian Authority (PA) was established 1994, I noticed that most Palestinian and Israeli human rights organizations continued monitoring the Israeli occupation, but that nobody wanted to pay any attention to the PA’s violations. In a meeting held in March 1996, the board members of B’Tselem decided that they would not concern themselves with PA abuses. That’s why I left. I wanted to fill a role that I thought was very important, but that was empty.

NS: So you left that same year?

Eid: Yes. The decision came out in March, and I left at the end of July 1996 to set up the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group. Our main aim is to observe the Palestinian Authority’s violations. Between 1996 and 2000, our publications did not cover Israeli violations at all. All of our reports and press releases responded to Palestinian Authority abuses. We only started collecting data on Israeli violations after the second Intifada broke out in September 2000. Then we started to investigate Israeli killings, assassinations, house demolitions, and the use of the excessive force. In the meantime, we continued to collect information about Palestinian Authority violations.
Today, we are probably the organization with the most extensive data on internal killings among the Palestinians. I believe we are the only organization, for example, that investigates the murder of collaborators by Palestinians. We also investigate long-term imprisonment without charge, torture, the conduct of the state security court, and deaths that occur in Palestinian detention centers. We collect information on these issues and update our reports everyday.

NS: Why do you think B’Tselem chose not to monitor the Palestinian Authority?

Eid: In my opinion, that was a wise decision. At that time, there were still large areas under Israeli occupation and B’Tselem still had a lot of work to do to expose rights violations by the Israeli army in the occupied territories.
On the other side, I think that if the Palestinians want to form a successful civil society, live in a democracy, and respect human rights, we will have to build institutions with our own hands. We should not lay our fate in other people’s hands. We have done so quite enough over the past sixty years. We are still demanding a state from the international community instead of building it ourselves. I think that it is the time for the Palestinians to start building their own democracy right now. I believe that democracy has never been offered by leaders or governments. Democracy is determined by the people themselves.

NS: How did the Palestinian Authority react to your new organization?

Eid: Creating a human rights organization under an Arab regime is like committing suicide. Yasser Arafat was used to doing whatever he wanted without being criticized or monitored. When I started watch-ing, investigating, criticizing, he started to look at me in a very bad light. The Palestinian Authority defamed us and slandered us. Among other accusations, they said that we serve the enemy’s interests.

When we started to publish reports on PA human rights viola-tions, the reports became sexy news material for the international community. They were particularly well-reported by the Israeli media. The issue was especially sexy because, as you know, I had spent the past seven and a half years criticizing only Israel. Arafat saw me as a traitor.
We had a very tough period and had to get through many tough moments. Sometimes, ironically, these fears and difficulties gave us more energy and made us become even more committed to the sub-ject. We decided to continue in spite of all the danger surrounding us. And here we are! We still exist.

NS: Has your work become easier or more difficult since Arafat’s death?

Eid: Well, I think the PA does not really exist anymore. It exists in the pages of newspapers rather than on the ground itself. The PA com-pletely destroyed itself during the past seven years. They got themselves into huge trouble.
As far as my work is concerned, I feel very secure right now. Eve-ryone knows me where I live in Jericho. I’m very satisfied with what I’m doing.

NS: What do you think of the prospects for Palestinians right now? Will there be a Palestinian state? Is the two-state solution still viable?

Eid: It must be possible to create a Palestinian state. The question is how. How will we deal with it? How will we build it? How will we unite to establish good institutions?

In my opinion, the establishment of a Palestinian state is not only related to the Israelis. It concerns the Palestinians. We have had a very bad experience with building a state, developing it, and keeping it alive.

That brings me to the September 2005 Israeli disengagement from Gaza. Everybody thought that the Israeli disengagement would be a kind of test for the Palestinians. It would test whether we are really able to build our own state and manage our daily lives ourselves. In my opinion, we totally failed to manage Gaza, develop it, and build infrastructure.

Today, fewer and fewer Palestinian voices speak up in favor of es-tablishing a state. Everybody has his own horrible troubles. The only people calling for a state right now are the politicians.

Politicians around the world are buying and selling blood. This is the only income that they have. And that’s exactly what Arafat prac-ticed with the Palestinians. I remember with great sadness what happened when he started creating an Intifada and threatening the Israelis. Palestinian security workers went to the schools, ordered the schoolmasters to close the schools, and then sent the schoolchildren to throw stones at the Israelis. That was a very horrible thing to do. Politicians sacrifice their people to achieve their political interests. This is unfortunately the Palestinian attitude.
Look at Prime Minister Salaam Fayyad, who is saying, “No more resistance!” This is a huge change. One can resist, but one must also protect oneself and one’s survival. People were born to live, not to die. When you are alive, you can choose to resist, but you can also choose to build, to achieve things, to reach for what you want. When you die, you just die. This is a good lesson for the Palestinians right now: sacrificing ourselves will not help us achieve anything. We won’t achieve anything with violent resistance.

We are having to face the consequences of our actions over the past seven years. In my opinion, the Palestinians totally lost their way during the past seven years. Things will get worse if we continue in the same way. We will have to change our direction.

NS: What do you think should happen in Gaza?

Eid: Gaza is a big problem for the Palestinians, Israelis, and Egyptians. The international community becomes more and more afraid of the Palestinians because Hamas reflects such a negative side of Palestinian politics. I don’t think that Hamas will ever offer Gaza to back to Abbas.

The question is: Who is going to control Hamas? Hamas right now oppresses the Gazan people. But who will contain Hamas? I don’t think that dialogue will solve the problem.
We will all be watching whether Hamas can manage Gaza and keep it functioning. The Arab countries should put more effort into solving the conflict between Hamas and Fatah. The problem is that the Arab countries are so divided, some supporting Hamas against Fatah and some supporting Fatah against Hamas. This won’t help the situation.

I don’t think the international community can do very much on this issue, besides continuing to provide important humanitarian aid to the people of Gaza. On the whole, though, it’s too early right now to tell what will happen to Gaza and Hamas.

NS: What about Hamas in the West Bank. Are they a factor?

Eid: They do exist in the West Bank, but what’s happening in Gaza could never happen in the West Bank.

This is not only because Fatah is stronger than Hamas, but also be-cause of the Israeli occupation in the West Bank. Israelis will never allow Hamas militants to take over Jenin, facing Afula.

Of course, Hamas will still threaten to occupy the West Bank, to jeopardize any peace agreement, and to harm the Palestinian Presi-dent and government in the West Bank. I don’t think we will see peace in the near future.
Daily life in the West Bank will become a little bit easier, though, according to the promises of Ehud Olmert and Mahmoud Abbas. But I think the peace process will take much longer than anybody expects.

NS: What do you think is the main reason that the conflict continues?

Eid: I think there is a lack of good will and leadership on both sides. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict also tends to become a commercial conflict. Everybody is making something off this conflict. There are countries that have an interest in perpetuating the fighting. The Iranians, for example, are trying to provoke a regional war using Hezbollah and Hamas.

I don’t think the Palestinians will have the same opportunities for peace that we were offered between 1947 and July 2000. Palestinian violence has probably caused some countries to want not to get involved anymore. The foreign policy of the international community is totally biased.

NS: When you say that foreign policy is biased, you mean in which direction?

Eid: Well, the problem is that the international community is not united. Countries are divided. Policies are divided. So many different biased policies are involved in this conflict. In this kind of situation, I don’t think that the Palestinians or the Israelis will be able to reach a kind of final peace or a final agreement between themselves.

NS: Do you think there’s a possibility that Israelis and Palestinians will be able to build something out of the cooperation that still exists between them in some areas? Are these areas of cooperation possible foundations for peace?

Eid: Small-scale cooperation is very important. But I don’t think a permanent solution is possible right now. Let us talk about a tempo-rary one, instead. This is what Abbas and Olmert are doing right now. Let us release few thousand Palestinian prisoners, let us evacuate a couple of checkpoints, let us open the gates of the wall between villages and clinics or schools, let us issue a couple of tens of thou-sands of work permits to Palestinians so that they can work in Israel—this is what we are negotiating with the Israelis now.

When you talk about the state, the settlements, the borders, and the water, the Israelis say, this is so complicated, let’s leave it to the end. In the meanwhile, let’s do things step-by-step. That is how we are today negotiating with the Israelis. Many of these small things will probably continue to be delivered in the future.

NS: How do you feel about the situation? What motivates you?

Eid: I’m very angry and frustrated. I’m hopeless. I know my ideas provoke people, but I’m not a politician. I care much more about people’s lives rather than their lands. Land you can get everywhere in the world, but you can never replace lives. I don’t want to hear about killings, I don’t want to hear about shootings. I hate violence.

I am 48 years old. I had never, ever in my life seen a tank shooting until the past six or seven years. Since then, when I’ve gone to Ramal-lah, Bethlehem, Jericho, I’ve been so afraid. I’ve seen the kinds of things I never want to see again. I don’t like the way we are militariz-ing the conflict. It’s horrible. And I don’t like the way we’re making it religious. That brings great danger.

Looking back through history, one finds several examples of con-flicts that were solved without any kind of bloodshed. So I do believe that we can solve our conflict. We will have to learn from the experi-ences of others.

NS: What did you learn when you went to South Africa this year?

Eid: South Africa is very interesting. But it couldn’t be a model for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. There are some very good things in the South African case that we can learn from. The Truth and Reconcilia-tion Committee, for example.
The most important lesson is that the people in South Africa built their democracy and institutions with their own hands. Nobody offered it to them. I hope Palestinians will learn from that.

But otherwise, the South African case is very different from our situation. It involved people fighting against one apartheid govern-ment. In the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, you are not talking about one government or one nation. It’s totally different. We are not fighting for a one-state solution. Of course we are not.

What I learnt in South Africa is that some Islamists in South Africa are totally disconnected from the realities and still believe that the solution will be one state—an Islamic state. I found that very horrible.

NS: Do people in the West Bank and East Jerusalem want one state or two states, or do they want something else entirely?

Eid: At the moment, I think the Palestinians want a three-state solu-tion for two nations—Gaza, the West Bank, and Israel. Of course, there are still some disconnected Palestinians and Israelis who believe in a one-state solution. But I think that the Palestinians dream of creating our own independent, democratic, anti-Islamist country. And I think the Israelis want their own Jewish, Zionist country. I think both people have a right to their own states.

NS: What do you think the role should be of the Palestinian Diaspora, people in other parts of the region and other parts of the world?

Eid: That’s a really a big problem right now. I don’t believe that all the Palestinian refugees would like to come back. Israel will never open its doors to those refugees. The Palestinians shouldn’t have to continue sacrificing themselves for the right of return, a dream that will never be applicable on the ground. There are refugees around the world. All nations have refugees. This is an international problem. Refugees should be able to move to the West Bank or other countries. They should be more realistic about the situation.

NS: How are your ideas received by other Palestinians?

Eid: I don’t think that most Palestinians agree with me. And politi-cians are completely ignorant of my ideas because they don’t serve their political interests. We are a totally unstable society. Our opinions change ever day. Sometimes we feel powerful and energetic; some-times we feel tired and hopeless. I prefer talking to people when they are tired. Then they are more likely to listen to new ideas.

NS: What are your perceptions of Israeli human rights groups? Are they succeeding in their work?

Eid: I think they are doing a good job. We, the Palestinians, have learnt a lot from the Israeli organizations. There are Palestinians who are critical of the Israeli organizations, but mostly they are people who have no real idea of what is going on. I know what happens inside the Israeli organizations. I think that they are doing the maximum they can do to improve the daily lives of the Palestinians. If you go to the High Court, you will realize that most of the appeals made on behalf of Palestinians have been presented by Israeli groups and Israeli lawyers, not Palestinian ones.

NS: Are you able to monitor what’s going on in Gaza right now?

Eid: That’s very, very difficult. Don’t forget that we are living under a Taliban regime in the Gaza Strip. Our fieldworker hesitates before investigating cases there. The situation for human rights organizations sometimes reminds me of the Saddam Hussein regime. We can’t monitor the Gaza Strip the way we used to monitor it when it was PA territory. We are trying to collect data from newspapers and other organizations that operate in the area. We are in touch with some journalists there. But we face serious opposition and danger.

NS: What advice would you like to give to the Palestinians?

Eid: The best opportunity for us to make peace with Israel was probably in 1978 or 1979 when Egyptian president Anwar Sadat visited Israel. He suggested that Yasser Arafat join him, but Arafat refused.

The most important thing for us to do now is learn from the mis-takes we made between 1947 and today so that we don’t repeat them. We should put these mistakes on the table and study them well. After studying our mistakes, I think the solution will be very easy to create.

Voir enfin:

Christian In Israel
Abandoned by the Israeli Left: The story of Bassem Eid
Palestinian activist reflects on what went wrong in peace process, and what can be done now.
David Parsons
The Jerusalem Post
06/25/2012

Back during the first Palestinian intifada (1987 to 1993), the Israeli human rights organization B’Tselem latched on to a young Palestinian field worker named Bassem Eid and turned him into the darling of the Israeli Left. He reported on many of the incidents of alleged use of force against Palestinian civilians, and was sent on speaking tours to dozens of nations around the world.

But when the Olso peace process was launched, Bassem Eid saw his hopes for a free and democratic Palestinian state dashed by the new regime set up by PLO leader Yasser Arafat. So he set up his own organization to monitor violations of human rights being committed by the Palestinian Authority against his own people. By the time the second intifada broke out in the year 2000, Bassem was watching his dreams of peace and coexistence between Israel and the Palestinians go up in smoke.


Israël: Attention, une légitimité peut en cacher une autre (Forget 181 and the green line: Looking back at Israel and its neighbor’s real legitimacy)

31 juillet, 2014

Le rejet du plan de partition de 1947 était une erreur, l’erreur du monde arabe dans son ensemble, mais est-ce qu’ils [les Israéliens] nous punissent de cette erreur soixante-quatre ans plus tard ? Mahmoud Abbas (Président de l’Autorité palestinienne, 28 octobre 2011)
Je pense que le Hamas cessera ses tirs de roquettes, le silence amènera le silence. Propos attribués à Barack Hussein Obama
Les signataires de ce communiqué, qui appartiennent au monde de la culture, déclarent leur indignation contre le génocide qui est en train d’être perpétué contre la population palestinienne par les troupes d’occupation israélienne dans la bande de Gaza." Collectif de célébrités espagnoles
Le gouvernement de Sa Majesté envisage favorablement l’établissement en Palestine d’un foyer national pour le peuple juif, et emploiera tous ses efforts pour faciliter la réalisation de cet objectif, étant clairement entendu que rien ne sera fait qui puisse porter atteinte ni aux droits civiques et religieux des collectivités non juives existant en Palestine, ni aux droits et au statut politique dont les juifs jouissent dans tout autre pays. Déclaration Balfour
Le Conseil de la Société des nations … Considérant que les Principales Puissances Alliées ont convenu que le Mandat est chargé d’appliquer la déclaration annoncée le 8 novembre 1917 par le Gouvernement Britannique et adoptée par les autres puissances alliées, en faveur de l’établissement en Palestine d’un foyer national pour le peuple juif ; étant clairement entendu qu’aucune démarche ne devrait être entreprise pouvant porter préjudice aux droits civils et religieux des communautés non juives en Palestine, ni aux droits et au statut politique dont bénéficiaient les Juifs dans d’autres pays. Résolution de San Remo (24  avril 1920, confirmée par le Conseil de la Société des nations le 24 juillet 1922, mise en application en septembre 1923)
3. Reconnaît que la dissolution de la Société des Nations mettra fin à ses fonctions en ce qui concerne les territoires sous mandat, mais note que des principes correspondant à ceux que déclare l’article 22 du Pacte sont incorporés dans les chapitres XI, XII et XIII de la Charte des Nations Unies; 4. Note que les Membres de la Société administrant actuellement des territoires sous mandat ont exprimé leur intention de continuer à les administrer, en vue du bien-être et du développement des peuples intéressés, conformément aux obligations contenues dans les divers mandats, jusqu’à ce que de nouveaux arrangements soient pris entre les Nations Unies et les diverses Puissances mandataires. Résolution de l’assemblée de la Société des nations (18 avril 1946)
À l’exception de ce qui peut être convenu dans les accords particuliers de tutelle conclus conformément aux Articles 77, 79 et 81 et plaçant chaque territoire sous le régime de tutelle, et jusqu’à ce que ces accords aient été conclus, aucune disposition du présent Chapitre ne sera interprétée comme modifiant directement ou indirectement en aucune manière les droits quelconques d’aucun État ou d’aucun peuple ou les dispositions d’actes internationaux en vigueur auxquels des Membres de l’Organisation peuvent être parties. Chapitre XII : Régime international de tutelle (article 80, San Francisco, 26 juin 1945)
Ayant en vue spécifiquement la mise en œuvre de la résolution du Conseil de sécurité du 16 Novembre 1948, les objectifs et principes suivants sont confirmés:
1. Est reconnu le principe selon lequel aucun avantage militaire ou politique ne devrait être acquis pendant la trêve ordonnée par le Conseil de sécurité;
2. Il est également reconnu, les dispositions du présent accord étant dictées exclusivement par des considérations militaires, qu’aucune disposition du présent Accord ne porte en rien atteinte aux droits, revendications et positions de l’une ni de l’autre Partie dans le règlement pacifique et final de la question palestinienne. Accord Jordano-israélien d’armistice général du 3 Avril 1949 (article II)
The state of Israel came into being by the same legitimate process that created the other new states in the region, the consequence of the dismantling of the Ottoman Empire after World War I. Consistent with the traditional practice of victorious states, the Allied powers France and England created Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Jordan, and of course Israel, to consolidate and protect their national interests. This legitimate right to rewrite the map may have been badly done and shortsighted––regions containing many different sects and ethnic groups were bad candidates for becoming a nation-state, as the history of Iraq and Lebanon proves, while prime candidates for nationhood like the Kurds were left out. But the right to do so was bestowed by the Allied victory and the Central Powers’ loss, the time-honored wages of starting a war and losing it. Likewise in Europe, the Austro-Hungarian Empire was dismantled, and the new states of Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia were created. And arch-aggressor Germany was punished with a substantial loss of territory, leaving some 10 million Germans stranded outside the fatherland. Israel’s title to its country is as legitimate as Jordan’s, Syria’s and Lebanon’s. Bruce Thornton
À la fin du XIXe siècle, se structure un nationalisme juif, le sionisme, qui soutient la création d’un État-nation juif en Palestine qu’il définit comme « Terre d’Israël »8. En 1917, les Britanniques, par l’intermédiaire de la Déclaration Balfour, se déclarent en faveur de l’établissement d’un foyer national pour le peuple juif. En 1919, est signé l’Accord Fayçal-Weizmann en tant qu’élément de la Conférence de paix de Paris. Cet accord prévoit l’établissement d’une coopération judéo-arabe pour le développement d’une patrie juive et d’une nation arabe en Palestine 9. La même année se tient à Jérusalem le Congrès de la Palestine arabe qui exige l’annulation de la déclaration de Balfour et l’inclusion de la Palestine comme partie intégrante du gouvernement arabe indépendant de la Syrie et rejette le sionisme tout en acceptant l’aide britannique sous condition de ne pas empiéter sur la souveraineté arabe en Palestine envisagée en tant qu’élément d’un État syrien indépendant10. La population arabe du pays s’oppose au projet. Des émeutes sont régulièrement organisées dans toute la Palestine dès 1919. En avril 1920, des émeutes à Jérusalem font une dizaine de morts et près de 250 blessés à la veille de la Conférence de San Remo qui doit étudier la question du futur de la Palestine. La Société des Nations s’y déclare favorable au projet d’établissement d’un foyer national juif et en 1922, elle officialise le mandat britannique sur la Palestine. Dès 1920, Mohammed Amin al-Husseini devient l’un des principaux leaders du nationalisme palestinien ayant pour but la création d’un État arabe palestinien indépendant; il s’oppose activement au sionisme et est considéré comme l’instigateur de 1921 à 1937 des émeutes violentes en réaction au projet de l’établissement d’un « Foyer juif » en Palestine. Il est réputé antisémite11,12. En 1937, alors qu’il est recherché par la police britannique pour son rôle dans ces émeutes il s’enfuit en Syrie13,14,15,16. En 1941, il se réfugie en Allemagne nazie et demande à Hitler de lui apporter son soutien contre la création d’un Foyer juif17,18,11. En 1925, Izz al-Din al-Qassam, né en Syrie, prône la lutte armée comme action politique19, en 1930 il fonde une organisation paramilitaire, La main noire qui se lance dans des attaques contre les juifs et les britanniques, prêchant la violence politique d’inspiration religieuse, le Jihad et l’anti-sionisme20,21. En 1935 est fondé le Parti arabe palestinien créé par la famille Al-Husseini. L’opposition arabe palestinienne culmine avec la Grande Révolte de 1936-1939. Menée par les nationalistes palestiniens, elle s’oppose à la fois à la présence juive et britannique en Palestine et aux hommes politiques palestiniens se revendiquant d’un nationalisme panarabe. Le 18 février 1947, les Britanniques annoncent l’abandon de leur mandat sur la région et transfèrent la responsabilité sur la Palestine mandataire à l’ONU. Wikipedia

 Attention: une légitimité peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où après une énième flagrante et continue agression du régime terroriste du Hamas soutenus par les islamistes du Qatar et de Turquie …

Et, l’idiot utile de la Maison Blanche et les maitres es ignorance du show biz espagnol en tête, l’habituelle et quasi-unanime condamnation du Monde dit libre …

Israël se voit à nouveau contraint de se défendre d’exister …

Retour, avec une excellente vidéo de Give peace a chance (merci Michel Gurfinkiel), sur la véritable légitimité de l’Etat d’Israël …

Qui, contrairement à une idée reçue ne tient ni la fameuse résolution 181 de l’ONU …

Ni à la fameuse "ligne verte"  qui n’est en fait qu’une ligne d’armistice …

Mais plutôt à la Résolution de San Remo de 1920 …

Comme d’ailleurs, suite au démembrement de l’Empire ottoman, … celle de la plupart des autres Etats de la région !

La légitimité d’Israël est liée à une décision internationale prise à San Remo

Document original créé par le site www.givepeaceachance.info

[Transcription par Menahem Macina, sur le site debriefing.org, 16 novembre 2011.]

La résolution de la Commission ad hoc sur la question de la Palestine a été adoptée par 33 voix pour, 13 voix contre, et 10 abstentions.

La résolution 181 de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies en 1947 a ouvert la voie à la renaissance, en 1948, de l’Etat d’Israël. Toutefois, cela confère-t-il à Israël une légitimité ?

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

La réponse est non. De façon générale, selon le droit international, les résolutions de l’assemblée générale ne sont pas contraignantes.

Howard Grief

C’est une légende très répandue. Il n’y a aucune vérité dans l’affirmation que le fondement juridique d’Israël repose sur la résolution de partition de l’ONU du 29 novembre 1947. Si le peuple juif et les Arabes s’étaient entendus pour contracter un accord fondé sur les termes d’une résolution, alors des droits et des devoirs auraient pu être créés dans le droit international. Mais cela n’a pas eu lieu.

Dore Gold, ancien ambassadeur d’Israël auprès de l’ONU

Le véritable fondement juridique de l’Etat moderne d’Israël remonte à l’époque qui a suivi la Première Guerre mondiale. Quand les grandes puissances de l’époque et la Société des Nations – L’ONU de cette époque –  ont décidé de qu’il adviendrait des différents territoires ennemis.

Howard Grief (juriste en droit international) pratique le droit depuis 1966. Pendant de nombreuses années, et même avant cette date, il s’est intéressé aux questions du Moyen-Orient. Dans les années 80 il a entrepris d’analyser les minutes de la Conférence de San Remo de 1920, documents enfouis depuis longtemps dans les archives britanniques. Cela l’a amené à publier un livre ayant pour titre « Les fondements juridiques et les frontières d’Israël selon le Droit international ».

Howard Grief

Par rapport au droit international, la résolution de San Remo est le document constitutionnel principal de l’Etat d’Israël.

San Remo. La Villa Devachan. C’est le lieu où les droits juridiques furent accordés. C’est le lieu où les droits juridiques furent donnés aussi bien au peuple juif qu’au peuple arabe.

Le Docteur Jacques Gauthier est un juriste international spécialisé dans la défense des droits de l’homme. Pendant plus de 25 ans il a travaillé sur le statut juridique de Jérusalem par rapport au droit international, qui est le sujet de sa thèse de doctorat.

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

C’est ici que les dirigeants ayant un pouvoir de décision juridiquement irrévocable à l’égard des territoires ottomans ont délibéré et pris la décision, après avoir entendu les revendications de l’Organisation Sioniste à Paris, lors de la Conférence de Paix en 1919, après avoir entendu les demandes des délégations arabes au sujet de leurs desiderata concernant les territoires ottomans. Suite à ces demandes, un groupe parmi eux s’est réuni et a pris les décisions juridiquement contraignantes et définitives du point de vue du droit international sur qui obtiendrait quoi.

Dore Gold

la légitimité d’Israël est liée à une décision internationale prise à San Remo

A San Remo [25 avril 1920], ce qui était auparavant une approche exclusivement britannique a reçu le soutien sans réserves de la Communauté internationale. Ainsi, dans cette perspective,

et pas uniquement à un caprice de la politique britannique.

Le problème palestinien
En 1917, Lord Allenby conquit la Terre Sainte et les Juifs se virent promettre par le Comte Balfour un foyer national en Palestine. Une politique réalisée par Woodrow Wilson et la Société des Nations, qui fit de la Palestine un Mandat britannique.

Dore Gold :

Dans le Mandat pour la Palestine de 1922, la Société des Nations adopta une résolution très particulière. Ils décidèrent qu’ils reconnaissaient les droits historiques du peuple juif. Pour quoi faire ? Pour rétablir leur foyer national. Si vous prêtez attention aux mots utilisés, vous remarquez deux choses : vous remarquez qu’ils reconnaissent un droit préexistant et non pas la création d’un droit nouveau ; en d’autres termes, les droits historiques du peuple juif sur cette terre étaient reconnus par les grandes puissances, par l’équivalent de l’ONU à l’époque.

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

Le peuple juif fut choisi pour être bénéficiaire d’une « fiducie », d’un Mandat concernant la Palestine aux bons soins du gouvernement britannique. Les habitants arabes des territoires de Mésopotamie – L’Irak d’aujourd’hui –, la Syrie, le Liban, furent choisis pour être les bénéficiaires d’une « fiducie », d’un Mandat, une partie sous la tutelle, ou le Mandat, de la France – la Syrie et le Liban, une partie sous supervision britannique – la Mésopotamie. Je veux souligner que l’objectif premier du Mandat britannique pour la Palestine était d’accorder les droits politiques au peuple juif en ce qui concerne la Palestine

Howard Grief

Les droits civiques et religieux des Arabes en tant qu’individus étaient entièrement garantis dans le document du Mandat. En ce qui concerne les droits nationaux, ainsi que les droits collectifs politiques, ils étaient exclusivement réservés au peuple juif, parce que les Arabes avaient déjà reçu ces mêmes droits, non pas en Palestine, mais dans les pays environnants. Et c’est pour cela qu’aujourd’hui, il y a 21 pays arabes et 1 Etat juif.

La Seconde Guerre mondiale provoqua la dissolution de la Société des Nations elle fut remplacée en 1945 par les Nations Unies.

Harry S. Truman, ancien Président américain

La Charte des Nations Unies que vous signez en ce moment est une fondation solide sur laquelle nous pouvons construire un monde meilleur.

Selon le droit international, comment cela affecte-t-il les droits du peuple juif ?

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

Dans la seconde résolution adoptée par la Société des Nations, datée d’avril 1946, il est spécifié que l’intention était qu’après la dissolution de la SDN, il était primordial de « continuer à veiller au bien-être et au développement des peuples concernés par chacun des mandats, pour ce qui est de la Palestine, il s’agissait du peuple juif.

Howard Grief

Ainsi les droits reconnus comme étant inhérents au peuple juif étaient garantis par l’article 80.

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

Aucune disposition de la Charte ne peut être interprétée comme annulant ou modifiant, directement ou indirectement, les droits d’aucun peuple, même acquis avant l’établissement des Nations Unies. Je fais ainsi allusion à l’article 80 de la Charte.

Suite à l’établissement de l’Etat d’Israël en 1948, le pays fut envahi par cinq armées arabes, avec l’intention de détruire l’Etat juif. La partie est de Jérusalem fut annexée par la Jordanie. La ville fut divisée pendant 19 ans. La souveraineté jordanienne sur la Cisjordanie et Jérusalem n’a jamais été reconnue par les Nations Unies.

En 1967, Israël reprit Jérusalem-est lors d’une guerre défensive, et l’annexa par la suite.

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

La résolution 242 du Conseil de Sécurité, du 22 novembre 1967, est souvent désignée comme étant à l’origine des droits et devoirs de toutes les parties au Moyen-Orient. Concernant Jérusalem proprement dit, je soutiens l’idée qu’encore une fois, les droits ont été accordés sur la base de la reconnaissance des droits historiques, en se fondant sur le principe du rétablissement des possessions anciennes du peuple juif. L’Etat juif et le Peuple juif n’ont rien fait pour abandonner les droits qui leur ont été donnés concernant ce territoire, ni pour y renoncer.

Dore Gold

Quiconque consulte les données de recensement du XIXe siècle datant de la présence ici de l’empire ottoman, réalisera que le peuple juif avait réussi déjà au XIXe siècle à former de nouveau une majorité à Jérusalem et dans sa Vieille Ville. En 1864, le Consulat Britannique à Jérusalem a produit des données de recensement qui indiquent que sur 15 000 habitants de Jérusalem, en 1863, 8 000 étaient juifs. Nous parlons donc d’une ville qui a été juive depuis l’époque ottomane, depuis le milieu du XIXe siècle.

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

La Vieille Ville est sans doute la partie la plus controversée, la plus convoitée, au centre de la question la plus litigieuse. Lorsque l’on parle de la question de Jérusalem, il faut se souvenir qu’avant le milieu du XIXe siècle, Jérusalem était la Vieille Ville.

Dore Gold

Beaucoup de ceux qui disent à Israël de diviser à nouveau Jérusalem selon les frontières de 1967, et qui placent ainsi la totalité de la Vieille Ville du côté arabe palestinien, oublient les événements de 1948. En 1948, Jérusalem était envahie par 5 armées arabes. L’ONU avait alors assuré la création d’une ville internationale [il s'agissait, en fait de l'internationalisation de la ville de Jérusalem], mais les Nations Unies n’ont finalement rien fait. En définitive, il y eut un nettoyage ethnique des Juifs de la Vieille Ville de Jérusalem, et les Juifs furent obligés de partir. La Légion arabe, avec l’appui des habitants palestiniens détruisit 55 synagogues et écoles talmudiques : elles furent dynamitées.

Quiconque dit à Israël : Rendez Jérusalem, doit expliquer comment cela éviterait que l’histoire se répète. Souvenez-vous : de 1948 à 1967, avant qu’Israël ne réunifie Jérusalem, les Juifs n’avaient pas accès au Mur occidental. Israël est déterminé à ne pas voir cela se reproduire.

Après 18 ans d’un processus de paix qui a échoué sans qu’aucun accord ne soit en vue, l’Autorité Palestinienne a indiqué vouloir obtenir de l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies la reconnaissance unilatérale d’un Etat palestinien dans les frontières de la « Ligne verte » d’avant 1967 et avec Jérusalem-est comme capitale.

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

La « Ligne verte » est simplement une ligne d’armistice. C’est la ligne de démarcation choisie par Israël, le peuple juif et les Jordaniens, lorsqu’ils arrêtèrent les combats en 1949. Cette ligne, précisée dans l’accord d’armistice israélo-jordanien, n’a jamais été prévue comme pouvant produire des droits et des devoirs pour qui que ce soit.

Dore Gold

Les premiers accords d’Oslo, ceux de 1993, les grands accords d’Oslo de 1995, connus sous le nom d’Accord Intérimaire, avaient une clause appelée article 31. Cet article disait qu’aucune partie ne pourrait modifier le statut de la Cisjordanie et de la Bande de Gaza avant l’achèvement des négociations de statut permanent.

Si les Palestiniens tentaient de modifier le statut du territoire sans négocier avec Israël, ce serait un acte unilatéral en violation de cet engagement. Pourquoi cela est-il particulièrement important pour l’Europe ? Parce que lorsque l’Accord intérimaire concernant cette clause importante fut signé à la Maison Blanche, en présence du Président Bill Clinton, l’Union Européenne avait également signé l’accord en tant que témoin. Donc, si les pays de l’UE décident de soutenir le projet Palestinien à l’ONU, en contradiction avec l’engagement palestinien d’Oslo, ils prêteront en fait main forte à la violation d’un accord écrit dont ils sont également signataires. La question qui se poserait immédiatement en Israël serait alors : qui pourrait à nouveau faire confiance à l’union européenne en l’impliquant dans le processus de paix, si elle viole les accords qu’elle a elle-même signés ?

Le monde entier dit à Israël : Pourquoi ne reconnaissez-vous pas les droits des Palestiniens à un Etat ? Cela semble élémentaire. Les Israéliens entendent cela tout le temps. Mais inversons les rôles un instant, voyez-vous qui que ce soit dire aux Palestiniens : Vous devez reconnaître au peuple juif le droit d’avoir son propre Etat, dont le régime a acquis une légitimité internationale, et des accords internationaux remontant à San Remo et au Mandat britannique de la Société des Nations ?  Malheureusement les mêmes exigences ne sont pas adressées à l’autre partie, et cela révèle peut-être les véritables intentions.

Docteur Jacques Gauthier

Beaucoup de ceux qui sont réunis ici à Rome (au Sénat de Rome en 2011) – sénateurs [dont Marcello Pera, ancien Président du Sénat italien], et parlementaires, venus pour parler du processus de paix, oui beaucoup sont inquiets des décisions que les nations pourraient prendre dans les semaines et mois à venir au sujet des droits du peuple juif, des droits de l’Etat d’Israël, de Jérusalem, et des territoires disputés. Afin de donner une chance à la paix, il est nécessaire d’honorer les promesses solennelles inscrites dans le droit des nations, promesses faites au peuple juif et à l’Etat d’Israël.

© Give Peace a chance

The British Mandate For Palestine
San Remo Conference, April 24, 1920

Confirmed by the Council of the League of Nations on July 24, 1922
Came into operation in September 1923.
"The Council of the League of Nations:

Whereas the Principal Allied Powers have agreed, for the purpose of giving effect to the provisions of Article 22 of the Covenant of the League of Nations, to entrust to a Mandatory selected by the said Powers the administration of the territory of Palestine, which formerly belonged to the Turkish Empire, within such boundaries as may be fixed by them; and

Whereas the Principal Allied powers have also agreed that the Mandatory should be responsible for putting into effect the declaration originally made on November 2nd, 1917, by the Government of His Britannic Majesty, and adopted by the said Powers, in favour of the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, it being clearly understood that nothing should be done which might prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country; and

Whereas recognition has thereby been given to the historical connexion of the Jewish people with Palestine and to the grounds for reconstituting their national home in that country; and

Whereas the Principal Allied Powers have selected His Britannic Majesty as the Mandatory for Palestine; and

Whereas the mandate in respect of Palestine has been formulated in the following terms and submitted to the Council of the League for approval; and

Whereas His Britannic Majesty has accepted the mandate in respect of Palestine and undertaken to exercise it on behalf of the League of Nations in conformity with the following provisions; and

Whereas by the aforementioned Article 22 (paragraph 8), it is provided that the degree of authority, control or administration to be exercised by the Mandatory, not having been previously agreed upon by the Members of the League, shall he explicitly defined by the Council of the League of Nations;

Confirming the said Mandate, defines its terms as follows:

ARTICLE 1.

The Mandatory shall have full powers of legislation and of administration, save as they may be limited by the terms of this mandate.

ARTICLE 2.

The Mandatory shall be responsible for placing the country under such political, administrative and economic conditions as will secure the establishment of the Jewish national home, as laid down in the preamble, and the development of self-governing institutions, and also for safeguarding the civil and religious rights of all the inhabitants of Palestine, irrespective of race and religion.

ARTICLE 3.

The Mandatory shall, so far as circumstances permit, encourage local autonomy.

ARTICLE 4.

An appropriate Jewish agency shall be recognized as a public body for the purpose of advising and cooperating with the Administration of Palestine in such economic, social and other matters as may affect the establishment of the Jewish national home and the interests of the Jewish population in Palestine, and, subject always to the control of the Administration, to assist and take part in the development of the country.

The Zionist Organization, so long as its organization and constitution are in the opinion of the Mandatory appropriate, shall he recognized as such agency. It shall take steps in consultation with His Britannic Majesty’s Government to secure the cooperation of all Jews who are willing to assist in the establishment of the Jewish national home.

ARTICLE 5.

The Mandatory shall be responsible for seeing that no Palestine territory shall be ceded or leased to, or in any way placed under the control of, the Government of any foreign Power.

ARTICLE 6.

The Administration of Palestine, while ensuring that the rights and position of other sections of the population are not prejudiced, shall facilitate Jewish immigration under suitable conditions and shall encourage, in co-operation with the Jewish agency referred to in Article 4, close settlement by Jews on the land, including State lands and waste lands not required for public purposes.

ARTICLE 7.

The Administration of Palestine shall be responsible for enacting a nationality law. There shall be included in this law provisions framed so as to facilitate the acquisition of Palestinian citizenship by Jews who take up their permanent residence in Palestine.

ARTICLE 8.

The privileges and immunities of foreigners, including the benefits of consular jurisdiction and protection as formerly enjoyed by Capitulation or usage in the Ottoman Empire, shall not be applicable in Palestine.

Unless the Powers whose nationals enjoyed the aforementioned privileges and immunities on August 1st, 1914, shall have previously renounced the right to their re-establishment, or shall have agreed to their non-application for a specified period, these privileges and immunities shall, at the expiration of the mandate, be immediately re-established in their entirety or with such modifications as may have been agreed upon between the Powers concerned.

ARTICLE 9.

The Mandatory shall be responsible for seeing that the judicial system established in Palestine shall assure to foreigners, as well as to natives, a complete guarantee of their rights.

Respect for the personal status of the various peoples and communities and for their religious interests shall be fully guaranteed. In particular, the control and administration of Waqfs shall be exercised in accordance with religious law and the dispositions of the founders.

ARTICLE 10.

Pending the making of special extradition agreements relating to Palestine, the extradition treaties in force between the Mandatory and other foreign Powers shall apply to Palestine.

ARTICLE 11.

The Administration of Palestine shall take all necessary measures to safeguard the interests of the community in connection with the development of the country, and, subject to any international obligations accepted by the Mandatory, shall have full power to provide for public ownership or control of any of the natural resources of the country or of the public works, services and utilities established or to be established therein. It shall introduce a land system appropriate to the needs of the country having regard, among other things, to the desirability of promoting the close settlement and intensive cultivation of the land.

The Administration may arrange with the Jewish agency mentioned in Article 4 to construct or operate, upon fair and equitable terms, any public works, services and utilities, and to develop any of the natural resources of the country, in so far as these matters are not directly undertaken by the Administration. Any such arrangements shall provide that no profits distributed by such agency, directly or indirectly, shall exceed a reasonable rate of interest on the capital, and any further profits shall be utilized by it for the benefit of the country in a manner approved by the Administration.

ARTICLE 12.

The Mandatory shall be entrusted with the control of the foreign relations of Palestine, and the right to issue exequaturs to consuls appointed by foreign Powers. He shall also be entitled to afford diplomatic and consular protection to citizens of Palestine when outside its territorial limits.

ARTICLE 13

All responsibility in connexion with the Holy Places and religious buildings or sites in Palestine, including that of preserving existing rights and of securing free access to the Holy Places, religious buildings and sites and the free exercise of worship, while ensuring the requirements of public order and decorum, is assumed by the Mandatory, who shall be responsible solely to the League of Nations in all matters connected herewith, provided that nothing in this article shall prevent the Mandatory from entering into such arrangements as he may deem reasonable with the Administration for the purpose of carrying the provisions of this article into effect; and provided also that nothing in this Mandate shall be construed as conferring upon the Mandatory authority to interfere with the fabric or the management of purely Moslem sacred shrines, the immunities of which are guaranteed.

ARTICLE 14.

A special Commission shall be appointed by the Mandatory to study, define and determine the rights and claims in connection with the Holy Places and the rights and claims relating to the different religious communities in Palestine. The method of nomination, the composition and the functions of this Commission shall be submitted to the Council of the League for its approval, and the Commission shall not be appointed or enter upon its functions without the approval of the Council.

ARTICLE 15.

The Mandatory shall see that complete freedom of conscience and the free exercise of all forms of worship, subject only to the maintenance of public order and morals, are ensured to all. No discrimination of any kind shall be made between the inhabitants of Palestine on the ground of race, religion or language. No person shall be excluded from Palestine on the sole ground of his religious belief.

The right of each community to maintain its own schools for the education of its own members in its own language, while conforming to such educational requirements of a general nature as the Administration may impose, shall not be denied or impaired.

ARTICLE 16.

The Mandatory shall be responsible for exercising such supervision over religious or eleemosynary bodies of all faiths in Palestine as may be required for the maintenance of public order and good government. Subject to such supervision, no measures shall be taken in Palestine to obstruct or interfere with the enterprise of such bodies or to discriminate against any representative or member of them on the ground of his religion or nationality.

ARTICLE 17.

The Administration of Palestine may organize on a voluntary basis the forces necessary for the preservation of peace and order, and also for the defence of the country, subject, however, to the supervision of the Mandatory, but shall not use them for purposes other than those above specified save with the consent of the Mandatory. Except for such purposes, no military, naval or air forces shall be raised or maintained by the Administration of Palestine.

Nothing in this article shall preclude the Administration of Palestine from contributing to the cost of the maintenance of the forces of the Mandatory in Palestine.

The Mandatory shall be entitled at all times to use the roads, railways and ports of Palestine for the movement of armed forces and the carriage of fuel and supplies.

ARTICLE 18.

The Mandatory shall see that there is no discrimination in Palestine against the nationals of any State Member of the League of Nations (including companies incorporated under its laws) as compared with those of the Mandatory or of any foreign State in matters concerning taxation, commerce or navigation, the exercise of industries or professions, or in the treatment of merchant vessels or civil aircraft. Similarly, there shall be no discrimination in Palestine against goods originating in or destined for any of the said States, and there shall be freedom of transit under equitable conditions across the mandated area.

Subject as aforesaid and to the other provisions of this mandate, the Administration of Palestine may, on the advice of the Mandatory, impose such taxes and customs duties as it may consider necessary, and take such steps as it may think best to promote the development of the natural resources of the country and to safeguard the interests of the population. It may also, on the advice of the Mandatory, conclude a special customs agreement with any State the territory of which in 1914 was wholly included in Asiatic Turkey or Arabia.

ARTICLE 19.

The Mandatory shall adhere on behalf of the Administration of Palestine to any general international conventions already existing, or which may be concluded hereafter with the approval of the League of Nations, respecting the slave traffic, the traffic in arms and ammunition, or the traffic in drugs, or relating to commercial equality, freedom of transit and navigation, aerial navigation and postal, telegraphic and wireless communication or literary, artistic or industrial property.

ARTICLE 20.

The Mandatory shall co-operate on behalf of the Administration of Palestine, so far as religious, social and other conditions may permit, in the execution of any common policy adopted by the League of Nations for preventing and combating disease, including diseases of plants and animals.

ARTICLE 21.

The Mandatory shall secure the enactment within twelve months from this date, and shall ensure the execution of a Law of Antiquities based on the following rules. This law shall ensure equality of treatment in the matter of excavations and archaeological research to the nationals of all States Members of the League of Nations.

ARTICLE 22.

English, Arabic and Hebrew shall be the official languages of Palestine. Any statement or inscription in Arabic on stamps or money in Palestine shall be repeated in Hebrew and any statement or inscription in Hebrew shall be repeated in Arabic.

ARTICLE 23.

The Administration of Palestine shall recognize the holy days of the respective communities in Palestine as legal days of rest for the members of such communities.

ARTICLE 24.

The Mandatory shall make to the Council of the League of Nations an annual report to the satisfaction of the Council as to the measures taken during the year to carry out the provisions of the mandate. Copies of all laws and regulations promulgated or issued during the year shall be communicated with the report.

ARTICLE 25.

In the territories lying between the Jordan and the eastern boundary of Palestine as ultimately determined, the Mandatory shall be entitled, with the consent of the Council of the League of Nations, to postpone or withhold application of such provisions of this mandate as he may consider inapplicable to the existing local conditions, and to make such provision for the administration of the territories as he may consider suitable to those conditions, provided that no action shall be taken which is inconsistent with the provisions of Articles 15, 16 and 18.

ARTICLE 26.

The Mandatory agrees that if any dispute whatever should arise between the Mandatory and another Member of the League of Nations relating to the interpretation or the application of the provisions of the mandate, such dispute, if it cannot be settled by negotiation, shall be submitted to the Permanent Court of International Justice provided for by Article 14 of the Covenant of the League of Nations.

ARTICLE 27.

The consent of the Council of the League of Nations is required for any modification of the terms of this mandate.

In the event of the termination of the mandate hereby conferred upon the Mandatory, the Council of the League of Nations shall make such arrangements as may be deemed necessary for safeguarding in perpetuity, under guarantee of the League, the rights secured by Articles 13 and 14, and shall use its influence for securing, under the guarantee of the League, that the Government of Palestine will fully honour the financial obligations legitimately incurred by the Administration of Palestine during the period of the mandate, including the rights of public servants to pensions or gratuities.

The present instrument shall be deposited in original in the archives of the League of Nations and certified copies shall be forwarded by the Secretary General of the League of Nations to all Members of the League.

DONE AT LONDON the twenty-fourth day of July, one thousand nine hundred and twenty-two."


Israël: Le seul pays dont les voisins font de l’anéantissement un objectif national explicite (And the only nation on earth that inhabits the same land, bears the same name, speaks the same language, and worships the same God that it did 3,000 years ago – on a territory smaller than Vermont)

24 juillet, 2014
http://peripluscd.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/merneptah-stele_cairo.jpg?w=450
Mesha stele
Tel Dan stele

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/t1.0-9/p350x350/10502389_4458367994364_7788663956708256369_n.jpg

Israël est détruit, sa semence même n’est plus. Amenhotep III (Stèle de Mérenptah, 1209 or 1208 Av. JC)
Je me suis réjoui contre lui et contre sa maison. Israël a été ruiné à jamais. Mesha (roi de Moab, Stèle de Mesha, 850 av. J.-C.)
J’ai tué Jéhoram, fils d’Achab roi d’Israël et j’ai tué Ahziahu, fils de Jéoram roi de la Maison de David. Et j’ai changé leurs villes en ruine et leur terre en désert. Hazaël (stèle de Tel Dan, c. 835 av. JC)
Le roi de Moab, voyant qu’il avait le dessous dans le combat, prit avec lui sept cents hommes tirant l’épée pour se frayer un passage jusqu’au roi d’Édom; mais ils ne purent pas. Il prit alors son fils premier-né, qui devait régner à sa place, et il l’offrit en holocauste sur la muraille. Et une grande indignation s’empara d’Israël, qui s’éloigna du roi de Moab et retourna dans son pays. 2 Rois 3: 26-27
Je les planterai dans leur pays et ils ne seront plus arrachés du pays que je leur ai donné, dit L’Éternel, ton Dieu. Amos (9: 15)
Quel est ton pays, et de quel peuple es-tu? (…) Je suis Hébreu, et je crains l’Éternel, le Dieu des cieux, qui a fait la mer et la terre. Jonas 1-8-9
La petite nation est celle dont l’existence peut être à n’importe quel moment mise en question, qui peut disparaître, et qui le sait. Un Français, un Russe, un Anglais n’ont pas l’habitude de se poser des questions sur la survie de leur nation. Leurs hymnes ne parlent que de grandeur et d’éternité. Or, l’hymne polonais commence par le vers : La Pologne n’a pas encore péri. Milan Kundera
L’Etat d’Israël est né du même processus légitime qui a créé les autres nouveaux États de la région, la conséquence du démantèlement de l’Empire Ottoman après la Première guerre mondiale. En conformité avec la pratique traditionnelle des États victorieux, les puissances alliées de France et d’Angleterre ont créé le Liban, la Syrie, l’Irak et Jordan et bien sûr Israël, pour consolider et protéger leurs intérêts nationaux. Ce droit légitime de réécrire la carte peut avoir été mal fait et à courte vue – des régions contenant beaucoup de différentes sectes et groupes ethniques étaient de mauvais candidats pour devenir des Etats-nation, comme l’histoire de l’Irak et le Liban le montre, alors que des candidats de premier plan pour l’identité nationale, comme les Kurdes, ont été écartés. Mais le droit de le faire a été accordé par la victoire des alliés et la défaite des puissances centrales, le prix vieux comme le monde de que doivent payer ceux qui déclenchent une guerre et la perdent. De même, en Europe, l’Autriche-Hongrie a été démantelée, et les nouveaux États de l’Autriche, de la Hongrie, de la Yougoslavie et de la Tchécoslovaquie ont été créés. Et l’agresseur par excellence qu’est l’Allemagne se vit infliger une perte importante de territoire, laissant environ 10 millions d’Allemands bloqués à l’extérieur de la patrie. le droit d’Israël à son pays est aussi légitime que ceux de la Jordanie, de la Syrie et du Liban. Bruce Thornton
Israël est l’incarnation pure et simple de la continuité juive : c’est la seule nation au monde qui habite la même terre, porte le même nom, parle la même langue et vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans. En creusant le sol, on peut trouver des poteries du temps de David, des pièces de l’époque de Bar Kochba, et des parchemins vieux de 2000 ans, écrits de manière étonnamment semblable à celle qui, aujourd’hui, vante les crèmes glacées de la confiserie du coin. Charles Krauthammer

Mais qui aujourd’hui se souvient encore de Moab ?

Alors que sous la furie combinée des roquettes palestiniennes (gracieusement fournies, via l’Egypte et le Soudan et le financement du Qatar, par l’Iran qui brusquement semblent inquiéter l’Occident) et des critiques occidentales

En cette drôle de guerre où le plus fort doit s’excuser de trop bien protéger sa population pendant que le plus faible fait la une des médias pour l’avoir sacrifiée

Un peuple annoncé "détruit à jamais" à trois reprises par un pharaon, un roi moabite et un roi syrien au XIIIe puis au IXe siècles AVANT Jésus-Christ …

Voit à nouveau son droit à défendre son existence contesté …

Comment ne pas repenser à ce magnifique texte que le célèbre éditorialiste américain Charles Krauthammer avait écrit pour le cinquantenaire …

De la (re)création, à l’instar des autres Etats de la région suite au démembrement de l’Empire ottoman, de l’Etat d"un peuple annoncé, comme nous le rappelions ici même pour son "60e anniversaire", "détruit à jamais" à trois reprises par un pharaon, un roi moabite et un roi syrien au XIIIe puis au IXe siècles AVANT Jésus-Christ …

Rappelant, à tous nos ignorants donneurs de leçons, que sur un territoire plus petit que l’infinitésimalissime état américain du Vermont (ou de la Lorraine ou la Sicile) …

"Le seul pays au monde dont les voisins font de l’anéantissement un objectif national explicite"  …

Est aussi "la seule nation au monde à habiter la même terre, porter le même nom, parler la même langue et vénérer le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans" !

Extraits:

Israël n’est pas uniquement une petite nation. Israël est la seule petite nation – la seule, point ! – dont les voisins déclarent publiquement que son existence même est un affront au droit, à la morale et à la religion, et qui font de son anéantissement un objectif national explicite. Et cet objectif n’est pas une simple déclaration d’intention. L’Iran, la Libye, et l’Iraq mènent une politique étrangère qui vise au meurtre des Israéliens et à la destruction de leur État. Ils choisissent leurs alliés (Hamas, Hezbollah) et développent leurs armements (bombes-suicide, gaz toxiques, anthrax, missiles nucléaires) conformément à cette politique. Des pays aussi éloignés que la Malaisie n’autorisent pas la présence d’un représentant d’Israël sur leur sol, allant jusqu’à interdire la projection du film "La Liste de Schindler", de peur qu’il n’engendre de la « sympathie pour Sion ».

D’autres sont plus circonspects dans leurs déclarations. La destruction n’est plus l’objectif unanime de la Ligue Arabe, comme cela a été le cas pendant les trente années qui ont précédé Camp David. La Syrie, par exemple, ne le dit plus de façon explicite. Cependant, la Syrie détruirait Israël demain, si elle en avait les moyens. (Sa retenue actuelle sur le sujet est largement due à son besoin de liens avec les Etats-Unis d’après la guerre froide). Même l’Égypte, première à avoir fait la paix avec Israël et prétendu modèle de "faiseur de paix", s’est dotée d’une grande armée équipée de matériel américain, qui effectue des exercices militaires très clairement conçus pour combattre Israël. Son exercice "géant", Badr 96, par exemple, le plus grand mené depuis la guerre de 1973, simulait des traversées du canal de Suez.

Et même l’OLP, obligée de reconnaître ostensiblement l’existence d’Israël dans les accords d’Oslo de 1993, est toujours régie par une charte nationale qui, dans au moins quatorze passages, appelle à l’éradication d’Israël. Le fait qu’après cinq ans [rappelons que Krauthammer écrit ceci en 1998] et quatre promesses spécifiques d’amender cette charte, elle reste intacte, est un signe qui montre à quel point le rêve de faire disparaître Israël reste profondément ancré dans l’inconscient collectif arabe.

Le monde islamique, berceau de la grande tradition juive séfarade et patrie d’un tiers de la population juive mondiale, est aujourd’hui pratiquement Judenrein. Aucun pays du monde islamique ne compte aujourd’hui plus de 20 000 Juifs. Après la Turquie, qui en compte 19 000, et l’Iran, où l’on en dénombre 14 000, le pays ayant la plus grande communauté juive dans le monde islamique est le Maroc, avec 6 100 Juifs – il y en a davantage à Omaha, dans le Nebraska. Ces communautés ne figurent pas dans les projections. Il n’y a d’ailleurs rien à projeter. Il n’est même pas besoin de les comptabiliser, il faut juste s’en souvenir. Leur expression même a disparu. Le yiddish et le ladino, langues respectives et distinctives des diasporas européennes et sépharades, ainsi que les communautés qui les ont inventées, ont quasiment disparu.

Israël est l’incarnation pure et simple de la continuité juive : c’est la seule nation au monde qui habite la même terre, porte le même nom, parle la même langue et vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans. En creusant le sol, on peut trouver des poteries du temps de David, des pièces de l’époque de Bar Kochba, et des parchemins vieux de 2000 ans, écrits de manière étonnamment semblable à celle qui, aujourd’hui, vante les crèmes glacées de la confiserie du coin.

Soit, appelez ces gens comme vous le voulez. Après tout, "Juif" est une dénomination plutôt récente de ce peuple. Ils furent d’abord des "Hébreux", puis des "Israélites". "Juif" (qui vient du royaume de Juda, un des deux États qui ont succédé au royaume de David et de Salomon) est l’appellation post-exilique pour "Israélite". C’est un nouveau venu dans l’histoire.

Comment qualifier un Israélien qui ne respecte pas les règles alimentaires, ne va pas à la synagogue, et considère le Shabbat comme le jour où l’on va faire un tour en voiture à la plage – ce qui, soit dit en passant, est une assez bonne description de la plupart des Premiers ministres d’Israël ? Cela n’a aucune importance. Installez un peuple juif dans un pays qui se fige le jour de Kippour, parle le langage de la Bible, vit au rythme (lunaire) du calendrier hébraïque, construit ses villes avec les pierres de ses ancêtres, produit une littérature et une poésie hébraïques, une éducation et un enseignement juifs qui n’ont pas d’égal dans le monde – et vous aurez la continuité. Les Israéliens pourraient s’appeler autrement. Peut-être un jour réserverons-nous le terme de "Juifs" à l’expérience d’exil d’il y a 2000 ans, et les appellerons-nous "Hébreux" [c'est le terme qu'utilise la langue italienne : "ebrei" - Note de Menahem Macina]. Ce terme a une belle connotation historique, c’est le nom que Joseph et Jonas ont donné en réponse a la question : « Qui êtes-vous ? »

Certains ne sont pas d’accord avec l’idée qu’Israël est porteur de la continuité du peuple juif, à cause de la multitude de désaccords et de fractures entre Israéliens : Orthodoxes contre Laïcs, Ashkénazes contre Sépharades, Russes contre Sabras, etc. Israël est aujourd’hui engagé dans d’amers débats à propos de la légitimité du judaïsme conservateur et réformiste, ainsi que de l’empiétement de l’orthodoxie sur la vie sociale et civique du pays.

Et alors, qu’y a-t-il là de nouveau ? Israël est tout simplement en train de revenir à la norme juive. Il existe des divisions tout aussi sérieuses au sein de la Diaspora, tout comme il en existait au sein du dernier État juif : « Avant la suprématie des Pharisiens et l’émergence d’une orthodoxie rabbinique, après la chute du second Temple», écrit l’universitaire Frank Cross, «le judaïsme était plus complexe et varié que nous le supposions ». Les Manuscrits de la Mer Morte, explique Hershel Shanks, «attestent de la variété – mal perçue jusqu’à ce jour – du judaïsme de la fin de la période du Second Temple, à tel point que les universitaires évoquent souvent, non pas le judaïsme, mais les judaïsmes. »

Le second État juif était caractérisé par des rixes entre sectaires juifs : Pharisiens, Sadducéens, Esséniens, apocalypticiens de tous bords, sectes aujourd’hui oubliées par l’histoire, sans parler des premiers chrétiens. Ceux qui s’inquiètent des tensions entre laïcs et religieux en Israël devraient méditer sur la lutte, qui dura plusieurs siècles, entre les Hellénistes et les Traditionalistes, durant la période du deuxième État juif. La révolte des Macchabées, entre 167 et 164 avant J.-C., célébrée aujourd’hui à Hanoukka, était, entre autres, une guerre civile entre Juifs.

Certes, il est peu probable qu’Israël produise une identité juive unique. Mais ce n’est pas nécessaire. Le monolithisme relatif du judaïsme rabbinique au Moyen-Âge est l’exception. Fracture et division sont les réalités du quotidien, à l’ère moderne, tout comme elles l’étaient dans le premier et le second États juifs. Ainsi, durant la période du premier Temple, le peuple d’Israël était divisé en deux États [le royaume de Juda, au sud, et celui d'Israël, au nord – note du réviseur de la version française], qui étaient en conflit quasi permanent. Les divisions actuelles au sein d’Israël ne supportent pas la comparaison.

La position centrale d’Israël est plus qu’une question de démographie. Elle représente une nouvelle stratégie, hardie et dangereuse pour la survie du peuple juif. Pendant deux millénaires, le peuple juif a survécu grâce à la dispersion et à l’isolement. Après le premier exil, en 586 avant J.-C., et le second, en 70, puis en 132, les Juifs se sont d’abord installés en Mésopotamie et autour du bassin Méditerranéen, puis en Europe de l’Est et du Nord, et, finalement, au Nouveau Monde, à l’Ouest, avec des communautés situées presque aux quatre coins du monde, jusqu’en Inde et en Chine.

Tout au long de cette période, le peuple juif a survécu à l’énorme pression de la persécution, des massacres et des conversions forcées, non seulement par sa foi et son courage, mais aussi grâce à sa dispersion géographique. Décimés ici, ils survivaient ailleurs. Les milliers de villes et de villages juifs répartis dans toute l’Europe, le monde islamique et le Nouveau Monde, constituaient une sorte d’assurance démographique. Même si de nombreux Juifs ont été massacrés lors de la première Croisade, le long du Rhin, même si de nombreux villages ont été détruits au cours des pogroms de 1648-1649, en Ukraine, il y en avait encore des milliers d’autres répartis sur toute la planète pour continuer. Cette dispersion a contribué à la faiblesse et la vulnérabilité des communautés juives prises séparément. Paradoxalement, pourtant, elle a constitué un facteur d’endurance et de force pour le peuple juif dans son ensemble. Aucun tyran ne pouvait réunir une force suffisante pour menacer la survie du peuple juif partout dans le monde.

Jusqu’à Hitler. Les nazis sont parvenus à détruire presque tout ce qu’il y avait de juif, des Pyrénées aux portes de Stalingrad, une civilisation entière, vieille de mille ans. Il y avait neuf millions de Juifs en Europe lorsque Hitler accéda au pouvoir. Il a exterminé les deux tiers d’entre eux. Cinquante ans plus tard, les Juifs ne s’en sont pas encore remis. Il y avait seize millions de Juifs dans le monde, en 1939. Aujourd’hui, ils sont treize millions.

Toutefois, les conséquences de l’Holocauste n’ont pas été que démographiques. Elles ont été psychologiques, bien sûr, et aussi idéologiques. La preuve avait été faite, une fois pour toutes, du danger catastrophique de l’impuissance. La solution était l’autodéfense, ce qui supposait une re-centration démographique dans un lieu doté de souveraineté, d’armement, et constituant un véritable État.

Avant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, il y avait un véritable débat, au sein du monde juif, à propos du sionisme. Les juifs réformistes, par exemple, avaient été antisionistes durant des décennies. L’Holocauste a permis de clore ce débat. A part certains extrêmes – la droite ultra-orthodoxe et l’extrême gauche – le sionisme est devenu la solution reconnue à l’impuissance et à la vulnérabilité juives. Au milieu des ruines, les Juifs ont pris la décision collective de dire que leur futur reposait sur l’autodéfense et la territorialité, le rassemblement des exilés en un endroit où ils pourraient enfin acquérir les moyens de se défendre eux-mêmes.

C’était la bonne décision, la seule décision possible. Mais ô combien périlleuse ! Quel curieux choix que celui de ce lieu pour l’ultime bataille : un point sur la carte, un petit morceau de quasi-désert, une fine bande d’habitat juif, à l’abri de barrières naturelles on ne peut plus fragiles (et auxquelles le monde exige qu’Israël renonce). Une attaque de tanks suffisamment déterminée peut la couper en deux. Un petit arsenal de Scuds à tête nucléaire peut la détruire intégralement.

Pour détruire le peuple juif, Hitler devait conquérir le monde. Tout ce qu’il faudrait aujourd’hui, c’est conquérir un territoire plus petit que le Vermont [aux Etats-Unis]. La terrible ironie est qu’en résolvant leur problème d’impuissance, les Juifs ont mis tous leurs oeufs dans le même panier, un petit panier au bord de la Méditerranée. Et, de son sort, dépend le sort de tous les Juifs.

Nous présumons que l’histoire juive est cyclique : exil babylonien en 586 av. J.-C., suivi par le retour, en 538 av. J.-C., exil romain en 135, suivi par le retour, légèrement différé en 1948. C’est oublier la part linéaire de l’histoire juive : il y a eu une autre destruction, un siècle et demi avant la chute du premier Temple. Elle restera irréparable. En 722 av. J.-C., les Assyriens firent la conquête de l’autre État juif, le plus grand, le royaume du nord d’Israël (la Judée, dont descendent les juifs modernes, constituait le royaume du Sud). Il s’agit de l’Israël des Dix Tribus, exilées et perdues pour toujours.

Leur mystère est si tenace que, lorsque les explorateurs Lewis et Clark partirent pour leur expédition [vers les vastes Plaines de l'Ouest américain], une des nombreuses questions préparées à leur intention par le Dr Benjamin Rush, à la demande du président Jefferson lui-même, fut la suivante : Quel lien existe-t-il entre leurs cérémonies [celles des Indiens] et celles des Juifs ? – « Jefferson et Lewis avaient longuement parlé de ces tribus », explique Stephen Ambrose. «Ils conjecturaient que les tribus perdues d’Israël pouvaient être quelque part dans les Plaines. »

Hélas, ce n’était pas le cas. Les Dix Tribus se sont dissoutes dans l’histoire. En cela, elles sont représentatives de la norme historique. Tout peuple conquis de cette façon et exilé disparaît avec le temps. Seuls les Juifs ont défié cette norme, à deux reprises.

Mais je crains que ce ne soit plus jamais le cas.

Charles Krauthammer

En fin de compte: Sion, Israël et le destin des Juifs

Charles  Krauthammer

The Weekly Standard

11 mai 1998

Traduction française de Nathalie Lerner, révisée par Menahem Macina.

1. Un petit État

Milan Kundera a défini un jour un petit État comme étant « un État dont l’existence même pourrait être remise en question à tout instant; un petit État peut disparaître, et il le sait » [1] Les États-Unis ne sont pas un ‘petit État’. Le Japon non plus. Ni même la France. Ces nations peuvent subir des défaites. Elles peuvent même être envahies. Mais elles ne peuvent pas disparaître. La Tchécoslovaquie de Kundera pouvait disparaître, et ce fut même le cas, en une occasion [2]. La Tchécoslovaquie d’avant-guerre est une petite nation paradigmatique: une démocratie libérale créée sur les cendres de la guerre par un monde déterminé à laisser les petites nations vivre librement; menacée par la convoitise et la taille importante d’un voisin en expansion; fatalement compromise par une lassitude grandissante de la part de l’Ouest à propos d’«une querelle dans un pays lointain – un pays dont nous ignorons tout»; laissée morcelée et sans défense, succombant finalement à la conquête. Quand Hitler est entré dans Prague, en mars 1939, il a déclaré : « La Tchécoslovaquie a cessé d’exister».

Israël est également une petite nation. Cela ne signifie pas que son destin soit de disparaître. Mais que ce pourrait l’être. Qui plus est, par sa vulnérabilité face à l’anéantissement, Israël n’est pas uniquement une petite nation. Israël est la seule petite nation – la seule, point ! – dont les voisins déclarent publiquement que son existence même est un affront au droit, à la morale et à la religion, et qui font de son anéantissement un objectif national explicite. Et cet objectif n’est pas une simple déclaration d’intention. L’Iran, la Libye, et l’Iraq mènent une politique étrangère qui vise au meurtre des Israéliens et à la destruction de leur État. Ils choisissent leurs alliés (Hamas, Hezbollah) et développent leurs armements (bombes-suicide, gaz toxiques, anthrax, missiles nucléaires) conformément à cette politique. Des pays aussi éloignés que la Malaisie n’autorisent pas la présence d’un représentant d’Israël sur leur sol, allant jusqu’à interdire la projection du film "La Liste de Schindler", de peur qu’il n’engendre de la « sympathie pour Sion ».

D’autres sont plus circonspects dans leurs déclarations. La destruction n’est plus l’objectif unanime de la Ligue arabe, comme cela a été le cas pendant les trente années qui ont précédé Camp David. La Syrie, par exemple, ne le dit plus de façon explicite. Cependant, la Syrie détruirait Israël demain, si elle en avait les moyens. (Sa retenue actuelle sur le sujet est largement due à son besoin de liens avec les Etats-Unis d’après la guerre froide). Même l’Égypte, première à avoir fait la paix avec Israël et prétendu modèle de "faiseur de paix", s’est dotée d’une grande armée équipée de matériel américain, qui effectue des exercices militaires très clairement conçus pour combattre Israël. Son exercice "géant", Badr 96, par exemple, le plus grand mené depuis la guerre de 1973, simulait des traversées du canal de Suez.

Et même l’OLP, obligée de reconnaître ostensiblement l’existence d’Israël dans les accords d’Oslo de 1993, est toujours régie par une charte nationale qui, dans au moins quatorze passages, appelle à l’éradication d’Israël. Le fait qu’après cinq ans [rappelons que Krauthammer écrit ceci en 1998] et quatre promesses spécifiques d’amender cette charte, elle reste intacte, est un signe qui montre à quel point le rêve de faire disparaître Israël reste profondément ancré dans l’inconscient collectif arabe [4].

« Comme l’a dit l’imam (Khomeiny), Israël doit être rayé de la carte… ».

« Les dirigeants de la nation musulmane qui reconnaîtront Israël brûleront dans les flammes de la colère de leur propre peuple ».

(Le Président iranien, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, lors d’un discours prononcé le 26 octobre 2005 devant un public de quatre mille étudiants radicaux, à l’occasion d’une conférence intitulée "Le monde sans le sionisme".)

2. Les enjeux

La perspective de la disparition d’Israël pose problème à cette génération. Pendant 50 ans, Israël "a fait partie des meubles". La plupart des gens ne se souviennent pas d’avoir vécu dans un monde où Israël n’existerait pas. Pourtant ce sentiment de "permanence" a plus d’une fois été mis à rude épreuve – pendant les premiers jours de la guerre du Kippour, lorsqu’il semblait qu’Israël allait être envahi, ou encore durant les quelques semaines de mai et début juin 1967, quand Nasser instaura un blocus du détroit de Tiran et fit déferler 100 000 soldats dans le Sinaï pour rejeter les Juifs à la mer.

Pourtant, la victoire étourdissante d’Israël, en 1967, sa supériorité en armes conventionnelles, son succès dans chaque guerre durant laquelle son existence était en jeu, ont engendré l’autosatisfaction. L’idée même de la non-permanence d’Israël paraissait ridicule. Israël, écrivait un intellectuel de la diaspora, « est fondamentalement indestructible. Yitzhak Rabin le savait. Les dirigeants arabes sur le Mont Herzl (lors de l’enterrement de Rabin) le savaient. Seuls les saints de la droite, voleurs de terres et dégainant à toute occasion, l’ignorent. Ils sont animés par l’espoir de la catastrophe, l’exaltation d’assister à la fin ».

L’exaltation n’était pas exactement la sensation éprouvée par les Israéliens lorsque, pendant la guerre du Golfe, ils durent s’enfermer dans des pièces hermétiquement isolées et porter des masques à gaz pour se protéger d’une destruction de masse – et ce pour une guerre dans laquelle Israël n’était même pas impliqué. Il y eut alors une vague de peur, de terreur, d’impuissance, ces sentiments juifs ancestraux que la mode post-sioniste d’aujourd’hui juge anachroniques, si ce n’est réactionnaires. Mais la volonté ne change pas la réalité. La guerre du Golfe a rappelé, même aux plus optimistes, qu’à l’époque des armes chimiques, des missiles, et des bombes nucléaires, époque dans laquelle aucun pays n’est à l’abri d’armes de destruction de masse, Israël, avec sa population compacte et son territoire réduit, est particulièrement exposé à l’anéantissement.Israël n’est pas au bord du gouffre. Il n’est pas au bord du précipice. Nous ne sommes ni en 1948, ni en 1967 ou 1973. Et il le sait.

Il peut sembler étrange de commencer une étude sur la signification d’Israël et de l’avenir des Juifs en envisageant sa fin. Mais cela contribue à concentrer l’esprit. Et cela permet de mettre les enjeux en évidence. Les enjeux ne pourraient pas être plus élevés. J’affirme que l’existence et la survie du peuple juif sont directement liées à l’existence et à la survie d’Israël. Ou encore, pour exprimer cette thèse sur un mode négatif, que la fin d’Israël signifierait la fin du peuple juif. Le peuple juif a survécu à la destruction et à l’exil des Babyloniens, en 586 avant l’ère chrétienne. Il a survécu à la destruction et à l’exil des Romains, en 70 de notre ère, et pour la dernière fois en 132. Mais il ne pourrait survivre à une autre destruction, ni à un autre exil. Ce troisième État – l’Israël moderne -, né il y a de cela [63] ans, est le dernier.

Le retour à Sion est maintenant le principal drame du peuple Juif. Ce qui a commencé comme une expérience constitue dorénavant le coeur même du peuple juif – son centre culturel, spirituel, et psychologique, et cet État est devenu également son centre démographique. Israël est la clé de voûte. C’est sur lui que reposent les espoirs – l’unique espoir même – de continuité et de survie des Juifs.

3. La Diaspora moribonde

En 1950, il y avait 5 millions de Juifs aux États-Unis. En 1990, leur nombre dépassait à peine les 5,5 millions. Durant ces décennies, la population globale des États-Unis a augmenté de 65%. Celle des Juifs stagne. En fait, durant le dernier demi-siècle, le pourcentage de Juifs au sein de la population américaine est passé de 3 à 2. Et aujourd’hui, se précise un déclin, non pas relatif mais absolu. Ce qui a maintenu la population juive et son niveau actuel a été tout d’abord le "Baby boom" d’après-guerre, puis l’arrivée de 400 000 Juifs, principalement de l’Union soviétique.

Mais le "baby boom" est terminé. Et l’immigration russe touche à sa fin. Le nombre de Juifs qui se trouvent aux États-Unis n’est pas illimité. Si nous laissons de côté ces anomalies historiques, la population juive américaine est moins importante aujourd’hui que ce qu’elle était en 1950. Elle sera certainement encore plus faible dans l’avenir. En fait, elle est aujourd’hui vouée à un déclin catastrophique. Steve Bayme, directeur du Jewish Communal Affairs, prévoit carrément que, d’ici 20 ans, la population juive aura baissé jusqu’à 4 millions, une perte d’environ 30%. Et qu’en sera-t-il dans 20 ans ? Une projection de quelques décennies de plus annonce un avenir encore plus effrayant.

Comment une communauté peut-elle se décimer dans des conditions aussi favorables que celles des États-Unis ? – La raison est simple : fertilité basse et phénomène endémique de mariages mixtes. Le taux de fertilité, chez les Juifs américains, est de 1,6 enfants par femme. Le taux de remplacement (c’est à dire le taux nécessaire pour que la population reste constante) est de 2,1. Le taux courant est donc inférieur de 20% à ce qui serait nécessaire pour une progression nulle. Ainsi le taux de fertilité, à lui seul, entraînerait une baisse de 20% à chaque génération. En trois générations, la population diminuerait de moitié.

 Le faible taux de natalité ne découle pas d’une aversion particulière des femmes juives à l’égard des enfants. C’est tout simplement un cas flagrant du phénomène bien connu du déclin du taux de naissance, proportionnel à l’augmentation du niveau d’éducation et du niveau socio-économique. Des femmes éduquées, à la carrière brillante, ont tendance à se marier tard et à avoir moins de bébés. Ajoutons maintenant un second facteur : les mariages mixtes. Aux États-Unis, aujourd’hui, les Juifs se marient plus avec des chrétiens qu’avec des Juifs. Le taux de mariages mixtes est de 52%. (un calcul plus conservateur donne 47%, mais l’effet démographique reste fondamentalement le même). En 1970 le taux était de 8%.

Plus important encore pour la continuité juive est l’identité finale des enfants nés de ces mariages. Or, seul un sur quatre est élevé dans la tradition juive. Ainsi, deux tiers des mariages juifs produisent des enfants dont les trois-quarts sont perdus pour le peuple juif. À lui seul, le taux de mariages mixtes causerait un déclin de 25% de la population juive à chaque génération [...] A ce rythme, la moitié des Juifs disparaîtraient en deux générations.

Combinez maintenant les effets de la fertilité et des mariages mixtes et faites la supposition, très optimiste, que chaque enfant élevé dans la tradition juive grandira en conservant son identité juive (c’est-à-dire avec un coefficient zéro de perte). Vous commencez avec 100 Juifs américains ; il vous en reste 60. En une génération, plus d’un tiers aura disparu. En deux générations seulement, 2 sur 3 se seront volatilisés.

On peut parvenir à la même conclusion par un autre raisonnement (en ne prenant pas du tout en compte les mariages mixtes). Un sondage du Los Angeles Times, effectué auprès des Juifs américains, en mars 1998, posait une question simple : élevez-vous vos enfants dans la tradition juive ? Seuls 70% ont répondu par l’affirmative. Une population dont le taux de remplacement biologique est de 80% et le taux de remplacement culturel de 70% est vouée à l’extinction. Selon ce calcul, 100 Juifs élèvent 56 enfants juifs. En deux générations, 7 Juifs sur 10 disparaîtront.

Les tendances démographiques dans le reste de la Diaspora ne sont pas plus encourageantes. En Europe de l’Ouest, la fertilité et les mariages mixtes sont le reflet de ceux des Etats-Unis. Prenons le cas de l’Angleterre. Durant la dernière génération, la communauté juive anglaise s’est comportée comme une sorte de cobaye expérimental : une communauté de la diaspora vivant dans une société ouverte, mais, contrairement à celle des États-Unis, sans être artificiellement alimentée par l’immigration. Que s’est-il passé ? Durant le dernier quart de siècle, le nombre de Juifs anglais a diminué de plus de 25%.

Durant la même période, la population juive de France n’a que légèrement diminué. Cependant la raison de cette stabilité relative est un facteur "unique" : l’afflux de la communauté juive d’Afrique du Nord. Cet apport est terminé. En France, aujourd’hui, seule une minorité de Juifs âgés de 20 et 44 ans, vivent dans une famille conventionnelle avec deux parents juifs. La France, elle aussi, suivra le chemin des autres pays.

« La dissolution de la communauté juive d’Europe », observe Bernard Wasserstein [5], « ne se situe pas dans un lointain futur hypothétique. Le processus est en train de se dérouler sous nos yeux et est déjà largement avancé ». D’après les tendances actuelles, « le nombre de Juifs en Europe en l’an 2000 ne dépasserait pas le million – le chiffre le plus bas depuis la fin du Moyen-Age ». En 1900, ils étaient 8 millions.

Ailleurs, la situation est encore plus décourageante. Le reste de ce qui fut un jour la Diaspora est maintenant soit un musée, soit un cimetière. L’Europe de l’Est a été vidée de ses Juifs. En 1939, la Pologne comptait 3,2 millions de Juifs. Il en reste aujourd’hui 35 000. La situation est à peu près identique dans les autres capitales d’Europe de l’Est.

Le monde islamique, berceau de la grande tradition juive séfarade et patrie d’un tiers de la population juive mondiale, est aujourd’hui pratiquement Judenrein. Aucun pays du monde islamique ne compte aujourd’hui plus de 20 000 Juifs. Après la Turquie, qui en compte 19 000, et l’Iran, où l’on en dénombre 14 000, le pays ayant la plus grande communauté juive dans le monde islamique est le Maroc, avec 6 100 Juifs – il y en a davantage à Omaha, dans le Nebraska. Ces communautés ne figurent pas dans les projections. Il n’y a d’ailleurs rien à projeter. Il n’est même pas besoin de les comptabiliser, il faut juste s’en souvenir. Leur expression même a disparu. Le yiddish et le ladino, langues respectives et distinctives des diasporas européennes et sépharades, ainsi que les communautés qui les ont inventées, ont quasiment disparu.

4. La dynamique de l’assimilation

N’est-il pas risqué de supposer que les tendances actuelles vont perdurer ? Non. Rien ne fera renaître les communautés juives d’Europe de l’est et du monde islamique. Et rien ne stoppera le déclin rapide, par le biais de l’assimilation, de la communauté juive de l’Ouest. Au contraire. En effectuant une projection plutôt classique des tendances actuelles – à supposer, comme je l’ai fait, que les taux restent fixes – il est risqué de supposer que l’assimilation ne va pas s’accélérer. Il n’y a rien, à l’horizon, qui soit susceptible d’inverser le processus d’assimilation des Juifs dans la culture occidentale. L’attirance des Juifs pour une culture plus vaste et le niveau d’acceptation des Juifs par cette culture sont sans précédent dans l’histoire.

Tout ceci est clair. Chaque génération devenant de plus en plus intégrée, les liens avec la tradition s’affaiblissent (comme on peut le mesurer par le taux de présence à la synagogue et le nombre d’enfants qui reçoivent une quelconque éducation juive). Cette dilution de l’identité, à son tour, entraîne une tendance plus forte aux mariages mixtes et à l’assimilation. Et d’ailleurs, pourquoi pas ? Qu’abandonnent-ils en définitive ? La boucle est bouclée et se renforce.

Examinons deux éléments culturels. Avant la naissance de la télévision – il y a de cela un demi-siècle -, la vie des Juifs en Amérique était représentée par les Goldberg : des Juifs aux bonnes manières, résolument ethniques, à l’accent marqué, socialement différents. 40 ans plus tard, les Goldberg ont engendré Seinfeld, le divertissement le plus populaire en Amérique aujourd’hui. Le personnage de Seinfeld n’a de juif que le nom. Il peut lui arriver d’évoquer son identité juive sans s’excuser et sans aucune gêne, mais – ce qui est plus important – sans que cela porte à conséquence. La chose n’a pas le moindre impact sur sa vie.

Une assimilation de cette nature n’est pas absolument sans précédent. D’une certaine manière, elle présente un parallèle avec le modèle d’Europe de l’Ouest, après l’émancipation des Juifs, à la fin du XVIIIe siècle et au début du XIXe. C’est la Révolution française qui constitue le tournant radical en conférant aux Juifs les droits civiques. Quand ils ont commencé à quitter le ghetto, ils ont tout d’abord rencontré une résistance à leur intégration et à leur ascension sociale. Ils étaient encore exclus des professions libérales, de l’éducation supérieure, et de la majeure partie des secteurs de la société. Mais, alors que ces barrières avaient lentement commencé à s’éroder et que les Juifs s’élevaient socialement, ils adoptèrent, de manière remarquable, la culture européenne, et, la plupart (ou beaucoup) adhérèrent au christianisme. Dans son Histoire du sionisme, Walter Laqueur cite l’opinion de Gabriel Riesser, un avocat, éloquent et courageux, de l’émancipation, au milieu du XIXe siècle, qui disait qu’un Juif qui préfère à l’Allemagne la nation et l’État inexistants d’Israël doit être placé sous la protection de la police, non parce qu’il est dangereux mais parce que, à l’évidence, il est fou.

Moïse Mendelssohn (1729-1786) était un précurseur. Cultivé, cosmopolite, bien que fermement Juif, il constituait la quintessence de l’émancipation précoce. Ainsi, son histoire est devenue emblématique de la progression historique rapide de l’émancipation vers l’assimilation : quatre de ses six enfants, ainsi que huit de ses neuf petits-enfants furent baptisés.

A cette époque, plus religieuse et plus chrétienne, l’assimilation prit la forme du baptême, ce que Henrich Heine qualifiait de "ticket d’entrée" dans la société européenne. En cette fin de XXe siècle [rappelons que l'auteur écrit cette article en 1998], nettement plus laïque, l’assimilation signifie simplement renoncer à un nom "pittoresque", aux rites, ainsi qu’à la totalité de l’accoutrement et des autres signes distinctifs du passé juif. Aujourd’hui, l’assimilation est entièrement passive. Ainsi, à part une visite au palais de justice pour transformer, disons, les "shmates [fripes] Ralph Lifshitz" en "polos Ralph Lauren" [6], l’assimilation est caractérisée par une absence d’action plutôt que par l’adoption volontaire d’une autre croyance. Contrairement aux enfants de Mendelssohn, Seinfeld n’a pas besoin d’être baptisé.

Bien sûr, nous savons, aujourd’hui, qu’en Europe, l’émancipation par l’assimilation s’est révélée être un leurre. La montée de l’antisémitisme, en particulier l’antisémitisme racial de la fin du XIXe siècle, qui a atteint son apogée dans le nazisme, a détourné les Juifs de la conviction que l’assimilation leur fournissait un moyen d’échapper au handicap et aux dangers d’être Juif. La saga de la famille de Madeleine Albright est emblématique. De ses quatre grand-parents juifs, parfaitement intégrés, parents d’enfants dont certains s’étaient convertis et avaient effacé leur passé de Juif, trois sont morts dans les camps de concentration nazis, parce que Juifs.

 Cependant, le contexte américain est différent. Il n’existe pas, dans l’histoire américaine, d’antisémitisme qui ressemble, même de loin, à celui qui existe dans l’histoire de l’Europe. La tradition américaine de tolérance remonte à 200 ans, à l’époque même de la fondation du pays. La lettre de Washington à la synagogue de Newport s’engage non pas à la tolérance – la tolérance témoigne de l’absence de persécution, accordée au pécheur comme une faveur, par le dominant – mais à l’égalité [7]. Cette situation n’a aucun équivalent dans l’histoire de l’Europe. Dans un tel pays, l’assimilation semble donc une solution raisonnable au problème de l’identité juive. Le fait d’unir son destin à celui d’une grande nation, humaine et généreuse, qui s’attache à promouvoir la dignité humaine et l’égalité, peut difficilement être considéré comme le pire des choix.Et pourtant, alors que l’assimilation peut être une solution pour les Juifs en tant qu’individus, elle constitue clairement un désastre pour les Juifs en tant que collectivité détentrice d’une mémoire, d’une langue, d’une tradition, d’une liturgie, d’une histoire, d’une foi, d’un patrimoine qui, en conséquence, disparaîtront. Quelle que soit la valeur qu’on attribue à l’assimilation, on ne peut en nier la réalité. Les tendances, tant démographiques que culturelles, sont puissantes. Et l’avenir de la diaspora, non seulement dans les anciennes contrées perdues de la Diaspora, non seulement dans son ancien centre européen, mais également dans son nouveau centre vital américain, sera fait de diminution, de déclin, puis de disparition. Cela ne se fera pas du jour au lendemain. Mais il y faudra moins de deux ou trois générations, un laps de temps à peine plus éloigné de notre quotidien que celui de la création de l’État d’Israël, il y a 50 ans.

5. Israël: l’exception

Israël est différent. En Israël la grande tentation du modernisme – l’assimilation – n’existe tout simplement pas. Israël est l’incarnation pure et simple de la continuité juive : c’est la seule nation au monde qui habite la même terre, porte le même nom, parle la même langue et vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans. En creusant le sol, on peut trouver des poteries du temps de David, des pièces de l’époque de Bar Kochba, et des parchemins vieux de 2000 ans, écrits de manière étonnamment semblable à celle qui, aujourd’hui, vante les crèmes glacées de la confiserie du coin.

Pourtant, comme la plus grande partie des Israéliens sont laïques, certains Juifs orthodoxes (ultra-religieux) contestent la prétention d’Israël de perpétuer une authentique histoire du peuple juif. Il en est de même pour certains Juifs laïques. Un critique français (le sociologue Georges Friedmann) a jadis qualifié les Israéliens de « goys parlant hébreu ». En fait, il y eut même une époque où il était à la mode, au sein d’un groupe d’intellectuels laïques israéliens, de se qualifier de "Cananéens" [8], c’est-à-dire des gens enracinés dans le pays, mais reniant totalement les traditions religieuses dont ils sont issus.

Malgré les apparences, ce ne sont pas des Arabes, mais des gardes juifs en 1905.
Ils étaient nombreux, alors, à s’identifier aux autochtones et à croire dur comme fer qu’ils partageraient le même destin. Leur sincère désir d’osmose ethnique était tel qu’ils s’habillaient à l’arabe, et souvent parlaient l’arabe.

Soit, appelez ces gens comme vous le voulez. Après tout, "Juif" est une dénomination plutôt récente de ce peuple. Ils furent d’abord des "Hébreux", puis des "Israélites". "Juif" (qui vient du royaume de Juda, un des deux États qui ont succédé au royaume de David et de Salomon) est l’appellation post-exilique pour "Israélite". C’est un nouveau venu dans l’histoire.

Comment qualifier un Israélien qui ne respecte pas les règles alimentaires, ne va pas à la synagogue, et considère le Shabbat comme le jour où l’on va faire un tour en voiture à la plage – ce qui, soit dit en passant, est une assez bonne description de la plupart des Premiers ministres d’Israël ? Cela n’a aucune importance. Installez un peuple juif dans un pays qui se fige le jour de Kippour, parle le langage de la Bible, vit au rythme (lunaire) du calendrier hébraïque, construit ses villes avec les pierres de ses ancêtres, produit une littérature et une poésie hébraïques, une éducation et un enseignement juifs qui n’ont pas d’égal dans le monde – et vous aurez la continuité. Les Israéliens pourraient s’appeler autrement. Peut-être un jour réserverons-nous le terme de "Juifs" à l’expérience d’exil d’il y a 2000 ans, et les appellerons-nous "Hébreux" [c'est le terme qu'utilise la langue italienne : "ebrei" - Note de Menahem Macina]. Ce terme a une belle connotation historique, c’est le nom que Joseph et Jonas ont donné en réponse a la question : « Qui êtes-vous ? » [Cf. Gn 40, 15 ; Jon 1, 9, ce terme figure environ une quarantaine de fois dans l'Ancien Testament – Note de M. Macina].

 Au sein du milieu culturel de l’Israël moderne, l’assimilation n’est pas vraiment le problème. Bien sûr, les Israéliens mangent au McDo et regardent les rediffusions du feuilleton ‘Dallas’. Tout comme le font les Russes, les Chinois, ou les Danois. Dire qu’il existe une forte influence occidentale (lisez : américaine) sur la culture israélienne ne signifie rien de plus que de dire qu’Israël subit la pression de la globalisation, comme n’importe quel autre pays. Mais cela ne change en rien sa particularité culturelle, prouvée par les grandes difficultés qu’éprouvent les immigrants à s’adapter à Israël.Dans le contexte israélien, l’assimilation signifie le rattachement des Juifs russes et roumains, ouzbeks et irakiens, algériens et argentins, à une culture distinctement hébraïque. C’est donc exactement l’opposé de ce que cela signifie dans la Diaspora : cela signifie l’abandon des langues, coutumes et traditions étrangères. Cela signifie l’abandon de Noël et de Pâques pour les remplacer par Hanouka et Pessah. Cela signifie l’abandon de la mémoire ancestrale des steppes et des pampas du monde pour les collines de Galilée et la pierre de Jérusalem, et la désolation de la Mer Morte. Voilà ce que ces nouveaux Israéliens apprennent. C’est ce qui sera transmis à leurs enfants. C’est pour cela que leur survie en tant que Juifs est assurée. Quelqu’un mettrait-il en doute le fait que le million de Russes qui ont immigré en Israël auraient été perdus pour le peuple juif s’ils étaient restés en Russie, et que, maintenant, ils ne sont plus perdus ?

Certains ne sont pas d’accord avec l’idée qu’Israël est porteur de la continuité du peuple juif, à cause de la multitude de désaccords et de fractures entre Israéliens : Orthodoxes contre Laïcs, Ashkénazes contre Sépharades, Russes contre Sabras, etc. Israël est aujourd’hui engagé dans d’amers débats à propos de la légitimité du judaïsme conservateur et réformiste, ainsi que de l’empiétement de l’orthodoxie sur la vie sociale et civique du pays.

Et alors, qu’y a-t-il là de nouveau ? Israël est tout simplement en train de revenir à la norme juive. Il existe des divisions tout aussi sérieuses au sein de la Diaspora, tout comme il en existait au sein du dernier État juif : « Avant la suprématie des Pharisiens et l’émergence d’une orthodoxie rabbinique, après la chute du second Temple», écrit l’universitaire Frank Cross, «le judaïsme était plus complexe et varié que nous le supposions ». Les Manuscrits de la Mer Morte, explique Hershel Shanks, «attestent de la variété – mal perçue jusqu’à ce jour – du judaïsme de la fin de la période du Second Temple, à tel point que les universitaires évoquent souvent, non pas le judaïsme, mais les judaïsmes. »

Le second État juif était caractérisé par des rixes entre sectaires juifs : Pharisiens, Sadducéens, Esséniens, apocalypticiens de tous bords, sectes aujourd’hui oubliées par l’histoire, sans parler des premiers chrétiens. Ceux qui s’inquiètent des tensions entre laïcs et religieux en Israël devraient méditer sur la lutte, qui dura plusieurs siècles, entre les Hellénistes et les Traditionalistes, durant la période du deuxième État juif. La révolte des Macchabées, entre 167 et 164 avant J.-C., célébrée aujourd’hui à Hanoukka, était, entre autres, une guerre civile entre Juifs.

Certes, il est peu probable qu’Israël produise une identité juive unique. Mais ce n’est pas nécessaire. Le monolithisme relatif du judaïsme rabbinique au Moyen-Âge est l’exception. Fracture et division sont les réalités du quotidien, à l’ère moderne, tout comme elles l’étaient dans le premier et le second États juifs. Ainsi, durant la période du premier Temple, le peuple d’Israël était divisé en deux États [le royaume de Juda, au sud, et celui d'Israël, au nord – note du réviseur de la version française], qui étaient en conflit quasi permanent. Les divisions actuelles au sein d’Israël ne supportent pas la comparaison.

Quelles que soient l’identité, ou les identités finalement adoptées par les Israéliens, le fait est que, pour eux, le problème majeur de la communauté juive de la Diaspora – le suicide par assimilation – n’existe tout simplement pas. Béni par la sécurité de son identité, Israël se développe. Et le résultat en est qu’Israël n’est plus seulement le centre culturel du monde juif, il en devient rapidement aussi le centre démographique. Le taux de natalité relativement élevé entraîne une augmentation naturelle de la population. Ajoutez à cela un taux net stable d’immigration (près d’un million depuis la fin des années 80), et les chiffres, en Israël, progressent inexorablement, même si la diaspora diminue. D’ici une décennie, Israël dépassera les Etats-Unis en tant que communauté juive la plus importante du monde. D’ici la fin de notre vie, la majorité des Juifs du monde vivront en Israël. Cela ne s’était pas produit depuis bien avant l’ère chrétienne.

Il y a de cela un siècle, l’Europe était le centre de la vie juive. Plus de 80% de la population juive du monde y vivait. La Deuxième Guerre mondiale a détruit la communauté juive européenne et dispersé les survivants vers le Nouveau Monde (principalement les États-Unis), et vers Israël. Aujourd’hui, nous avons un univers juif bipolaire, avec deux centres de gravité de taille approximativement égale. C’est une étape transitoire, pourtant. Une étoile est en train de s’affaiblir, et l’autre de s’allumer.

Bientôt et inévitablement, la face du peuple juif aura été à nouveau transformée, pour devenir un système mono-planétaire avec une Diaspora faiblissante en orbite. Ce sera un retour à l’ancienne norme : le peuple juif sera concentré – non seulement spirituellement, mais aussi physiquement – dans sa patrie historique.

6. La Fin de la Dispersion

Les conséquences de cette transformation sont énormes. La position centrale d’Israël est plus qu’une question de démographie. Elle représente une nouvelle stratégie, hardie et dangereuse pour la survie du peuple juif. Pendant deux millénaires, le peuple juif a survécu grâce à la dispersion et à l’isolement. Après le premier exil, en 586 avant J.-C., et le second, en 70, puis en 132, les Juifs se sont d’abord installés en Mésopotamie et autour du bassin Méditerranéen, puis en Europe de l’Est et du Nord, et, finalement, au Nouveau Monde, à l’Ouest, avec des communautés situées presque aux quatre coins du monde, jusqu’en Inde et en Chine.

Tout au long de cette période, le peuple juif a survécu à l’énorme pression de la persécution, des massacres et des conversions forcées, non seulement par sa foi et son courage, mais aussi grâce à sa dispersion géographique. Décimés ici, ils survivaient ailleurs. Les milliers de villes et de villages juifs répartis dans toute l’Europe, le monde islamique et le Nouveau Monde, constituaient une sorte d’assurance démographique. Même si de nombreux Juifs ont été massacrés lors de la première Croisade, le long du Rhin, même si de nombreux villages ont été détruits au cours des pogroms de 1648-1649, en Ukraine, il y en avait encore des milliers d’autres répartis sur toute la planète pour continuer. Cette dispersion a contribué à la faiblesse et la vulnérabilité des communautés juives prises séparément. Paradoxalement, pourtant, elle a constitué un facteur d’endurance et de force pour le peuple juif dans son ensemble. Aucun tyran ne pouvait réunir une force suffisante pour menacer la survie du peuple juif partout dans le monde.

Jusqu’à Hitler. Les nazis sont parvenus à détruire presque tout ce qu’il y avait de juif, des Pyrénées aux portes de Stalingrad, une civilisation entière, vieille de mille ans. Il y avait neuf millions de Juifs en Europe lorsque Hitler accéda au pouvoir. Il a exterminé les deux tiers d’entre eux. Cinquante ans plus tard, les Juifs ne s’en sont pas encore remis. Il y avait seize millions de Juifs dans le monde, en 1939. Aujourd’hui, ils sont treize millions [Attention : chiffres de la fin des années 1990].

Toutefois, les conséquences de l’Holocauste n’ont pas été que démographiques. Elles ont été psychologiques, bien sûr, et aussi idéologiques. La preuve avait été faite, une fois pour toutes, du danger catastrophique de l’impuissance. La solution était l’autodéfense, ce qui supposait une re-centration démographique dans un lieu doté de souveraineté, d’armement, et constituant un véritable État.

Avant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, il y avait un véritable débat, au sein du monde juif, à propos du sionisme. Les juifs réformistes, par exemple, avaient été antisionistes durant des décennies. L’Holocauste a permis de clore ce débat. A part certains extrêmes – la droite ultra-orthodoxe et l’extrême gauche – le sionisme est devenu la solution reconnue à l’impuissance et à la vulnérabilité juives. Au milieu des ruines, les Juifs ont pris la décision collective de dire que leur futur reposait sur l’autodéfense et la territorialité, le rassemblement des exilés en un endroit où ils pourraient enfin acquérir les moyens de se défendre eux-mêmes.

C’était la bonne décision, la seule décision possible. Mais ô combien périlleuse ! Quel curieux choix que celui de ce lieu pour l’ultime bataille : un point sur la carte, un petit morceau de quasi-désert, une fine bande d’habitat juif, à l’abri de barrières naturelles on ne peut plus fragiles (et auxquelles le monde exige qu’Israël renonce). Une attaque de tanks suffisamment déterminée peut la couper en deux. Un petit arsenal de Scuds à tête nucléaire peut la détruire intégralement.

Pour détruire le peuple juif, Hitler devait conquérir le monde. Tout ce qu’il faudrait aujourd’hui, c’est conquérir un territoire plus petit que le Vermont [aux Etats-Unis]. La terrible ironie est qu’en résolvant leur problème d’impuissance, les Juifs ont mis tous leurs oeufs dans le même panier, un petit panier au bord de la Méditerranée. Et, de son sort, dépend le sort de tous les Juifs.

7. Envisager l’impensable

Et si le troisième État Juif trouvait la mort, tout comme les deux premiers ? Ce scénario n’est pas si aberrant : un État Palestinien est né, s’arme, conclut des alliances avec, supposons, l’Iraq et la Syrie. La guerre éclate entre la Palestine et Israël (au sujet des frontières, ou de l’eau, ou du terrorisme). La Syrie et l’Iraq attaquent de l’extérieur. L’Égypte et l’Arabie Saoudite entrent dans la bataille. Le front subit des attaques de guérilla de la part de la Palestine. Les armes chimiques et biologiques pleuvent de Syrie, d’Iraq et d’Iran. Israël est envahi.
Pourquoi serait-ce la fin ? Le peuple juif ne peut-il pas survivre, ainsi qu’il l’a fait lorsque sa patrie a été détruite et son indépendance politique anéantie, comme ce fut le cas, à deux reprises, auparavant ? Pourquoi pas un nouvel exil, une nouvelle Diaspora, un nouveau cycle de l’histoire juive ?

Tout d’abord parce que les conditions culturelles de l’exil seraient largement différentes. Les premiers exils se sont produits à une époque où l’identité était quasiment synonyme de religion. Une expulsion, deux millénaires plus tard, dans un monde devenu laïc, n’est en rien comparable. Mais il y a plus important encore : pourquoi garder une telle identité ? Outre la dislocation, viendrait l’abattement pur et simple. Un tel événement anéantirait l’esprit. Aucun peuple ne pourrait y survivre. Pas même les Juifs. Il s’agit d’un peuple qui a miraculeusement survécu à deux précédentes destructions et à deux millénaires de persécution, dans l’espoir d’un retour définitif et d’une restauration. Israël EST cet espoir. Le voir détruit, avoir, une fois encore, des Isaïe et des Jérémie qui pleurent sur les veuves de Sion, au milieu des ruines de Jérusalem, excéderait ce qu’un peuple peut supporter.

Surtout après l’Holocauste, la pire calamité de l’histoire juive. Y avoir survécu est déjà suffisamment miraculeux en soi. Survivre ensuite à la destruction de ce qui est né pour le sauver – celle du nouvel État juif – reviendrait à attribuer à la nation juive et à la survie des Juifs un pouvoir surnaturel. Certes, des Juifs et des communautés dispersées survivraient. Les plus dévots, qui étaient déjà une minorité, perpétueraient – telle une tribu exotique – un anachronisme pittoresque, de style Amish, vestige, dispersé et à plaindre, d’un vestige. Mais les Juifs, en tant que peuple, auraient disparu de l’histoire.

Nous présumons que l’histoire juive est cyclique : exil babylonien en 586 av. J.-C., suivi par le retour, en 538 av. J.-C., exil romain en 135, suivi par le retour, légèrement différé en 1948. C’est oublier la part linéaire de l’histoire juive : il y a eu une autre destruction, un siècle et demi avant la chute du premier Temple. Elle restera irréparable. En 722 av. J.-C., les Assyriens firent la conquête de l’autre État juif, le plus grand, le royaume du nord d’Israël (la Judée, dont descendent les juifs modernes, constituait le royaume du Sud). Il s’agit de l’Israël des Dix Tribus, exilées et perdues pour toujours.

Leur mystère est si tenace que, lorsque les explorateurs Lewis et Clark partirent pour leur expédition [vers les vastes Plaines de l'Ouest américain], une des nombreuses questions préparées à leur intention par le Dr Benjamin Rush, à la demande du président Jefferson lui-même, fut la suivante : Quel lien existe-t-il entre leurs cérémonies [celles des Indiens] et celles des Juifs ? – « Jefferson et Lewis avaient longuement parlé de ces tribus », explique Stephen Ambrose. «Ils conjecturaient que les tribus perdues d’Israël pouvaient être quelque part dans les Plaines. »

Hélas, ce n’était pas le cas. Les Dix Tribus se sont dissoutes dans l’histoire. En cela, elles sont représentatives de la norme historique. Tout peuple conquis de cette façon et exilé disparaît avec le temps. Seuls les Juifs ont défié cette norme, à deux reprises.

Mais je crains que ce ne soit plus jamais le cas.

—————————–

Notes de Menahem Macina

[1] Phrase souvent citée hors contexte et sans référence. « La petite nation est celle dont l’existence peut être à n’importe quel moment mise en question, qui peut disparaître, et qui le sait. Un Français, un Russe, un Anglais n’ont pas l’habitude de se poser des questions sur la survie de leur nation. Leurs hymnes ne parlent que de grandeur et d’éternité. Or, l’hymne polonais commence par le vers : La Pologne n’a pas encore péri ». (Milan Kundera, « L’Occident kidnappé – ou la tragédie de l’Europe centrale », dans Le Débat 27, 1983, pp. 3-22).

[2] Le 15 mars 1939, les troupes allemandes envahissaient la Tchécolovaquie. L’occupation de ce pays était la conséquence directe des accords de Munich, signés le 30 septembre 1938, par Hitler, Chamberlain et Daladier. Par ces accords, un tiers du territoire du pays était cédé à l’Allemagne nazie. Voir l’Encyclopédie multimédia de la Shoah, Adolf Hitler passe ses troupes en revue dans le château de Prague le jour de l’occupation de la ville. Prague, Tchécoslovaquie, 15 mars 1939. Czechoslovak News Agency.

[3] D’après le propos de Neuville Chamberlain, en 1938. Sources : National Broadcast, London, September 27, 1938 ; Chamberlain, In Search of Peace, p. 174 (1939).

[4] Nous venons d’en avoir la preuve [remarque rédigée en 2006]. Si pessimiste qu’il soit, Krauthammer n’avait certainement pas imaginé, même dans ses pires cauchemars, qu’un président iranien irait jusqu’à proclamer publiquement, à la face des nations, son intention d’effacer Israël de la carte du monde, et qu’il en aurait les moyens, puisqu’il est en train de se doter de l’arme nucléaire. On peut lire cet appel au génocide dans la "Version française intégrale du discours antisioniste du Président iranien".

[5] Une Diaspora en voie de disparition : Les Juifs en Europe depuis 1945, Calmann-Lévy, 2000.

[6] Voir le site NNDB, où Ralph Lipshitz explique, avec franchise, pourquoi il a changé son nom en Ralph Lauren, devenu depuis un célèbre créateur de vêtements de mode.

[7] Voir : "The letter from George Washington in response to Moses Seixas".

[8] C’est le poète israélien, Yonatan Ratosh (1908-1981) qui fonda le groupe des "Cananéens", qui visait à un rapprochement judéo-arabe en Palestine. Selon Stephen Plaut, « il y a toujours eu une forte tendance "cananéenne" dans la société israélienne, particulièrement au sein de son élite intellectuelle, qui insistait sur le fait que les Israéliens représentaient une nouvelle nationalité "post-juive", et constituait ainsi essentiellement un groupe ethnique totalement non juif. (les "Cananéens" étaient un mouvement d’Israéliens, qui, dans les années 50 et par la suite, ont tenté de détacher l’israélité de la judéité et de créer une nouvelle "nationalité" non confessionnelle d'"Israéliens" de langue hébraïque, qui pourrait inclure également les Arabes.) En tant que tels, ces nouveaux "Israéliens" cananéisés" croyaient avoir peu de choses en commun avec les Juifs et encore moins avec l’histoire de la Diaspora. Maints Juifs israéliens "cananéisés" insistaient sur le fait qu’ils avaient bien plus de choses en commun avec les Druzes et les bédouins du pays, qu’avec tous les Juifs orthodoxes de Brooklyn. » (Voir son article "L’antisémitisme juif".)

At Last, Zion
Charles Krauthammer
The Weekly Standard
May 11, 1998

I. A SMALL NATION

Milan Kundera once defined a small nation as "one whose very existence may be put in question at any moment; a small nation can disappear, and it knows it."

The United States is not a small nation. Neither is Japan. Or France. These nations may suffer defeats. They may even be occupied. But they cannot disappear. Kundera’s Czechoslovakia could — and once did. Prewar Czechoslovakia is the paradigmatic small nation: a liberal democracy created in the ashes of war by a world determined to let little nations live free; threatened by the covetousness and sheer mass of a rising neighbor; compromised fatally by a West grown weary "of a quarrel in a far-away country between people of whom we know nothing"; left truncated and defenseless, succumbing finally to conquest. When Hitler entered Prague in March 1939, he declared, "Czechoslovakia has ceased to exist."

Israel too is a small country. This is not to say that extinction is its fate. Only that it can be.

Moreover, in its vulnerability to extinction, Israel is not just any small country. It is the only small country — the only period, period — whose neighbors publicly declare its very existence an affront to law, morality, and religion and make its extinction an explicit, paramount national goal. Nor is the goal merely declarative. Iran, Libya, and Iraq conduct foreign policies designed for the killing of Israelis and the destruction of their state. They choose their allies (Hamas, Hezbollah) and develop their weapons (suicide bombs, poison gas, anthrax, nuclear missiles) accordingly. Countries as far away as Malaysia will not allow a representative of Israel on their soil nor even permit the showing of Schindler’s List lest it engender sympathy for Zion.

Others are more circumspect in their declarations. No longer is the destruction of Israel the unanimous goal of the Arab League, as it was for the thirty years before Camp David. Syria, for example, no longer explicitly enunciates it. Yet Syria would destroy Israel tomorrow if it had the power. (Its current reticence on the subject is largely due to its post-Cold War need for the American connection.)

Even Egypt, first to make peace with Israel and the presumed model for peacemaking, has built a vast U.S.-equipped army that conducts military exercises obviously designed for fighting Israel. Its huge "Badr ’96" exercises, for example, Egypt’s largest since the 1973 war, featured simulated crossings of the Suez Canal.

And even the PLO, which was forced into ostensible recognition of Israel in the Oslo Agreements of 1993, is still ruled by a national charter that calls in at least fourteen places for Israel’s eradication. The fact that after five years and four specific promises to amend the charter it remains unamended is a sign of how deeply engraved the dream of eradicating Israel remains in the Arab consciousness.

II. THE STAKES

The contemplation of Israel’s disappearance is very difficult for this generation. For fifty years, Israel has been a fixture. Most people cannot remember living in a world without Israel.

Nonetheless, this feeling of permanence has more than once been rudely interrupted — during the first few days of the Yom Kippur War when it seemed as if Israel might be overrun, or those few weeks in May and early June 1967 when Nasser blockaded the Straits of Tiran and marched 100,000 troops into Sinai to drive the Jews into the sea.

Yet Israel’s stunning victory in 1967, its superiority in conventional weaponry, its success in every war in which its existence was at stake, has bred complacency. Some ridicule the very idea of Israel’s impermanence. Israel, wrote one Diaspora intellectual, "is fundamentally indestructible. Yitzhak Rabin knew this. The Arab leaders on Mount Herzl [at Rabin's funeral] knew this. Only the land-grabbing, trigger-happy saints of the right do not know this. They are animated by the imagination of catastrophe, by the thrill of attending the end."

Thrill was not exactly the feeling Israelis had when during the Gulf War they entered sealed rooms and donned gas masks to protect themselves from mass death — in a war in which Israel was not even engaged. The feeling was fear, dread, helplessness — old existential Jewish feelings that post- Zionist fashion today deems anachronistic, if not reactionary. But wish does not overthrow reality. The Gulf War reminded even the most wishful that in an age of nerve gas, missiles, and nukes, an age in which no country is completely safe from weapons of mass destruction, Israel with its compact population and tiny area is particularly vulnerable to extinction.

Israel is not on the edge. It is not on the brink. This is not ’48 or ’67 or ’73. But Israel is a small country. It can disappear. And it knows it.

It may seem odd to begin an examination of the meaning of Israel and the future of the Jews by contemplating the end. But it does concentrate the mind. And it underscores the stakes. The stakes could not be higher. It is my contention that on Israel — on its existence and survival — hangs the very existence and survival of the Jewish people. Or, to put the thesis in the negative, that the end of Israel means the end of the Jewish people. They survived destruction and exile at the hands of Babylon in 586 B.C. They survived destruction and exile at the hands of Rome in 70 A.D., and finally in 132 A.D. They cannot survive another destruction and exile. The Third Commonwealth — modern Israel, born just 50 years ago — is the last.

The return to Zion is now the principal drama of Jewish history. What began as an experiment has become the very heart of the Jewish people — its cultural, spiritual, and psychological center, soon to become its demographic center as well. Israel is the hinge. Upon it rest the hopes — the only hope – – for Jewish continuity and survival.

III. THE DYING DIASPORA

In 1950, there were 5 million Jews in the United States. In 1990, the number was a slightly higher 5.5 million. In the intervening decades, overall U.S. population rose 65 percent. The Jews essentially tread water. In fact, in the last half-century Jews have shrunk from 3 percent to 2 percent of the American population. And now they are headed for not just relative but absolute decline. What sustained the Jewish population at its current level was, first, the postwar baby boom, then the influx of 400,000 Jews, mostly from the Soviet Union.

Well, the baby boom is over. And Russian immigration is drying up. There are only so many Jews where they came from. Take away these historical anomalies, and the American Jewish population would be smaller today than today. In fact, it is now headed for catastrophic decline. Steven Bayme, director of Jewish Communal Affairs at the American Jewish Committee, flatly predicts that in twenty years the Jewish population will be down to four million, a loss of nearly 30 percent. In twenty years! Projecting just a few decades further yields an even more chilling future.

How does a community decimate itself in the benign conditions of the United States? Easy: low fertility and endemic intermarriage.

The fertility rate among American Jews is 1.6 children per woman. The replacement rate (the rate required for the population to remain constant) is 2.1. The current rate is thus 20 percent below what is needed for zero growth. Thus fertility rates alone would cause a 20 percent decline in every generation. In three generations, the population would be cut in half.

The low birth rate does not stem from some peculiar aversion of Jewish women to children. It is merely a striking case of the well-known and universal phenomenon of birth rates declining with rising education and socio- economic class. Educated, successful working women tend to marry late and have fewer babies.

Add now a second factor, intermarriage. In the United States today more Jews marry Christians than marry Jews. The intermarriage rate is 52 percent. (A more conservative calculation yields 47 percent; the demographic effect is basically the same.) In 1970, the rate was 8 percent.

Most important for Jewish continuity, however, is the ultimate identity of the children born to these marriages. Only about one in four is raised Jewish. Thus two-thirds of Jewish marriages are producing children three-quarters of whom are lost to the Jewish people. Intermarriage rates alone would cause a 25 percent decline in population in every generation. (Math available upon request.) In two generations, half the Jews would disappear.

Now combine the effects of fertility and intermarriage and make the overly optimistic assumption that every child raised Jewish will grow up to retain his Jewish identity (i.e., a zero dropout rate). You can start with 100 American Jews; you end up with 60. In one generation, more than a third have disappeared. In just two generations, two out of every three will vanish.

One can reach this same conclusion by a different route (bypassing the intermarriage rates entirely). A Los Angeles Times poll of American Jews conducted in March 1998 asked a simple question: Are you raising your children as Jews? Only 70 percent said yes. A population in which the biological replacement rate is 80 percent and the cultural replacement rate is 70 percent is headed for extinction. By this calculation, every 100 Jews are raising 56 Jewish children. In just two generations, 7 out of every 10 Jews will vanish.

The demographic trends in the rest of the Diaspora are equally unencouraging. In Western Europe, fertility and intermarriage rates mirror those of the United States. Take Britain. Over the last generation, British Jewry has acted as a kind of controlled experiment: a Diaspora community living in an open society, but, unlike that in the United States, not artificially sustained by immigration. What happened? Over the last quarter- century, the number of British Jews declined by over 25 percent.

Over the same interval, France’s Jewish population declined only slightly. The reason for this relative stability, however, is a one-time factor: the influx of North African Jewry. That influx is over. In France today only a minority of Jews between the ages of twenty and forty-four live in a conventional family with two Jewish parents. France, too, will go the way of the rest.

"The dissolution of European Jewry," observes Bernard Wasserstein in Vanishing Diaspora: The Jews in Europe since 1945, "is not situated at some point in the hypothetical future. The process is taking place before our eyes and is already far advanced." Under present trends, "the number of Jews in Europe by the year 2000 would then be not much more than one million — the lowest figure since the last Middle Ages."

In 1990, there were eight million.

The story elsewhere is even more dispiriting. The rest of what was once the Diaspora is now either a museum or a graveyard. Eastern Europe has been effectively emptied of its Jews. In 1939, Poland had 3.2 million Jews. Today it is home to 3,500. The story is much the same in the other capitals of Eastern Europe.

The Islamic world, cradle to the great Sephardic Jewish tradition and home to one-third of world Jewry three centuries ago, is now practically Judenrein. Not a single country in the Islamic world is home to more than 20,000 Jews. After Turkey with 19,000 and Iran with 14,000, the country with the largest Jewish community in the entire Islamic world is Morocco with 6, 100. There are more Jews in Omaha, Nebraska.

These communities do not figure in projections. There is nothing to project. They are fit subjects not for counting but for remembering. Their very sound has vanished. Yiddish and Ladino, the distinctive languages of the European and Sephardic Diasporas, like the communities that invented them, are nearly extinct.

IV. THE DYNAMICS OF ASSIMILATION

Is it not risky to assume that current trends will continue? No. Nothing will revive the Jewish communities of Eastern Europe and the Islamic world. And nothing will stop the rapid decline by assimilation of Western Jewry. On the contrary. Projecting current trends — assuming, as I have done, that rates remain constant — is rather conservative: It is risky to assume that assimilation will not accelerate. There is nothing on the horizon to reverse the integration of Jews into Western culture. The attraction of Jews to the larger culture and the level of acceptance of Jews by the larger culture are historically unprecedented. If anything, the trends augur an intensification of assimilation.

It stands to reason. As each generation becomes progressively more assimilated, the ties to tradition grow weaker (as measured, for example, by synagogue attendance and number of children receiving some kind of Jewish education). This dilution of identity, in turn, leads to a greater tendency to intermarriage and assimilation. Why not? What, after all, are they giving up? The circle is complete and self-reinforcing.

Consider two cultural artifacts. With the birth of television a half- century ago, Jewish life in America was represented by The Goldbergs: urban Jews, decidedly ethnic, heavily accented, socially distinct. Forty years later The Goldbergs begat Seinfeld, the most popular entertainment in America today. The Seinfeld character is nominally Jewish. He might cite his Jewish identity on occasion without apology or self- consciousness — but, even more important, without consequence. It has not the slightest influence on any aspect of his life.

Assimilation of this sort is not entirely unprecedented. In some ways, it parallels the pattern in Western Europe after the emancipation of the Jews in the late 18th and 19th centuries. The French Revolution marks the turning point in the granting of civil rights to Jews. As they began to emerge from the ghetto, at first they found resistance to their integration and advancement. They were still excluded from the professions, higher education, and much of society. But as these barriers began gradually to erode and Jews advanced socially, Jews began a remarkable embrace of European culture and, for many, Christianity. In A History of Zionism, Walter Laqueur notes the view of Gabriel Riesser, an eloquent and courageous mid-19th-century advocate of emancipation, that a Jew who preferred the non-existent state and nation of Israel to Germany should be put under police protection not because he was dangerous but because he was obviously insane.

Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) was a harbinger. Cultured, cosmopolitan, though firmly Jewish, he was the quintessence of early emancipation. Yet his story became emblematic of the rapid historical progression from emancipation to assimilation: Four of his six children and eight of his nine grandchildren were baptized.

In that more religious, more Christian age, assimilation took the form of baptism, what Henrich Heine called the admission ticket to European society. In the far more secular late-20th century, assimilation merely means giving up the quaint name, the rituals, and the other accouterments and identifiers of one’s Jewish past. Assimilation today is totally passive. Indeed, apart from the trip to the county courthouse to transform, say, (shmattes by) Ralph Lifshitz into (Polo by) Ralph Lauren, it is marked by an absence of actions rather than the active embrace of some other faith. Unlike Mendelssohn’s children, Seinfeld required no baptism.

We now know, of course, that in Europe, emancipation through assimilation proved a cruel hoax. The rise of anti-Semitism, particularly late-19th- century racial anti-Semitism culminating in Nazism, disabused Jews of the notion that assimilation provided escape from the liabilities and dangers of being Jewish. The saga of the family of Madeleine Albright is emblematic. Of her four Jewish grandparents — highly assimilated, with children some of whom actually converted and erased their Jewish past — three went to their deaths in Nazi concentration camps as Jews.

Nonetheless, the American context is different. There is no American history of anti-Semitism remotely resembling Europe’s. The American tradition of tolerance goes back 200 years to the very founding of the country. Washington’s letter to the synagogue in Newport pledges not tolerance — tolerance bespeaks non-persecution bestowed as a favor by the dominant upon the deviant — but equality. It finds no parallel in the history of Europe. In such a country, assimilation seems a reasonable solution to one’s Jewish problem. One could do worse than merge one’s destiny with that of a great and humane nation dedicated to the proposition of human dignity and equality.

Nonetheless, while assimilation may be a solution for individual Jews, it clearly is a disaster for Jews as a collective with a memory, a language, a tradition, a liturgy, a history, a faith, a patrimony that will all perish as a result.

Whatever value one might assign to assimilation, one cannot deny its reality. The trends, demographic and cultural, are stark. Not just in the long-lost outlands of the Diaspora, not just in its erstwhile European center, but even in its new American heartland, the future will be one of diminution, decline, and virtual disappearance. This will not occur overnight. But it will occur soon — in but two or three generations, a time not much further removed from ours today than the founding of Israel fifty years ago.

V. ISRAELI EXCEPTIONALISM

Israel is different. In Israel the great temptation of modernity — assimilation — simply does not exist. Israel is the very embodiment of Jewish continuity: It is the only nation on earth that inhabits the same land, bears the same name, speaks the same language, and worships the same God that it did 3,000 years ago. You dig the soil and you find pottery from Davidic times, coins from Bar Kokhba, and 2,000-year-old scrolls written in a script remarkably like the one that today advertises ice cream at the corner candy store.

Because most Israelis are secular, however, some ultra-religious Jews dispute Israel’s claim to carry on an authentically Jewish history. So do some secular Jews. A French critic (sociologist Georges Friedmann) once called Israelis "Hebrew-speaking gentiles." In fact, there was once a fashion among a group of militantly secular Israeli intellectuals to call themselves " Canaanites," i.e., people rooted in the land but entirely denying the religious tradition from which they came.

Well then, call these people what you will. "Jews," after all, is a relatively recent name for this people. They started out as Hebrews, then became Israelites. "Jew" (derived from the Kingdom of Judah, one of the two successor states to the Davidic and Solomonic Kingdom of Israel) is the post- exilic term for Israelite. It is a latecomer to history.

What to call the Israeli who does not observe the dietary laws, has no use for the synagogue, and regards the Sabbath as the day for a drive to the beach — a fair description, by the way, of most of the prime ministers of Israel? It does not matter. Plant a Jewish people in a country that comes to a standstill on Yom Kippur; speaks the language of the Bible; moves to the rhythms of the Hebrew (lunar) calendar; builds cities with the stones of its ancestors; produces Hebrew poetry and literature, Jewish scholarship and learning unmatched anywhere in the world — and you have continuity.

Israelis could use a new name. Perhaps we will one day relegate the word Jew to the 2,000-year exilic experience and once again call these people Hebrews. The term has a nice historical echo, being the name by which Joseph and Jonah answered the question: "Who are you?"

In the cultural milieu of modern Israel, assimilation is hardly the problem. Of course Israelis eat McDonald’s and watch Dallas reruns. But so do Russians and Chinese and Danes. To say that there are heavy Western (read: American) influences on Israeli culture is to say nothing more than that Israel is as subject to the pressures of globalization as any other country. But that hardly denies its cultural distinctiveness, a fact testified to by the great difficulty immigrants have in adapting to Israel.

In the Israeli context, assimilation means the reattachment of Russian and Romanian, Uzbeki and Iraqi, Algerian and Argentinian Jews to a distinctively Hebraic culture. It means the exact opposite of what it means in the Diaspora: It means giving up alien languages, customs, and traditions. It means giving up Christmas and Easter for Hanukkah and Passover. It means giving up ancestral memories of the steppes and the pampas and the savannas of the world for Galilean hills and Jerusalem stone and Dead Sea desolation. That is what these new Israelis learn. That is what is transmitted to their children. That is why their survival as Jews is secure. Does anyone doubt that the near- million Soviet immigrants to Israel would have been largely lost to the Jewish people had they remained in Russia — and that now they will not be lost?

Some object to the idea of Israel as carrier of Jewish continuity because of the myriad splits and fractures among Israelis: Orthodox versus secular, Ashkenazi versus Sephardi, Russian versus sabra, and so on. Israel is now engaged in bitter debates over the legitimacy of conservative and reform Judaism and the encroachment of Orthodoxy upon the civic and social life of the country.

So what’s new? Israel is simply recapitulating the Jewish norm. There are equally serious divisions in the Diaspora, as there were within the last Jewish Commonwealth: "Before the ascendancy of the Pharisees and the emergence of Rabbinic orthodoxy after the fall of the Second Temple," writes Harvard Near East scholar Frank Cross, "Judaism was more complex and variegated than we had supposed." The Dead Sea Scrolls, explains Hershel Shanks, "emphasize a hitherto unappreciated variety in Judaism of the late Second Temple period, so much so that scholars often speak not simply of Judaism but of Judaisms."

The Second Commonwealth was a riot of Jewish sectarianism: Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, apocalyptics of every stripe, sects now lost to history, to say nothing of the early Christians. Those concerned about the secular- religious tensions in Israel might contemplate the centuries-long struggle between Hellenizers and traditionalists during the Second Commonwealth. The Maccabean revolt of 167-4 B.C., now celebrated as Hanukkah, was, among other things, a religious civil war among Jews.

Yes, it is unlikely that Israel will produce a single Jewish identity. But that is unnecessary. The relative monolith of Rabbinic Judaism in the Middle Ages is the exception. Fracture and division is a fact of life during the modern era, as during the First and Second Commonwealths. Indeed, during the period of the First Temple, the people of Israel were actually split into two often warring states. The current divisions within Israel pale in comparison.

Whatever identity or identities are ultimately adopted by Israelis, the fact remains that for them the central problem of Diaspora Jewry — suicide by assimilation — simply does not exist. Blessed with this security of identity, Israel is growing. As a result, Israel is not just the cultural center of the Jewish world, it is rapidly becoming its demographic center as well. The relatively high birth rate yields a natural increase in population. Add a steady net rate of immigration (nearly a million since the late 1980s), and Israel’s numbers rise inexorably even as the Diaspora declines.

Within a decade Israel will pass the United States as the most populous Jewish community on the globe. Within our lifetime a majority of the world’s Jews will be living in Israel. That has not happened since well before Christ.

A century ago, Europe was the center of Jewish life. More than 80 percent of world Jewry lived there. The Second World War destroyed European Jewry and dispersed the survivors to the New World (mainly the United States) and to Israel. Today, 80 percent of world Jewry lives either in the United States or in Israel. Today we have a bipolar Jewish universe with two centers of gravity of approximately equal size. It is a transitional stage, however. One star is gradually dimming, the other brightening.

Soon an inevitably the cosmology of the Jewish people will have been transformed again, turned into a single-star system with a dwindling Diaspora orbiting around. It will be a return to the ancient norm: The Jewish people will be centered — not just spiritually but physically — in their ancient homeland.

VI. THE END OF DISPERSION

The consequences of this transformation are enormous. Israel’s centrality is more than just a question of demography. It represents a bold and dangerous new strategy for Jewish survival.

For two millennia, the Jewish people survived by means of dispersion and isolation. Following the first exile in 586 B.C. and the second exile in 70 A. D. and 132 A.D., Jews spread first throughout Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean Basin, then to northern and eastern Europe and eventually west to the New World, with communities in practically every corner of the earth, even unto India and China.

Throughout this time, the Jewish people survived the immense pressures of persecution, massacre, and forced conversion not just by faith and courage, but by geographic dispersion. Decimated here, they would survive there. The thousands of Jewish villages and towns spread across the face of Europe, the Islamic world, and the New World provided a kind of demographic insurance. However many Jews were massacred in the First Crusade along the Rhine, however many villages were destroyed in the 1648-1649 pogroms in Ukraine, there were always thousands of others spread around the globe to carry on.

This dispersion made for weakness and vulnerability for individual Jewish communities. Paradoxically, however, it made for endurance and strength for the Jewish people as a whole. No tyrant could amass enough power to threaten Jewish survival everywhere.

Until Hitler. The Nazis managed to destroy most everything Jewish from the Pyrenees to the gates of Stalingrad, an entire civilization a thousand years old. There were nine million Jews in Europe when Hitler came to power. He killed two-thirds of them. Fifty years later, the Jews have yet to recover. There were sixteen million Jews in the world in 1939. Today, there are thirteen million.

The effect of the Holocaust was not just demographic, however. It was psychological, indeed ideological, as well. It demonstrated once and for all the catastrophic danger of powerlessness. The solution was self-defense, and that meant a demographic reconcentration in a place endowed with sovereignty, statehood, and arms.

Before World War II there was great debate in the Jewish world over Zionism. Reform Judaism, for example, was for decades anti-Zionist. The Holocaust resolved that debate. Except for those at the extremes — the ultra-Orthodox right and far left — Zionism became the accepted solution to Jewish powerlessness and vulnerability. Amid the ruins, Jews made a collective decision that their future lay in self-defense and territoriality, in the ingathering of the exiles to a place where they could finally acquire the means to defend themselves.

It was the right decision, the only possible decision. But oh so perilous. What a choice of place to make one’s final stand: a dot on the map, a tiny patch of near-desert, a thin ribbon of Jewish habitation behind the flimsiest of natural barriers (which the world demands that Israel relinquish). One determined tank thrust can tear it in half. One small battery of nuclear- tipped Scuds can obliterate it entirely.

To destroy the Jewish people, Hitler needed to conquer the world. All that is needed today is to conquer a territory smaller than Vermont. The terrible irony is that in solving the problem of powerlessness, the Jews have necessarily put all their eggs in one basket, a small basket hard by the waters of the Mediterranean. And on its fate hinges everything Jewish.

VII. THINKING THE UNTHINKABLE

What if the Third Jewish Commonwealth meets the fate of the first two? The scenario is not that far-fetched: A Palestinian state is born, arms itself, concludes alliances with, say, Iraq and Syria. War breaks out between Palestine and Israel (over borders or water or terrorism). Syria and Iraq attack from without. Egypt and Saudi Arabia join the battle. The home front comes under guerilla attack from Palestine. Chemical and biological weapons rain down from Syria, Iraq, and Iran. Israel is overrun.

Why is this the end? Can the Jewish people not survive as they did when their homeland was destroyed and their political independence extinguished twice before? Why not a new exile, a new Diaspora, a new cycle of Jewish history?

First, because the cultural conditions of exile would be vastly different. The first exiles occurred at a time when identity was nearly coterminous with religion. An expulsion two millennia later into a secularized world affords no footing for a reestablished Jewish identity.

But more important: Why retain such an identity? Beyond the dislocation would be the sheer demoralization. Such an event would simply break the spirit. No people could survive it. Not even the Jews. This is a people that miraculously survived two previous destructions and two millennia of persecution in the hope of ultimate return and restoration. Israel is that hope. To see it destroyed, to have Isaiahs and Jeremiahs lamenting the widows of Zion once again amid the ruins of Jerusalem is more than one people could bear.

Particularly coming after the Holocaust, the worst calamity in Jewish history. To have survived it is miracle enough. Then to survive the destruction of that which arose to redeem it — the new Jewish state — is to attribute to Jewish nationhood and survival supernatural power.

Some Jews and some scattered communities would, of course, survive. The most devout, already a minority, would carry on — as an exotic tribe, a picturesque Amish-like anachronism, a dispersed and pitied remnant of a remnant. But the Jews as a people would have retired from history.

We assume that Jewish history is cyclical: Babylonian exile in 586 B.C., followed by return in 538 B.C. Roman exile in 135 A.D., followed by return, somewhat delayed, in 1948. We forget a linear part of Jewish history: There was one other destruction, a century and a half before the fall of the First Temple. It went unrepaired. In 722 B.C., the Assyrians conquered the other, larger Jewish state, the northern kingdom of Israel. (Judah, from which modern Jews are descended, was the southern kingdom.) This is the Israel of the Ten Tribes, exiled and lost forever.

So enduring is their mystery that when Lewis and Clark set off on their expedition, one of the many questions prepared for them by Dr. Benjamin Rush at Jefferson’s behest was this: "What Affinity between their [the Indians'] religious Ceremonies & those of the Jews?" "Jefferson and Lewis had talked at length about these tribes," explains Stephen Ambrose. "They speculated that the lost tribes of Israel could be out there on the Plains."

Alas, not. The Ten Tribes had melted away into history. As such, they represent the historical norm. Every other people so conquered and exiled has in time disappeared. Only the Jews defied the norm. Twice. But never, I fear, again.


Gaza: En droit de la guerre, la proportionnalité n’a rien à voir avec le nombre relatif des victimes (It is ironic that Israel is charged with disproportionality for successfully protecting its civilians by following international law)

21 juillet, 2014
https://scontent-a-fra.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/v/t1.0-9/10524312_4450865086796_1913747810205322816_n.jpg?oh=40466309645ea6092e30209f8bd616ec&oe=54594E05

http://www.europe-israel.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/terror2.jpg

http://www.jpost.com/HttpHandlers/ShowImage.ashx?id=249662&h=236&w=370

https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t1.0-9/10561604_4449284327278_2283345156004203018_n.jpg
J’ai une prémonition qui ne me quittera pas: ce qui adviendra d’Israël sera notre sort à tous. Si Israël devait périr, l’holocauste fondrait sur nous. Eric Hoffer
A 100% effective Iron Dome wouldn’t serve Tel Aviv’s strategical interest slightest bit since the regime relies on the public’s fear of Palestinian attacks. Add to that the huge cost of the defence system’s missles as compared to that of the primitive projectiles fired by the Gazan resistance. From the Palestinian perspective, before Iron Dome the qassams hardly ever caused damage to the Israeli military, but did spread fear and incite the Israeli public opinion against them. Today, thanks to Iron Dome, every airborn sewer pipe is guaranteed to inflict substantial financial loss to the IDF, at least if the system would be programmed to react to every threat. So my take is the Israeli army intentionally limited the effectiveness of the defence system. Pasparal da Beira do Canal (11 March 2013)
Qui se cache dans les mosquées ? Le Hamas. Qui met ses arsenaux sous des hôpitaux ? Le Hamas. Qui met des centres de commandement dans des résidences ou à proximité de jardins d’enfants ? Le Hamas. Le Hamas utilise les habitants de Gaza comme boucliers humains et provoque un désastre pour les civils de Gaza ; donc, pour toute attaque contre des civils de Gaza, ce que nous regrettons, le Hamas et ses partenaires sont seuls responsables. Benjamin Nétanyahou
Les attaques aveugles à la roquette à partir de Gaza vers Israël constituent des actes terroristes que rien ne justifie. Il est évident que le Hamas utilise délibérément des boucliers humains pour intensifier la terreur dans la région. L’absence d’une condamnation de ces actes répréhensibles par la communauté internationale encouragerait ces terroristes à poursuivre ces actions consternantes. Le Canada demande à ses alliés et partenaires de reconnaître que ces actes terroristes sont inacceptables et que la solidarité avec Israël est le meilleur moyen de mettre fin au conflit. L’appui du Canada envers Israël est sans équivoque. Nous appuyons son droit de se défendre, par lui‑même, contre ces attaques terroristes, et nous exhortons le Hamas à cesser immédiatement ses attaques aveugles à l’endroit d’innocents civils israéliens. Le Canada réitère son appel au gouvernement palestinien à désarmer le Hamas et d’autres groupes terroristes palestiniens qui opèrent à partir de Gaza, dont le Jihad islamique palestinien, mandaté par l’Iran. Stephen Harper (premier ministre canadien, 13.07.14)
En ce 13 juillet 2014 on mesure à nouveau le déséquilibre moral vertigineux entre Israël qui suit à la lettre le droit de la guerre et le Hamas qui le bafoue sans vergogne. En effet, les Palestiniens vivant au nord de la Bande de Gaza dans des zones d’où sont tirées à l’aveuglette des dizaines de roquettes sur les populations civiles d’Israël, ont été avertis par Tsahal d’évacuer les lieux pour permettre une opération de nettoyage de cibles militaires sans faire de victimes civiles. Ce que nombreux Palestiniens font, se réfugiant dans des bâtiments de l’UNRWA. Le Hamas, qui utilise sa population comme boucliers humains, leur ordonne de retourner dans ces zones. Pour la seule journée du 12 juillet 2014 plus de 129 roquettes ont été tirées depuis Gaza vers Israël. 117 roquettes au moins ont frappé Israël 9 roquettes ont été interceptées par le Dôme de Fer Tsahal a frappé 120 cibles terroristes dans la Bande de Gaza On est bien loin d’un soi-disant combat de David contre Goliath, le Hamas possédant un arsenal considérable. Fabriqué localement pour partie – d’où les restrictions israéliennes sur la nature des transferts à Gaza, qui se poursuivent actuellement en dépit des attaques terroristes – mais importé pour une plus grande partie. Fourni par l’Iran ou ses alliés, importé dans la Bande de Gaza via des tunnels de contrebande dont la construction est devenue une spécialité locale ayant bénéficié jusque récemment de complicités égyptiennes. L’Égypte aujourd’hui saisit ce type de matériel à destination de Gaza-. (…) C’est dans ce contexte que Tsahal, se conformant au droit international et au droit de la guerre a averti le 12 juillet des Gazaouis du nord de la Bande de Gaza, qui vivent autour de rampes de lancement de roquettes et autres installations terroristes militaires de partir de chez eux avant midi le lendemain avant que soit lancée une opération pour les détruire. Ce que rapporte même l’agence de presse palestinienne Maan News.. Qui fait également état du départ de milliers de Palestiniens qui vont se réfugier dans des écoles ou des bâtiments de l’UNRWA. Ce qui montre d’ailleurs qu’ils savent que les tirs israéliens ne sont pas aveugles, à la différence des tirs lancés depuis Gaza. Et que fait le Hamas ? Son ministère de l’Intérieur ordonne à ces Palestiniens de regagner immédiatement leur domicile, affirmant que ces avertissements entreraient dans le cadre d’une guerre psychologique et ne sont pas à prendre au sérieux, alors qu’il sait pertinemment que tel n’est pas le cas…., Le mouvement terroriste qui utilise sa population comme boucliers humains démontre une fois encore son peu de respect pour leurs vies. Les Gazaouis n’étant pour lui que de la chair à canon. Hélène Keller-Lind
News media coverage of the Gaza war is increasingly focusing on the body count. It’s an easy way to make Israel look bad. And it tends to obscure who the real aggressor in this conflict is, and who is the real victim. Each day, journalists report an ever-higher number of Gazans who have been killed, comparing it to the number of Israeli fatalities, which is still, thank G-d, zero. This kind of simplistic reporting creates a sympathetic portrayal of the Palestinians, who are shown to be genuinely suffering, while the Israeli public just seems a little scared. But there are important reasons why there are so many more Palestinian casualties than Israeli casualties. The first is that the Israeli government has built bomb shelters for its citizens, so they have places to hide when the Palestinians fire missiles at them. By contrast, the Hamas regime in Gaza refuses to build shelters for the general population, and prefers to spend its money buying and making more missiles. It’s not merely that Hamas has no regard for the lives of its own citizens. But even worse: Hamas deliberately places its civilians in the line of fire, in the expectation that Palestinian civilian casualties will generate international sympathy. On July 10, the Hamas Ministry of the Interior issued an official instruction to the public to remain in their apartments, and “and not heed these message from Israel” that their apartment buildings are about to be bombed. A New York Times report on July 11 described in sympathetic detail how seven Gazans were killed, and many others wounded, in an Israeli strike despite multiple advance warnings by Israel to vacate the premises. In the 18th paragraph of the 21-paragraph feature, the Times noted, in passing: “A member of the family said earlier that neighbors had come to ‘form a human shield.’ ” Isn’t that outrageous? Israel voluntarily gives up the advantage of surprise in order to warn Palestinian civilians and save their lives. Hamas responds by trying to ensure that Palestinian civilians get killed. And the international community chastises Israel for the Palestinian fatalities! Another reason there are so many more Palestinian casualties is that Hamas deliberately places its missile-launchers and arms depots in and around civilian neighborhoods. Hamas hopes that Israel will be reluctant to strike such targets because of the possibility of hitting civilians. Hezbollah does the same thing in southern Lebanon. This is by now an old Arab terrorist tactic, going back more than three decades. (…) The final reason the Palestinian casualty toll is higher than that of Israel is that Israel has a superior army, and it’s winning this war. Those who win wars almost always have fewer casualties than those who are defeated. In Israel’s case, that’s a good thing. Israel need not feel guilty or defensive about winning. It’s a lot better than losing, as the Jewish people have learned from centuries of bitter experience as helpless victims. Anyone with knowledge of history can appreciate how misleading casualty statistics can be. In World War II, the United States suffered about 360,000 military deaths. The Germans lost 3.2-million soldiers and 3.6-million civilians. Does that mean America was the aggressor, and Germany the victim? Japan estimates that it suffered 1 million military deaths and 2 million civilian deaths. Does that mean America attacked Japan, and not vice versa? The fourth lesson from the Gaza war: The body count is a form of Arab propaganda, which actually conceals who is the aggressor and who is the victim. Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn
Un simple cessez-le-feu serait de facto une victoire pour le Hamas. Il donnerait au Hamas le temps et l’espace de respiration dont il a besoin pour faire passer plus d’armes, réparer ses tunnels terroristes, et lancer de nouvelles attaques terroristes contre Israël. Il ne durerait que pour mieux prolonger la guerre. (…) les sous-sols de la ville de Shuja’iya que les israéliens ont bombardés cette nuit [représentent] tout un arsenal et des postes de commandement terroristes sous les immeubles d’habitation, la mosquée et l’hôpital. (…) Certes, nettoyer Gaza de ses armes et de son infrastructure militaire ne serait pas une tâche facile, compte tenu du vaste arsenal que le Hamas a amassé depuis le dernier cessez-le-feu il y a deux ans. Au début de la guerre actuelle, le Hamas avait environ 10.000 roquettes à portée de main. Ces missiles sont plus sophistiqués que les années précédentes, ils transportent des charges lourdes d’explosifs et peuvent atteindre Israël partout, même jusqu’à Nahariya, le long de la frontière nord d’Israël avec le Liban. Le Hamas a également des drones armés. Il a d’énormes dépôts d’armes et des laboratoires de fabrication de bombes. Il a des tunnels en béton où les terroristes se cachent et où passent les armes qui sont introduites en contrebande. En mars de cette année, la marine israélienne a intercepté un navire d’armes iranien à destination de Gaza. Cachées sous des sacs de ciment de fabrication iranienne il y avait des dizaines de roquettes M-302 sol-sol d’une portée de 75 à 150 km. (Remarque: la distance entre la bande de Gaza à Tel-Aviv est de 60 km.) La cache d’armes comprenait également près de 200 obus de mortier, et 400 000 cartouches de munitions. En 2009 et à nouveau en 2011, Israël a bombardé les convois d’armes transportées du Soudan à Gaza. Qui sait combien d’autres de ces livraisons d’armes iraniennes ou soudanaises ont réussi à échapper aux Israéliens et à atteindre Gaza? Ce n’est pas seulement un problème pour Israël. C’est un problème pour l’ensemble du monde libre. Israël est en première ligne dans la guerre internationale contre le terrorisme. Gaza n’est qu’un champ de bataille. Comme nous le savons depuis longtemps, ce qui commence à Gaza ou Bagdad ou Kaboul se propage vite à Londres, Madrid et New York. La communauté internationale a démontré que quand elle rassemble sa volonté, elle peut désarmer les terroristes. Une pression internationale sévère et des sanctions ont contraint la Syrie à entamer le démantèlement de ses armes chimiques l’année dernière. (…) Au lieu de continuer à verser des milliards de dollars d’aide financière dans le trou noir connu sous le nom de «économie de Gaza», la communauté internationale doit porter son attention sur les armes de Gaza. Il est temps à l’instar de ce que l’Irlande a réussi et des progrès faits en Syrie, de démilitariser la bande de Gaza. Les habitants de Gaza ont besoin de beurre, et non pas de munitions, et les gens du monde libre ont besoin de paix, et non pas de terrorisme. Moshe Phillips et Benyamin Korn
Curieux reportages : on ne parle que de femmes d’enfants et de vieux retrouvés dans les décombres, pas un seul homme, bizarre non ? Comme si en effet les hommes étaient dans les tunnels faisant déboucher leur rampe de lancement dans les maisons mêmes, les toits coulissants ou des verrières, avec obligation pour les femmes et enfants de vivre et mourir avec, voilà les conditions de la guerre que ne connaissent évidemment pas les casseurs de "juifs" à Barbès et de Sarcelles. En 2008 sur les 1500 morts gazouis, plus de la moitié étaient des combattants… Les autres sont les otages d’amoureux de la mort. Iris Canderson
Dans toute la France, ce sont aujourd’hui des milliers de manifestant-e-s qui sont descendus dans la rue pour exiger l’arrêt de l’intervention militaire de l’État d’Israël dans la bande de Gaza, pour crier leur révolte face au plus de 300 morts palestiniens depuis le début de cette intervention. En interdisant dans plusieurs villes et notamment à Paris, les manifestations de solidarité avec la Palestine, Hollande et le gouvernement Valls ont enclenché une épreuve de force qu’ils ont finalement perdue. Depuis l’Afrique où il organise l’aventure militaire de l’impérialisme français, Hollande avait joué les gros bras « ceux qui veulent à tout prix manifester en prendront la responsabilité ». C’est ce qu’ont fait aujourd’hui des milliers de manifestant-e-s qui sont descendus dans la rue pour exiger l’arrêt de l’intervention militaire de l’État d’Israël dans la bande de Gaza, pour crier leur révolte face au plus de 300 morts palestiniens depuis le début de cette intervention. Et pour faire respecter le droit démocratique à exprimer collectivement la solidarité. En particulier à Paris, plusieurs milliers de manifestants, malgré l’impressionnant quadrillage policier, ont défié l’interdiction du gouvernement. C’est un succès au vu des multiples menaces de la préfecture et du gouvernement. En fin de manifestation, des échauffourées ont eu lieu entre des manifestants et les forces de l’ordre. Comment aurait-il pu en être autrement au vu de dispositif policier et de la volonté du gouvernement de museler toute opposition à son soutien à la guerre menée par l’Etat d’Israël. Le NPA condamne les violences policières qui se sont déroulées ce soir à Barbès et affirme que le succès de cette journée ne restera pas sans lendemain. Dès mercredi, une nouvelle manifestation aura lieu à l’appel du collectif national pour une paix juste et durable. La lutte pour les droits du peuple palestinien continue. Le NPA appelle l’ensemble des forces de gauche et démocratiques, syndicales, associatives et politiques, à exprimer leur refus de la répression et leur solidarité active avec la lutte du peuple palestinien. NPA
Il faut dire que le réseau souterrain du Hamas a de quoi inquiéter Israël. "Des dizaines de tunnels parcourent la bande de Gaza, affirme Tsahal. Il s’agit d’un réseau sophistiqué, très bien entretenu, qui relie des ateliers de construction de roquettes, des rampes de lancement et des postes de commandement." A une vingtaine de mètres sous terre, ils sont parfois équipés du téléphone et de l’électricité. Les galeries, dont la construction peut prendre des années, sont devenues une fierté pour le Hamas, expliquait un ancien responsable de l’armée israélienne au journal Haaretz. Francetvinfo
Les tactiques de combat et l’idéologie du Hamas sont, "par excellence, un cas d’école" de violations systématiques du droit international humanitaire. Il n’y a "presqu’aucun exemple comparable" où que ce soit dans le monde d’aujourd’hui d’un groupe qui viole aussi systématiquement les accords internationaux liés aux conflits armés. Irwin Cotler (ancien Ministre de la Justice canadien, membre du parlement de ce pays et professeur de droit à l’Université McGill de Montreal)
En droit de la guerre, la proportionnalité n’a rien à voir avec le nombre relatif des victimes des deux côtés. Il fait plutôt référence à la valeur militaire d’une cible (combien d’impact la destruction de la cible aurait sur l’issue d’une bataille ou guerre) par rapport à la menace attendue pour la vie ou la propriété de civils. Si la cible a une haute valeur militaire, alors elle peut être attaquée même si cela risque d’entrainer des pertes civiles. Ce qui doit être "proportionnel" (le terme n’est en fait pas utilisé dans les conventions pertinentes), c’est la valeur militaire de la cible par rapport au risque pour les civils. En particulier, l’Article 51 du protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève de 1977 interdit aussi comme sans discrimination : 5 b ) les attaques dont on peut attendre qu’elles causent incidemment des pertes en vies humaines dans la population civile, des blessures aux personnes civiles, des dommages aux biens de caractère civil, ou une combinaison de ces pertes et dommages, qui seraient excessifs par rapport à l’avantage militaire concret et direct attendu. Par cette mesure, les efforts d’Israël pour détruire les missiles avant qu’ils puissent être tirés sur des civils israéliens, même si cela place des civils palestiniens en péril, semble se conformer parfaitement aux lois de la guerre. Rien n’oblige Israël à placer la vie de ses citoyens en danger pour protéger la vie des civils palestiniens. (…) Au-delà de cela, placer ses propres civils autour ou près d’une cible militaire pour servir de « boucliers humains » est interdit par la quatrième Convention de Genève : Art. 28. "Aucune personne protégée ne pourra être utilisée pour mettre, par sa présence, certains points ou certaines régions à l’abri des opérations militaires". L’article 58 du protocole 1 additionnel aux Conventions de Genève de 1977 va même plus loin à cet égard, exigeant que Hamas éloigne les civils palestiniens de la proximité de ses installations militaires, ce qui comprendrait tout endroit où seraient produits, stockés ou actionnés les mortiers, bombes et armes et ce en tout lieu où s’entrainent, se rassemblent ou se cachent ses combattants. Voici le texte qui engage les parties au conflit à: … a) s’efforceront, sans préjudice de l’article 49de la IVe Convention, d’éloigner du voisinage des objectifs militaires la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens de caractère civil soumis à leur autorité ; s’efforcer de supprimer la population civile, les civils et les biens de caractère civil sous leur contrôle du voisinage des objectifs militaires ; b éviter de placer des objectifs militaires dans ou près de zones densément peuplées ; (c) prendre les autres précautions nécessaires pour protéger la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens de caractère civil sous leur contrôle contre les dangers résultant des opérations militaires. Le Hamas, en tant que gouvernement de facto dans la bande de Gaza, a clairement violé l’ensemble de ces trois dispositions : ils n’ont fait aucun effort pour éloigner les civils du voisinage des objectifs militaires. Au contraire, ils cachent systématiquement des combattants et des armes dans les écoles, les mosquées et les maisons privées, et ils tirent des missiles et mortiers sur des civils israéliens à partir de ces lieux. Contrairement à Israël, le Hamas n’a fait aucun effort pour fournir des abris pour l’usage des civils palestiniens. Alors que le Hamas a importé des quantités énormes de ciment, celles-ci ont été détournées de force du secteur civil et utilisées à la place pour construire des bunkers et des tunnels pour les dirigeants du Hamas, ainsi que des postes de tir de missiles cachés. En revanche, l’exigence d’Israël, depuis le début des années 1990, est que toutes les maisons neuves soient dotées d’une salle sûre et renforcée et sa construction d’abris anti-bombe (souvent rudimentaires) dans les communautés près de Gaza a contribué à protéger les civils israéliens contre les attaques du Hamas, bien qu’à un coût de plus d’un milliard de dollars. Il est ironique de constater qu’Israël est accusé de disproportion pour avoir réussi à protéger efficacement ses civils en accord avec le droit international. Camera
Article 51 – Protection de la population civile
1. La population civile et les personnes civiles jouissent d’une protection générale contre les dangers résultant d’opérations militaires. En vue de rendre cette protection effective, les règles suivantes, qui s’ajoutent aux autres règles du droit international applicable, doivent être observées en toutes circonstances.
2. Ni la population civile en tant que telle ni les personnes civiles ne doivent être l’objet d’attaques.
Sont interdits les actes ou menaces de violence dont le but principal est de répandre la terreur parmi la population civile.
3. Les personnes civiles jouissent de la protection accordée par la présente Section, sauf si elles participent directement aux hostilités et pendant la durée de cette participation.
4. Les attaques sans discrimination sont interdites. L’expression «attaques sans discrimination» s’entend :
a) des attaques qui ne sont pas dirigées contre un objectif militaire déterminé ;
b) des attaques dans lesquelles on utilise des méthodes ou moyens de combat qui ne peuvent pas être dirigés contre un objectif militaire déterminé ; ou
c) des attaques dans lesquelles on utilise des méthodes ou moyens de combat dont les effets ne peuvent pas être limités comme le prescrit le présent Protocole ;
et qui sont, en conséquence, dans chacun de ces cas, propres à frapper indistinctement des objectifs militaires et des personnes civiles ou des biens de caractère civil.
5. Seront, entre autres, considérés comme effectués sans discrimination les types d’attaques suivants :
a) les attaques par bombardement, quels que soient les méthodes ou moyens utilisés, qui traitent comme un objectif militaire unique un certain nombre d’objectifs militaires nettement espacés et distincts situés dans une ville, un village ou toute autre zone contenant une concentration analogue de personnes civiles ou de biens de caractère civil ;
b) les attaques dont on peut attendre qu’elles causent incidemment des pertes en vies humaines dans la population civile, des blessures aux personnes civiles, des dommages aux biens de caractère civil, ou une combinaison de ces pertes et dommages, qui seraient excessifs par rapport à l’avantage militaire concret et direct attendu.
6. Sont interdites les attaques dirigées à titre de représailles contre la population civile ou des personnes civiles.
7. La présence ou les mouvements de la population civile ou de personnes civiles ne doivent pas être utilisés pour mettre certains points ou certaines zones à l’abri d’opérations militaires, notamment pour tenter de mettre des objectifs militaires à l’abri d’attaques ou de couvrir, favoriser ou gêner des opérations militaires. Les Parties au conflit ne doivent pas diriger les mouvements de la population civile ou des personnes civiles pour tenter de mettre des objectifs militaires à l’abri des attaques ou de couvrir des opérations militaires.
8. Aucune violation de ces interdictions ne dispense les Parties au conflit de leurs obligations juridiques à l’égard de la population civile et des personnes civiles, y compris l’obligation de prendre les mesures de précaution prévues par l’article 57 .
Protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève (du 12 août 1949 relatif à la protection des victimes des conflits armés internationaux (Protocole I), 8 juin 1977, article 51)
Article 58  – Précautions contre les effets des attaques
Dans toute la mesure de ce qui est pratiquement possible, les Parties au conflit :
a) s’efforceront, sans préjudice de l’article 49de la IVe Convention, d’éloigner du voisinage des objectifs militaires la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens de caractère civil soumis à leur autorité ;
b) éviteront de placer des objectifs militaires à l’intérieur ou à proximité des zones fortement peuplées ;
c) prendront les autres précautions nécessaires pour protéger contre les dangers résultant des opérations militaires la population civile, les personnes civiles et les biens de caractère civil soumis à leur autorité.
Protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève (du 12 août 1949 relatif à la protection des victimes des conflits armés internationaux (Protocole I), 8 juin 1977, article 58)
Aucune personne protégée ne pourra être utilisée pour mettre, par sa présence, certains points ou certaines régions à l’abri des opérations militaires. Convention (IV) de Genève (relative à la protection des personnes civiles en temps de guerre, 12 août 1949, Zones dangereuses, article 28)
Conformément à la pratique de l’ONU, les incidents impliquant des munitions non explosées qui pourraient mettre en danger les bénéficiaires et le personnel sont transmises aux autorités locales. Après la découverte des missiles, nous avons pris toutes les mesures nécessaires pour faire disparaître ces objets de nos écoles et préserver ainsi nos locaux.  Christopher Gunness (directeur de l’UNRWA à Gaza)
L’offensive terrestre décidée par le gouvernement israélien vise à « frapper les tunnels de la terreur allant de Gaza jusqu’en Israël » et protéger ses citoyens. A l’origine destinés à la contrebande des marchandises, les tunnels ont très vite été utilisés par les terroristes islamistes pour faire passer des armes de guerre via la frontière avec l’Egypte. En 2013, l’armée égyptienne sous l’égide de Mohamed Morsi, a décidé d’inonder les tunnels de contrebande pour « renforcer la sécurité à la frontière ». Une véritable foutaise de la part des autorités égyptiennes, alors issues comme le Hamas de la confrérie des Frères musulmans. Avec donc l’argent des contribuables européens, le Hamas a pu construire de nombreux tunnels reliant la bande de Gaza à Israël. L’objectif était de déjouer les systèmes de surveillance israéliens pour infiltrer des terroristes en vue de commettre des attentats dans des localités et prendre des otages israéliens. Plusieurs tunnels pénétraient « de plusieurs centaines de mètres en territoire israélien » construits pour mener des « attaques terroristes ». Les tunnels étaient construits avec des dalles de béton et à une profondeur de 5 à 10 mètres. Le réseau souterrain du Hamas est très sophistiqué, très bien entretenu, il relie des ateliers de construction de missiles et roquettes, des rampes de lancement et des postes de commandement. Plus de 600.000 tonnes de béton et de fer qui auraient pu vous servir a construire des écoles, des routes, des hôpitaux ont servi au Hamas à construire des tunnels en dessous des écoles, mosquées et hôpitaux et en territoire israélien. Pendant que des millions d’Européens vivent dans la misère, l’UE préfère financer les tunnels du terrorisme palestinien. Jean Vercors

Dôme de fer serait-il trop efficace ?

A l’heure où nos belles âmes n’ont à nouveau pas de mots assez durs pour fustiger le seul Israël de vouloir protéger sa population ….

Et, avec l’augmentation quotidienne du nombre des victimes, jamais assez de raisons pour excuser le Hamas d’exposer la population dont il est chargé de la protection …

Pendant qu’avec l’incroyable réseau souterrain creusé sous ses quartiers résidentiels et après les roquettes cachées dans une école de l’ONU, le monde découvre enfin toute l’étendue de sa perfidie …

Et que, poussées par les pyromanes de l’extrême-gauche, nos chères têtes blondes jouent à la guérilla urbaine dans nos propres rues

Comment ne pas voir, avec le site de réinformation américain Camera, l’incroyable ironie de la situation …

Quand Israël se voit accusé de disproportion …

Pour avoir réussi à protéger efficacement ses civils en accord avec le droit international ?

Voir aussi:

Myths and Facts about the Fighting in Gaza
Alex Safian, PhD
Camera
January 8, 200

Myth: Israel’s attacks against Hamas are illegal since Israel is still occupying Gaza through its control of Gaza’s borders and airspace, and it is therefore bound to protect the civilian population under the Fourth Geneva Convention.

Israel has control over Gaza’s air space and sea coast, and its forces enter the area at will. As the occupying power, Israel has the responsibility under the Fourth Geneva Convention to see to the welfare of the civilian population of the Gaza Strip. (Rashid Khalidi, What You Don’t Know About Gaza , New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 8, 2009)

Fact: Of the land borders with Gaza, Israel quite naturally controls those that are adjacent to Israel; the border with Egypt at Rafah is controlled by Egypt. Beyond this, it is clear under international law that Israel does not occupy Gaza. As Amb. Dore Gold put it in a detailed report on the question:

The foremost document in defining the existence of an occupation has been the 1949 Fourth Geneva Convention "Relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War." Article 6 of the Fourth Geneva Convention explicitly states that "the Occupying Power shall be bound for the duration of the occupation to the extent that such Power exercises the functions of government in such territory…." If no Israeli military government is exercising its authority or any of "the functions of government" in the Gaza Strip, then there is no occupation. (Legal Acrobatics: The Palestinian Claim that Gaza is Still "Occupied" Even After Israel Withdraws, Amb. Dore Gold, JCPA, 26 August 2005)

But what if despite this we take seriously Khalidi’s claim that Israel is the occupying power and is therefore legally the sovereign authority in Gaza? In that case the relevant body of law would not be the Geneva Conventions as Khalidi claims, but would rather be the Hague Regulations, which in the relevant article states:

The authority of the legitimate power having in fact passed into the hands of the occupant, the latter shall take all the measures in his power to restore, and ensure, as far as possible, public order and safety, while respecting, unless absolutely prevented, the laws in force in the country. (Article 43, Laws and Customs of War on Land (Hague IV); October 18, 1907)

Under this article Israel’s incursion into Gaza would therefore be completely legal as a legitimate exercise of Israel’s responsibility for restoring and ensuring public order and safety in Gaza. This would include removing Hamas, which by Khalidi’s logic is an illegitimate authority in Gaza. Under international law Hamas certainly has no right to stockpile weapons or attack Israel, and Israel is therefore justified in taking measures to disarm Hamas and prevent it from terrorizing both the Israeli population and the Gaza population. That is the inescapable logic of Khalidi’s position.

Myth: Since more Palestinians than Israelis have been killed in the fighting this means Israel is acting “disproportionately” or has even committed “war crimes.”

• [Israel] is causing a huge and disproportionate civilian casualty level in Gaza. (Christiane Amanpour CNN, Jan. 4, 2009)

• WAR CRIMES The targeting of civilians, whether by Hamas or by Israel, is potentially a war crime. Every human life is precious. But the numbers speak for themselves: Nearly 700 Palestinians, most of them civilians, have been killed since the conflict broke out at the end of last year. In contrast, there have been around a dozen Israelis killed, many of them soldiers. (Rashid Khalidi, What You Don’t Know About Gaza , New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 8, 2009)

Fact: First of all, contrary to Khalidi, three quarters of the Palestinians killed so far were combatants, not civilians, including 290 Hamas combatants who have been specifically identified.

Beyond this, real world examples obviate any charges about right or wrong based on the number of people killed. Consider that the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor killed about 3,000 Americans. Does it follow that the US should have ended its counterattacks against Japanese forces once a similar number of Japanese had been killed? Since it did not end its attacks, does that mean the US acted disproportionally and was in the wrong and that the Japanese were the aggrieved party? Clearly the answer is no.

Taking this further, counting the number of dead hardly determines right and wrong. For example, again looking at the Pacific Theatre in World War 2, over 2.7 million Japanese were killed, including 580,000 civilians, as against only 106,000 Americans, the vast majority combatants. Does it then follow that Japan was in the right and America was in the wrong? Again, clearly the answer is no. Just having more dead on your side does not make you right.

Proportionality in the sense used by Rashid Khalidi and Christiane Amanpour is meaningless.

Myth: Israel’s actions are illegal since International Law requires proportionality.

International law … calls for the element of proportionality. When you have conflict between nations or between countries, there is a sense of proportionality. You cannot go and kill and injure 3,000 Palestinians when you have four Israelis killed on the other side. That is immoral, that is illegal. And that is not right. And it should be stopped. (Dr. Riyad Mansour, Palestinian ambassador to the United Nations, CNN, Jan 3, 2009)

Actually, proportionality in the Law of War has nothing to do with the relative number of casualties on the two sides. Rather it refers to the military value of a target (how much of an impact would the target’s destruction have on the outcome of a battle or war) versus the expected threat to the lives or property of civilians. If the target has high military value, then it can be attacked even if it seems there will be some civilian casualties in doing so.

What has to be “proportional” (the term is not actually used in the relevant conventions) is the military value of the target versus the risk to civilians.

In particular, Article 51 of Protocol 1 Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1977 prohibits as indiscriminate:

5(b) An attack which may be expected to cause incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians, damage to civilian objects, or a combination thereof, which would be excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated.

By this measure, Israel’s efforts to destroy missiles before they can be fired at Israeli civilians, even if that places Palestinian civilians at risk, seems to conform perfectly to the Laws of War. There is no requirement that Israel place the lives of its own citizens in danger to protect the lives of Palestinian civilians.

Myth: Hamas has no choice but to place weapons and fighters in populated areas since the Gaza Strip is so crowded that is all there is.

[Hamas has] no other choice. Gaza is the size of Detroit. And 1.5 million live here where there are no places for them to fire from them but from among the population. (Taghreed El-Khodary, New York Times Gaza reporter, on CNN, Jan. 1, 2009)

In fact there is plenty of open space in Gaza, including the now empty sites where Israeli settlements once stood. The Hamas claim, parroted by the Times reporter, is nonsense.

Beyond this, placing your own civilians around or near a military target to act as “human shields” is prohibited by the Fourth Geneva Convention:

Art. 28. The presence of a protected person may not be used to render certain points or areas immune from military operations.

Article 58 of Protocol 1 Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1977 goes even further in this regard, requiring that Hamas remove Palestinian civilians from the vicinity of its military facilities, which would include any place where weapons, mortars, bombs and the like are produced, stored, or fired from, and any place where its fighters train, congregate or hide. Here is the text, which calls on the parties to the conflict to:

(A) … endeavour to remove the civilian population, individual civilians and civilian objects under their control from the vicinity of military objectives;

(b) Avoid locating military objectives within or near densely populated areas;

(c) Take the other necessary precautions to protect the civilian population, individual civilians and civilian objects under their control against the dangers resulting from military operations.

Hamas, as the defacto government in Gaza, has clearly violated all three of these provisions:

They have made no effort to remove civilians from the vicinity of military objectives.
On the contrary, they systematically hide fighters and weapons in schools, in mosques and private homes, and they fire missiles and mortars at Israeli civilians from these places.
Unlike Israel, Hamas has made no effort to provide bomb shelters for the use of Palestinian civilians. While Hamas has imported huge amounts of cement, it has been forcefully diverted from the civilian sector and instead used to build bunkers and tunnels for Hamas leaders, along with hidden missile firing positions.

On the other hand, Israel’s requirement since the early 1990’s that all new homes have a secure reinforced room, and its building of (often rudimentary) bomb shelters in communities near Gaza have helped to shield Israeli civilians from Hamas attacks, though at a cost of over $1 Billion dollars.

It is ironic that Israel is charged with disproportionality for successfully protecting its civilians by following international law.

Myth: Israel violated the ceasefire with Hamas in November, and is thus to blame for the conflict.

• Lifting the blockade, along with a cessation of rocket fire, was one of the key terms of the June cease-fire between Israel and Hamas. This accord led to a reduction in rockets fired from Gaza from hundreds in May and June to a total of less than 20 in the subsequent four months (according to Israeli government figures). The cease-fire broke down when Israeli forces launched major air and ground attacks in early November; six Hamas operatives were reported killed. (Rashid Khalidi, What You Don’t Know About Gaza , New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 8, 2009)

• Mustafa Barghouti, Palestinian Legislator (video clip): … The reality and the truth is that the side that broke this truce and this ceasefire was Israel. Two months before it ended, Israel started attacking Rafah, started attacking Khan Yunis …

Rick Sanchez: And you know what we did? I’ve checked with some of the folks here at our international desk, and I went to them and asked, What was he talking about, and do we have any information on that? Which they confirmed, two months ago — this is back in November — there was an attack. It was an Israeli raid that took out six people. (CNN, Dec. 31, 2008)

In fact, contrary to Khalidi, Barghouti and CNN’s Rick Sanchez, the Palestinians violated the ceasefire almost from day one. For example, the Associated Press published on June 25, just after the truce started, an article headlined Palestinian rockets threaten truce

The article in its lead paragraphs reported that:

Palestinian militants fired three homemade rockets into southern Israel yesterday, threatening to unravel a cease-fire days after it began, and Israel responded by closing vital border crossings into Gaza.

Despite what it called a "gross violation" of the truce, Israel refrained from military action and said it would send an envoy soon to Egypt to work on the next stage of a broader cease-fire agreement: a prisoner swap that would bring home an Israeli soldier held by Hamas for more than two years.

There were many further such Palestinian violations, including dozens of rockets and mortars fired into Israel during the so-called ceasefire. And there was also sniper fire against Israeli farmers, anti-tank rockets and rifle shots fired at soldiers in Israel, and not one but two attempts to abduct Israeli soldiers and bring them into Gaza. Here are some of the details:

(Most of this data is from The Six Months of the Lull Arrangement, a detailed report by the Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center, an Israeli NGO.)

From the start of the ceasefire at 6 AM on June 19 till the incident on November 4th, the following attacks were launched against Israel from Gaza in direct violation of the agreement:

18 mortars were fired at Israel in this period, beginning on the night of June 23.
20 rockets were fired, beginning on June 24, when 3 rockets hit the Israeli town of Sderot.
On July 6 farmers working in the fields of Nahal Oz were attacked by light arms fire from Gaza.
On the night of August 15 Palestinians fired across the border at Israeli soldiers near the Karni crossing.
On October 31 an IDF patrol spotted Palestinians planting an explosive device near the security fence in the area of the Sufa crossing. As the patrol approached the fence the Palestinians fired two anti-tank missiles.

There were two Palestinian attempts to infiltrate from Gaza into Israel apparently to abduct Israelis. Both were major violations of the ceasefire.

The first came to light on Sept. 28, when Israeli personnel arrested Jamal Atallah Sabah Abu Duabe. The 21-year-old Rafah resident had used a tunnel to enter Egypt and from there planned to slip across the border into Israel. Investigation revealed that Abu Duabe was a member of Hamas’s Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades, and that he planned to lure Israeli soldiers near the border by pretending to be a drug smuggler, capture them, and then sedate them with sleeping pills in order to abduct them directly into Gaza through a preexisting tunnel. For more details click here and here.

The second abduction plan was aborted on the night of Nov 4, thanks to a warning from Israeli Intelligence. Hamas had dug another tunnel into Israel and was apparently about to execute an abduction plan when IDF soldiers penetrated about 250 meters into Gaza to the entrance of the tunnel, hidden under a house. Inside the house were a number of armed Hamas members, who opened fire. The Israelis fired back and the house exploded – in total 6 or 7 Hamas operatives were killed and several were wounded. Among those killed were Mazen Sa’adeh, a Hamas brigade commander, and Mazen Nazimi Abbas, a commander in the Hamas special forces unit. For more details click here.

It was when Israel aborted this imminent Hamas attack that the group and other Palestinian groups in Gaza escalated their violations of the ceasefire by beginning to once again barrage Israel with rockets and mortars.

Note also that, contrary to Khalidi, Israeli figures do not show that Palestinian violations of the ceasefire during the first four months amounted to “less than 20” rockets.

Considering this long list of Palestinian attacks, charging that Israel broke the ceasefire in November is simply surreal.

Myth: Israel violated the ceasefire by not lifting its blockade of Gaza.

• Negotiation is a much more effective way to deal with rockets and other forms of violence. This might have been able to happen had Israel fulfilled the terms of the June cease-fire and lifted its blockade of the Gaza Strip. (Rashid Khalidi, What You Don’t Know About Gaza , New York Times Op-Ed, Jan. 8, 2009)

• Mustafa Barghouti, Palestinian Legislator: … [Israel] never lifted the blockade on Gaza. Gaza remains without fuel, without electricity, with bread, without medications, without any medical equipment for people who are dying in Gaza — 262 people died, 6 people because of no access to medical care. So Israel broke the ceasefire. (CNN, Dec. 31, 2008)

Contrary to Khalidi and Barghouti, Israel did open the crossings and allowed truckload after truckload of supplies to enter Gaza. Closures until November were short, and in direct response to Palestinian violations, some of which were detailed above.

To quote from the ITIC report on the "Lull Agreement":

On June 22, after four days of calm, Israel reopened the Karni and Sufa crossings to enable regular deliveries of consumer goods and fuel to the Gaza Strip. They were closed shortly thereafter, following the first violation of the arrangement, when rockets were fired at Sderot on June 24. However, when calm was restored, the crossings remained open for long periods of time. On August 17 the Kerem Shalom crossing was also opened for the delivery of goods, to a certain degree replacing the Sufa crossing, after repairs had been completed (the Kerem Shalom crossing was closed on April 19 when the IDF prevented a combined mass casualty attack in the region, as a result of which the crossing was almost completely demolished).

Before November 4, large quantities of food, fuel, construction material and other necessities for renewing the Gaza Strip’s economic activity were delivered through the Karni and Sufa crossings. A daily average of 80-90 trucks passed through the crossings, similar to the situation before they were closed following the April 19 attack on the Kerem Shalom crossing. Changes were made in the types of good which could be delivered, permitting the entry of iron, cement and other vital raw materials into the Gaza Strip.

… Israel, before November 4, refrained from initiating action in the Gaza Strip but responded to rocket and mortar shell attacks by closing the crossings for short periods of time (hours to days). After November 4 the crossings were closed for long periods in response to the continued attacks against Israel. (Rearranged from p 11- 12)

Day to day details of the supplies delivered to Gaza and the numbers of trucks involved have been published by the Israeli Foreign Ministry and are available here. The figures confirm that the passages were indeed open and busy.

Myth: Israel is using excessively large bombs in populated neighborhoods and is therefore to blame for any Palestinian civilians killed in the present fighting.
Fact: On the contrary, Israel is using extremely small bombs precisely because Hamas has violated international law by intentionally placing military facilities in densely populated civilian areas (see Article 58 of Protocol 1 Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1977 cited above). To attack these targets while minimizing civilian casualties, Israel is using the new GBU-39 SDB (Small Diameter Bomb), an extremely precise GPS-guided weapon designed to minimize collateral damage by employing a small warhead containing less than 50 lbs of high explosive. Despite its small size, thanks to its accuracy the GBU-39 is able to destroy targets behind even 3 feet of steel-reinforced concrete.

Many of the Palestinian civilian injuries have therefore likely been caused not by Israeli bombs but by Palestinian rockets and bombs which explode after Israel targets the places where they are stored or manufactured, such as mosques and other civilian structures. Numerous videos have been posted of Israeli bombing runs which clearly show the Israeli bomb causing a relatively small initial explosion followed by much larger secondary explosions. Some of the videos also show Palestinian missiles and other projectiles flying in all directions.

Here are two examples. On the left is video of an Israeli strike on December 27 against a hidden missile launcher. After the initial explosion a Palestinian missile flies out to the side and seems to impact in or near a populated area. The video on the right is of an Israeli strike on January 1st against a mosque in the Jabaliya refugee camp that was being used as a weapons storehouse. Right after the initial Israeli strike caused a small explosion, there were multiple huge secondary explosions as the stored Grad missiles and Qassam rockets detonated, and large amounts of ammunition cooked off:

Israeli strike on Dec. 27, 2008 against a hidden missile launcher; a Palestinian missile then seems to hit near a Palestinian neighborhood. Israeli strike on Jan. 1, 2009 against mosque in Jabaliya being used as a weapons depot, causing huge secondary explosions.
No doubt Palestinian civilians anywhere near the mosque were killed or injured by the multiple huge blasts and exploding ammunition and rockets. But it is difficult to see how Palestinians injured by Palestinian bombs and missiles can be blamed on Israel.

(updated 19 Jan 2009)

Voir également:

Chair à canon : Israël avertit les Palestiniens de quitter des zones qui vont être attaquées, le Hamas leur ordonne d’y retourner

Hélène Keller-Lind

Des Infos

13 juillet 2014

En ce 13 juillet 2014 on mesure à nouveau le déséquilibre moral vertigineux entre Israël qui suit à la lettre le droit de la guerre et le Hamas qui le bafoue sans vergogne. En effet, les Palestiniens vivant au nord de la Bande de Gaza dans des zones d’où sont tirées à l’aveuglette des dizaines de roquettes sur les populations civiles d’Israël, ont été avertis par Tsahal d’évacuer les lieux pour permettre une opération de nettoyage de cibles militaires sans faire de victimes civiles. Ce que nombreux Palestiniens font, se réfugiant dans des bâtiments de l’UNRWA. Le Hamas, qui utilise sa population comme boucliers humains, leur ordonne de retourner dans ces zones.

La terreur palestinienne et les répliques israéliennes

Pour la seule journée du 12 juillet 2014 plus de 129 roquettes ont été tirées depuis Gaza vers Israël.
117 roquettes au moins ont frappé Israël
9 roquettes ont été interceptées par le Dôme de Fer
Tsahal a frappé 120 cibles terroristes dans la Bande de Gaza

On est bien loin d’un soi-disant combat de David contre Goliath, le Hamas possédant un arsenal considérable. Fabriqué localement pour partie – d’où les restrictions israéliennes sur la nature des transferts à Gaza, qui se poursuivent actuellement en dépit des attaques terroristes – mais importé pour une plus grande partie. Fourni par l’Iran ou ses alliés, importé dans la Bande de Gaza via des tunnels de contrebande dont la construction est devenue une spécialité locale ayant bénéficié jusque récemment de complicités égyptiennes. L’Égypte aujourd’hui saisit ce type de matériel à destination de Gaza-.

L’Iran à Vienne et à Gaza

Le 13 juillet le Premier ministre Nétanyahou, lors de la réunion hebdomadaire du Cabinet ministériel, soulignait d’ailleurs,que alors que « les grandes puissances discutent aujourd’hui à Vienne de la question du programme nucléaire iranien » il convient de « leur rappeler que le Hamas et le Djihad Islamique sont financés, armés et entraînés par l’Iran, L’Iran est une puissance terroriste majeure..On ne peut permettre à cet Iran-là de pouvoir produire des matières fissiles pour des armes nucléaires. Si cela se produit ce que nous voyons se passer autour de nous et se passer dans le Moyen-Orient sera bien pire… ».

Israël avertit les populations civiles dans le respect du droit de la guerre

C’est dans ce contexte que Tsahal, se conformant au droit international et au droit de la guerre a averti le 12 juillet des Gazaouis du nord de la Bande de Gaza, qui vivent autour de rampes de lancement de roquettes et autres installations terroristes militaires de partir de chez eux avant midi le lendemain avant que soit lancée une opération pour les détruire. Ce que rapporte même l’agence de presse palestinienne Maan News.. Qui fait également état du départ de milliers de Palestiniens qui vont se réfugier dans des écoles ou des bâtiments de l’UNRWA. Ce qui montre d’ailleurs qu’ils savent que les tirs israéliens ne sont pas aveugles, à la différence des tirs lancés depuis Gaza.

Populations civiles palestiniennes qui sont de la chair à canon pour le Hamas

Et que fait le Hamas ? Son ministère de l’Intérieur ordonne à ces Palestiniens de regagner immédiatement leur domicile, affirmant que ces avertissements entreraient dans le cadre d’une guerre psychologique et ne sont pas à prendre au sérieux, alors qu’il sait pertinemment que tel n’est pas le cas…., Le mouvement terroriste qui utilise sa population comme boucliers humains démontre une fois encore son peu de respect pour leurs vies. Les Gazaouis n’étant pour lui que de la chair à canon. Ce que dénonçait à nouveau en ces termes Benjamin Netanyahou lors de la réunion de son Cabinet ministériel du 13 juillet 2014 « Qui se cache dans les mosquées ? Le Hamas. Qui met ses arsenaux sous des hôpitaux ? Le Hamas. Qui met des centres de commandement dans des résidences ou à proximité de jardins d’enfants ? Le Hamas. Le Hamas utilise les habitants de Gaza comme boucliers humains et provoque un désastre pour les civils de Gaza ; donc, pour toute attaque contre des civils de Gaza, ce que nous regrettons, le Hamas et ses partenaires sont seuls responsables ».

Pour faire bonne mesure le Hamas terrorise aussi sa population en faisant assassiner en pleine rue dans la ville de Gaza, par ’des combattants palestiniens’, sans autre forme de procès, un homme accusé d’être ’un collaborateur’,

Israël laisse sortir binationaux et malades graves et laisse entrer des biens de première nécessité

On notera que les binationaux qui le choisissent peuvent quitter la Bande de Gaza par le passage d’Erez et sont des centaines à le faire. Des patients palestiniens continuent à y transiter pour aller se faire soigner en Israël et des biens de première nécessité entrent dan la Bande de Gaza par le passage de Keren Shalom. On trouvera tous les détails de ces livraisons ici.

On rappellera également qu’une grande partie de l’eau potable et de l’électricité consommés dans la Bande de Gaza sont fournis par Israël.

Voir également:

Fourth Lesson From the Gaza War: Don’t Trust Body Counts and Hamas Propaganda
Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn
The Algemeiner
July 15, 2014

News media coverage of the Gaza war is increasingly focusing on the body count.

It’s an easy way to make Israel look bad. And it tends to obscure who the real aggressor in this conflict is, and who is the real victim.

Each day, journalists report an ever-higher number of Gazans who have been killed, comparing it to the number of Israeli fatalities, which is still, thank G-d, zero. This kind of simplistic reporting creates a sympathetic portrayal of the Palestinians, who are shown to be genuinely suffering, while the Israeli public just seems a little scared.

But there are important reasons why there are so many more Palestinian casualties than Israeli casualties.

The first is that the Israeli government has built bomb shelters for its citizens, so they have places to hide when the Palestinians fire missiles at them. By contrast, the Hamas regime in Gaza refuses to build shelters for the general population, and prefers to spend its money buying and making more missiles.

It’s not merely that Hamas has no regard for the lives of its own citizens. But even worse: Hamas deliberately places its civilians in the line of fire, in the expectation that Palestinian civilian casualties will generate international sympathy.

On July 10, the Hamas Ministry of the Interior issued an official instruction to the public to remain in their apartments, and “and not heed these message from Israel” that their apartment buildings are about to be bombed.

A New York Times report on July 11 described in sympathetic detail how seven Gazans were killed, and many others wounded, in an Israeli strike despite multiple advance warnings by Israel to vacate the premises. In the 18th paragraph of the 21-paragraph feature, the Times noted, in passing: “A member of the family said earlier that neighbors had come to ‘form a human shield.’ ”

Isn’t that outrageous? Israel voluntarily gives up the advantage of surprise in order to warn Palestinian civilians and save their lives. Hamas responds by trying to ensure that Palestinian civilians get killed. And the international community chastises Israel for the Palestinian fatalities!

Another reason there are so many more Palestinian casualties is that Hamas deliberately places its missile-launchers and arms depots in and around civilian neighborhoods. Hamas hopes that Israel will be reluctant to strike such targets because of the possibility of hitting civilians. Hezbollah does the same thing in southern Lebanon. This is by now an old Arab terrorist tactic, going back more than three decades.

“One must understand how our enemy operates,” Prime Minister Netanyahu pointed out at the most recent cabinet meeting. “Who hides in mosques? Hamas. Who puts arsenals under hospitals? Hamas. Who puts command centers in residences or near kindergartens? Hamas. Hamas is using the residents of Gaza as human shields and it is bringing disaster to the civilians of Gaza; therefore, for any attack on Gaza civilians, which we regret, Hamas and its partners bear sole responsibility.”

The final reason the Palestinian casualty toll is higher than that of Israel is that Israel has a superior army, and it’s winning this war. Those who win wars almost always have fewer casualties than those who are defeated. In Israel’s case, that’s a good thing. Israel need not feel guilty or defensive about winning. It’s a lot better than losing, as the Jewish people have learned from centuries of bitter experience as helpless victims.

Anyone with knowledge of history can appreciate how misleading casualty statistics can be. In World War II, the United States suffered about 360,000 military deaths. The Germans lost 3.2-million soldiers and 3.6-million civilians. Does that mean America was the aggressor, and Germany the victim? Japan estimates that it suffered 1 million military deaths and 2 million civilian deaths. Does that mean America attacked Japan, and not vice versa?

The fourth lesson from the Gaza war: The body count is a form of Arab propaganda, which actually conceals who is the aggressor and who is the victim.

Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn are members of the board of the Religious Zionists of America.

Gaza : les "tunnels de la terreur", cibles de l’offensive israélienne
Les galeries souterraines creusées par le Hamas sont la priorité de l’opération terrestre lancée le 17 juillet par l’armée israélienne, mais aussi une source de ravitaillement pour les Gazaouis malgré le blocus.
Louis Boy

Le Point

19/07/2014

"La décision de réoccuper Gaza n’a pas été prise." A en croire le ministre de la Sécurité publique israélien, l’offensive terrestre entamée par l’armée israélienne dans la nuit du jeudi 17 au vendredi 18 juillet n’est qu’une opération temporaire, même si Benyamin Nétanyahou s’est dit prêt à l'"élargir de manière significative".

Depuis le début des frappes aériennes, le 8 juillet, l’objectif affiché est le même : mettre le Hamas hors d’état de nuire aux Israéliens. Mais Tsahal semble avoir estimé que les frappes aériennes ne suffiraient pas pour détruire un des atouts principaux du mouvement palestinien : son réseau de souterrains, que le Premier ministre a surnommé les "tunnels de la terreur".
Une attaque souterraine déjouée le 17 juillet

C’est une attaque du Hamas qui semble avoir convaincu Israël de frapper ces tunnels, ou du moins lui avoir fourni le prétexte parfait. Dans la journée qui a précédé l’offensive terrestre, 13 combattants du Hamas pénètrent en Israël en empruntant un de leurs souterrains, à proximité d’un kibboutz. Repérés, ils sont repoussés par des soldats et l’armée de l’air avant de rebrousser chemin. Pour le porte-parole de l’armée, c’est "une attaque terroriste majeure" qui vient d’être déjouée.

Il faut dire que le réseau souterrain du Hamas a de quoi inquiéter Israël. "Des dizaines de tunnels parcourent la bande de Gaza, affirme Tsahal. Il s’agit d’un réseau sophistiqué, très bien entretenu, qui relie des ateliers de construction de roquettes, des rampes de lancement et des postes de commandement." A une vingtaine de mètres sous terre, ils sont parfois équipés du téléphone et de l’électricité. Les galeries, dont la construction peut prendre des années, sont devenues une fierté pour le Hamas, expliquait un ancien responsable de l’armée israélienne au journal Haaretz. Une de ces galeries, découverte par l’armée israélienne en 2013, est visible dans cette vidéo (non sous-titrée) de la chaîne américaine CNN.

Contrebande avec l’Egypte

Certains tunnels aboutissent en plein territoire israélien. Des habitants du sud du pays affirment même entendre des bruits de forage la nuit sous le sol de leurs maisons. Les responsables de l’armée israélienne craignent donc que le Hamas utilise ce réseau pour lancer des attaques en contournant le dispositif de sécurité qui borde la bande de Gaza. En 2006, c’est par ces tunnels que s’étaient évaporés les ravisseurs du soldat israélien Gilad Shalit.

Pourtant, ces tunnels n’avaient, au départ, pas une vocation militaire. Ils apparaissent en 1979 quand la ville de Rafah est divisée en deux : une moitié dans le sud de la bande de Gaza, l’autre moitié sous contrôle égyptien. Les tunnels relient alors les deux côtés de la frontière, et servent à transporter des marchandises de contrebande, voire de la drogue. Un rôle de contrebande qui s’est renforcé depuis 2007 et la mise en place d’un blocus de Gaza par l’Egypte et Israël, en réaction à l’élection du Hamas à la tête de la région. Depuis, les tunnels se sont multipliés, essentiellement à la frontière avec l’Egypte, et sont devenus un lien vital avec l’extérieur. Une partie d’entre eux, les plus secrets, sert aussi à acheminer des combattants et des armes pour le Hamas.
1 400 tunnels détruits par les Egyptiens

Un réseau qui s’est grandement affaibli en 2013, quand le nouveau pouvoir égyptien, hostile au Hamas, décide de s’attaquer aux tunnels. Près de 1 400 d’entre eux sont bouchés entre 2013 et mars 2014, selon l’armée égyptienne. Un chiffre qui témoigne de l’étendue du réseau. Depuis, l’approvisionnement de Gaza en nourriture, en matériaux de construction ou encore en carburant s’est fortement compliqué, affaiblissant aussi le Hamas.

Pour le site américain Vox, l’objectif officiel de l’opération militaire israélienne ces dernières semaines – affaiblir les infrastructures du Hamas – pourrait signifier qu’elle souhaite ne pas s’attaquer uniquement aux tunnels qui mènent en Israël, comme annoncé, mais bien à la totalité du réseau, y compris les tunnels que l’Egypte "pourrait avoir manqués". De quoi rendre encore plus pesant le blocus sur Gaza et, peut-être, porter un coup fatal au Hamas.

Voir encore:

Septième leçon de la guerre de Gaza: Nous devons démilitariser Gaza

Moshe Phillips and Benyamin Korn

The Algeimeiner

traduction Europe Israël

juil 20, 2014
Septième leçon de la guerre de Gaza: Nous devons démilitariser Gaza

Un exemple des tunnels terroristes et de contrebande du Hamas entre le poste frontière de Rafah avec l’Egypte et la bande de Gaza.

Un simple cessez-le-feu à Gaza laisserait au Hamas le temps de réarmer et de renouveler ses activités terroristes.

La démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza mettrait fin aux activités terroristes du Hamas.

Quel but est le plus logique?

Le président Barack Obama et le secrétaire d’Etat John Kerry travaillent dur pour parvenir à un cessez-le-feu entre Israël et le Hamas. Cet effort est à courte vue – et pire encore. Un simple cessez-le-feu serait de facto une victoire pour le Hamas. Il donnerait au Hamas le temps et l’espace de respiration dont il a besoin pour faire passer plus d’armes, réparer ses tunnels terroristes, et lancer de nouvelles attaques terroristes contre Israël. Il ne durerait que pour mieux prolonger la guerre.

Lorsque le Premier ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahu a accepté le 15 Juillet la proposition de cessez-le-feu, il a expliqué sa décision en ces termes: « Nous avons accepté la proposition égyptienne afin de permettre la démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza – de ses missiles, roquettes et tunnels – par des moyens diplomatiques. »
Ainsi, Netanyahu a déclaré lors d’une conférence de presse télévisée le 16 Juillet:«La chose la plus importante vis-à-vis de Gaza est de s’assurer que l’enclave soit démilitarisée».

terror1Voici les sous-sols de la ville de Shuja’iya que les israéliens ont bombardés cette nuit : tout un arsenal et des postes de commandement terroristes sous les immeubles d’habitation, la mosquée et l’hôpital.

Dans un plan présenté au bureau du premier ministre et au Comité Knesset des Affaires étrangères et de la Défense la semaine dernière, l’ancien ministre de la Défense, Shaul Mofaz, a présenté un plan détaillé pour la démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza.

De même, Tony Blair, l’ancien Premier ministre britannique qui est maintenant l’envoyé du Quartet pour le Moyen-Orient, a déclaré sur la chaîne israélienne TV 10 le 15 Juillet qu’il doit y avoir un « plan à long terme pour Gaza … qui traite des exigences de la sécurité réelle d’Israël de façon permanente … le Hamas ne peut pas poursuivre l’infrastructure militaire dont il dispose. »

Certes, nettoyer Gaza de ses armes et de son infrastructure militaire ne serait pas une tâche facile, compte tenu du vaste arsenal que le Hamas a amassé depuis le dernier cessez-le-feu il y a deux ans. Au début de la guerre actuelle, le Hamas avait environ 10.000 roquettes à portée de main. Ces missiles sont plus sophistiqués que les années précédentes, ils transportent des charges lourdes d’explosifs et peuvent atteindre Israël partout, même jusqu’à Nahariya, le long de la frontière nord d’Israël avec le Liban.

Le Hamas a également des drones armés. Il a d’énormes dépôts d’armes et des laboratoires de fabrication de bombes. Il a des tunnels en béton où les terroristes se cachent et où passent les armes qui sont introduites en contrebande.

En mars de cette année, la marine israélienne a intercepté un navire d’armes iranien à destination de Gaza. Cachées sous des sacs de ciment de fabrication iranienne il y avait des dizaines de roquettes M-302 sol-sol d’une portée de 75 à 150 km. (Remarque: la distance entre la bande de Gaza à Tel-Aviv est de 60 km.) La cache d’armes comprenait également près de 200 obus de mortier, et 400 000 cartouches de munitions. En 2009 et à nouveau en 2011, Israël a bombardé les convois d’armes transportées du Soudan à Gaza.

Qui sait combien d’autres de ces livraisons d’armes iraniennes ou soudanaises ont réussi à échapper aux Israéliens et à atteindre Gaza?

Ce n’est pas seulement un problème pour Israël. C’est un problème pour l’ensemble du monde libre. Israël est en première ligne dans la guerre internationale contre le terrorisme. Gaza n’est qu’un champ de bataille. Comme nous le savons depuis longtemps, ce qui commence à Gaza ou Bagdad ou Kaboul se propage vite à Londres, Madrid et New York.

La communauté internationale a démontré que quand elle rassemble sa volonté, elle peut désarmer les terroristes. Une pression internationale sévère et des sanctions ont contraint la Syrie à entamer le démantèlement de ses armes chimiques l’année dernière. La pression et la fermeté britannique ont entraîné le désarmement des terroristes de l’IRA. Peut-être que cette expérience est à l’origine de l’appel de l’ancien Premier ministre Tony Blair pour le démantèlement de l’infrastructure terroriste du Hamas dans la bande de Gaza.

Au lieu de continuer à verser des milliards de dollars d’aide financière dans le trou noir connu sous le nom de «économie de Gaza», la communauté internationale doit porter son attention sur les armes de Gaza. Il est temps à l’instar de ce que l’Irlande a réussi et des progrès faits en Syrie, de démilitariser la bande de Gaza. Les habitants de Gaza ont besoin de beurre, et non pas de munitions, et les gens du monde libre ont besoin de paix, et non pas de terrorisme.

La septième leçon de la guerre de Gaza: la démilitarisation de la bande de Gaza, pas un cessez le feu, doit être l’objectif non seulement d’Israël, mais de l’ensemble du monde libre.

Moshe Phillips et Benyamin Korn sont membres du conseil des sionistes religieux d’Amérique.

Voir de même:

Gaza: les tunnels de la terreur financés par l’Union Européenne
Jean Vercors

JSSNews

20 juillet 2014

Depuis son arrivée au pouvoir en janvier 2006, le Hamas a lancé plus de 10,000 missiles et roquettes sur la population civile d’Israël. Le Hamas, est considéré par le Quartet (Etats-Unis, Russie, UN et Union européenne, Australie, Canada, Japon) comme un mouvement terroriste.

L’idéologie et les objectifs de ce mouvement sont contenus dans sa charte, adoptée le 18 août 1988. Les buts du Hamas sont la destruction de l’Etat d’Israël et la création d’un Etat islamique en Palestine, avec Jérusalem comme capitale. Le Hamas se base entièrement sur l’islam et considère que le territoire palestinien dans son ensemble, ce qui inclut donc l’Etat d’Israël, est une terre islamique.

La population de gaza a voté majoritairement pour le Hamas, ils ont choisi des leaders terroristes et irresponsables.

La population civile paie la note du Hamas qu’ils ont élu massivement.

99.9% des gazaouïs approuvent toutes les actions du Hamas, le 0.10% est au cimetière.

L’UE est le principal bailleur de fonds de l’Autorité palestinienne et fournit chaque année plus de 450 millions de dollars par an d’aide directe. Sans compter les aides « privées » des Etats et des collectivités et sans compter également les dons faits aux organisations islamiques et arabes qui pullulent en France en faveur des palestiniens.

De nombreuses associations dites caritatives comme : le Comité de Bienfaisance et de Solidarité avec la Palestine, la Fondation Al-Aksa, le Holy Land Foundation for Relief and Development, le Palestinians’ Relief and Development Fund (Interpal) et le Palestine and Lebanon Relief Fund, actifs respectivement en France, en Allemagne, aux Etats-Unis et en Grande-Bretagne, servent ainsi au Hamas à récolter des fonds, sous couvert de solidarité et de charité.

L’offensive terrestre décidée par le gouvernement israélien vise à « frapper les tunnels de la terreur allant de Gaza jusqu’en Israël » et protéger ses citoyens.

A l’origine destinés à la contrebande des marchandises, les tunnels ont très vite été utilisés par les terroristes islamistes pour faire passer des armes de guerre via la frontière avec l’Egypte. En 2013, l’armée égyptienne sous l’égide de Mohamed Morsi, a décidé d’inonder les tunnels de contrebande pour « renforcer la sécurité à la frontière ». Une véritable foutaise de la part des autorités égyptiennes, alors issues comme le Hamas de la confrérie des Frères musulmans.

Avec donc l’argent des contribuables Européens, le Hamas a pu construire de nombreux tunnels reliant la bande de Gaza à Israël. L’objectif était de déjouer les systèmes de surveillance israéliens pour infiltrer des terroristes en vue de commettre des attentats dans des localités et prendre des otages Israéliens.

Plusieurs tunnels pénétraient « de plusieurs centaines de mètres en territoire israélien » construits pour mener des « attaques terroristes ».

Les tunnels étaient construits avec des dalles de béton et à une profondeur de 5 à 10 mètres.
Le réseau souterrain du Hamas est très sophistiqué, très bien entretenu, il relie des ateliers de construction de missiles et roquettes, des rampes de lancement et des postes de commandement.

Plus de 600.000 tonnes de béton et de fer qui auraient pu vous servir a construire des écoles, des routes, des hôpitaux ont servi au Hamas a construire des tunnels en dessous des écoles, mosquées et Hôpitaux et en territoire Israélien.
Pendant que des millions d’Européens vivent dans la misère, l’UE préfère financer les tunnels du terrorisme palestinien

Et La France, toujours prête à jouer les bons samaritains par l’intermédiaire de ses différents intervenants, consacre 7M€ par an aux collectivités territoriales palestiniennes : 2 M€ sont mobilisés annuellement par les collectivités françaises pour financer des projets, et 5M€ par l’Etat, via l’Agence Française de Développement (AFD)
La France accordait en mars 2012, 10M€ aux palestiniens pour la construction d’une usine de dessalement dans la bande de Gaza.

Où est donc passée cette usine?

Les télévisions du monde montrent sans relâche des images de Gazaouis blessés et morts comme si la responsabilité incombait à Israël.

Le Hamas utilise des boucliers humains pour se protéger de la riposte Israélienne.

De nombreux journalistes et photographes cherchent désespérément la photo parfaite : Celle de la petite poupée d’enfant soigneusement posée sur les débris d’une maison du Hamas bombardée la veille par l’aviation Israélienne.

Les Palestiniens ont choisi la terreur et la guerre, je ne vais pas pleurer pour eux. Il fallait réfléchir avant.

Aux Palestiniens, « Si le Hamas est un vaillant combattant, un vrai résistant, qu’il sorte de ses bunkers planqués sous vos maisons et viennent nous affronter »

Voir aussi:

IDF shows photos of alleged Hamas rocket sites dug into hospital, mosques
By Yaakov Lappin/ Reuters
Jerusalem Post

07/21/2014 16:06
inShare2
The images were taken from the northeastern Gaza City neighborhood of Shejaia, which was the scene of heavy fighting in recent days.

The IDF on Monday released declassified photos showing how Hamas uses hospitals, mosques, and playgrounds as rocket launch sites.

The images were taken from the northeastern Gaza City neighborhood of Shejaia, which was the scene of heavy fighting in recent days.

Israel’s army said it had been targeting militants in the clashes, charging that they had fired rockets from Shejaia and built tunnels and command centers there. The army said it had warned civilians to leave two days earlier.

Sounds of explosions rocked Gaza City through the morning, with residents reporting heavy fighting in Shejaia and the adjacent Zeitoun neighborhood. Locals also said there was heavy shelling in Beit Hanoun, in the northern Gaza Strip.

"It seems we are heading towards a massacre in Beit Hanoun. They drove us out of our houses with their fire. We carried our kids and ran away," said Abu Ahmed, he did not want to give his full name for fear of Israeli reprisals.

The Islamist group Hamas and its allies fired multiple missiles across southern and central Israel, and heavy fighting was reported in the north and east of Gaza.

Non-stop attacks lifted the Palestinian death toll to 496, including almost 100 children, since fighting started on July 8, Gaza health officials said. Israel says 18 of its soldiers have also died along with two civilians.

Despite worldwide calls for a cessation of the worst bout of Palestinian-Israeli violence for more than five years, Israeli ministers ruled out any swift truce.

"This is not the time to talk of a ceasefire," said Gilad Erdan, communications minister and a member of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s inner security cabinet.

Voir enfin:

Tunnels Matter More Than Rockets to Hamas
The terror group wants to infiltrate Israel to grab hostages and stage attacks as in Mumbai in 2008.
Michael B. Mukasey
The Wall Street Journal
July 20, 2014

Early in the current clash between Hamas and Israel, much of the drama was in the air. The Palestinian terrorist group launched hundreds of rockets at Israel, and Israel responded by knocking down rockets in the sky with its Iron Dome defense system and by bombing the rocket-launch sites in Gaza. But the real story has been underground. Hamas’s tunnels into Israel are potentially much more dangerous than its random rocket barrages.

Israel started a ground offensive against Hamas in Gaza on Thursday, intending to destroy Hamas’s tunnel network. The challenge became obvious on Saturday when eight Palestinian fighters wearing Israeli military uniforms emerged from a tunnel 300 yards inside Israel and killed two Israeli soldiers in a firefight. One of the Palestinian fighters was killed before the others fled through the tunnel back to Gaza.

According to Yigal Carmon, who heads the Middle East Media Research Institute, his organization’s monitoring of published material and discussions with Israeli officials indicate that Hamas’s tunnels—and not the well-publicized episode of kidnapping and murder involving young Israelis and a Palestinian teenager—were the spark for the conflict.

Consider: On July 5 Israeli planes damaged a tunnel dug by Hamas that ran for several kilometers from inside the Gaza Strip. The tunnel emerged near an Israeli kibbutz named Kerem Shalom —vineyard of peace.

That Israeli strike presented Hamas with a dilemma, because the tunnel was one of scores that the group had dug at great cost. Were the Israelis specifically aware of the tunnel or had their strike been a random guess? Several members of the Hamas military leadership came to inspect the damage the following day, July 6. A later official Israeli report said that the Hamas inspectors were killed in a "work accident." But what if the Israelis had been waiting for the follow-up and struck again?

Hamas now saw its strategic plan unraveling. The tunnel network gave it the ability to launch a coordinated attack within Israel like the 2008 Islamist rampage in Mumbai that killed 164 people. Recall that in 2011 Israel released more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners, more than 200 of whom were under a life sentence for planning and perpetrating terror attacks. They were exchanged for one Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, who had been taken hostage in a cross-border raid by Hamas. Imagine the leverage that Hamas could have achieved by sneaking fighters through the tunnels and taking hostages throughout Israel; the terrorists intercepted Saturday night were carrying tranquilizers and handcuffs.

If the Israeli strike on the tunnel near the Kerem Shalom kibbutz presaged a drive to destroy the entire network—the jewel of Hamas’s war-planning—the terrorist group must have been thrown into a panic. Because by this summer Hamas was already in desperate political straits.

For years Hamas was receiving weapons and funding from Shiite Iran and Syria, under the banner of militant resistance to Israel. But when Mohammed Morsi became president of Egypt in June 2012, Hamas abandoned its relationship with Iran and Syria and took up instead with Mr. Morsi and the Sunni Muslim Brotherhood. Hamas also took up with Turkey and Qatar, also Sunni states, describing them at one point as the saviors of Hamas. Former benefactors Syria and Iran then called Hamas traitorous for abandoning the resistance-to-Israel camp.

The Hamas romance with Mr. Morsi was especially galling to Shiite-led Iran and Syria. The Shiites are only 10% of the world’s Muslims, and neither Iran nor Syria welcomed the loss of a patron to Sunni Egypt. The coup that removed Mr. Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood regime in June 2013 brought a chill in Egypt’s relationship with Hamas that has kept Egypt’s border with Gaza closed, denying Hamas that route of supply.

But Iran and Syria did not rush to embrace their former beneficiary. When Hamas tried to re-ingratiate itself with Iran this May, its political bureau head, Khaled Mash’al, was denied an audience in Tehran and could only meet a minor diplomat in Qatar. On June 26 the Iranian website Tabnak posted an article titled, "Mr. Mash’al, Answer the Following Questions Before Asking for Help." The questions included: "How can Iran go back to trusting an organization that turned its back on the Syrian regime after it sat in Damascus for years and received all kinds of assistance?" and "How can we trust an organization that enjoyed Iranian support for years and then described Turkey and Qatar as its saviors?"

So on July 6, Hamas stood politically isolated and strategically vulnerable. It had lost the financial support of Egypt and could not get renewed support from Iran in the measure it needed. To some in the organization it appeared that Hamas had only one card to play—and on July 7 it played that card with rockets. As to the tunnels, last Thursday Israeli forces intercepted 13 armed terrorists as they emerged from a tunnel near Kibbutz Sufa in Israel.

There are other messages out there for the Palestinians instead of the violent one sent by Hamas. Writing in the London-based Arabic daily Al Hayat on July 12, Saudi intellectual Abdallah Hamid al-Din, no friend of Israel, urged Palestinians to abandon as unrealistic demands for a right of return, and to forgo as hypocritical calls to boycott Israel:

"The only way to stop Israel is peace. . . . Israel does not want peace, because it does not need it. But the Palestinians do. Therefore it is necessary to persist with efforts to impose peace. No other option exists. True resistance is resistance to illusions and false hopes, and no longer leaning on the past in building the future. Real resistance is to silently endure the handshake of your enemy so as to enable your people to learn and to live."

Plenty of others are sending the same message today. Whether Palestinians will listen is another matter.

Mr. Mukasey served as U.S. attorney general (2007-09) and as a U.S. district judge for the Southern District of New York (1988-2006).


Algérie: Non à la judaïsation ! (What about the other nakbas? : while salafists protest proposed reopening of the few remaining Algerian synagogues)

17 juillet, 2014
http://scd.rfi.fr/sites/filesrfi/imagecache/rfi_16x9_1024_578/sites/images.rfi.fr/files/aef_image/000_PAR2005052589558_0.jpg

Une ancienne synagogue, à Tlemcen, en Algérie, aujourd’hui transformée en école d’arts martiaux

http://jssnews.com/content/assets/2014/07/roquette.jpg

Une ancienne synagogue, à Paris, en France, aujourd’hui transformée en ambassade

http://sonofeliyahu.com/Images/Jewish%20Population.jpg
http://static.dreuz.info/wp-content/uploads/BsnTYzPCAAAebRp-500x351.jpghttps://pbs.twimg.com/media/Bsq5OXZCEAAfS8J.jpg:largeVous aimerez l’étranger, car vous avez été étrangers dans le pays d’Égypte. Deutéronome 10: 19
On admet généralement que toutes les civilisations ou cultures devraient être traitées comme si elles étaient identiques. Dans le même sens, il s’agirait de nier des choses qui paraissent pourtant évidentes dans la supériorité du judaïque et du chrétien sur le plan de la victime. Mais c’est dans la loi juive qu’il est dit: tu accueilleras l’étranger car tu as été toi-même exilé, humilié, etc. Et ça, c’est unique. Je pense qu’on n’en trouvera jamais l’équivalent mythique. On a donc le droit de dire qu’il apparaît là une attitude nouvelle qui est une réflexion sur soi. On est alors quand même très loin des peuples pour qui les limites de l’humanité s’arrêtent aux limites de la tribu. (…)  Mais il faut distinguer deux choses. Il y a d’abord le texte chrétien qui pénètre lentement dans la conscience des hommes. Et puis il y a la façon dont les hommes l’interprètent. De ce point de vue, il est évident que le Moyen Age n’interprétait pas le christianisme comme nous. Mais nous ne pouvons pas leur en faire le reproche. Pas plus que nous pouvons faire le reproche aux Polynésiens d’avoir été cannibales. Parce que cela fait partie d’un développement historique. (…) Il faut commencer par se souvenir que le nazisme s’est lui-même présenté comme une lutte contre la violence: c’est en se posant en victime du traité de Versailles que Hitler a gagné son pouvoir. Et le communisme lui aussi s’est présenté comme une défense des victimes. Désormais, c’est donc seulement au nom de la lutte contre la violence qu’on peut commettre la violence. Autrement dit, la problématique judaïque et chrétienne est toujours incorporée à nos déviations. (…)  Et notre souci des victimes, pris dans son ensemble comme réalité, n’a pas d’équivalent dans l’histoire des sociétés humaines. (…) Le souci des victimes a (…) unifié le monde. René Girard
L’existence d’Israël pose le problème du droit de vivre en sujets libre et souverains des nations non musulmanes dans l’aire musulmane. L’extermination des Arméniens, d’abord par l’empire ottoman, puis par le nouvel Etat turc a représenté la première répression d’une population dhimmie en quête d’indépendance nationale. Il n’y a quasiment plus de Juifs aujourd’hui dans le monde arabo-islamique et les chrétiens y sont en voie de disparition. Shmuel Trigano
Quand les synagogues se comportent comme des ambassades il n’est pas étonnant qu’elles subissent les mêmes attaques qu’une ambassade. Pierre Minnaert
Je ne vois pas comment on peut lutter contre la dérive antisémite de jeunes de banlieue quand les synagogues soutiennent Israël. Pierre Minaert
Moi je ne pousse à rien, je constate, et je constate aussi la hausse d’un discours anti juifs chez jeunes maghrébins qui s’explique. Pierre Minnaert ‏
 Quand les rabbins mettent Dieu dans un camp comment s’étonner qu’ils soient attaqués par l’autre ? Ils renforcent l’antisémitisme. Pierre Minnaert
Ils sont environ 7 000 à défiler dans les rues de Paris, ce dimanche 13 juillet, entre Barbès et la Bastille, pour dire leur solidarité avec les Palestiniens. Le parcours a été négocié par les responsables du NPA (Nouveau parti anticapitaliste), l’organisation héritière de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire. Pourquoi avoir exigé un parcours qui s’achève à proximité du quartier du Marais, connu pour abriter plusieurs lieux de culte juif ? Le fait est que les responsables de la Préfecture de police l’ont validé. Parmi les manifestants, de nombreuses femmes, souvent voilées, mais surtout des jeunes venus de la banlieue francilienne. Les premiers slogans ciblent Israël, mais aussi la "complicité française". Très vite, les « Allah Akbar » (Dieu est grand) dominent, donnant une tonalité fortement religieuse au cortège. La préfecture de police ne s’attendait pas à une telle mobilisation, mais ses responsables ont vu large au niveau du maintien de l’ordre, puisque cinq "forces mobiles", gendarmes et CRS confondues, ont été mobilisées. C’est à priori suffisant pour sécuriser tous les lieux juifs le long du parcours. Aucune dégradation, aucun incident n’est signalé en marge du cortège, jusqu’à l’arrivée à proximité de la Bastille. Un premier mouvement de foule est observé à la hauteur de la rue des Tournelles, qui abrite une synagogue. Les gendarmes bloquent la voie et parviennent sans difficulté à refouler les assaillants vers le boulevard Beaumarchais. Place de la Bastille, la dispersion commence, accélérée par une ondée, lorsque des jeunes décident de s’en prendre aux forces de l’ordre. De petites grappes s’engouffrent vers les rues adjacentes. Se donnent-ils le mot ? Ils sont entre 200 et 300 à marcher en direction de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette… où se tient un rassemblement pour la paix en Israël, en présence du grand rabbin. Les organisateurs affirment avoir alerté le commissariat de police, mais l’information n’est apparemment pas remontée jusqu’à la Préfecture de police. Détail important : s’ils avaient su, les responsables du maintien de l’ordre auraient forcément barré l’accès à la rue. Les choses se compliquent très vite, car les manifestants ne sont pas les seuls à vouloir en découdre. Une petite centaine de membres de la LDJ (ligue de défense juive) sont positionnés devant la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette, casques de moto sur la tête et outils (armes blanches) à portée de main. Loin de rester passive, la petite troupe monte au contact des manifestants, comme ils l’ont déjà fait lors d’une manifestation pro-palestinienne organisée Place Saint-Michel quelques jours auparavant. On frôle la bagarre générale, mais la police parvient à s’interposer. Les assaillants refluent vers le boulevard, tandis que les militants juifs reviennent vers la synagogue. Frédéric Ploquin
Une équipe qui a su non seulement séduire au-delà des frontières, mais donner à l’Allemagne une autre image d’elle-même : multiculturelle, ouverte et aimée à l’étranger. Sur les 23 joueurs de la sélection de Joachim Löw, onze sont d’origine étrangère. Outre le trio d’origine polonaise (Piotr Trochowski, Miroslav Klose, Lukas Podolski), qui depuis longtemps n’est plus considéré comme exotique, évoluent sur le terrain Marko Marin, Jérôme Boateng, Dennis Aogo, Sami Khedira ou encore deux joueurs d’origine turque : Serdar Tasci et le jeune prodige Mesut Özil. Tous les observateurs, en Allemagne, s’accordent à reconnaître que cette arrivée de nouveaux talents "venus d’ailleurs" fait beaucoup de bien à l’équipe. "Cela lui donne une aptitude à l’engagement, une envie de reconnaissance, vis-à-vis d’eux-mêmes mais également vis-à-vis des autres", déclarait le ministre de l’intérieur Thomas de Maizière à la Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung. Pour Bastian Schweinsteiger, talentueux milieu de terrain, "les diverses influences vivifient l’équipe, elles lui donnent un tout autre tempérament". Une diversité qui fait également beaucoup de bien au pays. A Kreuzberg, le quartier de Berlin où vit la plus importante communauté turque du pays, on défend depuis le début du mondial les couleurs de la Mannschaft. "Les performances des jeunes donnent à notre travail un élan énorme", se réjouit Gül Keskinler, une Turque chargée de l’intégration à la Fédération allemande de football. "L’exemple de Mesut Özil est à cet égard particulièrement important, souligne-t-elle. Les footballeurs ont, à travers leur fonction d’exemple, un rôle très fort, ils sont des ambassadeurs pour la jeunesse." Dans les rues de Berlin, pas de célébration pourtant d’un esprit de fraternité "black blanc beur" tel qu’avait pu le connaître la France après sa victoire au Mondial de 1998. Pour beaucoup d’Allemands, le maillot est rassembleur : peu importe l’origine des joueurs, à la première victoire ils ont été adoptés sans cérémonie. La diversité n’est qu’un élément parmi d’autres dans l’impression de renouveau que donne l’équipe d’Allemagne. "La diversité montre surtout que l’Allemagne va enfin chercher son inspiration ailleurs, estime Holger Cesnat, 35 ans. Le style de l’équipe a changé, il est plus léger, parce que Joachim Löw observe le football pratiqué au-delà des frontières et a rompu avec le style qui prédominait dans le football allemand jusqu’ici." Le Monde
Cela a commencé en 2006, c’était la première fois qu’on osait être fier de son pays, fier de son équipe, cela a libéré beaucoup de choses. Rainer Stich
C’est la première fois que l’équipe est si appréciée à l’étranger. Même en Israël on trouve la Mannschaft sympathique. C’est un sentiment auquel nous ne sommes pas habitués. Emilie Parker
 Cette idée de la France ‘black blanc beur’, c’est quelque chose qui les a beaucoup marqués pour révolutionner leur football. Jean-Jacques Bourdin (RMC)
La danse des Gauchos était de mauvais goût (…) Subitement, la modestie allemande a disparu dans le triomphe. Tagesspiegel (quotidien berlinois)
Plusieurs médias allemands critiquaient mercredi la «Nationalmannschaft» championne du monde pour avoir interprété lors des célébrations du titre mardi à Berlin une danse moquant les adversaires argentins vaincus en finale (1-0 a.p.). Mimant des Argentins courbés, comme par le désespoir et le poids de la défaite, six joueurs de l’équipe ont chanté : «ainsi marchent les Gauchos, les Gauchos marchent ainsi». Puis se relevant bien droits et fiers, ils ont continué : «Ainsi marchent les Allemands, les Allemands marchent ainsi». Ils ont répété la séquence plusieurs fois sous les applaudissements, dans un pays où toute expression ostentatoire de fierté nationale reste sujet à controverse. Libération
Maybe to explain what they sing. They sing: "So gehen die Gauchos, die Gauchos die gehen so. So gehen die Deutschen, die Deutschen die gehen so." ("That’s how the Gauchos walk, the Gauchos walk like this. That’s how the Germans walk, the Germans walk like this.") And it’s important to note that this song is a very common song in Germany for teasing the team that has lost the match. So they didn’t make an entirely new song up by themselves. Reddit
Israël existe et continuera à exister jusqu’à ce que l’islam l’abroge comme il a abrogé ce qui l’a précédé. Hasan al-Bannâ (préambule de la charte du Hamas, 1988)
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique est un mouvement palestinien spécifique qui fait allégeance à Allah et à sa voie, l’islam. Il lutte pour hisser la bannière de l’islam sur chaque pouce de la Palestine. Charte du Hamas (Article six)
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Cela prouve le caractère de notre noble peuple, combattant du djihad, qui défend ses droits et ses demeures le torse nu, avec son sang. La politique d’un peuple qui affronte les avions israéliens la poitrine nue, pour protéger ses habitations, s’est révélée efficace contre l’occupation. Cette politique reflète la nature de notre peuple brave et courageux. Nous, au Hamas, appelons notre peuple à adopter cette politique, pour protéger les maisons palestiniennes. Sami Abu Zuhri (porte-parole du Hamas)
I didn’t actually know that the picture was recycled. I guess I just used it as an illustration – people don’t need to take it as a literal account. If you think of bombs going off that’s pretty much what it looks like.. Twitteuse britannique (16 ans)
Il est interdit de tuer, blesser ou capturer un adversaire en recourant à la perfidie. Constituent une perfidie les actes faisant appel, avec l’intention de la tromper, à la bonne foi d’un adversaire pour lui faire croire qu’il a le droit de recevoir ou l’obligation d’accorder la protection prévue par les règles du droit international applicable dans les conflits armés. Les actes suivants sont des exemples de perfidie : (…) c) feindre d’avoir le statut de civil ou de non-combattant; d) feindre d’avoir un statut protégé en utilisant des signes emblèmes ou uniformes des Nations Unies (…) Protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève de 1949 relatif à la protection des victimes des conflits armés internationaux, I, article 37, alinéa 1, 1977)
Sont interdits les actes ou menaces de violence dont le but principal est de répandre la terreur parmi la population civile. (…) Les personnes civiles jouissent de la protection accordée par la présente Section, sauf si elles participent directement aux hostilités et pendant la durée de cette participation. Protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève de 1949 (I, art. 51, al. 2 & 3)
See, the Hamas and the other terrorist groups like Islamic Jihad are firing from Gaza when their rocketeers and their command posts are embedded in homes, hospitals, next to kindergartens, mosques. And so we are trying to operate, to target them surgically, but the difference between us is that we’re using missile defense to protect our civilians, and they’re using their civilians to protect their missiles. So naturally they’re responsible for all the civilian deaths that occur accidentally. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
Lors d’une inspection, l’agence pour l’aide aux réfugiés palestiniens (UNRWA) a trouvé "environ 20 roquettes cachées" dans une école vide située dans la bande de Gaza, un "premier" incident du genre. L’Express
If 80 rockets would be fired upon the citizens of Great Britain, No way I wouldn’t be taking action. If an Israeli prime minister would fail to take action, people would say that this is unacceptable. Tony Blair
Depuis le début de l’opération, au moins 35 bâtiments résidentiels auraient été visés et détruits, entraînant dans la majorité des pertes civiles enregistrées jusqu’à présent, y compris une attaque le 8 Juillet à Khan Younis qui a tué sept civils, dont trois enfants, et blessé 25 autres. Dans la plupart des cas, avant les attaques, les habitants ont été avertis de quitter, que ce soit via des appels téléphoniques de l’armée d’Israël ou par des tirs de missiles d’avertissement. Rapport ONU (09.07.14)
Selon bon nombre de ses détracteurs, Israël serait en train de massacrer des civils à Gaza. Pour un membre arabe du parlement israélien, son armée «élimine délibérément des familles entières». Pour Mahmoud Abbas, président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Israël est en train de commettre un «génocide –le meurtre de familles entières». Et selon l’Iran, il s’agit de «massacres contre des Palestiniens sans défense». De telles accusations sont fausses. Selon les standards de la guerre, les efforts que déploie Israël pour épargner les civils sont exemplaires. Ce combat n’a pas été décidé par Israël. Selon le Hamas et le Djihad Islamique, les deux organisations terroristes qui contrôlent Gaza, Israël aurait provoqué ces hostilités en arrêtant en Cisjordanie des membres du Hamas. Mais des arrestations sur un territoire ne justifient pas des bombardements aériens sur un autre. Israël ne s’en est pris à Gaza qu’après le tir de plus de 150 roquettes sur son territoire et le refus par les terroristes d’un cessez-le-feu. Plusieurs images publiées ces derniers jours et censées prouver le carnage des bombes israéliennes sont des faux, empruntés à d’autres guerres. Mercredi après-midi, le bilan humain oscillait entre 30 et 50 personnes, voire davantage, une fourchette dépendant du moment choisi pour marquer le début de ce conflit. La moindre mort est tragique, et plus les hostilités dureront, plus le bilan s’alourdira. Pour autant, en sachant qu’Israël a lancé plus de 500 raids aériens, vous pouvez en tirer deux conclusions. La première, c’est que l’armée israélienne est misérablement nulle pour tuer des gens. La seconde, et la plus plausible, c’est qu’elle fait au contraire tout son possible pour ne pas en tuer. Le ministre israélien de la Défense a admis que ses offensives avaient ciblé des «domiciles de terroristes», mais aussi des «armes, des infrastructures terroristes, des systèmes de commandements, des institutions du Hamas [et] des bâtiments officiels». Les logements étaient ceux de chefs militaires du Hamas. Selon les dires d’un officiel israélien, «au Hamas, le moindre petit commandant de brigade n’a désormais plus de maison où rentrer chez lui». En termes légaux, Israël justifie ces attaques en affirmant que ces maisons étaient des «centres de commandement terroristes», impliqués dans des tirs de roquette et autres «activités terroristes». Mais si Israël a parfois tenté (et réussi) de tuer des leaders du Hamas dans leurs voitures, son armée a toujours évité de se prendre sans sommation à leurs maisons. La dernière fois qu’Israël a tiré sur des bâtiments civils à Gaza, voici un an et demi, ses habitants ont été au préalable prévenus par téléphone ou par le parachutage de tracts pour qu’ils quittent les lieux. L’armée israélienne se sert aussi de fusées éclairantes ou de mortiers à faibles charges explosives (la consigne dite du «toquer au toit») pour signaler la survenue de bombardements. (…) Le bilan civil le plus grave –sept morts, selon les informations les plus récentes– est survenu dans le bombardement d’une maison située dans la ville de Khan Younès et appartenant à un leader terroriste. Pour le Hamas, il s’agit d’un «massacre contre des femmes et des enfants». Mais selon des voisins, la famille a été prévenue à la fois par téléphone et par un tir de mortier léger sur le toit. Selon un membre des services de sécurité israéliens, les forces israéliennes ont attendu que la famille quitte le bâtiment pour tirer leur missile. Il ne comprend pas pourquoi des membres de cette famille, avec visiblement certains de leurs voisins, sont retournés à l’intérieur. Pour des personnes vivant sur place, c’est parce qu’ils ont voulu «former un bouclier humain». (…) Difficile, très difficile à dire. Mais, dans ce conflit, quiconque se préoccupe des civils tués délibérément devrait d’abord se tourner vers le Hamas. Les tirs de roquettes de Gaza vers Israël ont commencé bien avant l’offensive israélienne sur Gaza. Au départ, les roquettes sont une idée du Djihad Islamique. Mais, ces derniers jours, le Hamas ne s’est pas fait prier pour la reprendre, et a revendiqué plusieurs tirs de missiles, tombés entre autres sur Tel Aviv, Jérusalem et Haïfa. William Saletan (Slate)
Trente pour cent des 172 Palestiniens qui ont perdu la vie ces sept derniers jours et nuits dans la bande de Gaza sont des femmes et des enfants, selon l’agence de presse allemande (DPA). Cette dernière s’est basée sur une liste des victimes fournie par le ministère de la Santé à Gaza. Au total des sept journées d’offensives contre Gaza, ce sont 29 femmes qui ont péri, dont sept étaient âgées de moins de 18 ans. On retrouve également parmi les victimes 24 hommes de moins de 18 ans. Environ la moitié sont de jeunes garçons âgés de dix ans ou moins, le plus jeune est un bébé âgé de 18 mois. Il n’est pas immédiatement possible de vérifier combien de civils se trouvent parmi les 119 hommes tués. Deux d’entre eux étaient âgés de 75 et 80 ans. Libre Belgique
Il est 15 h 20 à Gaza, mercredi 16 juillet, quand une terrible déflagration ébranle le front de mer. Quelques minutes plus tard, une seconde frappe retentit. Touchée par ce qui semble être un obus tiré d’un navire israélien, une bicoque de pêcheurs, construite sur la digue du port de pêche, est réduite en un tas de parpaings éclatés et de tôles noircies. A côté des décombres, les corps en partie calcinés de quatre garçons de la même famille, Mohammad, Ahed, Zakariya et Ismail. Ils avaient entre 9 et 11 ans. Les enfants Bakr jouaient sur la plage depuis quelques heures. Certains avaient apporté un ballon, d’autres pêchaient ou grattaient le sable à la recherche de morceaux de métal à revendre. Après la première frappe millimétrée sur la cabane, il semble que les enfants, blessés, aient été pris sciemment pour cible alors qu’ils remontaient la plage pour se mettre à l’abri. A quelques mètres de la cahute, Mohammad Abou Watfah a assisté au carnage : «Les enfants étaient paniqués, ils se sont mis à courir vers la plage. Un deuxième obus les a suivis. Il est tombé à quelques mètres et j’ai perdu connaissance», raconte péniblement le commerçant, touché à l’estomac par des éclats. Le corps ensanglanté, hors d’haleine, des enfants blessés parviennent à la terrasse d’un établissement du bord de mer, alors que résonne l’explosion d’un troisième obus. (…) Dans le service de chirurgie, Tagred, une autre mère du clan Bakr, veille sur son fils, Ahmad, 13 ans, touché à la poitrine par des éclats d’obus: «Ce ne sont que des enfants. Ils ne faisaient rien de mal contre les Israéliens, pleure d’incompréhension la mère palestinienne. Mon fils jouait simplement avec ses cousins et maintenant ils sont tous morts.» «Comment peut-on tirer sur des enfants qui courent ?» L’armée israélienne a annoncé, dans la soirée, qu’elle enquêtait «consciencieusement» pour déterminer les circonstances exactes de la mort des quatre enfants. Expliquant que les frappes visaient, en principe, des membres du Hamas, Tsahal n’a pas exclu la possibilité d’une «erreur» dans cette attaque, dont l’étendue sera de toute évidence difficile à justifier. Le Monde
Mercredi, sous les yeux des journalistes occidentaux, quatre enfants palestiniens ont été tués sur une plage de Gaza après un tir ou une explosion. Immédiatement, les médias occidentaux attribuent leur mort à deux navires de guerre de l’armée israélienne situés au large de la plage. Le 9 juin 2006, sur cette même plage, huit personnes (dont trois enfants) d’une même famille avaient été tuées, et plus de trente autres civils furent blessés par une explosion dont l’origine a été attribuée à l’armée israélienne par les médias occidentaux. Or, après enquête de l’armée israélienne il s’est avéré que l’explosion sur la plage n’a pas pu être provoquée par la marine israélienne car il s’est écoulé 10 minutes entre le dernier tir d’obus et le drame. Les éclats de projectiles qui ont été retirés des corps des personnes blessées ne correspondent à aucune des armes en circulation dans l’armée israélienne. D’autre part, les services de renseignement israéliens et égyptiens sont arrivés à la conclusion que la famille a été victime d’une mine installée par les artificiers du Hamas la semaine précédente, afin d’empêcher les commandos marines israéliens de débarquer sur la côte et d’intercepter ses lanceurs de roquettes. Dans les deux cas, et dans de nombreux autres cas, comme dans celui de l’affaire Al-Dura, il est intéressant de souligner la présence au même moment, d’équipes de télévisions filmant en direct ce qui semble être un non-événement, et qualifié après par les médias de « massacre ». Le Monde juif
So far, 194 Palestinians been killed during Operation Protective Edge; that’s already a higher death toll than that of the entire 2012 Operation Pillar of Defense. Or at least that’s what’s reported in the press, internationally but also in Israel. The truth is that the number of casualties, and the percentage of civilians among the dead, comes exclusively from Palestinian sources. Israel only publishes its version of the body count — which is always significantly lower than the Palestinian account — weeks after such operations end. Meanwhile, the damage to Israel’s reputation is done. During Pillar of Defense, 160 Palestinians were killed, 55 “militants” and 105 civilians, according to Palestinian sources. According to the IDF, 177 Palestinians were killed during the weeklong campaign — about 120 of whom were enemy combatants. A report by the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center says 101 of those killed were terrorists, while 68 were noncombatants. B’Tselem claims 62 combatants and 87 civilians died. And yet, the figures from the Gazan ministry are routinely adopted, unquestioned, by the United Nations. Times of Israel
Hamas and affiliate militant factions out of the Gaza Strip are so far rejecting an Egyptian-proposed cease-fire, having launched far more than 100 rockets since the cease-fire proposal. In exposing Israel’s inability to stem the rocket flow, Hamas is trying to claim a symbolic victory over Israel. Hamas’ spin aside, the military reality paints a very different picture.
Nonstate actors such as Hamas and many of its peer organizations, of course, need some ability to exert force if they are to influence the actions of a state whose imperatives run counter to their own. The Gaza Strip is small and its resource base is limited, reducing the options for force. This makes cheap asymmetric tactics and strategies ideal. For Gaza and its militants, terrorizing the Israeli population through limited force often has previously influenced, constrained or forced the hand of the Israeli government and its subsequent policies. It accomplished this with assassinations, ambushes or suicide bombings targeting security forces or Israeli citizens. A confluence of events later led to a gradual evolution in the conflict. By 2006, the security wall that surrounds and contains the Gaza Strip had eliminated militants’ ability to directly engage the Israeli populace and security personnel, and Israel Defense Forces had completely withdrawn from the territory. Meanwhile, Hezbollah had demonstrated the effectiveness of relatively cheap artillery rockets volleyed into Israel in a high enough volume to seriously disrupt the daily life of Israeli life. While artillery rockets were not new to Gaza, the conditions were ripe for this tactic’s adoption. The intent was to build up a substantial arsenal of the weapons and increase their range to threaten Israel’s entire population as much as possible. (Increased range was also needed to overcome Israel’s growing defensive capabilities.) This would be the asymmetric threat that could be used to project force, albeit limited force, from Gaza. (…) Much of this cyclical nature is because both sides are operating under serious limitations, preventing either from gaining "victory" or some form of permanent resolution. For Israel there are two main limitations. The first is the intelligence gaps created by monitoring from the outside and having no permanent presence on the ground. The Israelis have been unable to stop the rockets from getting into Gaza, cannot be sure where they are exactly and can only degrade the ability to launch with airstrikes and naval strikes. This leads to the second constraint, which is the cost associated with overcoming this gap by doing a serious and comprehensive clearing of the entire strip. Though Operation Cast Lead did have a ground component, it was limited and did not enter the major urban areas or serious tunnel networks within them. This is exactly where many of the resources associated with the rocket threat reside. The intense urban operation that would result if Israeli forces entered those areas would have a huge cost in casualties for Israeli personnel and for civilians, the latter resulting in intense international and domestic pressure being brought to bear against the Israeli government. For decision-makers, the consequences of sitting back and absorbing rocket attacks versus trying to comprehensively accomplish the military objective of eliminating this capability keep weighing on the side of managing the problem from a distance. But the longer the conflict lasts, the more complications the militants in Gaza face as they see their threat of force erode with time. Adversaries adapt to tactics, and in this case Israel Defense Forces have steadily improved their ability to mitigate the disruptive ability of these attacks through a combination of responsive air power and Iron Dome batteries that effectively provide protection to urban populations. Subsequently, the terror and disruption visited upon the Israeli population diminishes slightly, and the pressures on the government lessen. So militants seem to be in a position to maintain their tool, but that tool is becoming less effective and imposing fewer costs. This raises the question of what new tactic or capability the militants will adopt next to exert new costs on Israel. Many surmise the incident that started this latest round — the kidnapping and killing of three Israeli teenagers in the West Bank — might become the tactic of choice if it proves effective in accomplishing its goals and is repeatable. The militants will also almost certainly attempt to refine their projectiles’ accuracy and range through the acquisition of more advanced rockets or even missiles. What is certain regarding the latest round of fighting is that we are far from seeing victory or any form of conclusion and that the conflict will continue to evolve. Stratfor
After Algeria gained its independence, according to its 1963 Nationality Code, it authorized citizenship only to Muslims. It extended citizenship only to those individuals whose fathers and paternal grandfathers were personally Muslim.  All but 6,500 of the country’s 140,000 Jews were essentially driven into exile by this change. Some 130,000 took advantage of their French citizenship and moved to France along with the pied-noirs, settlers of French ancestry. Moroccan Jews who were living in Algeria and Jews from the M’zab Valley in the Algerian Sahara, who did not have French citizenship, as well as a small number of Algerian Jews from Constantine, emigrated to Israel at that time. After Houari Boumediene came to power in 1965, Jews were persecuted in Algeria, facing social and political discrimination and heavy taxes. In 1967-68 the government seized all but one of the country’s synagogues and converted them to mosques. By 1969, fewer than 1,000 Jews were still living in Algeria. Only 50 Jews remained in Algeria in the 1990s. Wikipedia
À la suite des accords d’Évian en mars 1962, les départs sont massifs. Le contexte du conflit israélo-arabe va contribuer à envenimer les relations entre les Musulmans et les Juifs d’Algérie dans les années qui vont suivre. L’indépendance de l’Algérie est proclamée le 5 juillet 1962, et en octobre, on ne compte plus que 25 000 Juifs en Algérie dont 6000 à Alger. En 1971, il n’en reste plus qu’un millier117. En 1975, la Grande synagogue d’Oran, comme toutes les autres, est transformée en mosquée. À l’instar de nombreux cimetières chrétiens, beaucoup de cimetières juifs sont profanés. En 1982, on compte encore environ 200 Juifs, la guerre civile algérienne des années 1990 provoque le départ des derniers membres de la communauté. Le dossier juif reste un sujet tabou car les Juifs résidant dans le pays n’ont pas de personnalités connues, mis à part quelques conseillers ayant travaillé avec le ministre algérien du commerce Ghazi Hidoussi, à cause de la sensibilité du dossier et de son lien avec Israël. Certains partis, notamment nationalistes et islamistes, comme le Mouvement de la renaissance islamique, réagissent violemment à l’accréditation du Lions Clubs et du Rotary Club qu’ils présument d’obédience sioniste et franc-maçonne ainsi qu’à la poignée de main du président algérien Abdelaziz Bouteflika et du premier ministre israélien Ehud Barak, lors des funérailles du roi Hassan II au Maroc en juillet 1999. En 1999, Abdelaziz Bouteflika rend un hommage appuyé aux Juifs constantinois, à l’occasion du 2500e anniversaire de cette ville. En 2000, la tournée qu’Enrico Macias doit effectuer sur sa terre natale est annulée à la suite de pressions internes et malgré l’invitation officielle de la présidence. En mars 2003, un plan d’action avait été mis en place par les autorités françaises et algériennes, pour que les cimetières juifs retrouvent leur dignité et ce, selon un programme établi annuellement. Le projet reste cependant lettre morte dans des dizaines de cimetières communaux dans lesquels existent des carrés juifs. En 2005, deux évènements marquent l’actualité : la tenue d’un colloque des Juifs de Constantine à Jérusalem provoquant une rumeur selon laquelle ils auraient fait une demande d’indemnisation auprès du gouvernement de l’Algérie, à la suite de leur départ en 1962. Cette information sera démentie par les autorités d’Alger et la visite à Tlemcen de 130 Juifs originaires de cette ville, fait sans précédent depuis l’indépendance, est vécue dans l’émotion tant du côté des Juifs Algériens que de celui des Musulmans Algériens[réf. nécessaire]. En décembre 2007, Enrico Macias bien qu’invité par le président français Sarkozy, à l’accompagner en visite officielle en Algérie, il doit renoncer face à l’hostilité et au refus du ministre algérien des Anciens Combattants. En 2009, l’État algérien accrédite un organisme représentant la religion hébraïque en Algérie, présidé par Roger Saïd. On recense 25 synagogues, abandonnées pour la plupart, les Juifs d’Algérie ayant peur d’organiser des cérémonies de culte pour des raisons sécuritaires. Cet organisme devra également agir, en coordination avec le ministère des affaires religieuses sur l’état des tombes juives, particulièrement à Constantine, Blida et Tlemcen[réf. nécessaire]. En janvier 2010, le dernier Juif vivant en Oranie décède à l’hôpital civil d’Oran. En août 2012, le représentant de la communauté juive en Algérie, maitre Roger Saïd chargé de veiller sur les intérêts judéo-algériens décède à Paris. Wikipedia
Although much is heard about the plight of the Palestinian refugees from the aftermath of the 1948 Israeli War of Independence and the 1967 Six Day War, little is said about the hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forced to flee from Arab states before and after the creation of Israel. In fact, these refugees were largely forgotten because they were assimilated into their new homes, most in Israel, and neither the United Nations nor any other international agency took up their cause or demanded restitution for the property and money taken from them. In 1945, roughly 1 million Jews lived peacefully in the various Arab states of the Middle East, many of them in communities that had existed for thousands of years. After the Arabs rejected the United Nations decision to partition Palestine and create a Jewish state, however, the Jews of the Arab lands became targets of their own governments’ anti-Zionist fervor. As Egypt’s delegate to the UN in 1947 chillingly told the General Assembly: “The lives of one million Jews in Muslim countries will be jeopardized by partition.” The dire warning quickly became the brutal reality. Throughout 1947 and 1948, Jews in Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Syria, and Yemen (Aden) were persecuted, their property and belongings were confiscated, and they were subjected to severe anti-Jewish riots instigated by the governments. In Iraq, Zionism was made a capital crime. In Syria, anti-Jewish pogroms erupted in Aleppo and the government froze all Jewish bank accounts. In Egypt, bombs were detonated in the Jewish quarter, killing dozens. In Algeria, anti-Jewish decrees were swiftly instituted and in Yemen, bloody pogroms led to the death of nearly 100 Jews. Jewish virtual library

Attention: des réfugiés peuvent en cacher d’autres !

A l’heure où, entre boucliers humains et photos et chiffres trafiqués, le martyre du peuple palestinien fait à nouveau la une de nos journaux

Et que nos chères têtes blondes en profitent pour crier "mort aux juifs" à tous les coins de rue et préférentiellement devant les nouvelles ambassades que sont devenues – dixit un responsable écologiste français –  les synagogues

Pendant que 70 ans après l’abomination nazie outre-rhin, l’équipe de la diversité que tout le monde attendait se voit crucifier par sa propre presse pour avoir fêté leur victoire en Coupe du monde en chambrant comme c’est l‘habitude dans leur pays leurs adversaires qualifiés pour l’occasion de gauchos …

Et que, de l’autre côté de la Méditerrannée, on tente de "rejudaïser" un pays qui, entre exil forcé, synagogues transformées en mosquées ou désaffectées et carrés juifs profanés,  avait réussi en un peu plus de 60 ans à effacer 2 000 ans et 90% de sa présence juive   …

Retour sur ces réfugiés dont on ne parle jamais …

A savoir, entre l’extermination des chrétiens arméniens, assyriens ou grecs de Turquie et l’actuel nettoyage ethnique des mêmes chrétiens du reste du Monde musulman, ces quelque 900 000 juifs ethniquement épurés du Monde arabe …

Fact Sheet:
Jewish Refugees from Arab Countries

(Updated January 2013)


Although much is heard about the plight of the Palestinian refugees from the aftermath of the 1948 Israeli War of Independence and the 1967 Six Day War, little is said about the hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forced to flee from Arab states before and after the creation of Israel. In fact, these refugees were largely forgotten because they were assimilated into their new homes, most in Israel, and neither the United Nations nor any other international agency took up their cause or demanded restitution for the property and money taken from them.

Yemenite Jews
Yemenite Jews flee during Operation Magic Carpet

In 1945, roughly 1 million Jews lived peacefully in the various Arab states of the Middle East, many of them in communities that had existed for thousands of years. After the Arabs rejected the United Nations decision to partition Palestine and create a Jewish state, however, the Jews of the Arab lands became targets of their own governments’ anti-Zionist fervor. As Egypt’s delegate to the UN in 1947 chillingly told the General Assembly: “The lives of one million Jews in Muslim countries will be jeopardized by partition.” The dire warning quickly became the brutal reality.

Throughout 1947 and 1948, Jews in Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Syria, and Yemen (Aden) were persecuted, their property and belongings were confiscated, and they were subjected to severe anti-Jewish riots instigated by the governments. In Iraq, Zionism was made a capital crime. In Syria, anti-Jewish pogroms erupted in Aleppo and the government froze all Jewish bank accounts. In Egypt, bombs were detonated in the Jewish quarter, killing dozens. In Algeria, anti-Jewish decrees were swiftly instituted and in Yemen, bloody pogroms led to the death of nearly 100 Jews.

In January 1948, the president of the World Jewish Congress, Dr. Stephen Wise, appealed to U.S. Secretary of State George Marshall: “Between 800,000 and a million Jews in the Middle East and North Africa, exclusive of Palestine, are in ‘the greatest danger of destruction’ at the hands of Moslems being incited to holy war over the Partition of Palestine … Acts of violence already perpetrated, together with those contemplated, being clearly aimed at the total destruction of the Jews, constitute genocide, which under the resolutions of the General Assembly is a crime against humanity." In May 1948, the New York Times echoed Wise’s appeal, and ran an article headlined, "Jews in Grave Danger in all Muslim Lands: Nine Hundred Thousand in Africa and Asia face wrath of their foes."

With their lives in danger and the situation growing ever more perilous, the Jews of the Arab World fled their homes as refugees.

Of the 820,000 Jewish refugees between 1948 and 1972, more than 200,000 found refuge in Europe and North America while 586,000 were resettled in Israel – at great expense to the Israeli government, and without any compensation from the Arab governments who had confiscated their possessions. The majority of the Jewish refugees left their homes penniless and destitute and with nothing more than the shirts on their backs. These Jews, however, had no desire to be repatriated in the Arab World and little is heard about them because they did not remain refugees for long.

In Israel, a newly independent country that was still facing existential threats to its survival, the influx of immigrants nearly doubled the population and a put a great strain on an economy struggling to just meet the needs of its existing population.  The Jewish State, however, never considered turning away the refugees and, over the years, worked to absorb them into society.

Iraqi Jews
Iraqi Jews flee as refugees to Israel

Overall, the number of Jews fleeing Arab countries for Israel in the years following Israel’s independence was nearly double the number of Arabs leaving Palestine. The contrast between the Jewish refugees and the Palestinian refugees grows even starker considering the difference in cultural and geographic dislocation – most of the Jewish refugees traveled hundreds or thousands of miles to a tiny country whose inhabitants spoke a different language and lived with a vastly different culture. Most Palestinian refugees traveled but a few miles to the other side of the 1949 armistice lines while remaining inside a linguistically, culturally and ethnically similar society.

Moreover, the value of Jewish property left behind and confiscated by the Arab governments is estimated to be at least 50 percent higher than the total value of assets lost by the Palestinian refugees.  In the 1950’s, John Measham Berncastle, under the aegis of the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, estimated that total assets lost by Palestinian refugees from 1948 – including land, buildings, movable property, and frozen bank accounts – amounted to roughly $350 million ($650 per refugee). Adding in an additional $100 million for assets lost by Palestinian refugees as a result of the Six Day War, an approximate total is $450 million – $4.4 billion in 2012 prices. By contrast, the value of assets lost by the Jewish refugees – compiled by a similar methodology – is estimated at $700 million – roughly $6.7 billion today.

To date, more than 100 UN resolutions have been passed referring explicitly to the fate of the Palestinian refugees. Not one has specifically addressed Jewish refugees. Additionally, the United Nations created a organization, UNRWA, to solely handle Palestinian refugees while all other refugees are handled collectively by UNHRC. The UN even defines Palestinian refugees differently than every other refugee population, setting distinctions that have allowed their numbers to grow exponentially so that nearly 5 million are now considered refugees despite the fact that the number estimated to have fled their homes is only approximately 400-700,000.

Today, nearly half of Israel’s native population descends from the Jewish refugees of the Arab world and their rights must be recognized alongside any discussion of the rights for Palestinian refugees and their descendants. In Israel, the issue of the Jewish refugees has been of preeminent importance during all peace negotiations with the Palestinians, including the 1993 Oslo Accords and the 2000 Camp David summit.  Under the leadership of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon, Israel is now calling on United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon to hold a summit specifically the issue of the Jewish refugees.

In the United States, led by Congressman Jerrold Nadler, efforts are also being made to ensure the world recognizes the plight of these Jewish refugees.  In July 2012, Nadler led a bipartisan group of six congressmen in sponsoring H.R. 6242, legislation that would require the President to submit a regular report to Congress on actions taken relating to the resolution of the Jewish refugee issue. Nadler’s latest effort comes more than four years after he successfully passed H.R. 185, a non-binding resolution asking the President to ensure that explicit reference is made to the Jewish refugees in any international forum discussing Middle East or Palestinian refugees.

Use the resource below to learn more about
the Jewish Refugees from the Arab World:

AlgeriaEgyptIraqLibyaMoroccoSyriaTunisiaYemen (Aden)

Jews in the Arab World
1948
1958
1968
1978
2011
Algeria
140,000
130,000
1,500
1,000
1,500
Egypt
75,000
40,000
1,000
400
100
Iraq
135,000
6,000
2,500
350
7
Libya
38,000
3,750
100
40
0
Morocco
265,000
200,000
50,000
18,000
4,000
Syria
30,000
5,000
4,000
4,500
100
Tunisia
105,000
80,000
10,000
7,000
1,500
Yemen/Aden
63,000
4,300
500
500
250
Total
851,000
469,060
69,600
31,790
~7,500

Algeria

Jews in 1948: 140,000. Jews in 2011: 1,500.

Jewish settlement in Algeria can be traced back to the first centuries of the Common Era. In the 14th century, with the deterioration of conditions in Spain, many Spanish Jews moved to Algeria, among them a number of outstanding scholars including Rav Yitzchak ben Sheshet Perfet (the Ribash) and Rav Shimon ben Zemah Duran (the Rashbatz). After the French occupation of the country in 1830, Jews gradually adopted French culture and were granted French citizenship.

On the eve of WWII, there were around 120,000 Jews in Algeria. In 1934, incited by events in Nazi Germany, Muslims rampaged in Constantine, killing 25 Jews and injuring many more. Starting in 1940, under Vichy rule, Algerian Jews were persecuted socially and economically. In 1948, at the time of Israel’s independence and on the eve of the Algerian Civil War, there were approximately 140,000 Jews living in Algeria, of whom roughly 30,000 lived in the capital.

Nearly all of the Algerian Jews fled the country shortly after it gained independence from France in 1962. The newly established Algerian government harassed the Jewish community, confiscated Jewish property, and deprived Jews of their principle economic rights. As a result, almost 130,000 Algerian Jews immigrated to France and, since 1948, 25,681 Algerian Jews have immigrated to Israel.

According to the State Department, there is now fewer than 2,000 Jews in Algeria and there are no functioning synagogues in the country.

EGYPT

Jews in 1948: 75,000. Jews in 2011: 100.

Jews have lived in Egypt since Biblical times. Israelite tribes first moved to the land of Goshen, the northeastern edge of the Nile Delta, during the reign of the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep IV (1375-1358 BCE). By 1897, there were more than 25,000 Jews in Egypt, concentrated in Cairo and Alexandria.

The first Nationality Code was promulgated by Egypt in May 1926 and said that only those "who belonged racially to the majority of the population of a country whose language is Arabic or whose religion is Islam" were entitle to Egyptian nationality. This provision served as the official pretext for expelling many Jews from Egypt.

In 1937, the Jewish population was 63,500 but by 1945, with the rise of Egyptian nationalism and the cultivation of anti-Jewish sentiment, violence erupted against the peaceful Jewish community. That year, 10 Jews were killed, more than 300 injured, and a synagogue, a Jewish hospital, and an old-age home were destroyed. In July 1947, an amendment to Egyptian law stipulated that companies must employ a minimum of 90% Egyptian nationals. This decree resulted in the loss of livelihood for many Jews.

Israel’s establishment led to further anti-Jewish sentiments. Between June and November 1948, bombs set off in the Jewish Quarter of Cairo killed more than 70 Jews and wounded nearly 200, while another 2,000 Jews were arrested and had their property confiscated. Rioting over the following months resulted in more Jewish deaths. In 1956, the Egyptian government used the Sinai Campaign as a pretext for expelling almost 25,000  Jews and confiscating their property while approximately 1,000 more Jews were sent to prisons and detention camps. In November 1956, a government proclamation declared that "all Jews are Zionists and enemies of the state," and promised that they would be soon expelled. Thousands of Jews were ordered to leave the country, allowed to take only one suitcase, a small sum of cash, and forced to sign declarations "donating" their property to the Egyptian government.

By 1957 the Jewish population had fallen to 15,000 and in 1967, after the Six-Day War, there was a renewed wave of persecution and the community dwindled to 2,500. By the 1970’s, after the remaining Jews were given permission to leave the country, the number of Jews feel to just a few hundred. Today, the community is on the verge of extinction with fewer than 100 Jews remaining in Egypt, the majority elderly.

IRAQ

Jews in 1948: 135,000. Jews in 2011: 7.

Jews have lived in modern-day Iraq since before the common era and prospered in what was then called Babylonia until the Muslim conquest in 634 AD. Under Muslim rule, the situation of the Jewish community fluctuated yet at the same time, Jews were subjected to special taxes and restrictions on their professional activity. Under British rule, which began in 1917, Jews fared well economically, but this changed when Iraq gained independence.

In June 1941, the Mufti-inspired, pro-Nazi coup of Rashid Ali sparked rioting and a pogrom in Baghdad. Armed mobs, with the complicity of the police and the army, murdered 180 Jews and wounded almost 1,000. Although emigration was prohibited, many Jews made their way to Mandate Palestine with the aid of an underground movement.

Additional outbreaks of anti-Jewish rioting occurred between 1946 and 1949, and following the establishment of Israel in 1948, Zionism was made a capital crime. In 1950, the Iraqi parliament legalized emigration to Israel, provided that Iraqi Jews forfeited their citizenship before leaving. Between May 1950 and August 1951, the Jewish Agency and the Israeli government succeeded in airlifting approximately 110,000 Jews to Israel in Operation Ezra & Nehemiah. At the same time, 20,000 Jews were smuggled out of Iraq through Iran. A year later the property of Jews who emigrated from Iraq was frozen, and economic restrictions were placed on Jews who remained in the country.

In 1952, Iraq’s government barred Jews from emigrating, and publicly hanged two Jews after falsely charging them with hurling a bomb at the Baghdad office of the U.S. Information Agency. A community that had reached a peak of 150,000 in 1947, dwindled to a mere 6,000 after 1951. Persecutions continued, especially after the Six Day War in 1967, when 3,000 Jews were arrested, dismissed from their jobs, and some hanged in the public square of Baghdad. In one instance, on January 27, 1969, Baghdad Radio called upon Iraqis to “come and enjoy the feast” and some 500,000 people paraded and danced past the scaffolds where the bodies of the hanged Jews swung; the mob rhythmically chanting “Death to Israel” and “Death to all traitors.”

As of 2008, the Jewish Agency for Israel estimated that there were only seven Jews remaining in Iraq while Baghdad’s Meir Tweig synagogue, the last synagogue in use, was closed in 2003 after it became too dangerous to gather openly. The State Department reported in 2011 that anti-Semitism is still widespread in both state-owned and private media outlets and Holocaust denial is often glorified.

LIBYA

Jews in 1948: 38,000. Jews in 2011: 0.

The Jewish community of Libya traces its origin back some 2,500 years to the time of Hellenistic rule under Ptolemy Lagos in 323 B.C.E. in Cyrene. Once home to a very large and thriving Jewish community, Libya is now completely empty of Jews due to anti-Jewish pogroms that spurred immigration to Israel.

At the time of the Italian occupation in 1911, there were approximately 21,000 Jews in the country, the majority in the capital Tripoli. By the late 1930s, fascist anti-Jewish laws were gradually being enforced and the Jewish community was subject to terrible repression. Yet, in 1941, the Jews still accounted for a quarter of Tripoli’s population and maintained 44 synagogues.

In 1942, the Germans occupied the Jewish quarter of Benghazi, plundered shops, and deported more than 2,000 Jews across the desert, where more than one-fifth of them perished. Many Jews from Tripoli were also sent to forced labor camps.

Conditions did not greatly improve following liberation and under the British occupation there were a series of brutal pogroms. One savage pogrom occurred in Tripoli on November 5, 1945, when more than 140 Jews were massacred and almost every synagogue in the city was looted. In June 1948, rioters murdered another 12 Jews and destroyed 280 Jewish homes. When the British legalized emigration in 1949, more than 30,000 Jews fled Libya.

Thousands more Jews fled to Israel after Libya became independent in 1951 and was granted membership in the Arab League. A law passed in December 1958 ordered for the dissolution of the Jewish Community Council. In 1961, a special permit was needed to show proof of being a "true Libyan" and all but six Jews were denied this document.

After the Six-Day War, the Jewish population – numbering roughly 7,000 – was again subjected to pogroms in which 18 people were killed and many more injured; the riots also sparked a near-total exodus from the Jewish community, leaving fewer than 100 Jews in Libya. When Muammar Gaddafi came to power in 1969, all Jewish property was confiscated and all debts to Jews cancelled. Although emigration was illegal, more than 3,000 Jews succeeded in leaving for Israel.

By 1974, there were no more than 20 Jews in the country, and it is believed that Esmeralda Meghnagi, who died in February 2002, was the last Jew to live in Libya.  In October 2011, protests in Tripoli called for the deportation of a Jewish activist who had returned to Libya with the intent of restoring Tripoli’s synagogue. Some protesters’ signs read, “There is no place for the Jews in Libya,” and “We don’t have a place for Zionism.”

MOROCCO

Jews in 1948: 265,000. Jews in 2011: 4,000.

Jews have been living in Morocco since the time of Antiquity, traveling there two millennia ago with Phoenician traders, and the first substantial Jewish settlements developed in 586 BCE after Nebuchadnezzar destroyed Jerusalem and exiled the Jews.

Prior to World War II, the Jewish population of Morocco reached its height of approximately 265,000, and though Nazi deportations did not occur the Jewish community still suffered great humiliation under the Vichy French government. Following the war, the situation became even more perilous.

In June 1948, bloody riots in Oujda and Djerada killed 44 Jews while wounding scores more. That same year, an unofficial economic boycott was instigated against the Moroccan Jewish community. By 1959 Zionist activities were made illegal and in 1963, at least 100,000 Moroccan Jews were forced out from their homes. Nearly 150,000 Jews sought refuge in Israel, France and the Americas.

In 1965, Moroccan writer Said Ghallab described the attitude of Moroccan Muslims toward their Jewish neighbors when he wrote:

"The worst insult that a Moroccan could possibly offer was to treat someone as a Jew … The massacres of the Jews by Hitler are exalted ecstatically. It is even credited that Hitler is not dead, but alive and well, and his arrival is awaited to deliver the Arabs from Israel."

In early 2004, Marrakech had a small Jewish population of about 260 people, most over the age of 60, while Casablanca had the largest community, about 3,000 people. There are still synagogues in use today in CasablancaFez, Marrakech, Mogador, Rabat, Tetuan and Tangier.

The Jewish community now numbers between 4,000 and 5,500 and while the government is one of the most friendly towards Israel, the Jewish community is still the target of sporadic violence. On a Saturday in May 2003, for example, a series of suicide bombers attacked four Jewish targets in Casablanca, though fortunately no Jews were killed.  In a show of kindness, the government subsequently organized a large rally in the streets of Casablanca to demonstrate support for the Jewish community and the king reasserted his family’s traditional protection for the country’s Jews.

SYRIA

Jews in 1948: 30,000. Jews in 2011: 100.

Jews had lived in Syria since biblical times and the Jewish population increased significantly after the Spanish expulsion in 1492. Throughout the generations, the main Jewish communities were to be found in Damascus and Aleppo.

By 1943, the Jewish community of Syria had approximately 30,000 members but In 1944, after Syria gained independence from France, the new Arab government prohibited Jewish immigration to Palestine, severely restricted the teaching of Hebrew in Jewish schools, called boycotts against Jewish businesses, and sat idle as attacks against Jews escalated. In 1945, in an attempt to thwart international efforts to establish a Jewish homeland in Palestine, the Syrian government fully restricted Jewish emigration, burned, looted and confiscated Jewish property, and froze Jewish bank accounts.

When partition was declared in 1947, Arab mobs in Aleppo devastated the 2,500-year-old Jewish community and left it in ruins. Scores of Jews were killed and more than 200 homes, shops and synagogues were destroyed. Thousands of Jews illegally fled as refugees, 10,000 going to the United States and 5,000 to Israel.  All of their property were taken over by the local Muslims.

Over the next few decades, those Syrian Jews that remained were in effect hostages of a hostile regime as the government intensified its persecution of the Jewish population. Jews were stripped of their citizenship and experienced employment discrimination. They had their assets frozen and property confiscated. The community lived under constant surveillance by the secret police. Freedom of movement was also severely restricted and any Jew who attempted to flee faced either the death penalty or imprisonment at hard labor. Jews could not acquire telephones or driver’s licenses and were barred from buying property. An airport road was paved over the Jewish cemetery in Damascus; Jewish schools were closed and handed over to Muslims.

The last Jews to leave Syria departed with the chief rabbi in October 1994. By the middle of 2001, Rabbi Huder Shahada Kabariti estimated that 150 Jews were living in Damascus, 30 in Haleb and 20 in Kamashili. while two synagogues remained open in Damascus. According to the US State Department, there were about 100 Jews left in country as 2011, concentrated in Damascus and Aleppo.  Contact between the Syrian Jewish community is Israel is prohibited.

TUNISIA

Jews in 1948: 105,000. Jews in 2011: 1,500.

The first documented evidence of Jews living in Tunisia dates back to 200 CE. By 1948, the Tunisian Jewish community had numbered 105,000, with 65,000 living in the capital Tunis.

Tunisia was the only Arab country to come under direct German occupation during World War II and, according to Robert Satloff, “From November 1942 to May 1943, the Germans … implemented a forced-labor regime, confiscations of property, hostage-taking, mass extortion, deportations, and executions. They required thousands of Jews in the countryside to wear the Star of David.”

When Tunisia gained independence in 1956, the new government passed a series of discriminatory anti-Jewish decrees. In 1957, the rabbinical tribunal was abolished and a year later the Jewish community councils were dissolved.  The government also destroyed ancient synagogues, cemeteries, and even Tunis’ Jewish quarter for "urban renewal" projects.

During the Six-Day War, Jews were attacked by rioting Arab mobs, while businesses were burned and the Great Synagogue of Tunis was destroyed. The government actually denounced the violence and appealed to the Jewish population to stay, but did not bar them from leaving.

The increasingly unstable situation caused more than 40,000 Tunisian Jews to immigrate to Israel and at least 7,000 more to France. By 1968, the country’s Jewish population had shrunk to around 10,000.

Today, the US State Department estimates that there are 1,500 Jews remaining in Tunisia, with one-third living in and around the capital and the remainder living on the island of Djerba.  The Tunisian government now provides the Jewish community freedom of worship and also provided security and renovation subsidies for the synagogues.

YEMEN (Aden)

Jews in 1948: 63,000. Jews in 2011: 250.

The first historical record of Jews in Yemen is from the third century CE.

In 1922, the government of Yemen reintroduced an ancient Islamic law decreeing that Jewish orphans under age 12 were to be converted to Islam.

In 1947, after the partition vote on Palestine, the police forces joined Muslim rioters in a bloody pogrom in Aden, killing 82 Jews and destroying hundreds of Jewish homes. The pogrom left Aden’s Jewish community economically paralyzed, as most of the stores and businesses were destroyed.

Early in 1948, looting occurred after six Jews were falsely accused of murdering two Arab girls and the government began to forcefully evict the Jews. Between June 1949 and September 1950, Israel ran Operation "Magic Carpet" and brought virtually the entire Yemenite Jewish community – almost 50,000 people – to Israel as refugees.

In 1959, another 3,000 Jews from Aden emigrated to Israel while many more fled as refugees to the US and England. A smaller, continuous migration was allowed to continue into 1962, when a civil war put an abrupt halt to any further Jewish exodus.

Today, there are no Jews in Aden and there are an estimated 250 Jews in Yemen. The Jews are the only indigenous non-Muslim religious minority and the small community that remains in the northern area of Yemen is tolerated and allowed to practice Judaism. However, the community is still treated as second-class citizens and cannot serve in the army or be elected to political positions. Jews are traditionally restricted to living in one section of a city and are often confined to a limited choice of employment.


Sources: Aharon Mor & Orly Rahimiyan, "The Jewish Exodus from Arab Lands," Jerusalem Center for Public Opinion, (September 11, 2012).
"Compensate Jewish Refugees from Arab Countries, Conference Urges," JTA, (September 10, 2012).
Kershner, Isabel. “The Other Refugees.“ Jerusalem Report, (January 12, 20/04).
Littman, David. “The Forgotten Refugees: An Exchange of Population.“ The National Review, (December 3, 2002).
Matas, David, Urman, Stanley A. “Jews From Arab Countries: The Case for Rights and Redress.“ Justice for Jews from Arab Countries, (June 23, 2003).
Sachar, Howard. A History of Israel. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., New York, 2000.
Stillman, Norman. The Jews of Arab Lands in Modern Times. The Jewish Publication Society of America, 1991.
“Ad Hoc Committee on Palestine – 30th Meeting,” United Nations Press Release GA/PAL/84, (November 24, 1947).
Arieh Avneri, The Claim of Dispossesion, (NJ: Transaction Books, 1984), p. 276.
Jerusalem Post, (December 4, 2003).
Stephen Farrell, "Baghdad Jews Have Become a Fearful Few," New York Times, (June 1, 2008).
US State Department – Religious Freedom Reports (2011); Human Rights Reports (2011)
Roumani, Maurice. The Jews from Arab Countries: A Neglected Issue. WOJAC, 1983
American Jewish Yearbook: 1958, 1969, 1970, 1978, 1988, 2001. Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication Society of America
American Sephardi Federation
"Point of no return: Information and links about the Middle East’s forgotten Jewish refugees"
Jews Indigenous to the Middle East and North Africa (JIMENA)
Association of Jews from the Middle East and North Africa (HARIF)
"Israel Pushing for UN Summit on Jewish Refugees," The Algemeiner, (August 27, 2012).
Hillel Fendel, "US Congress Recognizes Jewish Refugees from Arab Lands," Arutz Sheva, (February 4, 2008).
House Resolution 185 (110th), "Regarding the Creation of Refugee Populations in the Middle East," GovTrack.
House Resolution 6242 (112th), "Relating to the Resolution of the Issue of Jewish Refugees from Arab Countries," GovTrack.

Voir aussi:

Algérie: des salafistes contre les synagogues
RFI

En Algérie, une manifestation a réuni quelques dizaines de personnes dans un quartier populaire de la capitale. Les manifestants, des salafistes, veulent protester contre l’annonce officielle de la réouverture des synagogues dans le pays.

Ce n’est pas la première fois qu’Abdelfattah Hamadache, imam salafiste du quartier de Bellecourt, proche du Front islamique du salut (FIS), appelle à manifester. Il y a quelques semaines, c’était pour s’opposer au ministre du Commerce qui venait de donner plusieurs autorisations d’ouverture de magasins d’alcool.

Vendredi, plusieurs dizaines d’hommes ont manifesté contre la réouverture des synagogues, mesure annoncée par le ministre des Affaires religieuses. Ils considèrent que l’Algérie est musulmane et qu’il n’y a pas de place pour une autre religion.

Cette manifestation, rapidement bloquée par les forces de l’ordre, n’a surpris personne. Mais l’annonce du ministre, en revanche, a laissé certains observateurs sans voix. Chaque été, la police arrête certaines personnes sous prétexte qu’elles mangent en plein jour pendant le ramadan, le ministre affirmant que le respect du jeûne était une affaire personnelle.

Alors lorsqu’il affirme que les synagogues vont être ouvertes après 20 ans de fermeture pour des raisons de sécurité, la presse ne sait pas comment réagir. Si les journaux défendent pour la majorité la liberté de culte, difficile de savoir si la mesure sera vraiment appliquée. Les commentaires se multiplient sur les réseaux sociaux, mais les salafistes, eux, sont bien les premiers à rendre le débat public.

Contre la « judaïsation » de l’Algérie

En Algérie, la communauté juive est discrète, mais elle existe toujours. Les synagogues sont fermées pour des raisons de sécurité depuis que dans les années 1990, deux figures de cette communauté avaient été assassinées.

Les manifestants, qui ont dénoncé cette mesure comme « une provocation contre les musulmans en plein ramadan », disent vouloir s’opposer à la « judaïsation » de l’Algérie. Ils craignent que la réouverture des synagogues soit un premier pas vers une normalisation des relations de l’Algérie avec Israël.

Voir également:

Why doesn’t Israel publish figures and details of Gaza casualties?
The world relies on data from the Hamas-run health ministry, and there’s nothing we can do about that, officials in Jerusalem say
Raphael Ahren
The Times of Israel
July 15, 2014
Raphael Ahren is the diplomatic correspondent at The Times of Israel.

So far, 194 Palestinians been killed during Operation Protective Edge; that’s already a higher death toll than that of the entire 2012 Operation Pillar of Defense. Or at least that’s what’s reported in the press, internationally but also in Israel. The truth is that the number of casualties, and the percentage of civilians among the dead, comes exclusively from Palestinian sources. Israel only publishes its version of the body count — which is always significantly lower than the Palestinian account — weeks after such operations end. Meanwhile, the damage to Israel’s reputation is done.

During Pillar of Defense, 160 Palestinians were killed, 55 “militants” and 105 civilians, according to Palestinian sources. According to the IDF, 177 Palestinians were killed during the weeklong campaign — about 120 of whom were enemy combatants. A report by the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center says 101 of those killed were terrorists, while 68 were noncombatants. B’Tselem claims 62 combatants and 87 civilians died.

Why the confusion, and what is the accurate body count for the current conflict?

For Operation Protective Edge, the only data published so far comes from the health ministry in Gaza. This ministry is run by Hamas, therefore rendering the number of casualties and injuries it reports more than unreliable, said Maj. Arye Shalicar of the Israel Defense Forces Spokesperson’s unit. “Hamas has no shame about lying. We know they’re a terrorist organization that makes cynical use of casualty numbers for propaganda purposes. You can’t trust a single number they publish.”

And yet, the figures from the Gazan ministry are routinely adopted, unquestioned, by the United Nations. “According to preliminary information, over 77 per cent of the fatalities since 7 July have been civilians, raising concerns about respect for international humanitarian law,” states a situation report published Tuesday by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Once given the stamp of approval of such an important body, these numbers are quoted everywhere else.

“All these publications are not worth the paper they’re written on,” said Reuven Erlich, the director of the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center. “They’re based mostly on Palestinian sources in Gaza, who have a vested interest in showing that we’re killing many civilians.”

His center spends considerable resources on researching the real number of casualties, publishing a daily report with information as reliable as can be obtained. On Monday, the center’s “initial and temporary data” suggested the distribution of those killed so far in Operation Protective Edge is as follows: of 157 Gazans who have died, 57 were terrorist operatives (29 from Hamas, 22 from Palestinian Islamic Jihad and six from other terrorist organizations); 76 were non-involved civilians; and 38 could not be identified.

“The numbers from Gaza’s Health Ministry are very general, they don’t explain who is a terrorist and who is a civilian,” Erlich said. “Knowing how many of the casualties were terrorists and how many were civilians requires very thorough work. You have to check every single name. Such an investigation takes time, and unfortunately every day new names are being added to the list.”

In order to ascertain who was killed and whether the victim is a terrorist or a civilian, the center’s staff looks up their names on Palestinian websites and searches for information about their funerals and for other hints that could shed light on a person’s background.

The authorities in Gaza generally count every young man who did not wear a uniform as a civilian — even if he was involved in terrorist activity and was therefore considered by the IDF a legitimate target, military sources said.

And yet, no official Israeli government body releases any information about casualties caused by Israeli airstrikes in real-time. We simply cannot know what we hit, several officials said. In the West Bank, IDF forces are able to ascertain who dies as a result of IDF actions, but since Israel has no military or civilian presence in Gaza, no information is available during or right after a strike. To be sure, the IDF does investigate claims about casualties, but results are usually only released weeks after the hostilities have ended. By then, the world, gauging Israel’s conduct in part on the basis of available information on civilian casualties, has turned its attention elsewhere.

After Israel’s 2008-9 Operation Cast Lead, many pro-Palestinian activists were outraged over the high number of innocent Palestinians killed. Palestinian sources, widely cited including by the UN, reported 1,444 casualties, of whom 314 were children. Israel, on the other hand, said that 1,166 Gazans were killed — 709 of them were “Hamas terror operatives”, 295 were “uninvolved Palestinians,” while the remaining 162 were “men that have not yet been attributed to any organization.” It put the number of children (under 16-years-old) killed at 89.

The international outrage over the operation played a role in the UN Human Rights Commission’s appointment of a panel to investigate “all violations of international human rights law and international humanitarian law that might have been committed.” Headed by Judge Richard Goldstone, the panel authored the now-notorious “UN Fact Finding Mission on the Gaza Conflict,” also known as Goldstone report. It leveled heavy criticism against Israel, including the assertion that Israel set out deliberately to kill civilians, an allegation which Goldstone, though not his fellow commission members, later retracted.

How difficult it can be to ascertain who is being killed by Israeli airstrikes in Gaza is perhaps best illustrated by an incident from Operation Pillar of Defense, in which the infant son of a BBC employee was killed.

On November 14, 2012, 11-month-old Omar Jihad al-Mishrawi and Hiba Aadel Fadel al-Mishrawi, 19, died after what appeared to be an Israeli airstrike. The death of Omar, the son of BBC Arabic journalist Jihad al-Mishrawi, garnered more than usual media attention and focused anger for the death on Israel. Images of the bereaved father tearfully holding the corpse of his baby went around the world.
Jihad Mishrawi speaks to the media, while carrying the body of his son Omar, on November 15, 2012. (photo credit: screenshot BBC)

Jihad Mishrawi speaks to the media, while carrying the body of his son Omar, on November 15, 2012. (photo credit: screenshot BBC)

Only months later did a UN report clear Israel of the charge it had killed the baby, suggesting instead he was hit by shrapnel from a rocket fired by Palestinians that was aimed at Israel, but missed its mark.

Given the difficulty of determining who exactly was killed by an airstrike in Gaza, Israeli authorities are focusing their public diplomacy efforts on other areas.

Rather than arguing about the exact number of Palestinians killed, and what percentage of them were civilians, officials dealing with hasbara (pro-Israel advocacy) try to engage the public opinion makers in a debate about asymmetrical warfare.

“Our work doesn’t focus on the number of casualties, but rather on Hamas’s methods, which are the sole reason for the fact that civilians are being hurt; and on our method, which is to do everything to avoid civilian casualties,” said Yarden Vatikai, the director of the National Information Directorate at the Prime Minister’s Office.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tries to hammer this point home every time he talks to a world leader or to the press. “See, the Hamas and the other terrorist groups like Islamic Jihad are firing from Gaza when their rocketeers and their command posts are embedded in homes, hospitals, next to kindergartens, mosques,” he said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” “And so we are trying to operate, to target them surgically, but the difference between us is that we’re using missile defense to protect our civilians, and they’re using their civilians to protect their missiles. So naturally they’re responsible for all the civilian deaths that occur accidentally.”

Numbers matter, and although it’s tough to explain the many civilian casualties caused by Israeli air raids, there is nothing the IDF can do about it, officials insist. It’s simply impossible to establish an independent body count while the hostilities are ongoing, admitted a senior official in the government’s hasbara apparatus. “It’s a challenge. But even if you said: No, only 40 or 50 percent of those killed were civilian, and not 70 — would that change anything in the world’s opinion?”

The numbers game is not an arena in which Israel can win, the official said. “When it comes to arguments over the actual justice of our campaign, I think we can win. When it comes to numbers, though, we cannot win. Because first of all, we don’t really have the ability to count the casualties, and secondly, because most people don’t really care that it was, say, only 50 percent and not 60.”

If the UN or other groups want to investigate possible war crimes or the high number of casualties after Operation Protective Edge, Jerusalem will deal with it then, the official said. Even if Israel were to publish its body count at the same time as the Gazan health ministry, it would not prevent a second Goldstone report, he added. “The people involved in these kinds of reports are not interested in the exact numbers. If they want to attack Israel they will do it regardless of the true number of casualties. They have their narrative, and nothing is going to change that.”

Voir encore:

L’Allemagne s’enflamme pour sa Mannschaft "black blanc beur"

Cécile Boutelet – Berlin, correspondance

Le Monde

07.07.2010

"Je ne veux pas forcément qu’ils deviennent champions du monde, je veux surtout qu’ils continuent à jouer." Pour cette Allemande de 39 ans, la demi-finale de la Coupe du monde qui opposera l’Espagne à l’Allemagne, mercredi, sera un rendez-vous de plus avec l’équipe qui lui semble la plus sympathique et la plus talentueuse du Mondial 2010. Une équipe qui a su non seulement séduire au-delà des frontières, mais donner à l’Allemagne une autre image d’elle-même : multiculturelle, ouverte et aimée à l’étranger.

Sur les 23 joueurs de la sélection de Joachim Löw, onze sont d’origine étrangère. Outre le trio d’origine polonaise (Piotr Trochowski, Miroslav Klose, Lukas Podolski), qui depuis longtemps n’est plus considéré comme exotique, évoluent sur le terrain Marko Marin, Jérôme Boateng, Dennis Aogo, Sami Khedira ou encore deux joueurs d’origine turque : Serdar Tasci et le jeune prodige Mesut Özil.

Tous les observateurs, en Allemagne, s’accordent à reconnaître que cette arrivée de nouveaux talents "venus d’ailleurs" fait beaucoup de bien à l’équipe. "Cela lui donne une aptitude à l’engagement, une envie de reconnaissance, vis-à-vis d’eux-mêmes mais également vis-à-vis des autres", déclarait le ministre de l’intérieur Thomas de Maizière à la Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung. Pour Bastian Schweinsteiger, talentueux milieu de terrain, "les diverses influences vivifient l’équipe, elles lui donnent un tout autre tempérament".

Une diversité qui fait également beaucoup de bien au pays. A Kreuzberg, le quartier de Berlin où vit la plus importante communauté turque du pays, on défend depuis le début du mondial les couleurs de la Mannschaft. "Les performances des jeunes donnent à notre travail un élan énorme", se réjouit Gül Keskinler, une Turque chargée de l’intégration à la Fédération allemande de football. "L’exemple de Mesut Özil est à cet égard particulièrement important, souligne-t-elle. Les footballeurs ont, à travers leur fonction d’exemple, un rôle très fort, ils sont des ambassadeurs pour la jeunesse."

Dans les rues de Berlin, pas de célébration pourtant d’un esprit de fraternité "black blanc beur" tel qu’avait pu le connaître la France après sa victoire au Mondial de 1998. Pour beaucoup d’Allemands, le maillot est rassembleur : peu importe l’origine des joueurs, à la première victoire ils ont été adoptés sans cérémonie.

La diversité n’est qu’un élément parmi d’autres dans l’impression de renouveau que donne l’équipe d’Allemagne. "La diversité montre surtout que l’Allemagne va enfin chercher son inspiration ailleurs, estime Holger Cesnat, 35 ans. Le style de l’équipe a changé, il est plus léger, parce que Joachim Löw observe le football pratiqué au-delà des frontières et a rompu avec le style qui prédominait dans le football allemand jusqu’ici."

Pour Rainer Stich, 52 ans : "C’est quand même une vraie tendance à l’ouverture. On parie sur des jeunes, sur des joueurs d’origines diverses. Vingt ans après la réunification, le pays n’est plus concentré sur lui-même, sur sa propre réunification. Cela a commencé en 2006, c’était la première fois qu’on osait être fier de son pays, fier de son équipe, cela a libéré beaucoup de choses." Emilie Parker se félicite : "C’est la première fois que l’équipe est si appréciée à l’étranger. Même en Israël on trouve la Mannschaft sympathique. C’est un sentiment auquel nous ne sommes pas habitués."

La Mannschaft "new look", un baromètre de la diversité migratoire
Pierre Weiss
Le Nouvel Observateur
21-06-2014

Jusqu’à très récemment, la sélection allemande comptait peu ou pas de joueurs d’origine immigrée. Explications.

La présence massive de descendants d’immigrés dans l’effectif de la "Deutsche Nationalmannschaft" est un phénomène relativement récent. S’il ne s’apparente pas à une manifestation de rue ni à un scrutin politique, il peut à tout le moins être un révélateur ou un traducteur, intéressant à examiner à ce titre (1).

Formule associée à l’équipe de France championne du monde de football en 1998, le "Black-Blanc-Beur" s’est décliné en Allemagne, depuis le début des années 2000, sous la forme du "multikulti". Un simple regard sur la liste des 23 internationaux sélectionnés par l’entraîneur Joachim Löw à l’occasion du mondial brésilien suffit à identifier six noms trahissant une histoire sociale marquée par le processus "d’émigration-immigration" (2). Il s’agit des défenseurs Jérôme Boateng et Shkodran Mustafi, des milieux de terrain Sami Khedira, Mesut Özil et Lukas Podolski, ainsi que du buteur emblématique Miroslav Klose. A leur manière, ces joueurs cumulant plus de 380 matchs sous le maillot du "Nationalelf" sont un baromètre de la diversité migratoire de la société allemande. En ce sens, ils permettent de rappeler que cette dernière apparaît comme une société d’ancienne immigration (3), à l’instar de ses voisines française ou anglaise. Néanmoins, à la différence de la France, l’Allemagne a maintenu une forte immigration depuis le milieu des années 1990, entre autres pour compenser le vieillissement de sa population active.

En même temps, la composition ethnoculturelle de plus en plus diversifiée de la "Mannschaft" témoigne de signes d’une tangible transformation du mode de constitution de la nation allemande. Profitant de la réforme du Code de la nationalité en 2000 qui mit fin au seul droit du sang, l’Allemagne a en effet tourné la page et de l’équipe nationale et de la communauté des citoyens monochromatiques. Cette sélection de sportifs "new look" traduit enfin un mouvement de modernisation des instances dirigeantes du football allemand, dont l’origine se situe à la charnière du XXe et du XXIe siècles. Ainsi l’espace des joueurs issus de l’immigration est marqué par l’empreinte de la politique antidiscriminatoire menée par le "Deutscher Fußball-Bund" (DFB) et ses organisations-membres.

1 – Les "couleurs" de l’histoire

Depuis la Coupe du monde en 2002, les compositions successives de l’équipe allemande qui a participé aux phases finales du tournoi planétaire sont un bon révélateur de l’histoire des flux migratoires du pays, à l’exception des populations d’origine italienne, portugaise ou marocaine.

Les sportifs immigrés polonais ou enfants d’immigrés représentent le contingent le plus important. Ils sont au nombre de quatre : nés en Pologne, Miroslav Klose, Lukas Podolski et Piotr Trochowski émigrent en Allemagne à la fin des années 1980 ; Tim Borowski, quant à lui, est né en RDA de parents polonais. Leur émigration – ou celle de leur famille – s’inscrit dans le contexte plus large des arrivées massives "d’Aussiedler" (des "réfugiés de souche allemande") entre 1950 et 1989 (4). N’ayant pratiquement pas d’équivalent dans d’autres pays occidentaux, cette forme de migration puise sa source dans les relations conflictuelles entre l’Etat et la "nation ethnique" en Allemagne, mais encore dans les changements politiques et territoriaux résultant des deux guerres mondiales et de la guerre froide.

Les footballeurs immigrés ghanéens ou descendants d’immigrés constituent le second groupe. Ils sont trois : né au Ghana, Gerald Asamoah émigre en Allemagne en 1990 ; concernant David Odonkor et Jérôme Boateng, ils sont nés en RFA et d’origine ghanéenne par leur père. Cette immigration d’Afrique de l’Ouest trouve notamment son explication dans l’histoire de l’empire colonial voulu par Bismarck. Protectorat allemand depuis 1884, le "Togoland" est partagé entre la France et la Grande-Bretagne suite au Traité de Versailles de 1919. En 1956, la partie anglaise de cette province jadis germanisée est rattachée à la République indépendante du Ghana et échappe à l’Etat indépendant du Togo en 1960 (5). Aussi est-il assez cohérent que l’Allemagne soit la destination privilégiée des membres des minorités germanophones implantées au Ghana.

Les joueurs enfants d’immigrés de Turquie se placent en troisième position. Ils sont au nombre de deux : nés outre-Rhin de parents turcs, Mesut Özil et Serdar Tasci incarnent la génération de la "Mannschaft" du mondial de 2010. Leurs ascendants ont émigré en RFA à l’occasion du "Wirtschaftswunder" d’après-guerre. Entre 1961 et 1973, le patronat allemand et les autorités fédérales ont en effet recruté des milliers de travailleurs immigrés originaires de Turquie pour occuper les emplois pénibles dont les nationaux ne voulaient pas, en particulier dans les secteurs de l’agriculture, de la construction et de l’automobile (6). Par la suite, cet ensemble d’ouvriers faiblement qualifiés est complété par une immigration familiale dans le cadre des regroupements primaire et secondaire.

2 – La diversification de la communauté des citoyens

La composition de l’équipe allemande des années 2000 affiche l’origine ethnoculturelle de plus en plus diversifiée des Allemands, et le soutien que ces derniers lui apportent, notamment depuis 2006 (7), informe du niveau de consensus rencontré par cette diversification. Le contraste est d’ailleurs saisissant entre cette équipe "multikulti" et la sélection unicolore du siècle dernier. Entre 1934 et 1998, la "Mannschaft" n’a par exemple accueilli qu’un seul joueur d’origine non germanique en la personne de Maurizio Gaudino, descendant d’immigré italien ayant pris part à la Coupe du monde en 1994 (8). Précisons toutefois que ce constat ne vaut que si l’on fait abstraction de la présence importante de footballeurs issus de l’immigration polonaise, mais en réalité "de souche allemande".

A l’inverse, entre 2002 et 2014, le "Nationalelf" a déjà comporté 15 sportifs d’origine non germanique, dont neuf binationaux : Asamoah, Klose, Podolski, Boateng, Cacau, Gomez, Khedira, Özil et Mustafi. D’un côté, l’hétérogénéité frappante de l’équipe des années 2000 témoigne d’une modification tangible du mode de constitution de la nation allemande. Pendant longtemps, le principe fondateur de cette dernière a reposé intégralement sur les liens du sang – "ethnos" (9). Créée par une idéologie "ethnicisante" distinguant ce qui n’est pas allemand au sens "ethnique" du terme, cette frontière institutionnelle explique à la fois l’homogénéité de l’équipe allemande du XXe siècle et l’intégration progressive des joueurs polonais d’ascendance germanique. Menée à son terme par la coalition "rouge-verte", avec le soutien des libéraux et des démocrates-chrétiens, la réforme du Code de la nationalité du 1er janvier 2000 a désormais introduit dans la législation des éléments du droit du sol. Ce dernier facilite la naturalisation des migrants et l’inclusion de leurs descendants. Il est fondé sur une conception de la citoyenneté mettant surtout l’accent sur l’individu au sens politique du terme – "demos". Nés en Allemagne de parents turcs, Mesut Özil et Serdar Tasci ont acquis la nationalité allemande par ce biais. Tous deux ont commencé à jouer en sélection U19, entre 2006 et 2007. Il existe donc un lien de causalité entre le Code de la nationalité et la taille du vivier de footballeurs disponibles pour le système de formation.

D’un autre côté, il faut prendre en compte les effets de l’assouplissement de la politique de nationalité sportive menée par la FIFA ; en particulier ceux du décret de 2009 autorisant un sportif professionnel à changer une fois d’équipe nationale, sans limite d’âge, à condition de n’avoir jamais porté le maillot de sa précédente sélection "A" en compétition. Le cas des frères Boateng est intéressant à scruter à ce titre. S’ils sont tous les deux nés à Berlin, l’un, Jérôme, évolue sous les couleurs de la "Mannschaft", tandis que l’autre, Kevin-Prince, a opté pour le pays de son père, le Ghana.
3 – La modernisation des instances du football allemand

La présence de joueurs de couleur et de sportifs aux patronymes à la consonance étrangère dans le "Nationalelf" traduit en dernier ressort la modernisation des instances dirigeantes du football allemand. A la suite de l’élimination prématurée de l’équipe nationale en quart de finale de la Coupe du monde en 1998, de nombreuses voix s’élevèrent, pour la première fois, contre le système de formation et la politique d’intégration des immigrés menée par le DFB. Parmi elles, on peut citer l’entraîneur du Bayern de Munich de l’époque, Ottmar Hitzfeld, qui déclara dans le "Spiegel" que sans les migrants et leurs descendants, l’Allemagne renonçait inconsidérément à plus de 50 % de la nouvelle génération de footballeurs de haut niveau, potentiellement sélectionnables en équipe nationale (10).

Le développement des attitudes racistes et xénophobes dans les ligues amateurs, les exclusions d’immigrés des clubs allemands et la recrudescence des associations mono-ethniques ont alors conduit les responsables du DFB à utiliser le football à la fois comme un outil de lutte contre la discrimination ethno-raciale et comme un vecteur de promotion de la diversité culturelle. L’arrivée en 2004 d’Oliver Bierhoff en tant que manager général de l’équipe d’Allemagne constitue une étape décisive dans ce processus. Ancien international, Bierhoff est diplômé en sciences économiques et en management de l’Université d’Hagen. Habitué à la rhétorique managériale et proche des milieux entrepreneuriaux, il introduit la thématique de la "diversité" au sein du DFB. Par son travail politique et son capital symbolique, cette notion venue des pays anglo-saxons devient une nouvelle catégorie de l’action sportive à destination des jeunes garçons issus de l’immigration et des classes populaires.

Profitant de l’organisation du Mondial de 2006 en Allemagne, le DFB, appuyé par les pouvoirs publics, lance des initiatives visant à favoriser la pratique du football chez les immigrés et leurs enfants. Cette impulsion donne par exemple naissance à des dispositifs socio-sportifs d’intégration des descendants d’immigrés des quartiers paupérisés des grandes métropoles. Quelle que soit son efficacité en matière de prévention et d’éducation, cette politique antidiscriminatoire est surtout une bonne manière de repérer puis d’inclure de nouveaux talents dans le système de formation du football national. A la Coupe du monde au Brésil, Shkodran Mustafi est là pour nous le rappeler !

La "Mannschaft" new look n’est pas un "miroir" de la société allemande et de ses évolutions. Tout au plus, elle peut en être un reflet déformant. En ce sens, nous avons (trop) rapidement tenté de montrer que les significations contenues dans les manifestations de la diversité migratoire auxquelles donne lieu le spectacle des joueurs du "Nationalelf" sont sans effet historique. Ces significations ne comportent aucune autonomie réelle ; au mieux, elles ne font que traduire un mouvement, sans jamais être en mesure de l’influencer. Autrement dit, dans ce cas précis, elles sont entièrement dépendantes des contextes historique, politico-juridique et socio-sportif. Pour les sciences sociales, le football national n’est finalement qu’une clé de compréhension des sociétés humaines et de leurs transformations (11).

(1) Voir Paul Yonnet, Systèmes des sports, Paris, Editions Gallimard, 1998.

(2) Nous empruntons cette expression au sociologue Abdelmalek Sayad. Cf. son ouvrage intitulé La double absence : des illusions de l’émigré aux souffrances de l’immigré, Paris, Editions du Seuil, 1999.

(3) Rien qu?au cours des années 1950-1960, la RFA a par exemple recruté plus de trois millions de travailleurs étrangers suite à des accords conclus avec une série d?Etats : Italie, Espagne, Grèce, Turquie, Maroc, Portugal, Tunisie et Yougoslavie.

(4) 1 238 316 Aussiedler de Pologne se sont installés en Allemagne au cours de cette période. Voir Rainer Ohliger, « Une migration privilégiée. Les Aussiedler, Allemands et immigrés », Migrance, n° 17-18, 2000-2001, pp. 8-17.

(5) Voir Ulrike Schuerkens, Du Togo allemand aux Togo et Ghana indépendants, Paris, Editions L’Harmattan, 2001.

(6) Cf. Ulrich Herbert, Geschichte der Ausländerpolitik in Deutschland. Saisonarbeiter, Zwangsarbeiter, Gastarbeiter, Flüchtlinge, Munich, C. H. Beck, 2001.

(7) Albrecht Sonntag, « Un été noir-rouge-or », in C. Demesmay et H. Stark (éd.), Radioscopies de l’Allemagne 2007, Paris, IFRI Travaux et Recherches, 2007, pp. 19-39.

(8) Voir le site Internet suivant : http://www.dfb.de/index.php?id=11848

(9) Cf. Dominique Schnapper, L’Europe des immigrés : essai sur les politiques d’immigration, Paris, Editions F. Bourin, 1992.

(10) Sur ce point, voir Diethelm Blecking, « Le football allemand, une histoire d’identités multiples », Allemagne d’aujourd’hui, n° 193, 2010, pp. 93-101.

(11) Cf. Norbert Elias et Eric Dunning, Sport et civilisation. La violence maîtrisée, Paris, Editions Fayard, 1994.

Voir enfin:

Manif pro-palestinienne à Paris : deux synagogues prises pour cible

Frédéric Ploquin

Marianne

14 Juillet 2014

Plusieurs manifestations pro-palestiennes ont eu lieu dimanche 13 juillet en France. A Paris, deux synagogues ont été prises pour cible. Voici les faits.

Ils sont environ 7 000 à défiler dans les rues de Paris, ce dimanche 13 juillet, entre Barbès et la Bastille, pour dire leur solidarité avec les Palestiniens. Le parcours a été négocié par les responsables du NPA (Nouveau parti anticapitaliste), l’organisation héritière de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire. Pourquoi avoir exigé un parcours qui s’achève à proximité du quartier du Marais, connu pour abriter plusieurs lieux de culte juif ? Le fait est que les responsables de la Préfecture de police l’ont validé.

Parmi les manifestants, de nombreuses femmes, souvent voilées, mais surtout des jeunes venus de la banlieue francilienne. Les premiers slogans ciblent Israël, mais aussi la "complicité française". Très vite, les « Allah Akbar » (Dieu est grand) dominent, donnant une tonalité fortement religieuse au cortège.
La préfecture de police ne s’attendait pas à une telle mobilisation, mais ses responsables ont vu large au niveau du maintien de l’ordre, puisque cinq "forces mobiles", gendarmes et CRS confondues, ont été mobilisées. C’est à priori suffisant pour sécuriser tous les lieux juifs le long du parcours.

Aucune dégradation, aucun incident n’est signalé en marge du cortège, jusqu’à l’arrivée à proximité de la Bastille. Un premier mouvement de foule est observé à la hauteur de la rue des Tournelles, qui abrite une synagogue. Les gendarmes bloquent la voie et parviennent sans difficulté à refouler les assaillants vers le boulevard Beaumarchais.

Place de la Bastille, la dispersion commence, accélérée par une ondée, lorsque des jeunes décident de s’en prendre aux forces de l’ordre. De petites grappes s’engouffrent vers les rues adjacentes. Se donnent-ils le mot ? Ils sont entre 200 et 300 à marcher en direction de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette… où se tient un rassemblement pour la paix en Israël, en présence du grand rabbin. Les organisateurs affirment avoir alerté le commissariat de police, mais l’information n’est apparemment pas remontée jusqu’à la Préfecture de police. Détail important : s’ils avaient su, les responsables du maintien de l’ordre auraient forcément barré l’accès à la rue.

Les choses se compliquent très vite, car les manifestants ne sont pas les seuls à vouloir en découdre. Une petite centaine de membres de la LDJ (ligue de défense juive) sont positionnés devant la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette, casques de moto sur la tête et outils (armes blanches) à portée de main. Loin de rester passive, la petite troupe monte au contact des manifestants, comme ils l’ont déjà fait lors d’une manifestation pro-palestinienne organisée Place Saint-Michel quelques jours auparavant. On frôle la bagarre générale, mais la police parvient à s’interposer. Les assaillants refluent vers le boulevard, tandis que les militants juifs reviennent vers la synagogue.

Durant le week-end, des manifestations similaires ont été organisées dans plusieurs grandes villes. Selon la police, ils étaient 2 300 à Lille, 1 200 à Marseille et autour de 400 à Bordeaux. Aucun incident n’a été signalé.


Hommage: Fouad Ajami ou l’anti-Edward Saïd (Edward Said accused him of having “unmistakably racist prescriptions")

24 juin, 2014
http://i1.ytimg.com/vi/kXV199fIWjw/0.jpgEdward Said, the Palestinian cultural critic who died in 2003, accused him of having “unmistakably racist prescriptions. The NYT
Après la chute des Twin Towers, des universitaires américains renommés, Bernard Lewis et Fouad Ajami en tête, ont avalisé cet orientalisme de stéréotypes, et fourni ainsi une caution intellectuelle au discours ambiant, néoconservateur et belliciste, affirmant que la démocratie était étrangère aux Arabes, qu’il fallait la leur imposer par la contrainte. Jean-Pierre Filiu
What makes self-examination for Arabs and Muslims, and particularly criticism of Islam in the West very difficult is the totally pernicious influence of Edward Said’s Orientalism. The latter work taught an entire generation of Arabs the art of self-pity – “ were it not for the wicked imperialists , racists and Zionists , we would be great once more ”- encouraged the Islamic fundamentalist generation of the 1980s , and bludgeoned into silence any criticism of Islam , and even stopped dead the research of eminent Islamologists who felt their findings might offend Muslims sensibilities , and who dared not risk being labelled “orientalist ”. The aggressive tone of Orientalism is what I have called “ intellectual terrorism ” , since it does not seek to convince by arguments or historical analysis but by spraying charges of racism, imperialism , Eurocentrism ,from a moral highground ; anyone who disagrees with Said has insult heaped upon him. The moral high ground is an essential element in Said’s tactics ; since he believes his position is morally unimpeachable , Said obviously thinks it justifies him in using any means possible to defend it , including the distortion of the views of eminent scholars , interpreting intellectual and political history in a highly tendentious way , in short twisting the truth. But in any case , he does not believe in the “truth”. (…) In order to achieve his goal of painting the West in general , and the discipline of Orientalism in particular , in as negative a way as possible , Said has recourse to several tactics . One of his preferred moves is to depict the Orient as a perpetual victim of Western imperialism ,dominance,and aggression. The Orient is never seen as an actor , an agent with free-will , or designs or ideas of its own . It is to this propensity that we owe that immature and unattractive quality of much contemporary Middle Eastern culture , self-pity , and the belief that all its ills are the result of Western -Zionist conspiracies. Here is an example of Said’s own belief in the usual conspiracies taken from “ The Question of Palestine ”: It was perfectly apparent to Western supporters of Zionism like Balfour that the colonization of Palestine was made a goal for the Western powers from the very beginning of Zionist planning : Herzl used the idea , Weizmann used it , every leading Israeli since has used it . Israel was a device for holding Islam – later the Soviet Union , or communism – at bay ”. So Israel was created to hold Islam at bay !
For a number of years now , Islamologists have been aware of the disastrous effect of Said’s Orientalism on their discipline. Professor Berg has complained that the latter’s influence has resulted in “ a fear of asking and answering potentially embarrassing questions – ones which might upset Muslim sensibilities ….”. Professor Montgomery Watt , now in his nineties , and one of the most respected Western Islamologists alive , takes Said to task for asserting that Sir Hamilton Gibb was wrong in saying that the master science of Islam was law and not theology .This , says Watt , “ shows Said’s ignorance of Islam ” . But Watt , rather unfairly ,adds , “ since he is from a Christian Arab background ”. Said is indeed ignorant of Islam , but surely not because he is a Christian since Watt and Gibb themselves were devout Christians . Watt also decries Said’s tendency to ascribe dubious motives to various writers , scholars and stateman such as Gibb and Lane , with Said committing doctrinal blunders such as not realising that non-Muslims could not marry Muslim women. R.Stephen Humphreys found Said’s book important in some ways because it showed how some Orientalists were indeed “ trapped within a vision that portrayed Islam and the Middle East as in some way essentially different from ‘the West ’ ” . Nonetheless , “Edward Said’s analysis of Orientalism is overdrawn and misleading in many ways , and purely as [a] piece of intellectual history , Orientalism is a seriously flawed book .” Even more damning , Said’s book actually discouraged , argues Humphreys , the very idea of modernization of Middle Eastern societies . “In an ironic way , it also emboldened the Islamic activists and militants who were then just beginning to enter the political arena . These could use Said to attack their opponents in the Middle East as slavish ‘Westernists’, who were out of touch with the authentic culture and values of their own countries . Said’s book has had less impact on the study of medieval Islamic history – partly because medievalists know how distorted his account of classical Western Orientalism really is ….”.  Even scholars praised by Said in Orientalism do not particularly like his analysis , arguments or conclusions .Maxime Rodinson thinks “ as usual , [ Said’s ] militant stand leads him repeatedly to make excessive statements ” , due , no doubt , to the fact that Said was “ inadequately versed in the practical work of the Orientalists ”. Rodinson also calls Said’s polemic and style “ Stalinist ”. While P.J.Vatikiotis wrote , “ Said introduced McCarthyism into Middle Eastern Studies ”. Jacques Berque , also praised by Said , wrote that the latter had “ done quite a disservice to his countrymen in allowing them to believe in a Western intelligence coalition against them ”. For Clive Dewey , Said’s book “ was , technically ,so bad ; in every respect , in its use of sources , in its deductions , it lacked rigour and balance .The outcome was a caricature of Western knowledge of the Orient , driven by an overtly political agenda .Yet it clearly touched a deep vein of vulgar prejudice running through American academe ”. The most famous modern scholar who not only replied to but who mopped the floor with Said was ,of course,Bernard Lewis .Lewis points to many serious errors of history ,interpretation , analysis and omission . Lewis has never been answered let alone refuted . Lewis points out that even among British and French scholars on whom Said concentrates , he does not mention at all Claude Cahen , Lévi-Provençal , Henri Corbin ,Marius Canard , Charles Pellat , William and George Marçais , William Wright , or only mentioned in passing ,usually in a long list of names , scholars like R.A.Nicholson , Guy Le Strange , Sir Thomas Arnold , and E.G.Browne. “ Even for those whom he does cite , Mr.Said makes a remarkably arbitrary choice of works . His common practice indeed is to omit their major contributions to scholarship and instead fasten on minor or occasional writings ”. Said even fabricates lies about eminent scholars : “ Thus in speaking of the late –eighteenth early-nineteenth-century French Orientalist Silvestre de Sacy , Mr.Said remarks that ‘he ransacked the Oriental archives ….What texts he isolated , he then brought back ; he doctored them …” If these words bear any meaning at all it is that Sacy was somehow at fault in his access to these documents and then committed the crime of tampering with them .This outrageous libel on a great scholar is without a shred of truth ”. Another false accusation that Said flings out is that Orientalists never properly discussed the Oriental’s economic activities until Rodinson’s Islam and Capitalism (1966) .This shows Said’s total ignorance of the works of Adam Mez , J.H.Kramers , W.Björkman , V.Barthold , Thomas Armold , all of whom dealt with the economic activities of Muslims . As Rodinson himself points out elsewhere , one of the three scholars who was a pioneer in this field was Bernard Lewis . Said also talks of Islamic Orientalism being cut off from developments in other fields in the humanities , particularly the economic and social. But this again only reveals Said’s ignorance of the works of real Orientalists rather than those of his imagination . As Rodinson says the sociology of Islam is an ancient subject , citing the work of R.Lévy . Rodinson then points out that Durkheim’s celebrated journal L’Année sociologique listed every year starting from the first decades of the XX century a certain number of works on Islam .
It must have been particularly galling for Said to see the hostile reviews of his Orientalism from Arab , Iranian or Asian intellectuals , some of whom he admired and singled out for praise in many of his works . For example , Nikki Keddie , praised in Covering Islam , talked of the disastrous influence of Orientalism , even though she herself admired parts of it : “ I think that there has been a tendency in the Middle East field to adopt the word “ orientalism” as a generalized swear-word essentially referring to people who take the “wrong” position on the Arab-Israeli dispute or to people who are judged too “conservative ”. It has nothing to do with whether they are good or not good in their disciplines .So “orientalism” for may people is a word that substitutes for thought and enables people to dismiss certain scholars and their works .I think that is too bad .It may not have been what Edward Said meant at all , but the term has become a kind of slogan ”.  Nikki Keddie also noted that the book “ could also be used in a dangerous way because it can encourage people to say , ‘You Westerners , you can’t do our history right , you can’t study it right , you really shouldn’t be studying it , we are the only ones who can study our own history properly ”. Albert Hourani , who is much admired by Said , made a similar point , “ I think all this talk after Edward’s book also has a certain danger .There is a certain counter-attack of Muslims , who say nobody understands Islam except themselves ”. Hourani went further in his criticism of Said’s Orientalism : “ Orientalism has now become a dirty word .Nevertheless it should be used for a perfectly respected discipline ….I think [ Said] carries it too far when he says that the orientalists delivered the Orient bound to the imperial powers ….Edward totally ignores the German tradition and philosophy of history which was the central tradition of the orientalists ….I think Edward’s other books are admirable ….”. Similarly , Aijaz Ahmed thought Orientalism was a “deeply flawed book” , and would be forgotten when the dust settled , whereas Said’s books on Palestine would be remembered. Kanan Makiya , the eminent Iraqi scholar , chronicled Said’s disastrous influence particularly in the Arab world : “ Orientalism as an intellectual project influenced a whole generation of young Arab scholars , and it shaped the discipline of modern Middle East studies in the 1980s .The original book was never intended as a critique of contemporary Arab politics , yet it fed into a deeply rooted populist politics of resentment against the West .The distortions it analyzed came from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries , but these were marshaled by young Arab and “ pro-Arab ” scholars into an intellectual-political agenda that was out of kilter with the real needs of Arabs who were living in a world characterized by rapidly escalating cruelty , not ever-increasing imperial domination .The trajectory from Said’s Orientalism to his Covering Islam …is premised on the morally wrong idea that the West is to be blamed in the here-and-now for its long nefarious history of association with the Middle East .Thus it unwittingly deflected from the real problems of the Middle East at the same time as it contributed more bitterness to the armory of young impressionable Arabs when there was already far too much of that around .” Orientalism , continues , Makiya , “ makes Arabs feel contented with the way they are , instead of making them rethink fundamental assumptions which so clearly haven’t worked ….They desperately need to unlearn ideas such as that “ every European ” in what he or she has to say about the world is or was a “racist” ….The ironical fact is that the book was given the attention it received in the “almost totally ethnocentric ” West was largely because its author was a Palestinian ….”. Though he finds much to admire in Said’s Orientalism , the Syrian philosopher Sadiq al- ‘Azm finds that “the stylist and polemicist in Edward Said very often runs away with the systematic thinker ”. Al-‘Azm also finds Said guilty of the very essentialism that Said ostensibly sets out to criticise , perpetuating the distinction between East and West .Said further renders a great disservice to those who wish to examine the difficult question of how one can study other cultures from a libertarian perspective .Al-‘Azm recognizes Said anti-scientific bent , and defends certain Orientalist theses from Said’s criticism ; for example , al-‘Azm says : “ I cannot agree with Said that their “ Orientalist mentality ”blinded them to the realities of Muslim societies and definitively distorted their views of the East in general .For instance : isn’t it true , on the whole , that the inhabitants of Damascus and Cairo today feel the presence of the transcendental in their lives more palpably and more actively than Parisians and Londoners ? Isn’t it tue that religion means everything to the contemporary Moroccan , Algerian and Iranian peasant in amnner it cannot mean for the American farmer or the member of a Russian kolkhoz ? And isn’t it a fact that the belief in the laws of nature is more deeply rooted in the minds of university students in Moscow and New York than among the students of al-Azhar and of Teheran University ”. Ibn Warraq
Fouad Ajami would have been amused, but not surprised, to read his own obituary in the New York Times. "Edward Said, the Palestinian cultural critic who died in 2003, accused [Ajami] of having ‘unmistakably racist prescriptions,’" quoted obituarist Douglas Martin. Thus was Said, the most mendacious, self-infatuated and profitably self-pitying of Arab-American intellectuals—a man whose account of his own childhood cannot be trusted—raised from the grave to defame, for one last time, the most honest and honorable and generous of American intellectuals, no hyphenation necessary. Ajami (…) first made his political mark as an advocate for Palestinian nationalism. For those who knew Ajami mainly as a consistent advocate of Saddam Hussein’s ouster, it’s worth watching a YouTube snippet of his 1978 debate with Benjamin Netanyahu, in which Ajami makes the now-standard case against Israeli iniquity. Today Mr. Netanyahu sounds very much like his 28-year-old self. But Ajami changed. He was, to borrow a phrase, mugged by reality. By the 1980s, he wrote, "Arab society had run through most of its myths, and what remained in the wake of the word, of the many proud statements people had made about themselves and their history, was a new world of cruelty, waste, and confusion." What Ajami did was to see that world plain, without the usual evasions and obfuscations and shifting of blame to Israel and the U.S. Like Sidney Hook or Eric Hoffer, the great ex-communists of a previous generation, his honesty, courage and intelligence got the better of his ideology; he understood his former beliefs with the hard-won wisdom of the disillusioned. (…) Ajami understood the Arab world as only an insider could—intimately, sympathetically, without self-pity. And he loved America as only an immigrant could—with a depth of appreciation and absence of cynicism rarely given to the native-born. If there was ever an error in his judgment, it’s that he believed in people—Arabs and Americans alike—perhaps more than they believed in themselves. It was the kind of mistake only a generous spirit could make. Bret Stephens
Ce qui caractérise pour l’essentiel Ajami n’est pas sa foi religieuse (s’il en a une au sens traditionnel) mais son appréciation sans égal de l’ironie historique – l’ironie , par exemple, dans le fait qu’en éliminant la simple figure de Saddam Hussein nous ayons brutalement contraint un Monde arabe qui ne s’y attendait pas à un règlement de comptes général; l’ironie que la véhémence même de l’insurrection irakienne puisse au bout du compte la vaincre et l’humilier sur son propre terrain et pourrait déjà avoir commencé à le faire; l’ironie que l’Iran chiite pourrait bien maudire le jour où ses cousins chiites en Irak ont été libérés par les Américains. Et ironie pour ironie, Ajami est clairement épaté qu’un membre de l’establishment pétrolier américain, lui-même fils d’un président qui en 1991 avait appelé les Chiites irakiens à l’insurrection contre un Saddam Hussein blessé pour finalement les laisser se faire massacrer, ait été amené à s’exclamer en septembre 2003: Comme dictature, l’Irak avait un fort pouvoir de déstabilisation du Moyen-Orient. Comme démocratie, il aura un fort pouvoir d’inspiration pour le Moyen-Orient. Victor Davis Hanson
The relations between Islam and Christianity, both Orthodox and Western, have often been stormy. Each has been the other’s Other. The 20th-century conflict between liberal democracy and Marxist-Leninism is only a fleeting and superficial historical phenomenon compared to the continuing and deeply conflictual relation between Islam and Christianity. Samuel Huntington
Nearly 15 years on, Huntington’s thesis about a civilizational clash seems more compelling to me than the critique I provided at that time. In recent years, for example, the edifice of Kemalism has come under assault, and Turkey has now elected an Islamist to the presidency in open defiance of the military-bureaucratic elite. There has come that “redefinition” that Huntington prophesied. To be sure, the verdict may not be quite as straightforward as he foresaw. The Islamists have prevailed, but their desired destination, or so they tell us, is still Brussels: in that European shelter, the Islamists shrewdly hope they can find protection against the power of the military. (…) Huntington had the integrity and the foresight to see the falseness of a borderless world, a world without differences. (He is one of two great intellectual figures who peered into the heart of things and were not taken in by globalism’s conceit, Bernard Lewis being the other.) I still harbor doubts about whether the radical Islamists knocking at the gates of Europe, or assaulting it from within, are the bearers of a whole civilization. They flee the burning grounds of Islam, but carry the fire with them. They are “nowhere men,” children of the frontier between Islam and the West, belonging to neither. If anything, they are a testament to the failure of modern Islam to provide for its own and to hold the fidelities of the young. More ominously perhaps, there ran through Huntington’s pages an anxiety about the will and the coherence of the West — openly stated at times, made by allusions throughout. The ramparts of the West are not carefully monitored and defended, Huntington feared. Islam will remain Islam, he worried, but it is “dubious” whether the West will remain true to itself and its mission. Clearly, commerce has not delivered us out of history’s passions, the World Wide Web has not cast aside blood and kin and faith. It is no fault of Samuel Huntington’s that we have not heeded his darker, and possibly truer, vision. Fouad Ajami
There should be no illusions about the sort of Arab landscape that America is destined to find if, or when, it embarks on a war against the Iraqi regime. There would be no "hearts and minds" to be won in the Arab world, no public diplomacy that would convince the overwhelming majority of Arabs that this war would be a just war. An American expedition in the wake of thwarted UN inspections would be seen by the vast majority of Arabs as an imperial reach into their world, a favor to Israel, or a way for the United States to secure control over Iraq’s oil. No hearing would be given to the great foreign power. (…) America ought to be able to live with this distrust and discount a good deal of this anti-Americanism as the "road rage" of a thwarted Arab world – the congenital condition of a culture yet to take full responsibility for its self-inflicted wounds. There is no need to pay excessive deference to the political pieties and givens of the region. Indeed, this is one of those settings where a reforming foreign power’s simpler guidelines offer a better way than the region’s age-old prohibitions and defects. Fouad Ajami
The current troubles of the Obama presidency can be read back into its beginnings. Rule by personal charisma has met its proper fate. The spell has been broken, and the magician stands exposed. We need no pollsters to tell us of the loss of faith in Mr. Obama’s policies—and, more significantly, in the man himself. Charisma is like that. Crowds come together and they project their needs onto an imagined redeemer. The redeemer leaves the crowd to its imagination: For as long as the charismatic moment lasts—a year, an era—the redeemer is above and beyond judgment. Fouad Ajami
[Bush] can definitely claim paternity…One despot fell in 2003. We decapitated him. Two despots, in Tunisia and Egypt, fell, and there is absolutely a direct connection between what happened in Iraq in 2003 and what’s happening today throughout the rest of the Arab world. (…) It wasn’t American tanks [that brought about this moment]…It was a homegrown enterprise. It was Egyptians, Tunisians, Libyans conquering their fear – people went out and conquered fear and did something amazing. Fouad Ajami
The United States will have to be prepared for and accept the losses and adversity that are an integral part of staying on, rightly, in so tangled and difficult a setting. Fouad Ajami
The mask of the Assad regime finally falls.. Fouad Ajami
The Iraqis needn’t trumpet the obvious fact in broad daylight, but the balance of power in the Persian Gulf would be altered for the better by a security arrangement between the United States and the government in Baghdad. (…) There remains, of course, the pledge given by presidential candidate Barack Obama that a President Obama would liquidate the American military role in Iraq by the end of 2011. That pledge was one of the defining themes of his bid for the presidency, and it endeared him to the “progressives” within his own party, who had been so agitated and mobilized against the Iraq war. But Barack Obama is now the standard-bearer of America’s power. He has broken with the “progressives” over Afghanistan, the use of drones in Pakistan, Guantánamo, military tribunals, and a whole host of national security policies that have (nearly) blurred the line between his policies and those of his predecessor. The left has grumbled, but, in the main, it has bowed to political necessity. At any rate, the fury on the left that once surrounded the Iraq war has been spent; a residual American presence in Iraq would fly under the radar of the purists within the ranks of the Democratic Party. (…) The enemy will have a say on how things will play out for American forces in Iraq. Iran and its Iraqi proxies can be expected to do all they can to make the American presence as bloody and costly as possible. A long, leaky border separates Iran from Iraq; movement across it is quite easy for Iranian agents and saboteurs. They can come in as “pilgrims,” and there might be shades of Lebanon in the 1980s, big deeds of terror that target the American forces.  (…) Even in the best of worlds, an American residual presence in Iraq will have its costs and heartbreak. But the United States will have to be prepared for and accept the losses and adversity that are an integral part of staying on, rightly, in so tangled and difficult a setting. Fouad Ajami
L’argument selon lequel la liberté ne peut venir que de l’intérieur et ne peut être offerte à des peuples lointains est bien plus fausse que l’on croit. Dans toute l’histoire moderne, la fortune de la liberté a toujours dépendu de la volonté de la ou des puissances dominantes du moment. Le tout récemment disparu professeur Samuel P. Huntington avait développé ce point de la manière la plus détaillée. Dans 15 des 29 pays démocratiques en 1970, les régimes démocratiques avaient été soit initiés par une puissance étrangère soit étaient le produit de l’indépendance contre une occupation étrangère. (…) Tout au long du flux et du reflux de la liberté, la puissance est toujours restée importante et la liberté a toujours eu besoin de la protection de grandes puissances. Le pouvoir d’attraction des pamphlets de Mill, Locke et Paine était fondé sur les canons de la Pax Britannica, et sur la force de l’Amérique quand la puissance britannique a flanché.  (…) L’ironie est maintenant évidente: George W. Bush comme force pour l’émancipation des terres musulmanes et Barack Hussein Obama en messager des bonnes vieilles habitudes. Ainsi c’est le plouc qui porte au monde le message que les musulmans et les Arabes n’ont pas la tyrannie dans leur ADN et l’homme aux fragments musulmans, kenyans et indonésiens dans sa propre vie et son identité qui annonce son acceptation de l’ordre établi. Mr. Obama pourrait encore reconnaître l’impact révolutionnaire de la diplomatie de son prédecesseur mais jusqu’à présent il s’est refusé à le faire. (…) Son soutien au " processus de paix" est un retour à la diplomatie stérile des années Clinton, avec sa croyance que le terrorisme prend sa source dans les revendications des Palestiniens. M. Obama et ses conseillers se sont gardés d’affirmer que le terrorisme a disparu, mais il y a un message indubitable donné par eux que nous pouvons retourner à nos propres affaires, que Wall Street est plus mortel et dangereux que la fameuse " rue Arabo-Musulmane".  Fouad Ajami
Two men bear direct responsibility for the mayhem engulfing Iraq: Barack Obama and Nouri al-Maliki. (…) This sad state of affairs was in no way preordained. In December 2011, Mr. Obama stood with Mr. Maliki and boasted that "in the coming years, it’s estimated that Iraq’s economy will grow even faster than China’s or India’s." But the negligence of these two men—most notably in their failure to successfully negotiate a Status of Forces Agreement that would have maintained an adequate U.S. military presence in Iraq—has resulted in the current descent into sectarian civil war. (…) With ISIS now reigning triumphant in Fallujah, in the oil-refinery town of Baiji, and, catastrophically, in Mosul, the Obama administration cannot plead innocence. Mosul is particularly explosive. It sits astride the world between Syria and Iraq and is economically and culturally intertwined with the Syrian territories. This has always been Mosul’s reality. There was no chance that a war would rage on either side of Mosul without it spreading next door. The Obama administration’s vanishing "red lines" and utter abdication in Syria were bound to compound Iraq’s troubles. Grant Mr. Maliki the harvest of his sectarian bigotry. He has ridden that sectarianism to nearly a decade in power. Mr. Obama’s follies are of a different kind. They’re sins born of ignorance. He was eager to give up the gains the U.S. military and the Bush administration had secured in Iraq. Nor did he possess the generosity of spirit to give his predecessors the credit they deserved for what they had done in that treacherous landscape. Fouad Ajami

Descente en règle dans le NYT et the Nation, silence radio dans les médias comme d’ailleurs dans l’édition en France, notice wikipedia en français de quatre lignes …

Quel meilleur hommage, pour un spécialiste du Monde arabe, que d’être accusé  de racisme par Edward Saïd ?

Et quel silence plus éloquent, au lendemain de sa mort et au moment même de la perte de l’Irak contre laquelle il avait tant averti l’Administration américaine, que celui de la presse française pour l’un des plus respectés spécialistes du Moyen-Orient ?

Qui, si l’on suit les médias qui prennent la peine de parler de lui, avait commis l’impardonnable péché d’appeler de ses voeux l’intervention alliée en Irak …

Et surtout, vis à vis de l’Illusioniste en chef de la Maison Blanche et coqueluche de nos médias, de ne jamais mâcher ses mots ?

Fouad Ajami, Commentator and Expert in Arab History, Dies at 68
Douglas Martin
The New York Times
June 22, 2014

Fouad Ajami, an academic, author and broadcast commentator on Middle East affairs who helped rally support for the United States invasion of Iraq in 2003 — partly by personally advising top policy makers — died on Sunday. He was 68.

The cause was cancer, the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, where Mr. Ajami was a senior fellow, said in a statement

An Arab, Mr. Ajami despaired of autocratic Arab governments finding their own way to democracy, and believed that the United States must confront what he called a “culture of terrorism” after the 2001 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. He likened the Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein to Hitler.

Mr. Ajami strove to put Arab history into a larger perspective. He often referred to Muslim rage over losing power to the West in 1683, when a Turkish siege of Vienna failed. He said this memory had led to Arab self-pity and self-delusion as they blamed the rest of the world for their troubles. Terrorism, he said, was one result.

It was a view that had been propounded by Bernard Lewis, the eminent Middle East historian at Princeton and public intellectual, who also urged the United States to invade Iraq and advised President George W. Bush.

Most Americans became familiar with Mr. Ajami’s views on CBS News, CNN and the PBS programs “Charlie Rose” and “NewsHour,” where his distinctive beard and polished manner lent force to his opinions. He wrote more than 400 articles for magazines and newspapers, including The New York Times, as well as a half-dozen books on the Middle East, some of which included his own experiences as a Shiite Muslim in majority Sunni societies.

Condoleezza Rice summoned him to the Bush White House when she was national security adviser, and he advised Paul Wolfowitz, then the deputy secretary of defense. In a speech in 2002, Vice President Dick Cheney invoked Mr. Ajami as predicting that Iraqis would greet liberation by the American military with joy.

In the years following the Iraqi invasion, Mr. Ajami continued to support the action as stabilizing. But he said this month that Prime Minister Nuri Kamal al-Maliki had squandered an opportunity to unify the country after American intervention and become a dictator. More recently, he favored more aggressive policies toward Iran and Syria. Mr. Ajami’s harshest criticism was leveled at Arab autocrats, who by definition lacked popular support. But his use of words like “tribal,” “atavistic” and “clannish” to describe Arab peoples rankled some. So did his belief that Western nations should intervene in the region to correct wrongs. Edward Said, the Palestinian cultural critic who died in 2003, accused him of having “unmistakably racist prescriptions.”

Others praised him for balance. Daniel Pipes, a scholar who specializes in the Middle East, said in Commentary magazine in 2006 that Mr. Ajami had avoided “the common Arab fixation on the perfidy of Israel.”

Fouad Ajami was born on Sept. 19, 1945, at the foot of a castle built by Crusaders in Arnoun, a dusty village in southern Lebanon. His family came from Iran (the name Ajami means “Persian” in Arabic) and were prosperous tobacco farmers. When he was 4, the family moved to Beirut.

As a boy he was taunted by Sunni Muslim children for being Shiite and short, he wrote in “The Dream Palace of the Arabs: A Generation’s Odyssey” (1998), an examination of Arab intellectuals of the last two generations. As a teenager, he was enthusiastic about Arab nationalism, a cause he would later criticize. He also fell in love with American culture, particularly Hollywood movies, and especially Westerns. In 1963, a day or two before his 18th birthday, his family moved to the United States.

He attended Eastern Oregon College (now University), then earned a Ph.D. at the University of Washington after writing a thesis on international relations and world government. He next taught political science at Princeton. In 1980, the School of Advanced International Studies of Johns Hopkins University named him director of Middle East studies. He joined the Hoover Institution in 2011.

Mr. Ajami’s first book, “The Arab Predicament: Arab Political Thought and Practice Since 1967” (1981), explored the panic and sense of vulnerability in the Arab world after Israel’s victory in the 1967 war. His next book, “The Vanishing Imam: Musa al Sadr and the Shia of Lebanon” (1986), profiled an Iranian cleric who helped transform Lebanese Shia from “a despised minority” to effective successful political actors. For the 1988 book “Beirut: City of Regrets,” Mr. Ajami provided a long introduction and some text to accompany a photographic essay by Eli Reed.

“The Dream Palace of the Arabs” told of how a generation of Arab intellectuals tried to renew their homelands’ culture through the forces of modernism and secularism. The Christian Science Monitor called it “a cleareyed look at the lost hopes of the Arabs.”

Partly because of that tone, some condemned the book as too negative. The scholar Andrew N. Rubin, writing in The Nation, said it “echoes the kind of anti-Arabism that both Washington and the pro-Israeli lobby have come to embrace.”

Mr. Ajami received many awards, including a MacArthur Fellowship in 1982 and a National Humanities Medal in 2006. He is survived by his wife, Michelle. In a profile in The Nation in 2003, Adam Shatz described Mr. Ajami’s distinctive appearance, characterized by a “dramatic beard, stylish clothes and a charming, almost flirtatious manner.”

He continued: “On television, he radiates above-the-frayness, speaking with the wry, jaded authority that men in power admire, especially in men who have risen from humble roots. Unlike the other Arabs, he appears to have no ax to grind. He is one of us; he is the good Arab.”

Voir aussi:

The Native Informant
Fouad Ajami is the Pentagon’s favorite Arab.
Adam Shatz
April 10, 2003 | This article appeared in the April 28, 2003 edition of The Nation.

Late last August, at a reunion of Korean War veterans in San Antonio, Texas, Dick Cheney tried to assuage concerns that a unilateral, pre-emptive war against Iraq might "cause even greater troubles in that part of the world." He cited a well-known Arab authority: "As for the reaction of the Arab street, the Middle East expert Professor Fouad Ajami predicts that after liberation in Basra and Baghdad, the streets are sure to erupt in joy." As the bombs fell over Baghdad, just before American troops began to encounter fierce Iraqi resistance, Ajami could scarcely conceal his glee. "We are now coming into acquisition of Iraq," he announced on CBS News the morning of March 22. "It’s an amazing performance."

If Hollywood ever makes a film about Gulf War II, a supporting role should be reserved for Ajami, the director of Middle East Studies at the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University. His is a classic American success story. Born in 1945 to Shiite parents in the remote southern Lebanese village of Arnoun and now a proud naturalized American, Ajami has become the most politically influential Arab intellectual of his generation in the United States. Condoleezza Rice often summons him to the White House for advice, and Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz, a friend and former colleague, has paid tribute to him in several recent speeches on Iraq. Although he has produced little scholarly work of value, Ajami is a regular guest on CBS News, Charlie Rose and the NewsHour With Jim Lehrer, and a frequent contributor to the editorial pages of the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times. His ideas are also widely recycled by acolytes like Thomas Friedman and Judith Miller of the Times.

Ajami’s unique role in American political life has been to unpack the unfathomable mysteries of the Arab and Muslim world and to help sell America’s wars in the region. A diminutive, balding man with a dramatic beard, stylish clothes and a charming, almost flirtatious manner, he has played his part brilliantly. On television, he radiates above-the-frayness, speaking with the wry, jaded authority that men in power admire, especially in men who have risen from humble roots. Unlike the other Arabs, he appears to have no ax to grind. He is one of us; he is the good Arab.

Ajami’s admirers paint him as a courageous gadfly who has risen above the tribal hatreds of the Arabs, a Middle Eastern Spinoza whose honesty has earned him the scorn of his brethren. Commentary editor-at-large Norman Podhoretz, one of his many right-wing American Jewish fans, writes that Ajami "has been virtually alone in telling the truth about the attitude toward Israel of the people from whom he stems." The people from whom Ajami "stems" are, of course, the Arabs, and Ajami’s ethnicity is not incidental to his celebrity. It lends him an air of authority not enjoyed by non-Arab polemicists like Martin Kramer and Daniel Pipes.

But Ajami is no gadfly. He is, in fact, entirely a creature of the American establishment. His once-luminous writing, increasingly a blend of Naipaulean clichés about Muslim pathologies and Churchillian rhetoric about the burdens of empire, is saturated with hostility toward Sunni Arabs in general (save for pro-Western Gulf Arabs, toward whom he is notably indulgent), and to Palestinians in particular. He invites comparison with Henry Kissinger, another émigré intellectual to achieve extraordinary prominence as a champion of American empire. Like Kissinger, Ajami has a suave television demeanor, a gravitas-lending accent, an instinctive solicitude for the imperatives of power and a cool disdain for the weak. And just as Kissinger cozied up to Nelson Rockefeller and Nixon, so has Ajami attached himself to such powerful patrons as Laurence Tisch, former chairman of CBS; Mort Zuckerman, the owner of US News & World Report; Martin Peretz, a co-owner of The New Republic; and Leslie Gelb, head of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Despite his training in political science, Ajami often sounds like a pop psychologist in his writing about the Arab world or, as he variously calls it, "the world of Araby," "that Arab world" and "those Arab lands." According to Ajami, that world is "gripped in a poisonous rage" and "wedded to a worldview of victimology," bad habits reinforced by its leaders, "megalomaniacs who never tell their people what can and cannot be had in the world of nations." There is, to be sure, a grain of truth in Ajami’s grim assessment. Progressive Arab thinkers from Sadeq al-Azm to Adonis have issued equally bleak indictments of Arab political culture, lambasting the dearth of self-criticism and the constant search for external scapegoats. Unlike these writers, however, Ajami has little sympathy for the people of the region, unless they happen to live within the borders of "rogue states" like Iraq, in which case they must be "liberated" by American force. The corrupt regimes that rule the Arab world, he has suggested, are more or less faithful reflections of the "Arab psyche": "Despots always work with a culture’s yearnings…. After all, a hadith, a saying attributed to the Prophet Muhammad, maintains ‘You will get the rulers you deserve.'" His own taste in regimes runs to monarchies like Kuwait. The Jews of Israel, it seems, are not just the only people in the region who enjoy the fruits of democracy; they are the only ones who deserve them.

Once upon a time, Ajami was an articulate and judicious critic both of Arab society and of the West, a defender of Palestinian rights and an advocate of decent government in the Arab world. Though he remains a shrewd guide to the hypocrisies of Arab leaders, his views on foreign policy now scarcely diverge from those of pro-Israel hawks in the Bush Administration. "Since the Gulf War, Fouad has taken leave of his analytic perspective to play to his elite constituency," said Augustus Richard Norton, a Middle East scholar at Boston University. "It’s very unfortunate because he could have made an astonishingly important contribution."

Seeking to understand the causes of Ajami’s transformation, I spoke to more than two dozen of his friends and acquaintances over the past several months. (Ajami did not return my phone calls or e-mails.) These men and women depicted a man at once ambitious and insecure, torn between his irascible intellectual independence and his even stronger desire to belong to something larger than himself. On the one hand, he is an intellectual dandy who, as Sayres Rudy, a former student, puts it, "doesn’t like groups and thinks people who join them are mediocre." On the other, as a Shiite among Sunnis, and as an émigré in America, he has always felt the outsider’s anxiety to please, and has adjusted his convictions to fit his surroundings. As a young man eager to assimilate into the urbane Sunni world of Muslim Beirut, he embraced pan-Arabism. Received with open arms by the American Jewish establishment in New York and Washington, he became an ardent Zionist. An informal adviser to both Bush administrations, he is now a cheerleader for the American empire.

The man from Arnoun appears to be living the American dream. He has a prestigious job and the ear of the President. Yet the price of power has been higher in his case than in Kissinger’s. Kissinger, after all, is a figure of renown among the self-appointed leaders of "the people from whom he stems" and a frequent speaker at Jewish charity galas, whereas Ajami is a man almost entirely deserted by his people, a pariah at what should be his hour of triumph. In Arnoun, a family friend told me, "Fouad is a black sheep because of his staunch support for the Israelis." Although he frequently travels to Tel Aviv and the Persian Gulf, he almost never goes to Lebanon. In becoming an American, he has become, as he himself has confessed, "a stranger in the Arab world."

Up From Lebanon

This is an immigrant’s tale.

It begins in Arnoun, a rocky hamlet in the south of Lebanon where Fouad al-Ajami was born on September 19, 1945. A prosperous tobacco-growing Shiite family, the Ajamis had come to Arnoun from Iran in the 1850s. (Their name, Arabic for "Persian," gave away their origins.)

When Ajami was 4, he moved with his family to Beirut, settling in the largely Armenian northeastern quarter, a neighborhood thick with orange orchards, pine trees and strawberry fields. As members of the rural Shiite minority, the country’s "hewers of wood and drawers of water," the Ajamis stood apart from the city’s dominant groups, the Sunni Muslims and the Maronite Christians. "We were strangers to Beirut," he has written. "We wanted to pass undetected in the modern world of Beirut, to partake of its ways." For the young "Shia assimilé," as he has described himself, "anything Persian, anything Shia, was anathema…. speaking Persianized Arabic was a threat to something unresolved in my identity." He tried desperately, but with little success, to pass among his Sunni peers. In the predominantly Sunni schools he attended, "Fouad was taunted for being a Shiite, and for being short," one friend told me. "That left him with a lasting sense of bitterness toward the Sunnis."

In the 1950s, Arab nationalism appeared to hold out the promise of transcending the schisms between Sunnis and Shiites, and the confessional divisions separating Muslims and Christians. Like his classmates, Ajami fell under the spell of Arab nationalism’s charismatic spokesman, the Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser. At the same time, he was falling under the spell of American culture, which offered relief from the "ancestral prohibitions and phobias" of his "cramped land." Watching John Wayne films, he "picked up American slang and a romance for the distant power casting its shadow across us." On July 15, 1958, the day after the bloody overthrow of the Iraqi monarchy by nationalist army officers, Ajami’s two loves had their first of many clashes, when President Eisenhower sent the US Marines to Beirut to contain the spread of radical Arab nationalism. In their initial confrontation, Ajami chose Egypt’s leader, defying his parents and hopping on a Damascus-bound bus for one of Nasser’s mass rallies.

Ajami arrived in the United States in the fall of 1963, just before he turned 18. He did his graduate work at the University of Washington, where he wrote his dissertation on international relations and world government. At the University of Washington, Ajami gravitated toward progressive Arab circles. Like his Arab peers, he was shaken by the humiliating defeat of the Arab countries in the 1967 war with Israel, and he was heartened by the emergence of the PLO. While steering clear of radicalism, he often expressed horror at Israel’s brutal reprisal attacks against southern Lebanese villages in response to PLO raids.

apartment in New York. He made a name for himself there as a vocal supporter of Palestinian self-determination. One friend remembers him as "a fairly typical advocate of Third World positions." Yet he was also acutely aware of the failings of Third World states, which he unsparingly diagnosed in "The Fate of Nonalignment," a brilliant 1980/81 essay in Foreign Affairs. In 1980, when Johns Hopkins offered him a position as director of Middle East Studies at SAIS, a Washington-based graduate program, he took it.

Ajami’s Predicament

A year after arriving at SAIS, Ajami published his first and still best book, The Arab Predicament. An anatomy of the intellectual and political crisis that swept the Arab world following its defeat by Israel in the 1967 war, it is one of the most probing and subtle books ever written in English on the region. Ranging gracefully across political theory, literature and poetry, Ajami draws an elegant, often moving portrait of Arab intellectuals in their anguished efforts to put together a world that had come apart at the seams. The book did not offer a bold or original argument; like Isaiah Berlin’s Russian Thinkers, it provided an interpretive survey–respectful even when critical–of other people’s ideas. It was the book of a man who had grown disillusioned with Nasser, whose millenarian dream of restoring the "Arab nation" had run up against the hard fact that the "divisions of the Arab world were real, not contrived points on a map or a colonial trick." But pan-Arabism was not the only temptation to which the intellectuals had succumbed. There was radical socialism, and the Guevarist fantasies of the Palestinian revolution. There was Islamic fundamentalism, with its romance of authenticity and its embittered rejection of the West. And then there was the search for Western patronage, the way of Nasser’s successor, Anwar Sadat, who forgot his own world and ended up being devoured by it.

Ajami’s ambivalent chapter on Sadat makes for especially fascinating reading today. He praised Sadat for breaking with Nasserism and making peace with Israel, and perhaps saw something of himself in the "self-defined peasant from the dusty small village" who had "traveled far beyond the bounds of his world." But he also saw in Sadat’s story the tragic parable of a man who had become more comfortable with Western admirers than with his own people. When Sadat spoke nostalgically of his village–as Ajami now speaks of Arnoun–he was pandering to the West. Arabs, a people of the cities, would not be "taken in by the myth of the village." Sadat’s "American connection," Ajami suggested, gave him "a sense of psychological mobility," lifting some of the burdens imposed by his cramped world. And as his dependence on his American patrons deepened, "he became indifferent to the sensibilities of his own world."

Sadat was one example of the trap of seeking the West’s approval, and losing touch with one’s roots; V.S. Naipaul was another. Naipaul, Ajami suggested in an incisive 1981 New York Times review of Among the Believers, exemplified the "dilemma of a gifted author led by his obsessive feelings regarding the people he is writing about to a difficult intellectual and moral bind." Third World exiles like Naipaul, Ajami wrote, "have a tendency to…look at their own countries and similar ones with a critical eye," yet "these same men usually approach the civilization of the West with awe and leave it unexamined." Ajami preferred the humane, nonjudgmental work of Polish travel writer Ryszard Kapucinski: "His eye for human folly is as sharp as V.S. Naipaul. His sympathy and sorrow, however, are far deeper."

The Arab Predicament was infused with sympathy and sorrow, but these qualities were ignored by the book’s Arab critics in the West, who–displaying the ideological rigidity that is an unfortunate hallmark of exile politics–accused him of papering over the injustices of imperialism and "blaming the victim." To an extent, this was a fair criticism. Ajami paid little attention to imperialism, and even less to Israel’s provocative role in the region. What is more, his argument that "the wounds that mattered were self-inflicted" endeared him to those who wanted to distract attention from Palestine. Doors flew open. On the recommendation of Bernard Lewis, the distinguished British Orientalist at Princeton and a strong supporter of Israel, Ajami became the first Arab to win the MacArthur "genius" prize in 1982, and in 1983 he became a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. The New Republic began to publish lengthy essays by Ajami, models of the form that offer a tantalizing glimpse of the career he might have had in a less polarized intellectual climate. Pro-Israel intellectual circles groomed him as a rival to Edward Said, holding up his book as a corrective to Orientalism, Said’s classic study of how the West imagined the East in the age of empire.

In fact, Ajami shared some of Said’s anger about the Middle East. The Israelis, he wrote in an eloquent New York Times op-ed after the 1982 invasion of Lebanon, "came with a great delusion: that if you could pound men and women hard enough, if you could bring them to their knees, you could make peace with them." He urged the United States to withdraw from Lebanon in 1984, and he advised it to open talks with the Iranian government. Throughout the 1980s, Ajami maintained a critical attitude toward America’s interventions in the Middle East, stressing the limits of America’s ability to influence or shape a "tormented world" it scarcely understood. "Our arguments dovetailed," says Said. "There was an unspoken assumption that we shared the same kind of politics."

But just below the surface there were profound differences of opinion. Hisham Milhem, a Lebanese journalist who knows both men well, explained their differences to me by contrasting their views on Joseph Conrad. "Edward and Fouad are both crazy about Conrad, but they see in him very different things. Edward sees the critic of empire, especially in Heart of Darkness. Fouad, on the other hand, admires the Polish exile in Western Europe who made a conscious break with the old country."

Yet the old world had as much of a grip on Ajami as it did on Said. In southern Lebanon, Palestinian guerrillas had set up a state within a state. They often behaved thuggishly toward the Shiites, alienating their natural allies and recklessly exposing them to Israel’s merciless reprisals. By the time Israeli tanks rolled into Lebanon in 1982, relations between the two communities had so deteriorated that some Shiites greeted the invaders with rice and flowers. Like many Shiites, Ajami was fed up with the Palestinians, whose revolution had brought ruin to Lebanon. Arnoun itself had not been unscathed: A nearby Crusader castle, the majestic Beaufort, was now the scene of intense fighting.

In late May 1985, Ajami–now identifying himself as a Shiite from southern Lebanon–sparred with Said on the MacNeil Lehrer Report over the war between the PLO and Shiite Amal militia, then raging in Beirut’s refugee camps. A few months later, they came to verbal blows again, when Ajami was invited to speak at a Harvard conference on Islam and Muslim politics organized by Israeli-American academic Nadav Safran. After the Harvard Crimson revealed that the conference had been partly funded by the CIA, Ajami, at the urging of Said and the late Pakistani writer Eqbal Ahmad, joined a wave of speakers who were withdrawing from the conference. But Ajami, who was a protégé and friend of Safran, immediately regretted his decision. He wrote a blistering letter to Said and Ahmad a few weeks later, accusing them of "bringing the conflicts of the Middle East to this country" while "I have tried to go beyond them…. Therefore, my friends, this is the parting of ways. I hope never to encounter you again, and we must cease communication. Yours sincerely, Fouad Ajami."

The Tribal Turn

By now, the "Shia assimilé" had fervently embraced his Shiite identity. Like Sadat, he began to rhapsodize about his "dusty village" in wistful tones. The Vanished Imam, his 1986 encomium to Musa al-Sadr, the Iranian cleric who led the Amal militia before mysteriously disappearing on a 1978 visit to Libya, offers important clues into Ajami’s thinking of the time. A work of lyrical nationalist mythology, The Vanished Imam also provides a thinly veiled political memoir, recounting Ajami’s disillusionment with Palestinians, Arabs and the left, and his conversion to old-fashioned tribal politics.

The marginalized Shiites had found a home in Amal, and a spiritual leader in Sadr, a "big man" who is explicitly compared to Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim and credited with a far larger role than he actually played in Shiite politics. Writing of Sadr, Ajami might have been describing himself. Sadr is an Ajam–a Persian–with "an outsider’s eagerness to please." He is "suspicious of grand schemes," blessed with "a strong sense of pragmatism, of things that can and cannot be," thanks to which virtue he "came to be seen as an enemy of everything ‘progressive.'" "Tired of the polemics," he alone is courageous enough to stand up to the Palestinians, warning them not to "seek a ‘substitute homeland,’ watan badil, in Lebanon." Unlike the Palestinians, Ajami tells us repeatedly, the Shiites are realists, not dreamers; reformers, not revolutionaries. Throughout the book, a stark dichotomy is also drawn between Shiite and Arab nationalism, although, as one of his Shiite critics pointed out in a caustic review in the International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, "allegiance to Arab nationalist ideals…was paramount" in Sadr’s circles. The Shiites of Ajami’s imagination seem fundamentally different from other Arabs: a community that shares America’s aversion to the Palestinians, a "model minority" worthy of the West’s sympathy.

The Shiite critic of the Palestinians cut an especially attractive profile in the eyes of the American media. Most American viewers of CBS News, which made him a high-paid consultant in 1985, had no idea that he was almost completely out of step with the community for which he claimed to speak. By the time The Vanished Imam appeared, the Shiites, under the leadership of a new group, Hezbollah, had launched a battle to liberate Lebanon from Israeli control. Israeli soldiers were now greeted with grenades and explosives, rather than rice and flowers, and Arnoun became a hotbed of Hezbollah support. Yet Ajami displayed little enthusiasm for this Shiite struggle. He was also oddly silent about the behavior of the Israelis, who, from the 1982 invasion onward, had killed far more Shiites than either Arafat ("the Flying Dutchman of the Palestinian movement") or Hafez al-Assad (Syria’s "cruel enforcer"). The Shiites, he suggested, were "beneficiaries of Israel’s Lebanon war."

In the Promised Land

By the mid-1980s, the Middle Eastern country closest to Ajami’s heart was not Lebanon but Israel. He returned from his trips to the Jewish state boasting of traveling to the occupied territories under the guard of the Israel Defense Forces and of being received at the home of Teddy Kollek, then Jerusalem’s mayor. The Israelis earned his admiration because they had something the Palestinians notably lacked: power. They were also tough-minded realists, who understood "what can and cannot be had in the world of nations." The Palestinians, by contrast, were romantics who imagined themselves to be "exempt from the historical laws of gravity."

n 1986, Ajami had praised Musa al-Sadr as a realist for telling the Palestinians to fight Israel in the occupied territories, rather than in Lebanon. But when the Palestinians did exactly that, in the first intifada of 1987-93, it no longer seemed realistic to Ajami, who then advised them to swallow the bitter pill of defeat and pay for their bad choices. While Israeli troops shot down children armed only with stones, Ajami told the Palestinians they should give up on the idea of a sovereign state ("a phantom"), even in the West Bank and Gaza. When the PLO announced its support for a two-state solution at a 1988 conference in Algiers, Ajami called the declaration "hollow," its concessions to Israel inadequate. On the eve of the Madrid talks in the fall of 1991 he wrote, "It is far too late to introduce a new nation between Israel and Jordan." Nor should the American government embark on the "fool’s errand" of pressuring Israel to make peace. Under Ajami’s direction, the Middle East program of SAIS became a bastion of pro-Israel opinion. An increasing number of Israeli and pro-Israel academics, many of them New Republic contributors, were invited as guest lecturers. "Rabbi Ajami," as many people around SAIS referred to him, was also receiving significant support from a Jewish family foundation in Baltimore, which picked up the tab for the trips his students took to the Middle East every summer. Back in Lebanon, Ajami’s growing reputation as an apologist for Israel reportedly placed considerable strains on family members in Arnoun.

‘The Saudi Way’

Ajami also developed close ties during the 1980s to Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, which made him–as he often and proudly pointed out–the only Arab who traveled both to the Persian Gulf countries and to Israel. In 1985 he became an external examiner in the political science department at Kuwait University; he said "the place seemed vibrant and open to me." His major patrons, however, were Saudi. He has traveled to Riyadh many times to raise money for his program, sometimes taking along friends like Martin Peretz; he has also vacationed in Prince Bandar’s home in Aspen. Saudi hospitality–and Saudi Arabia’s lavish support for SAIS–bred gratitude. At one meeting of the Council on Foreign Relations, Ajami told a group that, as one participant recalls, "the Saudi system was a lot stronger than we thought, that it was a system worth defending, and that it had nothing to apologize for." Throughout the 1980s and ’90s, he faithfully echoed the Saudi line. "Rage against the West does not come naturally to the gulf Arabs," he wrote in 1990. "No great tales of betrayal are told by the Arabs of the desert. These are Palestinian, Lebanese and North African tales."

This may explain why Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait in 1990 aroused greater outrage in Ajami than any act of aggression in the recent history of the Middle East. Neither Israel’s invasion of Lebanon nor the 1982 Sabra and Shatila massacre had caused him comparable consternation. Nor, for that matter, had Saddam’s slaughter of the Kurds in Halabja in 1988. This is understandable, of course; we all react more emotionally when the victims are friends. But we don’t all become publicists for war, as Ajami did that fateful summer, consummating his conversion to Pax Americana. What was remarkable was not only his fervent advocacy; it was his cavalier disregard for truth, his lurid rhetoric and his religious embrace of American power. In Foreign Affairs, Ajami, who knew better, described Iraq, the cradle of Mesopotamian civilization, a major publisher of Arabic literature and a center of the plastic arts, as "a brittle land…with little claim to culture and books and grand ideas." It was, in other words, a wasteland, led by a man who "conjures up Adolf Hitler."

Months before the war began, the Shiite from Arnoun, now writing as an American, in the royal "we," declared that US troops "will have to stay in the Gulf and on a much larger scale," since "we have tangible interests in that land. We stand sentry there in blazing clear daylight." After the Gulf War, Ajami’s cachet soared. In the early 1990s Harvard offered him a chair ("he turned it down because we expected him to be around and to work very hard," a professor told me), and the Council on Foreign Relations added him to its prestigious board of advisers last year. "The Gulf War was the crucible of change," says Augustus Richard Norton. "This immigrant from Arnoun, this man nobody had heard of from a place no one had heard of, had reached the peak of power. This was a true immigrant success story, one of those moments that make an immigrant grateful for America. And I think it implanted a deep sense of patriotism that wasn’t present before."

And, as Ajami once wrote of Sadat, "outside approval gave him the courage to defy" the Arabs, especially when it came to Israel. On June 3, 1992, hardly a year after Gulf War I, Ajami spoke at a pro-Israel fundraiser. Kissinger, the keynote speaker, described Arabs as congenital liars. Ajami chimed in, expressing his doubts that democracy would ever work in the Arab world, and recounting a visit to a Bedouin village where he "insisted on only one thing: that I be spared the ceremony of eating with a Bedouin."

Since the signing of the Oslo Accords in 1993, Ajami has been a consistent critic of the peace process–from the right. He sang the praises of each of Israel’s leaders, from the Likud’s Benjamin Netanyahu, with his "filial devotion [to] the land he had agreed to relinquish," to Labor leader Ehud Barak, "an exemplary soldier." The Palestinians, he wrote, should be grateful to such men for "rescuing" them from defeat, and to Zionism for generously offering them "the possibility of their own national political revival." (True to form, the Palestinians showed "no gratitude.") A year before the destruction of Jenin, he proclaimed that "Israel is existentially through with the siege that had defined its history." Ajami’s Likudnik conversion was sealed by telling revisions of arguments he had made earlier in his career. Where he had once argued that the 1982 invasion of Lebanon aimed to "undermine those in the Arab world who want some form of compromise," he now called it a response to "the challenge of Palestinian terror."

Did Ajami really believe all this? In a stray but revealing comment on Sadat in The New Republic, he left room for doubt. Sadat, he said, was "a son of the soil, who had the fellah’s ability to look into the soul of powerful outsiders, to divine how he could get around them even as he gave them what they desired." Writing on politics, the man from Arnoun gave them what they desired. Writing on literature and poetry, he gave expression to the aesthete, the soulful elegist, even, at times, to the Arab. In his 1998 book, The Dream Palace of the Arabs, one senses, for the first time in years, Ajami’s sympathy for the world he left behind, although there is something furtive, something ghostly about his affection, as if he were writing about a lover he has taught himself to spurn. On rare occasions, Ajami revealed this side of himself to his students, whisking them into his office. Once the door was firmly shut, he would recite the poetry of Nizar Qabbani and Adonis in Arabic, caressing each and every line. As he read, Sayres Rudy told me, "I could swear his heart was breaking."

Ajami’s Solitude

September 11 exposed a major intelligence failure on Ajami’s part. With his obsessive focus on the menace of Saddam and the treachery of Arafat, he had missed the big story. Fifteen of the nineteen hijackers hailed from what he had repeatedly called the "benign political order" of Saudi Arabia; the "Saudi way" he had praised had come undone. Yet the few criticisms that Ajami directed at his patrons in the weeks and months after September 11 were curiously muted, particularly in contrast to the rage of most American commentators. Ajami’s venues in the American media, however, were willing to forgive his softness toward the Saudis. America was going to war with Muslims, and a trusted native informant was needed.

Other forces were working in Ajami’s favor. For George W. Bush and the hawks in his entourage, Afghanistan was merely a prelude to the war they really wanted to fight–the war against Saddam that Ajami had been spoiling for since the end of Gulf War I. As a publicist for Gulf War II, Ajami has abandoned his longstanding emphasis on the limits of American influence in that "tormented region." The war is being sold as the first step in an American plan to effect democratic regime change across the region, and Ajami has stayed on message. We now find him writing in Foreign Affairs that "the driving motivation of a new American endeavor in Iraq and in neighboring Arab lands should be modernizing the Arab world." The opinion of the Arab street, where Iraq is recruiting thousands of new jihadists, is of no concern to him. "We have to live with this anti-Americanism," he sighed recently on CBS. "It’s the congenital condition of the Arab world, and we have to discount a good deal of it as we press on with the task of liberating the Iraqis."

In fairness, Ajami has not completely discarded his wariness about American intervention. For there remains one country where American pressure will come to naught, and that is Israel, where it would "be hubris" to ask anything more of the Israelis, victims of "Arafat’s war." To those who suggest that the Iraq campaign is doomed without an Israeli-Palestinian peace settlement, he says, "We can’t hold our war hostage to Arafat’s campaign of terror."

Fortunately, George W. Bush understands this. Ajami has commended Bush for staking out the "high moral ground" and for "putting Iran on notice" in his Axis of Evil speech. Above all, the President should not allow himself to be deterred by multilateralists like Secretary of State Colin Powell, "an unhappy, reluctant soldier, at heart a pessimist about American power." Unilateralism, Ajami says, is nothing to be ashamed of. It may make us hated in the "hostile landscape" of the Arab world, but, as he recently explained on the NewsHour, "it’s the fate of a great power to stand sentry in that kind of a world."

It is no accident that the "sentry’s solitude" has become the idée fixe of Ajami’s writing in recent years. For it is a theme that resonates powerfully in his own life. Like the empire he serves, Ajami is more influential, and more isolated, than he has ever been. In recent years he has felt a need to defend this choice in heroic terms. "All a man can betray is his conscience," he solemnly writes in The Dream Palace of the Arabs, citing a passage from Conrad. "The solitude Conrad chose is loathed by politicized men and women."

It is a breathtakingly disingenuous remark. Ajami may be "a stranger in the Arab world," but he can hardly claim to be a stranger to its politics. That is why he is quoted, and courted, by Dick Cheney and Paul Wolfowitz. What Ajami abhors in "politicized men and women" is conviction itself. A leftist in the 1970s, a Shiite nationalist in the 1980s, an apologist for the Saudis in the 1990s, a critic-turned-lover of Israel, a skeptic-turned-enthusiast of American empire, he has observed no consistent principle in his career other than deference to power. His vaunted intellectual independence is a clever fiction. The only thing that makes him worth reading is his prose style, and even that has suffered of late. As Ajami observed of Naipaul more than twenty years ago, "he has become more and more predictable, too, with serious cost to his great gift as a writer," blinded by the "assumption that only men who live in remote, dark places are ‘denied a clear vision of the world.'" Like Naipaul, Ajami has forgotten that "darkness is not only there but here as well."

Voir également:

Middle East expert Fouad Ajami, supporter of U.S. war in Iraq, dies at 68
Ajami was known for his criticism of the Arab world’s despotic rulers, among them Hosni Mubarak, Muammar Gadhafi, and Hafez and Bashar Assad.
Ofer Aderet
Haaretz
Jun. 23, 2014

American-Lebanese intellectual and Middle East scholar Prof. Fouad Ajami has died of cancer, aged 68. He passed away Sunday in the United States.

Ajami, who was an expert on the Middle East, is remembered chiefly for his support of the American invasion of Iraq in 2003. He advised the Bush administration during that period. He was strongly opposed to the dictatorial regimes in the Arab countries, believed that the United States must confront “the culture of terror,” as he called it, and supported an assertive policy in regard to Iran and Syria.

Ajami immigrated to the United States from Lebanon with his family in 1963, when he was 18. At Princeton University, he stood out as a supporter of the Palestinians’ right to self-rule. He later went on to Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, where he was in charge of the Middle East studies program.

He became well-known for his appearances on current affairs programs on American television, the hundreds of articles he wrote in journals and newspapers, and the six books he published.

Ajami was very close to the administration of George W. Bush and served as an adviser to Condoleezza Rice while she was national security adviser, and to Paul Wolfowitz, who was deputy secretary of defense at the time. In a speech delivered in 2002, Vice President Dick Cheney claimed Ajami had said the Iraqis would greet their liberation by the Americans with rejoicing.

His support for the war in Iraq elicited harsh criticism. He reiterated this support in an interview with Haaretz in 2011, in which he said: “I still support that war, and I think that the liberals who attacked Bush in America and elsewhere, who attacked him mercilessly, need to reexamine their assumptions.”

Ajami was known for his criticism of the Arab world’s despotic rulers, among them Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, Muammar Gadhafi in Libya, and Hafez and Bashar Assad in Syria. He expressed optimism at the time of the Arab Spring, and had recently supported an assertive policy against Iran and Syria.

Fouad Ajami, Great American
His genius lay in the breadth of his scholarship and the quality of his human understanding.
Bret Stephens
The Wall Street Journal
June 23, 2014

Fouad Ajami would have been amused, but not surprised, to read his own obituary in the New York Times. "Edward Said, the Palestinian cultural critic who died in 2003, accused [Ajami] of having ‘unmistakably racist prescriptions,'" quoted obituarist Douglas Martin.

Thus was Said, the most mendacious, self-infatuated and profitably self-pitying of Arab-American intellectuals—a man whose account of his own childhood cannot be trusted—raised from the grave to defame, for one last time, the most honest and honorable and generous of American intellectuals, no hyphenation necessary.

Ajami, who died of prostate cancer Sunday in his summer home in Maine, was often described as among the foremost scholars of the modern Arab and Islamic worlds, and so he was. He was born in 1945 to a family of farmers in a Shiite village in southern Lebanon and was raised in Beirut in the politics of the age.

"I was formed by an amorphous Arab nationalist sensibility," he wrote in his 1998 masterpiece, "The Dream Palace of the Arabs." He came to the U.S. for college and graduate school, became a U.S. citizen, and first made his political mark as an advocate for Palestinian nationalism. For those who knew Ajami mainly as a consistent advocate of Saddam Hussein’s ouster, it’s worth watching a YouTube snippet of his 1978 debate with Benjamin Netanyahu, in which Ajami makes the now-standard case against Israeli iniquity.

Today Mr. Netanyahu sounds very much like his 28-year-old self. But Ajami changed. He was, to borrow a phrase, mugged by reality. By the 1980s, he wrote, "Arab society had run through most of its myths, and what remained in the wake of the word, of the many proud statements people had made about themselves and their history, was a new world of cruelty, waste, and confusion."

What Ajami did was to see that world plain, without the usual evasions and obfuscations and shifting of blame to Israel and the U.S. Like Sidney Hook or Eric Hoffer, the great ex-communists of a previous generation, his honesty, courage and intelligence got the better of his ideology; he understood his former beliefs with the hard-won wisdom of the disillusioned.

He also understood with empathy and without rancor. Converts tend to be fanatics. But Ajami was too interested in people—in their motives and aspirations, their deceits and self-deceits, their pride, shame and unexpected nobility—to hate anyone except the truly despicable, namely tyrants and their apologists. To read Ajami is to see that his genius lay not only in the breadth of the scholarship or the sharpness of political insight but also in the quality of human understanding. If Joseph Conrad had been reborn as a modern-day academic, he would have been Fouad Ajami.

Consider a typical example, from an op-ed he wrote for these pages in February 2013 on the second anniversary of the fall of Hosni Mubarak’s regime:

"Throughout [Mubarak's] reign, a toxic brew poisoned the life of Egypt—a mix of anti-modernism, anti-Americanism and anti-Zionism. That trinity ran rampant in the universities and the professional syndicates and the official media. As pillage had become the obsession of the ruling family and its retainers, the underclass was left to the rule of darkness and to a culture of conspiracy."

Or here he is on Barack Obama’s fading political appeal, from a piece from last November:

"The current troubles of the Obama presidency can be read back into its beginnings. Rule by personal charisma has met its proper fate. The spell has been broken, and the magician stands exposed. We need no pollsters to tell us of the loss of faith in Mr. Obama’s policies—and, more significantly, in the man himself. Charisma is like that. Crowds come together and they project their needs onto an imagined redeemer. The redeemer leaves the crowd to its imagination: For as long as the charismatic moment lasts—a year, an era—the redeemer is above and beyond judgment."

A publisher ought to collect these pieces. Who else could write so profoundly and so well? Ajami understood the Arab world as only an insider could—intimately, sympathetically, without self-pity. And he loved America as only an immigrant could—with a depth of appreciation and absence of cynicism rarely given to the native-born. If there was ever an error in his judgment, it’s that he believed in people—Arabs and Americans alike—perhaps more than they believed in themselves. It was the kind of mistake only a generous spirit could make.

Over the years Ajami mentored many people—the mentorship often turning to friendship—who went on to great things. One of them, Samuel Tadros, a native of Egypt and now a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, wrote me Monday with an apt valediction:

"Fouad is remarkable because he became a full American, loved this country as anyone could love it, but that did not lessen his passion for what he left behind. He cared deeply about the region, he was always an optimist. He knew well the region’s ills, the pains it gave those who cherished it. God knows it gave him nothing but pain, but he always believed that the peoples of the region deserved better."

Free at Last
Victor Davis Hanson
Commentary Magazine
September 6, 2006

A review of The Foreigner’s Gift: The Americans, the Arabs, and the Iraqis in Iraq by Fouad Ajami (Free Press, 400 pp)

The last year or so has seen several insider histories of the American experience in Iraq. Written by generals (Bernard Trainor’s Cobra II, with Michael Wood), reporters (George Packer’s The Assassins’ Gate), or bureaucrats (Paul Bremer’s My Year in Iraq), each undertakes to explain how our enterprise in that country has, allegedly, gone astray; who is to blame for the failure; and why the author is right to have withdrawn, or at least to question, his earlier support for the project.

Fouad Ajami’s The Foreigner’s Gift is a notably welcome exception—and not only because of Ajami’s guarded optimism about the eventual outcome in Iraq. A Lebanese-born scholar of the Middle East, Ajami, now at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, lacks entirely the condescension of the typical in-the-know Western expert who blithely assures his American readers, often on the authority of little or no learning, of the irreducible alienness of Arab culture. Instead, the world that Ajami describes, once stripped of its veneer of religious pretense, is defined by many of the same impulses—honor, greed, selfinterest—that guide dueling Mafia families, rival Christian televangelists, and (for that matter) many ordinary people hungry for power. As an Arabic-speaker and native Middle Easterner, Ajami has enjoyed singular access to both Sunni and Shiite grandees, and makes effective use here of what they tell him. He also draws on a variety of contemporary written texts, mostly unknown by or inaccessible to Western authors, to explicate why many of the most backward forces in the Arab world are not in the least unhappy at the havoc wrought by the Sunni insurgency in Iraq.

The result, based on six extended visits to Iraq and a lifetime of travel and experience, is the best and certainly the most idiosyncratic recent treatment of the American presence there. Ajami’s thesis is straightforward. What brought George W. Bush to Iraq, he writes, was a belief in the ability of America to do something about a longstanding evil, along with a post-9/11 determination to stop appeasing terror-sponsoring regimes. That the United States knew very little about the bloodthirsty undercurrents of Shiite, Sunni, and Kurdish sectarianism, for years cloaked by Saddam’s barbaric rule—the dictator “had given the Arabs a cruel view of history,” one saturated in “iron and fire and bigotry”—did not necessarily doom the effort to failure. The idealism and skill of American soldiers, and the enormous power and capital that stood behind them, counted, and still count, for a great deal. More importantly, the threats and cries for vengeance issued by various Arab spokesmen have often been disingenuous, serving to obfuscate the genuine desire of Arab peoples for consensual government (albeit on their own terms). In short, Ajami assures us, the war has been a “noble” effort, and will remain so whether in the end it “proves to be a noble success or a noble failure.”

Aside from the obvious reasons he adduces for this judgment—we have taken no oil, we have stayed to birth democracy, and we are now fighting terrorist enemies of civilization—there is also the fact that we have stumbled into, and are now critically influencing, the great political struggle of the modern Middle East. The real problem in that region, Ajami stresses, remains Sunni extremism, which is bent on undermining the very idea of consensual government—the “foreigner’s gift” of his title. Having introduced the concept of one person/one vote in a federated Iraq, America has not only empowered the perennially maltreated Kurds but given the once despised Iraqi Shiites a historic chance at equality. Hence the “rage against this American war, in Iraq itself and in the wider Arab world.”

No wonder, Ajami comments, that a “proud sense of violation [has] stretched from the embittered towns of the Sunni Triangle in western Iraq to the chat rooms of Arabia and to jihadists as far away from Iraq as North Africa and the Muslim enclaves of Western Europe.” Sunni, often Wahhabi, terrorists have murdered many moderate Shiite clerics, taken a terrible toll of Shiites on the street, and, with the clandestine aid of the rich Gulf sheikdoms, hope to prevail through the growing American weariness at the loss in blood and treasure. The worst part of the story, in Ajami’s estimation, is that the intensity of the Sunni resistance has fooled some Americans into thinking that we cannot work with the Shiites—or that our continuing to do so will result in empowering the Khomeinists in nearby Iran or its Hizballah ganglia in Lebanon. Ajami has little use for this notion. He dismisses the view that, within Iraq, a single volatile figure like Moqtadar al-Sadr is capable of sabotaging the new democracy (“a Shia community groping for a way out would not give itself over to this kind of radicalism”). Much less does he see Iraq’s Shiites as the religious henchmen of Iran, or consider Iraqi holy men like Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani or Sheikh Humam Hamoudi to be intent on establishing a theocracy. In common with the now demonized Ahmad Chalabi, Ajami is convinced that Iraqi Shiites will not slavishly follow their Khomeinist brethren but instead may actually subvert them by creating a loud democracy on their doorstep.

In general,according to Ajami, the pathologies of today’s Middle East originate with the mostly Sunni autocracies that threaten, cajole, and flatter Western governments even as they exploit terrorists to deflect popular discontent away from their own failures onto the United States and Israel. Precisely because we have ushered in a long-overdue correction that threatens not only the old order of Saddam’s clique but surrounding governments from Jordan to Saudi Arabia, we can expect more violence in Iraq.

What then to do? Ajami counsels us to ignore the cries of victimhood from yesterday’s victimizers, always to keep in mind the ghosts of Saddam’s genocidal regime, to be sensitive to the loss of native pride entailed in accepting our “foreigner’s gift,” and to let the Iraqis follow their own path as we eventually recede into the shadows. Along with this advice, he offers a series of first-hand portraits, often brilliantly subtle, of some fascinating players in contemporary Iraq. His meeting in Najaf with Ali al-Sistani discloses a Gandhi-like figure who urges: “Do everything you can to bring our Sunni Arab brothers into the fold.” General David Petraeus, the man charged with rebuilding Iraq’s security forces, lives up to his reputation as part diplomat, part drillmaster, and part sage as he conducts Ajami on one of his dangerous tours of the city of Mosul. On a C-130 transport plane, Ajami is so impressed by the bookish earnestness of a nineteen-year-old American soldier that he hands over his personal copy of Graham Greene’s The Quiet American (“I had always loved a passage in it about American innocence roaming the world like a leper without a bell, meaning no harm”).

There are plenty of tragic stories in this book. Ajami recounts the bleak genesis of the Baath party in Iraq and Syria, the brainchild of Sorbonne-educated intellectuals like Michel Aflaq and Salah al-Din Bitar who thought they might unite the old tribal orders under some radical antiWestern secular doctrine. Other satellite figures include Taleb Shabib, a Shiite Baathist who, like legions of other Arab intellectuals, drifted from Communism, Baathism, and panArabism into oblivion, his hopes for a Western-style solution dashed by dictatorship, theocracy, or both. Ajami bumps into dozens of these sorry men, whose fate has been to end up murdered or exiled by the very people they once sought to champion. There are much worse types in Ajami’s gallery. He provides a vividly repugnant glimpse of the awful alGhamdi tribe of Saudi Arabia. One of their number, Ahmad, crashed into the south tower of the World Trade Center on 9/11; another, Hamza, helped to take down Flight 93. A second Ahmad was the suicide bomber who in December 2004 blew up eighteen Americans in Mosul. And then there is Sheik Yusuf alQaradawi, the native Egyptian and resident of Qatar who in August 2004 issued a fatwa ordering Muslims to kill American civilians in Iraq. Why not kill them in Westernized Qatar, where they were far more plentiful? Perhaps because they were profitable to, and protected by, the same government that protected Qaradawi himself. Apparently, like virtue, evil too needs to be buttressed by hypocrisy.

The Foreigner’s Gift is not an organized work of analysis, its arguments leading in logical progression to a solidly reasoned conclusion. Instead, it is a series of highly readable vignettes drawn from Ajami’s serial travels and reflections. Which is hardly to say that it lacks a point, or that its point is uncontroversial—far from it. Critics will surely cite Ajami’s own Shiite background as the catalyst for his professed confidence in the emergence of Iraq’s Shiites as the stewards of Iraqi democracy. But any such suggestion of a hidden agenda, or alternatively of naiveté, would be very wide of the mark. What most characterizes Ajami is not his religious faith (if he has any in the traditional sense) but his unequalled appreciation of historical irony—the irony entailed, for example, in the fact that by taking out the single figure of Saddam Hussein we unleashed an unforeseen moral reckoning among the Arabs at large; the irony that the very vehemence of Iraq’s insurgency may in the end undo and humiliate it on its own turf, and might already have begun to do so; the irony that Shiite Iran may rue the day when its Shiite cousins in Iraq were freed by the Americans. When it comes to ironies, Ajami is clearly bemused that an American oilman, himself the son of a President who in 1991 called for the Iraqi Shiites to rise up and overthrow a wounded Saddam Hussein, only to stand by as they were slaughtered, should have been brought to exclaim in September 2003: “Iraq as a dictatorship had great power to destabilize the Middle East. Iraq as a democracy will have great power to inspire the Middle East.” Ajami himself is not yet prepared to say that Iraq will do so—only that, with our help, it just might. He needs to be listened to very closely.

The Clash
Fouad Ajami
The New York Times
January 6, 2008

It would have been unlike Samuel P. Huntington to say “I told you so” after 9/11. He is too austere and serious a man, with a legendary career as arguably the most influential and original political scientist of the last half century — always swimming against the current of prevailing opinion.

In the 1990s, first in an article in the magazine Foreign Affairs, then in a book published in 1996 under the title “The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order,” he had come forth with a thesis that ran counter to the zeitgeist of the era and its euphoria about globalization and a “borderless” world. After the cold war, he wrote, there would be a “clash of civilizations.” Soil and blood and cultural loyalties would claim, and define, the world of states.

Huntington’s cartography was drawn with a sharp pencil. It was “The West and the Rest”: the West standing alone, and eight civilizations dividing the rest — Latin American, African, Islamic, Sinic, Hindu, Orthodox, Buddhist and Japanese. And in this post-cold-war world, Islamic civilization would re-emerge as a nemesis to the West. Huntington put the matter in stark terms: “The relations between Islam and Christianity, both Orthodox and Western, have often been stormy. Each has been the other’s Other. The 20th-century conflict between liberal democracy and Marxist-Leninism is only a fleeting and superficial historical phenomenon compared to the continuing and deeply conflictual relation between Islam and Christianity.”

Those 19 young Arabs who struck America on 9/11 were to give Huntington more of history’s compliance than he could ever have imagined. He had written of a “youth bulge” unsettling Muslim societies, and young Arabs and Muslims were now the shock-troops of a new radicalism. Their rise had overwhelmed the order in their homelands and had spilled into non-Muslim societies along the borders between Muslims and other peoples. Islam had grown assertive and belligerent; the ideologies of Westernization that had dominated the histories of Turkey, Iran and the Arab world, as well as South Asia, had faded; “indigenization” had become the order of the day in societies whose nationalisms once sought to emulate the ways of the West.

Rather than Westernizing their societies, Islamic lands had developed a powerful consensus in favor of Islamizing modernity. There was no “universal civilization,” Huntington had observed; this was only the pretense of what he called “Davos culture,” consisting of a thin layer of technocrats and academics and businessmen who gather annually at that watering hole of the global elite in Switzerland.

In Huntington’s unsparing view, culture is underpinned and defined by power. The West had once been pre-eminent and militarily dominant, and the first generation of third-world nationalists had sought to fashion their world in the image of the West. But Western dominion had cracked, Huntington said. Demography best told the story: where more than 40 percent of the world population was “under the political control” of Western civilization in the year 1900, that share had declined to about 15 percent in 1990, and is set to come down to 10 percent by the year 2025. Conversely, Islam’s share had risen from 4 percent in 1900 to 13 percent in 1990, and could be as high as 19 percent by 2025.

It is not pretty at the frontiers between societies with dwindling populations — Western Europe being one example, Russia another — and those with young people making claims on the world. Huntington saw this gathering storm. Those young people of the densely populated North African states who have been risking all for a journey across the Strait of Gibraltar walk right out of his pages.

Shortly after the appearance of the article that seeded the book, Foreign Affairs magazine called upon a group of writers to respond to Huntington’s thesis. I was assigned the lead critique. I wrote my response with appreciation, but I wagered on modernization, on the system the West had put in place. “The things and ways that the West took to ‘the rest,’” I wrote, “have become the ways of the world. The secular idea, the state system and the balance of power, pop culture jumping tariff walls and barriers, the state as an instrument of welfare, all these have been internalized in the remotest places. We have stirred up the very storms into which we now ride.” I had questioned Huntington’s suggestion that civilizations could be found “whole and intact, watertight under an eternal sky.” Furrows, I observed, run across civilizations, and the modernist consensus would hold in places like India, Egypt and Turkey.

Huntington had written that the Turks — rejecting Mecca, and rejected by Brussels — would head toward Tashkent, choosing a pan-Turkic world. My faith was invested in the official Westernizing creed of Kemalism that Mustafa Kemal Ataturk had bequeathed his country. “What, however, if Turkey redefined itself?” Huntington asked. “At some point, Turkey could be ready to give up its frustrating and humiliating role as a beggar pleading for membership in the West and to resume its much more impressive and elevated historical role as the principal Islamic interlocutor and antagonist of the West.”

Nearly 15 years on, Huntington’s thesis about a civilizational clash seems more compelling to me than the critique I provided at that time. In recent years, for example, the edifice of Kemalism has come under assault, and Turkey has now elected an Islamist to the presidency in open defiance of the military-bureaucratic elite. There has come that “redefinition” that Huntington prophesied. To be sure, the verdict may not be quite as straightforward as he foresaw. The Islamists have prevailed, but their desired destination, or so they tell us, is still Brussels: in that European shelter, the Islamists shrewdly hope they can find protection against the power of the military.

“I’ll teach you differences,” Kent says to Lear’s servant. And Huntington had the integrity and the foresight to see the falseness of a borderless world, a world without differences. (He is one of two great intellectual figures who peered into the heart of things and were not taken in by globalism’s conceit, Bernard Lewis being the other.)

I still harbor doubts about whether the radical Islamists knocking at the gates of Europe, or assaulting it from within, are the bearers of a whole civilization. They flee the burning grounds of Islam, but carry the fire with them. They are “nowhere men,” children of the frontier between Islam and the West, belonging to neither. If anything, they are a testament to the failure of modern Islam to provide for its own and to hold the fidelities of the young.

More ominously perhaps, there ran through Huntington’s pages an anxiety about the will and the coherence of the West — openly stated at times, made by allusions throughout. The ramparts of the West are not carefully monitored and defended, Huntington feared. Islam will remain Islam, he worried, but it is “dubious” whether the West will remain true to itself and its mission. Clearly, commerce has not delivered us out of history’s passions, the World Wide Web has not cast aside blood and kin and faith. It is no fault of Samuel Huntington’s that we have not heeded his darker, and possibly truer, vision.

Fouad Ajami is a professor of Middle Eastern studies at the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, and the author, most recently, of “The Foreigner’s Gift.”

Samuel Huntington’s Warning
He predicted a ‘clash of civilizations,’ not the illusion of Davos Man.
Fouad Ajami
The WSJ
Dec. 30, 2008

The last of Samuel Huntington’s books — "Who Are We? The Challenges to America’s National Identity," published four years ago — may have been his most passionate work. It was like that with the celebrated Harvard political scientist, who died last week at 81. He was a man of diffidence and reserve, yet he was always caught up in the political storms of recent decades.

"This book is shaped by my own identities as a patriot and a scholar," he wrote. "As a patriot I am deeply concerned about the unity and strength of my country as a society based on liberty, equality, law and individual rights." Huntington lived the life of his choice, neither seeking controversies, nor ducking them. "Who Are We?" had the signature of this great scholar — the bold, sweeping assertions sustained by exacting details, and the engagement with the issues of the time.

He wrote in that book of the "American Creed," and of its erosion among the elites. Its key elements — the English language, Christianity, religious commitment, English concepts of the rule of law, the responsibility of rulers, and the rights of individuals — he said are derived from the "distinct Anglo-Protestant culture of the founding settlers of America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries."

Critics who branded the book as a work of undisguised nativism missed an essential point. Huntington observed that his was an "argument for the importance of Anglo-Protestant culture, not for the importance of Anglo-Protestant people." The success of this great republic, he said, had hitherto depended on the willingness of generations of Americans to honor the creed of the founding settlers and to shed their old affinities. But that willingness was being battered by globalization and multiculturalism, and by new waves of immigrants with no deep attachments to America’s national identity. "The Stars and Stripes were at half-mast," he wrote in "Who Are We?", "and other flags flew higher on the flagpole of American identities."

Three possible American futures beckoned, Huntington said: cosmopolitan, imperial and national. In the first, the world remakes America, and globalization and multiculturalism trump national identity. In the second, America remakes the world: Unchallenged by a rival superpower, America would attempt to reshape the world according to its values, taking to other shores its democratic norms and aspirations. In the third, America remains America: It resists the blandishments — and falseness — of cosmopolitanism, and reins in the imperial impulse.

Huntington made no secret of his own preference: an American nationalism "devoted to the preservation and enhancement of those qualities that have defined America since its founding." His stark sense of realism had no patience for the globalism of the Clinton era. The culture of "Davos Man" — named for the watering hole of the global elite — was disconnected from the call of home and hearth and national soil.

But he looked with a skeptical eye on the American expedition to Iraq, uneasy with those American conservatives who had come to believe in an "imperial" American mission. He foresaw frustration for this drive to democratize other lands. The American people would not sustain this project, he observed, and there was the "paradox of democracy": Democratic experiments often bring in their wake nationalistic populist movements (Latin America) or fundamentalist movements (Muslim countries). The world tempts power, and denies it. It is the Huntingtonian world; no false hopes and no redemption.

In the 1990s, when the Davos crowd and other believers in a borderless world reigned supreme, Huntington crossed over from the academy into global renown, with his "clash of civilizations" thesis. In an article first published in Foreign Affairs in 1993 (then expanded into a book), Huntington foresaw the shape of the post-Cold War world. The war of ideologies would yield to a civilizational struggle of soil and blood. It would be the West versus the eight civilizations dividing the rest — Latin American, African, Islamic, Sinic, Hindu, Orthodox, Buddhist and Japanese.

In this civilizational struggle, Islam would emerge as the principal challenge to the West. "The relations between Islam and Christianity, both orthodox and Western, have often been stormy. Each has been the other’s Other. The 20th-century conflict between liberal democracy and Marxist-Leninism is only a fleeting and superficial historical phenomenon compared to the continuing and deeply conflictual relation between Islam and Christianity."

He had assaulted the zeitgeist of the era. The world took notice, and his book was translated into 39 languages. Critics insisted that men want Sony, not soil. But on 9/11, young Arabs — 19 of them — would weigh in. They punctured the illusions of an era, and gave evidence of the truth of Huntington’s vision. With his typical precision, he had written of a "youth bulge" unsettling Muslim societies, and young, radicalized Arabs, unhinged by modernity and unable to master it, emerging as the children of this radical age.

If I may be permitted a personal narrative: In 1993, I had written the lead critique in Foreign Affairs of his thesis. I admired his work but was unconvinced. My faith was invested in the order of states that the West itself built. The ways of the West had become the ways of the world, I argued, and the modernist consensus would hold in key Third-World countries like Egypt, India and Turkey. Fifteen years later, I was given a chance in the pages of The New York Times Book Review to acknowledge that I had erred and that Huntington had been correct all along.

A gracious letter came to me from Nancy Arkelyan Huntington, his wife of 51 years (her Armenian descent an irony lost on those who dubbed him a defender of nativism). He was in ill-health, suffering the aftermath of a small stroke. They were spending the winter at their summer house on Martha’s Vineyard. She had read him my essay as he lay in bed. He was pleased with it: "He will be writing you himself shortly." Of course, he did not write, and knowing of his frail state I did not expect him to do so. He had been a source of great wisdom, an exemplar, and it had been an honor to write of him, and to know him in the regrettably small way I did.

We don’t have his likes in the academy today. Political science, the field he devoted his working life to, has been in the main commandeered by a new generation. They are "rational choice" people who work with models and numbers and write arid, impenetrable jargon.

More importantly, nowadays in the academy and beyond, the patriotism that marked Samuel Huntington’s life and work is derided, and the American Creed he upheld is thought to be the ideology of rubes and simpletons, the affliction of people clinging to old ways. The Davos men have perhaps won. No wonder the sorrow and the concern that ran through the work of Huntington’s final years.

Mr. Ajami is professor of Middle East Studies at The Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies. He is also an adjunct research fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.

Robert Gates Is Right About Iraq
Fouad Ajami
The New Republic
June 3, 2011

The U.S. war in Iraq has just been given an unexpected seal of approval. Defense Secretary Robert Gates, in what he billed as his “last major policy speech in Washington,” has owned up to the gains in Iraq, to the surprise that Iraq has emerged as “the most advanced Arab democracy in the region.” It was messy, this Iraqi democratic experience, but Iraqis “weren’t in the streets shooting each other, the government wasn’t in the streets shooting its people,” Gates observed. The Americans and the Iraqis had not labored in vain; the upheaval of the Arab Spring has only underlined that a decent polity had emerged in the heart of the Arab world.

Robert Gates has not always been a friend of the Iraq war. He was a member in good standing, it should be recalled, of the Iraq Study Group, a panel of sages and foreign policy luminaries, co-chaired by James Baker and Lee Hamilton, who had taken a jaundiced view of the entire undertaking in Iraq. Their report endorsed a staged retreat from the Iraq war and an accommodation with Syria and Iran. When Gates later joined the cabinet of George W. Bush, after the “thumping” meted out to the Republicans in the congressional elections of 2006, his appointment was taken as a sharp break with the legacy of his predecessor, Donald Rumsfeld. It was an open secret that the outlook of the new taciturn man at the Department of Defense had no place in it for the spread of democracy in Arab lands. Over a long career, Secretary Gates had shared the philosophical approach of Zbigniew Brzezinski and Brent Scowcroft, peers of his and foreign policy “realists” who took the world as it is. They had styled themselves as unillusioned men who had thought that the Iraq war, and George W. Bush’s entire diplomacy of freedom, were projects of folly—romantic, self deluding undertakings in the Arab world.

To the extent that these men thought of the Greater Middle East, they entered it through the gateway of the Israeli-Palestinian struggle. The key to the American security dilemma in the region, they maintained, was an Arab-Israeli settlement that would drain the swamps of anti-Americanism and reconcile the Arab “moderates” to the Pax Americana. This was a central plank of the Iraq Study Group—the centrality of the Israeli-Palestinian issue to the peace of the region, and to the American position in the lands of Islam.

Nor had Robert Gates made much of a secret of his reading of Iran. He and Zbigniew Brzezinski had been advocates of “engaging” the regime in Tehran—this was part of the creed of the “realists.” It was thus remarkable that, in his last policy speech, Gates acknowledged a potentially big payoff of the American labor in Iraq: a residual U.S. military presence in that country as a way of monitoring the Iranian regime next door.

Is Gates right about both the progress in Iraq and the U.S. future in the country? In short, yes. The Iraqis needn’t trumpet the obvious fact in broad daylight, but the balance of power in the Persian Gulf would be altered for the better by a security arrangement between the United States and the government in Baghdad. The Sadrists have already labeled a potential accord with the Americans as a deal with the devil, but the Sadrists have no veto over the big national decisions in Baghdad. If the past is any guide, Prime Minister Nuri Al Maliki has fought and won a major battle with the Sadrists; he crushed them on the battlefield but made room for them in his coalition government, giving them access to spoils and patronage, but on his terms.

Democracy, it turns out, has its saving graces: Nuri Al Maliki need not shoulder alone the burden of sustaining a security accord with the Americans. He has already made it known that the decision to keep American forces in Iraq would depend on the approval of the major political blocs in the country, and that the Sadrists would have no choice but to accept the majority’s decision. The Sadrists would be left with the dubious honor of “resistance” to the Americans—but they would hold onto the privileges granted them by their access to state treasury and resources. Muqtada Al Sadr and the political functionaries around him know that life bereft of government patronage and the oil income of a centralized state is a journey into the wilderness.

There remains, of course, the pledge given by presidential candidate Barack Obama that a President Obama would liquidate the American military role in Iraq by the end of 2011. That pledge was one of the defining themes of his bid for the presidency, and it endeared him to the “progressives” within his own party, who had been so agitated and mobilized against the Iraq war. But Barack Obama is now the standard-bearer of America’s power. He has broken with the “progressives” over Afghanistan, the use of drones in Pakistan, Guantánamo, military tribunals, and a whole host of national security policies that have (nearly) blurred the line between his policies and those of his predecessor. The left has grumbled, but, in the main, it has bowed to political necessity. At any rate, the fury on the left that once surrounded the Iraq war has been spent; a residual American presence in Iraq would fly under the radar of the purists within the ranks of the Democratic Party. They will be under no obligation to give it their blessing. That burden would instead be left to the centrists—and to the Republicans.

It is perhaps safe to assume that Robert Gates is carrying water for the Obama administration—an outgoing official putting out some necessary if slightly unpalatable political truths. Gates is an intensely disciplined man; he has not been a free-lancer, but instead has forged a tight personal and political relationship with President Obama. His swan song in Washington is most likely his gift to those left with maintaining and defending the American position in Iraq and in the Persian Gulf.

It is a peculiarity of the American-Iraq relationship that it could yet be nurtured and upheld without fanfare or poetry. The Iraqis could make room for that residual American presence while still maintaining the fiction of their political purity and sovereignty. For their part, American officials could be discreet and measured; they needn’t heap praise on Iraq nor take back what they had once said about the war—and its costs and follies. Iraq’s neighbors would of course know what would come to pass. In Tehran, and in Arab capitals that once worried about an American security relationship with a Shia-led government in Baghdad, powers would have to make room for this American-Iraqi relationship. The Iranians in particular will know that their long border with Iraq is, for all practical purposes, a military frontier with American forces. It will be no consolation for them that this new reality so close to them is the work of their Shia kinsmen, who come to unexpected power in Baghdad.

The enemy will have a say on how things will play out for American forces in Iraq. Iran and its Iraqi proxies can be expected to do all they can to make the American presence as bloody and costly as possible. A long, leaky border separates Iran from Iraq; movement across it is quite easy for Iranian agents and saboteurs. They can come in as “pilgrims,” and there might be shades of Lebanon in the 1980s, big deeds of terror that target the American forces. The Iraqi government will be called upon to do a decent job of tracking and hunting down saboteurs and terrorists, as this kind of intelligence is not a task for American soldiers. This will take will and political courage on the part of Iraq’s rulers. They will have to speak well of the Americans and own up to the role that American forces are playing in the protection and defense of Iraq. They can’t wink at anti-Americanism or give it succor.

Even in the best of worlds, an American residual presence in Iraq will have its costs and heartbreak. But the United States will have to be prepared for and accept the losses and adversity that are an integral part of staying on, rightly, in so tangled and difficult a setting.

Fouad Ajami teaches at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He is also a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

The Men Who Sealed Iraq’s Fate
Fouad Ajami
The Wall Street Journal
June 15, 2014

Two men bear direct responsibility for the mayhem engulfing Iraq: Barack Obama and Nouri al-Maliki. The U.S. president and Iraqi prime minister stood shoulder to shoulder in a White House ceremony in December 2011 proclaiming victory. Mr. Obama was fulfilling a campaign pledge to end the Iraq war. There was a utopian tone to his pronouncement, suggesting that the conflicts that had been endemic to that region would be brought to an end. As for Mr. Maliki, there was the heady satisfaction, in his estimation, that Iraq would be sovereign and intact under his dominion.

In truth, Iraq’s new Shiite prime minister was trading American tutelage for Iranian hegemony. Thus the claim that Iraq was a fully sovereign country was an idle boast. Around the Maliki regime swirled mightier, more sinister players. In addition to Iran’s penetration of Iraqi strategic and political life, there was Baghdad’s unholy alliance with the brutal Assad regime in Syria, whose members belong to an Alawite Shiite sect and were taking on a largely Sunni rebellion. If Bashar Assad were to fall, Mr. Maliki feared, the Sunnis of Iraq would rise up next.

Now, even as Assad clings to power in Damascus, Iraq’s Sunnis have risen up and joined forces with the murderous, al Qaeda-affiliated Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), which controls much of northern Syria and the Iraqi cities of Fallujah, Mosul and Tikrit. ISIS marauders are now marching on the Shiite holy cities of Najaf and Karbala, and Baghdad itself has become a target.

In a dire sectarian development on Friday, Iraq’s leading Shiite cleric, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, called on his followers to take up arms against ISIS and other Sunni insurgents in defense of the Baghdad government. This is no ordinary cleric playing with fire. For a decade, Ayatollah Sistani stayed on the side of order and social peace. Indeed, at the height of Iraq’s sectarian troubles in 2006-07, President George W. Bush gave the ayatollah credit for keeping the lid on that volcano. Now even that barrier to sectarian violence has been lifted.

This sad state of affairs was in no way preordained. In December 2011, Mr. Obama stood with Mr. Maliki and boasted that "in the coming years, it’s estimated that Iraq’s economy will grow even faster than China’s or India’s." But the negligence of these two men—most notably in their failure to successfully negotiate a Status of Forces Agreement that would have maintained an adequate U.S. military presence in Iraq—has resulted in the current descent into sectarian civil war.

There was, not so long ago, a way for Mr. Maliki to avoid all this: the creation of a genuine political coalition, making good on his promise that the Kurds in the north and the Sunnis throughout the country would be full partners in the Baghdad government. Instead, the Shiite prime minister set out to subjugate the Sunnis and to marginalize the Kurds. There was, from the start, no chance that this would succeed. For their part, the Sunni Arabs of Iraq were possessed of a sense of political mastery of their own. After all, this was a community that had ruled Baghdad for a millennium. Why should a community that had known such great power accept sudden marginality?

As for the Kurds, they had conquered a history of defeat and persecution and built a political enterprise of their own—a viable military institution, a thriving economy and a sense of genuine national pride. The Kurds were willing to accept the federalism promised them in the New Iraq. But that promise rested, above all else, on the willingness on the part of Baghdad to honor a revenue-sharing system that had decreed a fair allocation of the country’s oil income. This, Baghdad would not do. The Kurds were made to feel like beggars at the Maliki table.

Sadly, the Obama administration accepted this false federalism and its façade. Instead of aiding the cause of a reasonable Kurdistan, the administration sided with Baghdad at every turn. In the oil game involving Baghdad, Irbil, the Turks and the international oil companies, the Obama White House and State Department could always be found standing with the Maliki government.

With ISIS now reigning triumphant in Fallujah, in the oil-refinery town of Baiji, and, catastrophically, in Mosul, the Obama administration cannot plead innocence. Mosul is particularly explosive. It sits astride the world between Syria and Iraq and is economically and culturally intertwined with the Syrian territories. This has always been Mosul’s reality. There was no chance that a war would rage on either side of Mosul without it spreading next door. The Obama administration’s vanishing "red lines" and utter abdication in Syria were bound to compound Iraq’s troubles.

Grant Mr. Maliki the harvest of his sectarian bigotry. He has ridden that sectarianism to nearly a decade in power. Mr. Obama’s follies are of a different kind. They’re sins born of ignorance. He was eager to give up the gains the U.S. military and the Bush administration had secured in Iraq. Nor did he possess the generosity of spirit to give his predecessors the credit they deserved for what they had done in that treacherous landscape.

As he headed for the exits in December 2011, Mr. Obama described Mr. Maliki as "the elected leader of a sovereign, self-reliant and democratic Iraq." One suspects that Mr. Obama knew better. The Iraqi prime minister had already shown marked authoritarian tendencies, and there were many anxieties about him among the Sunnis and Kurds. Those communities knew their man, while Mr. Obama chose to look the other way.

Today, with his unwillingness to use U.S. military force to save Syrian children or even to pull Iraq back from the brink of civil war, the erstwhile leader of the Free World is choosing, yet again, to look the other way.

Mr. Ajami, a senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution, is the author, most recently, of "The Syrian Rebellion" (Hoover Press, 2012).

Voir aussi:

Fouad Ajami on America and the Arabs
Excerpts from the Middle Eastern scholar’s work in the Journal over nearly 30 years.
The Wall Street Journal

June 22, 2014

Editor’s note: Fouad Ajami, the Middle Eastern scholar and a contributor to these pages for 27 years, died Sunday at age 68. Excerpts from his writing in the Journal are below, and a related editorial appears nearby:

"A Tangled History," a review of Bernard Lewis’s book, "Islam and the West," June 24, 1993:

The book’s most engaging essay is a passionate defense of Orientalism that foreshadows today’s debate about multiculturalism and the study of non-Western history. Mr. Lewis takes on the trendy new cult led by Palestinian-American Edward Said, whose many followers advocate a radical form of Arab nationalism and deride traditional scholarship of the Arab world as a cover for Western hegemony. The history of that world, these critics insist, must be reclaimed and written from within. With Mr. Lewis’s rebuttal the debate is joined, as a great historian defends the meaning of scholarship and takes on those who would bully its practitioners in pursuit of some partisan truths.

" Barak’s Gamble," May 25, 2000:

It was bound to end this way: One day Israel was destined to vacate the strip of Lebanon it had occupied when it swept into that country in the summer of 1982. Liberal societies are not good at the kind of work military occupation entails.

"Show Trial: Egypt: The Next Rogue Regime?" May 30, 2001:

If there is a foreign land where U.S. power and influence should be felt, Egypt should be reckoned a reasonable bet. A quarter century of American solicitude and American treasure have been invested in the Egyptian regime. Here was a place in the Arab world—humane and tempered—where Pax Americana had decent expectations: support for Arab-Israeli peace, a modicum of civility at home.
Enlarge Image

Fouad Ajami Getty Images

It has not worked out that way: The regime of Hosni Mubarak has been a runaway ally. In the latest display of that ruler’s heavy handedness, Saad Eddin Ibrahim, a prominent Egyptian-American sociologist, has recently been sentenced to seven years’ imprisonment on charges of defaming the state. It was a summary judgment, and a farce: The State Security Court took a mere 90 minutes to deliberate over the case.

"Arabs Have Nobody to Blame But Themselves," Oct. 16, 2001:

A darkness, a long winter, has descended on the Arabs. Nothing grows in the middle between an authoritarian political order and populations given to perennial flings with dictators, abandoned to their most malignant hatreds. Something is amiss in an Arab world that besieges American embassies for visas and at the same time celebrates America’s calamities. Something has gone terribly wrong in a world where young men strap themselves with explosives, only to be hailed as "martyrs" and avengers.

"Beirut, Baghdad," Aug. 25, 2003:

A battle broader than the country itself, then, plays out in Iraq. We needn’t apologize to the other Arabs about our presence there, and our aims for it. The custodians of Arab power, and the vast majority of the Arab political class, never saw or named the terrible cruelties of Saddam. A political culture that averts its gaze from mass graves and works itself into self-righteous hysteria over a foreign presence in an Arab country is a culture that has turned its back on political reason.
Opinion Video

Editorial Page Editor Paul Gigot pays tribute to Middle East scholar Fouad Ajami. Photo credit: hoover.org

Yet this summer has tested the resolve of those of us who supported the war, and saw in it a chance to give Iraq and its neighbors a shot at political reform. There was a leap of faith, it must be conceded, in the argument that a land as brutalized as Iraq would manage to find its way out of its cruel past and, in the process, give other Arabs proof that a modicum of liberty could flourish in their midst.

"The Curse of Pan-Arabia," May 12, 2004:

Consider a tale of three cities: In Fallujah, there are the beginnings of wisdom, a recognition, after the bravado, that the insurgents cannot win in the face of a great military power. In Najaf, the clerical establishment and the shopkeepers have called on the Mahdi Army of Muqtada al-Sadr to quit their city, and to "pursue another way." It is in Washington where the lines are breaking, and where the faith in the gains that coalition soldiers have secured in Iraq at such a terrible price appears to have cracked. We have been doing Iraq by improvisation, we are now "dumping stock," just as our fortunes in that hard land may be taking a turn for the better. We pledged to give Iraqis a chance at a new political life. We now appear to be consigning them yet again to the same Arab malignancies that drove us to Iraq in the first place.

" Bush of Arabia," Jan. 8, 2008:

Suffice it for them that George W. Bush was at the helm of the dominant imperial power when the world of Islam and of the Arabs was in the wind, played upon by ruinous temptations, and when the regimes in the saddle were ducking for cover, and the broad middle classes in the Arab world were in the grip of historical denial of what their radical children had wrought. His was the gift of moral and political clarity. . . .

We scoffed, in polite, jaded company when George W. Bush spoke of the "axis of evil" several years back. The people he now journeys amidst didn’t: It is precisely through those categories of good and evil that they describe their world, and their condition. Mr. Bush could not redeem the modern culture of the Arabs, and of Islam, but he held the line when it truly mattered. He gave them a chance to reclaim their world from zealots and enemies of order who would have otherwise run away with it.

" Obama’s Afghan Struggle," March 20, 2009:

[President Obama] can’t build on the Iraq victory, because he has never really embraced it. The occasional statement that we can win over the reconcilables and the tribes in Afghanistan the way we did in the Anbar is lame and unconvincing. The Anbar turned only when the Sunni insurgents had grown convinced that the Americans were there to stay, and that the alternative to accommodation with the Americans, and with the Baghdad government, is a sure and widespread Sunni defeat. The Taliban are nowhere near this reckoning. If anything, the uncertain mood in Washington counsels patience on their part, with the promise of waiting out the American presence.

"Pax Americana and the New Iraq," Oct. 6, 2010:

The question posed in the phase to come will be about the willingness of Pax Americana to craft a workable order in the Persian Gulf, and to make room for this new Iraq. It is a peculiarity of the American presence in the Arab-Islamic world, as contrasted to our work in East Asia, that we have always harbored deep reservations about democracy’s viability there and have cast our lot with the autocracies. For a fleeting moment, George W. Bush broke with that history. But that older history, the resigned acceptance of autocracies, is the order of the day in Washington again.

It isn’t perfect, this Iraqi polity midwifed by American power. But were we to acknowledge and accept that Iraqis and Americans have prevailed in that difficult land, in the face of such forbidding odds, we and the Iraqis shall be better for it. We have not labored in vain.


Crime d’honneur/Elif Shafak : A ceux qui entendent et à ceux qui voient (Turkish writer takes on honor killings)

21 juin, 2014
http://www.reorientmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Honour-Elif-Shafak1.jpghttps://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xap1/t1.0-9/p320x320/10384106_4354564079331_5132324409277895332_n.jpghttp://extranet.editis.com/it-yonixweb/IMAGES/118/P3/9782264060525.jpg

Mal nommer les choses, c’est ajouter au malheur du monde. Camus

Le passé est encore là – simplement, il est inégalement réparti. D’après  William Gibson
Aussi loin qu’il se souvienne, il s’est toujours perçu comme le prince de la maison et sa mère comme celle qui, de façon contestable, le mettait en valeur, était sa protectrice inquiète. J. M. Coetzee (Scènes de la vie d’un jeune garçon)
Quand j’avais sept ans, nous vivions dans une maison de verre. Un de nos voisins, un tailleur de talent, battait souvent sa femme. Le soir, on écoutait les pleurs, les cris, les insultes. Le matin, on vaquait à nos occupations habituelles. Tout le voisinage prétendait n’avoir rien entendu, n’avoir rien vu. Ce roman est dédié à ceux qui entendent et à ceux qui voient. Elif Shafak (Crime d’honneur, exergue)
Ma mère est morte deux fois. Je me suis promis de ne pas permettre qu’on oublie son histoire, mais je n’ai jamais trouvé le temps, la volonté ou le courage de la coucher par écrit. Jusqu’à récemment, je veux dire. (…) Il fallait pourtant que je raconte cette histoire, ne serait-ce qu’à une personne. Il fallait que je l’envoie dans un coin de l’univers où elle pourrait flotter librement, loin de nous. Je la devais à maman, cette liberté. (…) C’est ainsi que, dans le pays où naquirent Destinée-Rose et Assez-Belle, « honneur » était plus qu’un mot. C’était aussi un nom. On pouvait le donner à un enfant, à condition que ce soit un garçon. Les hommes avaient de l’honneur – les vieillards, ceux dans la force de l’âge, même les écoliers, si jeunes que, si on leur appuyait sur le nez, il en sortirait du lait. Les femmes n’avaient pas d’honneur. Elles étaient marquées par la honte. Comme tout le monde le savait, « Honte » était un bien mauvais nom à porter. (…) Son silence le déroutait. Et si elle n’était pas vierge ? Comment pourrait-il vivre avec cette interrogation le reste de sa vie ? Que penserait son frère Tariq quand il apprendrait qu’il s’était trouvé une femme souillée – la réplique exacte de leur mère ? (…) Ce serait une des nombreuses ironies de la vie de Pembe, que ce qu’elle détestait le plus dans la bouche de sa mère, elle allait le répéter à sa fille Esma, mot pour mot, des années plus tard, en Angleterre. Elif Shafak (Crime d’honneur, extrait)
Pourquoi Iskander Tobrak, seize ans, fils aîné et chef d’une famille mi-turque mi-kurde depuis le départ de son père, Adem, a-t-il, en 1978, poignardé à mort sa mère, Pembe ? C’est la question toujours aussi douloureuse que se pose, quatorze ans après les faits et alors qu’elle part chercher Iskander à sa sortie de prison, Esma, sa soeur. Pour tenter d’y répondre, elle doit remonter à leurs propres origines, dans un petit village des bords de l’Euphrate. Pembe et Jamila, son identique jumelle, y sont nées en 1945. Selon leur père, quel que soit le malheur infligé à l’une, elles étaient vouées à souffrir ensemble, et donc deux fois plus… Venu d’Istanbul, le jeune Adem Tobrak s’éprit follement de Jamila, mais celle-ci ayant été, quelques mois plus tôt, enlevée, et sa virginité étant, de ce fait, contestée, il ne put l’épouser et se rabattit sur Pembe. Cette dernière accepta et suivit son mari à Istanbul puis en Grande-Bretagne où, malgré la naissance de trois enfants, la vie du couple ne tarda pas à partir à vau-l’eau… Un roman superbe et bouleversant. L’Actualité littéraire
It’s usually the father, brother or first male cousin who is charged with the actual shooting or stabbing, (but not) the mother who lures the girl home. The religion has failed to address this as a problem and failed to seriously work to abolish it as un-Islamic. Phyllis Chesler
I think that as women we’re strong enough now to not only acknowledge our racism, our class bias and our homophobia but our sexism. The coming generation, and second-wave feminists as well, can acknowledge that women, like men, are aggressive and, like men, are as close to the apes as the angels. Our lived realities have never conformed to the feminist view that women are morally superior to men, are compassionate, nurturing, maternal and also very valiant under siege. This is a myth. (…) Women don’t have to be better than anyone else to deserve human rights. Our failure to look at our own sexism lost us a few inches in our ability to change history in our lifetime. The first thing we do is acknowledge what the truth is, and then we have to not have double standards. We have to try not to use gossip to get rid of a rival, we have to try not to slander the next woman because we’re jealous that she’s pretty or that she got a scholarship. I think we have to learn some of the rules of engagement that men are good at. Women coerce dreadful conformity from each other. I would like us to embrace diversity. Then we could have a more viable, serious feminist movement. (…) Because the stereotypes of women have been so used to justify our subordination and since it was a heady moment in history to suddenly come together with other women in quantum numbers around issues of women’s freedom and human rights, it took a while before each of us in turn started looking at how we treated each other. The unacknowledged aggression and cruelty and sexism among women in general — and that includes feminists — is what drove many an early activist out of what was a real movement. (…) I think it gets worse when it’s women only. Men are happy in a middle-distance ground toward all others. They don’t take anything too personally, and they don’t have to get right into your face, into your business, into your life. Women need to do that. Women, the minute they meet another woman, it’s: she’s going to be my fairy godmother, my best friend, the mother I never had. And when that’s not the case we say, "well, she’s the evil stepmother." (…) I do have a chapter that says if you have a situation that is male-dominated with a few token women, women will not like each other, they will be particularly vicious in how they compete and keep other women down and out. We can’t say how women as a group would behave if overnight they had all the positions that men now have. (…) It helps to understand that in these non-Western countries where you have mothers-in-law dousing daughters-in-law with kerosene for their dowries and we say "how shocking," we have a version here. You have here mothers who think their daughters have to be thin, their daughters have to be pretty and their daughters need to have plastic surgery and their daughters have to focus mainly on the outward appearance and not on inner strength or inner self. It’s not genital mutilation but it’s ultimately a concern with outward appearance for the sake of marriageability.(…) I’m thinking back to the civil rights era and the faces of white mothers who did not want little black children to integrate schools. What should we say about those women who joined the Ku Klux Klan or the Nazi party? You have a lot of women groaning under the yoke of oppression. Nevertheless, there are women who warm the beds and are the partners of men who create orphans. Women are best at collaborating with men who run the world because then we can buy pretty trinkets and have safe homes and nests for ourselves.(…) Women are silenced not because men beat up on us but because we don’t want to be shunned by our little cliques. That applies to all age groups. That’s one of the reasons that women are so conformist and so indirect: we end up sabotaging her rather than risking the loss of her intimate companionship. Women stealing each other’s lovers and spouses and jobs is pandemic. Phyllis Chesler
Les crimes d’honneur sont des actes de violence, le plus souvent des meurtres, commis par les membres masculins d’une famille à l’encontre de ses membres féminins, lorsqu’ils sont perçus comme cause de déshonneur pour la famille tout entière. Une femme peut être la cible d’individus au sein de sa propre famille pour des motifs divers, comprenant : le refus de participer à un mariage arrangé, le refus des faveurs sexuelles, la tentative de divorce — que ce soit dans le cadre de la violence conjugale exercée par son mari ou dans un contexte avéré d’adultère. La simple interprétation selon laquelle son comportement a « déshonoré » sa famille est suffisante pour enclencher une représaille. Human Rights Watch
En général, en Occident, le crime d’honneur varie en fonction de la géographie. Peu coutumier de nos jours dans les régions du Nord, il devient plus intense en descendant vers le Sud (sociétés méditerranéennes et/ou musulmanes, etc..) où les codes d’honneur propres à telle ou telle société traditionnelle ont conservé plus d’importance. C’est ainsi que la vengeance par la justice privée, plus connue sous le nom de vendetta fait partie de la culture de certains groupes ethniques qui se situent dans les Balkans (notamment les régions peuplées d’albanophones), en Turquie (Anatolie, Kurdistan, etc..), le sud de l’Italie et les îles de la Méditerranée (Corse, Sardaigne, Sicile, Crète). Avec l’immigration musulmane (notamment pakistanaise, turque/kurde et arabe), les crimes d’honneur sont réapparus en Europe. En Italie, en 2006, Hina Saleem (it), une jeune pakistanaise de 21 ans, est assassinée à Sarezzo (Lombardie) par ses parents et des membres de sa famille qui n’acceptaient pas sa relation avec un Italien et sa vie jugée "trop occidentale"10. Hina s’était également opposée à un mariage arrangé. Toujours en Italie, en 2009, Sanaa Dafani, une jeune marocaine de 18 ans résidant avec sa famille à Pordenone (N.-E.), est égorgée par son père qui lui reprochait d’être "trop occidentale" et d’avoir une relation avec un Italien11. Il sera condamné définitivement à 30 ans de prison en 201212. En 2010 à Modène (Italie), un pakistanais, aidé de son fils, "punit" à coups de barre d’acier et de pierre son épouse et sa fille qui refusaient un mariage arrangé. La mère succombera à ses blessures13. En Allemagne, en 2005, Hatun Sürücü, une jeune Allemande d’origine turque, est tuée à Berlin par son frère pour « s’être comportée comme une Allemande »14. En Belgique, en 2007, Sadia Sheikh, une pakistanaise de 20 ans, est assassinée à Charleroi (Région wallonne) par des membres de sa famille pour avoir refusé un mariage arrangé15. Aux Pays-Bas, la police estime que treize meurtres ont été commis en 2009 au nom de l’honneur16. En Grande-Bretagne, l’association IKWRO (Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation)) a recensé 2823 agressions (séquestrations, coups, brûlures, homicides) commises en 2010 contre des femmes sous prétexte de "venger l’honneur d’une famille". Wikipedia
Les crimes d’honneur ne sont pas réservés aux provinces reculées du Pakistan, de la Turquie ou de l’Inde. En Europe occidentale aussi, des jeunes femmes sont torturées et tuées par des membres de leur famille à cause de leurs fréquentations, de leur façon de s’habiller ou de leur refus de se soumettre à un mariage forcé. En clair, parce que leur attitude laisse planer un doute sur leur virginité. C’est le constat de la fondation suisse Surgir, spécialisée dans la lutte contre les violences faites aux femmes. Très prudent dans sa volonté de ne "stigmatiser" aucune communauté, le rapport publié par Surgir établit un lien direct entre ces assassinats et l’immigration, tout en soulignant que, "majoritairement pratiqué au sein des communautés musulmanes, le crime d’honneur l’est aussi par les communautés sikhs, hindoues et chrétiennes". Entre 15 000 et 20 000 femmes sont tuées chaque année dans le monde, selon les estimations des organisations non gouvernementales, par un cousin, un frère ou un père craignant l’opprobre de la communauté. "Plus qu’un permis de tuer, c’est un devoir de tuer", écrit Surgir, qui note que "le déshonneur [d'une fille] est une menace d’exclusion sociale pour toute la famille élargie". Dans le cas de communautés immigrées, la crainte de l’assimilation peut renforcer ce besoin de protéger le groupe, alors que le mariage mixte et l’émancipation des jeunes générations sont perçus comme des menaces. Aucune statistique précise n’existe sur le sujet et la loi du silence est de mise dans les familles. Les chiffres avancés par la fondation reposent sur des estimations policières, quand celles-ci distinguent violences domestiques et violences liées à l’honneur, et sur l’étude de coupures de presse. Aux Pays-Bas, la police estime que treize meurtres ont été commis en 2009 au nom de l’honneur ; au Royaume-Uni, une douzaine de cas sont recensés chaque année ; en Allemagne, soixante-douze jeunes filles ont été tuées en dix ans ; en France, depuis 1993, une dizaine de cas ont été évoqués dans les médias, en grande majorité dans les communautés indiennes, pakistanaises, sri-lankaises, kurdes et turques. (…) La fondation Surgir appelle les autres Etats européens à prendre des mesures – le code pénal italien prévoit notamment une réduction de la peine pour les crimes commis sur fond de "traditions culturelles" – tout en soulignant qu’un durcissement des législations entraîne systématiquement une hausse des suicides maquillés et pousse les familles à désigner un meurtrier mineur qui sera moins sévèrement jugé. Le Monde

Attention: un crime peut en cacher un autre !

Alors qu’après la prestigieuse Oxford Union (assimilée à un vulgaire bureau des étudiants) l’an dernier

Et sous couvert de la neutralité du titre anglais et le refus de toute identification nationale de l’auteure ou de ses personnages …

(réduisant à de simples sorties-cinéma les rencontres, nécessairement clandestines dans les cinémas les plus excentrés du Londres des années 70 et d’ailleurs payées au prix fort du matricide, d"une héroïne kurde abandonnée par son mari et d’un restaurateur multiculturel d’origine grecque) …

C’est la tragique héroïne d’un roman anglo-turc que la cuvée du bac d’anglais 2014 assassine à nouveau …

Pendant qu’avec le retour des djihadistes en Irak suite au départ précipité du Munichois en chef de la Maison Blanche, les belles âmes qui avaient hurlé contre Bush et regretté Saddam nous ressortent leurs arguments les plus éculés contre la démocratisation d’une des régions les plus arriérées de la planète …

Comment ne pas voir cet étrange aveuglement, politiquement correct oblige, d’une Europe et d’un Occident d’ordinaire si prompts à dénoncer les moindres manquements aux droits de ces nouveaux damnés de la terre que sont devenus les immigrés …

Sur ces crimes dits d’honneur qui, avec l’afflux d’immigrants et comme le rappelait il y a quelques années Le Monde, ne sont plus  "réservés aux provinces reculées du Pakistan, de la Turquie ou de l’Inde" …

Et qui, devant le durcissement des législations, se voient même maquillés en suicides ou attribués à des meurtriers mineurs susceptibles d’être jugés moins sévèrement ?

Et comment ne pas saluer, par contraste, la véritable plongée que nous offre  la romancière turque fille d’un philosophe et d’une diplomate Elif Shafak dans ce passé encore "là mais inégalement réparti" …

Ce monde qui nous était devenu inconnu …

Où, via l’éducation qu’elles prodiguent à leurs fils et filles, les victimes elles-mêmes font partie de la reproduction de leur propre victimisation …

Et qui, avec l’immigration et à l’instar de certaines maladies que l’on croyait disparues, fait pourtant son retour en force chez nous ?

Q & A With Elif Shafak

Penguin Q & A with Elif Safak, author of Honour

What is your new book about?

Honour is about a family, mother-son relationship and how we, knowingly or unknowingly, hurt the people we love most. This is the story of a half-Turkish, half-Kurdish family in London in the late 1970s.

What or who inspired it?

Life.

What was the biggest challenge, writing it?

The central character, Iskender, is a young man obsessed with the notion of honour to the extent that he becomes a murderer. It was a challenge for me to put myself in his shoes, to build empathy for this extremely macho character, but it was important. Without understanding boys/men like Iskender we cannot discuss, let alone solve, honour killings.

What did you want to achieve with your book?

I wanted to tell a story, that has always been my primary aim, whatever the subject. I love giving a voice to characters who are kept in the margins, left unheard in life.

What do you hope for your book?

I hope it will connect readers from different backgrounds and lifestyles, I hope it will speak to their hearts and transcend cultural ghettoes.

Are there any parts of it that have special personal significance to you?

My novels are not autobiographical. In other words, my starting point is not myself. I find writing about myself rather boring. What I am more interested in is being other people, discovering other world and universes.

Do you have a favourite character or one you really enjoyed writing?

I don’t have a favourite character, as I feel and love each and every character along the way, even the side characters, even the ones who look troubled. However I must say Yunus, the family’s younger son has a special place in my heart. Imagining him, being him, was an inspiring journey.

What do you see as the major themes in your book?

Love and freedom. There cannot be love without freedom. And there is no honour in murder.

What made you set it in London?

My novel travels to different cities and locations, like all of my novels do. There are scenes in a Kurdish village, Istanbul, but London has been central. I love this city. I love the multicultural blending here, which is different than anywhere else. But I also wanted to say if honour-related attacks are happening even here, and they are, then that means they can happen anywhere.

Did the title come instantly to you or did you labour over it?

The title had a journey of its own. In Turkey the novel is called Iskender, which means Alexander. However I could not name it Alexander in English as people would have thought it was a novel about Alexander the Great. So instead of focusing on a character I focused on the theme and chose Honour. It is being translated into many languages and as it travels from one country to another book jackets change. In Italy they also changed the name because the word Honour in Italian recalls the mafia, and the novel has nothing to do with the mafia. So my Italian publisher Rizzoli and I chose another title: The House of Four Winds, which is the name of the Kurdish village in the novel.

To whom have you dedicated the book and why?

This book is dedicated to people who see, people who hear, people who care. And why I did that? Well the answer is in this little story I wrote at the opening page…

Who do you think will enjoy your book?

I don’t have a specific audience. Very different people read my work and I cherish that. I sincerely hope people who love stories and the art of storytelling will enjoy it, that’s what matters.

Do you have a special spot for writing at home? (If so, describe it)

I don’t have writing rituals or specific places for that. I write at home but I also write in crowded cafes, restaurants, trains stations, airports, always on the move.

Do you like silence or music playing while you’re writing?

I don’t like silence at all. I cannot write in silence. There has to be the sounds of life, music, the sounds coming from the street, rain cars and all of that. Istanbul is a very noisy city. I am used to writing in chaos and noise.

When did you start writing?

At the age of eight, but that’s not because I wanted to be a writer. I didn’t even know there was such a possibility. I fell in love with words and stories. I was a lonely kid and on my own most of the time. Books were my best friends, they were the gates unto other worlds, and they still are.

Did you always want to become an author?

The desire to become an author came to me later, when I was 17 or 18, and it was crystallised in my early twenties. So first there was the love of writing, the love of stories and only much later the desire to become an author. I have a writer inside me and an author inside me. They are different personalities. Most of the time they get along but sometimes they quarrel and disagree.

Tell us a bit about your childhood?

I was raised by a single mother, an independent minded, feminist divorcee. That was a bit unusual in 1970s Turkey. I was also raised by my Grandma for a while and she was a very different woman, she was a healer and an oral storyteller. To this day I love combining the two worlds, the two women.

If you’ve had other jobs outside of writing, what were they?

I contribute regularly to a major newspaper in Turkey, I write twice a week and I also write op-ed pieces for papers around the world. I am a political scientist by training, I teach creative writing too.

Describe yourself in three words?

Storyteller, nomad, freethinker.

What star sign are you and are you typical of it?

I am a Scorpio and like many Scorpio’s I am inward-looking and love to sabotage myself.

What three things do you dislike?

Hate speech, xenophobia, gender discrimination.

What three things do you like?

Connections, creativity, compassion.

Have you a family, partner or are you single?

I am a mother of two and a terrible wife in addition to being a writer.

Voir aussi:

Honour by Elif Shafak – review
A fierce tale of tradition in Muslim culture
Maureen Freely
The Guardian
20 April 2012

Elif Shafak begins her new novel with a dedication containing a dark and portentous anecdote: when she was seven years old, she lived next door to a tailor who was in the habit of beating his wife. "In the evenings, we listened to the shouts, the cries, the swearing. In the morning, we went on with our lives as usual. The entire neighbourhood pretended not to have heard, not to have seen."

Honour
by Elif Shafak

Tell us what you think: Star-rate and review this book

Having dedicated her book to "those who hear, those who see", Shafak hands over to Esma Toprak, a London-bred Turkish Kurd, as she prepares to set off for Shrewsbury Prison to collect her brother, who has just served a 14-year term for murder. It is implied, but not confirmed, that his victim was their mother. Esma admits to having thought often about killing her brother in revenge. And yet she plans to welcome him back into the house she now shares with her husband and two daughters.

This is the cloud that hangs over the next 300-odd pages, as Esma offers up fragments of family history, beginning with her mother’s birth in a village near the Euphrates. She describes a world where women as well as men enforce an honour code that results in the social death of men who fail to act like men, and the actual death of several female relatives. When her family migrates to Istanbul, and then to London in the early 1970s, they take that code with them, but as they grow accustomed to life in the west it becomes less a system of social regulation than a compulsion they can neither control nor understand.

Adem, the father, falls in love with an exotic dancer. Disgraced, he drifts away. Iskender, the eldest son, is left unprotected and is brutally bullied before forming his own gang and doing much worse to others. His views on masculinity are further sharpened by the neighbourhood’s fledgling radicals and he has one rule for his English girlfriend and another for Pembe, his mother. Tradition dictates that he is now the head of the household, and even though she does not like him controlling her, she nevertheless defers to him, going out of her way to convey her approval for her "sultan".

Running in parallel with this all-too-familiar tragedy is another story. Even in that village near the Euphrates, where mothers grieve at the birth of each new daughter, women wield considerable social powers, although they are inclined to express them through dreams, premonitions, and potions. They also impart a gentler Islamic tradition of mercy and compassion, encouraging an imaginative engagement with both tradition and the modern world. Pembe longs to travel, and she has her wish. Her twin sister Jamila stays behind to become the region’s fabled Virgin Midwife, travelling fearlessly through territories controlled by bandits, trusting her fate to God’s hands. When a dream signals that her twin is in danger, Jamila has no trouble finding the people who can get her to London without proper documentation. The two younger Toprak children show a similar independence of thought as they struggle to resolve the contradictions that have brought their family down.

Shafak is an extremely popular novelist in Turkey, particularly loved by young, educated and newly independent women who appreciate her fusion of feminism and Sufism, her disarmingly quirky characters and the artful twists and turns of her epic romances. Born in Strasbourg to a diplomat mother, educated in Europe, the United States and Turkey, she writes some books in her native Turkish and others (like this one) in English. In everything she writes, she sets out to dissolve what she regards as false narratives. In this one, it’s the story of the "honour killing" as we know it from those shock headlines. The book calls to mind The Color Purple in the fierceness of its engagement with male violence and its determination to see its characters to a better place. But Shafak is closer to Isabel Allende in spirit, confidence and charm. Her portrayal of Muslim cultures, both traditional and globalising, is as hopeful as it is politically sophisticated. This alone should gain her the world audience she has long deserved.

• Maureen Freely’s Enlightenment is published by Marion Boyars.

Voir également:

Les crimes d’honneur, une réalité européenne
Benoît Vitkine
Le Monde
15.11.2011

Les crimes d’honneur ne sont pas réservés aux provinces reculées du Pakistan, de la Turquie ou de l’Inde. En Europe occidentale aussi, des jeunes femmes sont torturées et tuées par des membres de leur famille à cause de leurs fréquentations, de leur façon de s’habiller ou de leur refus de se soumettre à un mariage forcé. En clair, parce que leur attitude laisse planer un doute sur leur virginité.

C’est le constat de la fondation suisse Surgir, spécialisée dans la lutte contre les violences faites aux femmes. Très prudent dans sa volonté de ne "stigmatiser" aucune communauté, le rapport publié par Surgir établit un lien direct entre ces assassinats et l’immigration, tout en soulignant que, "majoritairement pratiqué au sein des communautés musulmanes, le crime d’honneur l’est aussi par les communautés sikhs, hindoues et chrétiennes".

Entre 15 000 et 20 000 femmes sont tuées chaque année dans le monde, selon les estimations des organisations non gouvernementales, par un cousin, un frère ou un père craignant l’opprobre de la communauté. "Plus qu’un permis de tuer, c’est un devoir de tuer", écrit Surgir, qui note que "le déshonneur [d'une fille] est une menace d’exclusion sociale pour toute la famille élargie". Dans le cas de communautés immigrées, la crainte de l’assimilation peut renforcer ce besoin de protéger le groupe, alors que le mariage mixte et l’émancipation des jeunes générations sont perçus comme des menaces.

Aucune statistique précise n’existe sur le sujet et la loi du silence est de mise dans les familles. Les chiffres avancés par la fondation reposent sur des estimations policières, quand celles-ci distinguent violences domestiques et violences liées à l’honneur, et sur l’étude de coupures de presse. Aux Pays-Bas, la police estime que treize meurtres ont été commis en 2009 au nom de l’honneur ; au Royaume-Uni, une douzaine de cas sont recensés chaque année ; en Allemagne, soixante-douze jeunes filles ont été tuées en dix ans ; en France, depuis 1993, une dizaine de cas ont été évoqués dans les médias, en grande majorité dans les communautés indiennes, pakistanaises, sri-lankaises, kurdes et turques.

"PRÉTENDU" HONNEUR

Le rapport évoque plusieurs cas enregistrés chaque année en Suède, en Suisse ou en Italie. En octobre 2010, par exemple, à Modène, une Pakistanaise de 20 ans et sa mère de 46 ans se sont opposées au mariage arrangé prévu pour la jeune femme : le père et le fils ont tué la mère à coups de barre de fer et blessé grièvement la jeune fille.

Le Parlement européen et le Conseil de l’Europe ont avancé pour la première fois en 2003 des recommandations d’ordre général. Mais seuls les Pays-Bas et le Royaume-Uni ont adopté un dispositif complet, alliant prévention auprès des associations d’immigrés, protection des témoins, formation des policiers et création d’unités spéciales. Dans les textes britanniques, le mot "honneur" est, à la demande explicite du gouvernement, précédé de la mention "so called" ("prétendu").

La fondation Surgir appelle les autres Etats européens à prendre des mesures – le code pénal italien prévoit notamment une réduction de la peine pour les crimes commis sur fond de "traditions culturelles" – tout en soulignant qu’un durcissement des législations entraîne systématiquement une hausse des suicides maquillés et pousse les familles à désigner un meurtrier mineur qui sera moins sévèrement jugé.

Voir encore:

Les «crimes d’honneur» augmentent au Royaume-Uni
Chloé Woitier
Le Figaro
03/12/2011

Banaz Mahmod, 20 ans, a été violée, torturée, étranglée puis brûlée sur ordre de son père et de son oncle en 2006 car elle fréquentait un garçon. Son meurtre avait choqué le Royaume-Uni.

Une association a recensé près de 3000 victimes de «crimes d’honneur» dans le pays en 2010. Les plaintes déposées à la police ont doublé en un an dans certaines zones, dont Londres.

Battues, séquestrées, mutilées, aspergées à l’acide ou tuées pour avoir porté atteinte à l’honneur de leur famille. Cette réalité a été vécue en 2010 par près de 3000 jeunes femmes résidant en Grande-Bretagne, selon une étude parue par l’Organisation pour le droit des femmes iraniennes et kurdes (Ikwro). Dans la seule capitale de Londres, ces «crimes d’honneur» ont doublé en un an, avec près de 500 cas.

Les données, collectées pour la première fois dans le pays, ont été obtenues par l’association grâce au Freedom of Information Act, une loi promulguée en 2000 par le gouvernement de Tony Blair qui permet à tout citoyen d’avoir accès à un très grand nombre de documents administratifs. Ikwro a ainsi envoyé une demande à l’ensemble des forces de police afin de connaître le nombre de violences qui ont été perpétrées l’an passé au nom de «l’honneur».

Le total, estimé à 2823 incidents, peut selon l’association être augmenté d’au moins 500 cas, 13 unités de police sur 52 n’ayant pas répondu à la demande. Dans certaines zones, les cas recensés ont doublé en un an. Ikwro estime également que ces chiffres sont sous-estimés, de nombreuses victimes n’osant pas porter plainte par peur de représailles.
«Un problème sérieux qui touche des milliers de personnes»

Pour l’association, la très grande majorité des femmes victimes de ces violences proviennent de familles originaires du sous-continent indien, d’Europe de l’Est et du Moyen-Orient. «Elles résistent de plus en plus aux atteintes à leur liberté, comme un mariage forcé décidé par leur famille. De fait, elles sont plus exposées aux violences», explique au Guardian Fionnuala Ni Mhurchu, responsable de la campagne d’Ikwro. «Ces chiffres sont importants car ils prouvent qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un phénomène isolé. C’est au contraire un problème sérieux qui touche des milliers de personnes chaque année, dont un certain nombre subit de très importantes violences avant de porter plainte.»

Ces femmes subissent le courroux de leur famille parce qu’elles ont un petit ami, ont refusé un mariage arrangé, ont été violées, ou parlent simplement à des hommes. D’autres sont victimes de violences car elles sont homosexuelles, se maquillent, ou s’habillent à l’occidentale. «Les coupables de ces crimes sont considérés comme des héros dans leur communauté parce qu’ils ont défendu l’honneur de leur famille et la réputation de la communauté»,a expliqué la directrice de l’Ikwro, Dina Nammi, sur la BBC.

L’association, forte de ces données, réclame que les autorités britanniques se donnent les moyens de lutter contre les «crimes d’honneur». Un porte-parole du ministère britannique de l’Intérieur a assuré que le gouvernement était «déterminé à mettre fin» à ces pratiques. Le Royaume-Uni est en effet avec les Pays-Bas le seul pays d’Europe à avoir élaboré une politique complète en la matière selon un rapport de la fondation suisse Surgir. La police britannique s’est ainsi dotée d’unités spéciales, tandis que tous les policiers du pays sont formés depuis 2009 à reconnaître les signes de violence liées à l’honneur. Des sites d’informations destinées aux jeunes filles ont également été mis en ligne pour inciter les victimes à porter plainte contre leur famille. Il n’existe pas de politique similaire en France.

Voir de même:

Meurtre de Banaz Mahmod en Grande-Bretagne : de nouvelles révélations ajoutent à l’horreur de ce "crime d’honneur"
Daily Mail
4 septembre 2007

De nouveaux détails concernant l’affaire Banaz Mahmod viennent d’être révélés sur les dernières heures de la jeune femme kurde assassinée par sa famille pour être tombée amoureuse du mauvais garçon. Ces détails ajoutent encore un peu plus dans le pathétique d’une affaire qui émeut toute l’Angleterre. Banaz Mahmod, 20 ans, a été violée et frappée à coups de pieds pendant deux heures avant d’être étranglée par une cordelette. Mohamad Hama, âgé de 30 ans avait été reconnu coupable du meurtre. Il avait été recruté par le père de Banaz (52 ans), et par Ari, le frère de celui-ci (51 ans), eux aussi reconnus coupables du meurtre. Les détails terrifiants du meurtre sont parvenus au public après que Hama ait été secrètement enregistré en train de parler à un de ses compagnons de cellule. Il a admis avoir "frappé" et "baisé" Banaz, qui a été soumise à des actes sexuels dégradant. Dans cet enregistrement, on peut entendre Hama et son ami rire de bon coeur pendant qu’il décrit comme il l’a tuée chez elle à Mitcham, dans le sud de Londres, avec Ari Mahmod pour "superviseur" des opérations. Les meurtriers, puisque deux autres suspects se sont enfuis en Irak, pensaient que Banaz serait seule chez elle. Hama déclare : "Ari (l’oncle) avait dit qu’il n’y avait personne d’autre. Mais il y avait quelqu’un d’autre : sa soeur (Biza). Le bâtard nous avait menti". Au sujet du meurtre, il déclare "Je jure sur Allah que ça a pris plus de deux heures. Son âme et sa vie ne voulaient pas partir. Selon le meurtrier, Banaz avait été garottée pendant cinq minutes, mais il a fallu encore une demi-heure avant qu’elle ne meure. "Le cordon était fin et l’âme ne voulait pas partir comme ça. Nous ne pouvions pas l’enlever, ça a pris en tout et pour tout cinq minutes pour l’étrangler. Je l’ai frappé à coups de pieds sur le cou pour faire sortir son âme. Elle était complètement à poil, sans rien sur elle" Le corps de Banaz a été mis dans une valise et enterrée dans un jardin à Birmingham, où on l’a retrouvée trois mois plus tard.

Voir par ailleurs:

‘Honor killings’ in USA raise concerns
Oren Dorell
USA TODAY
11/30/2009

Muslim immigrant men have been accused of six "honor killings" in the United States in the past two years, prompting concerns that the Muslim community and police need to do more to stop such crimes.

"There is broad support and acceptance of this idea in Islam, and we’re going to see it more and more in the United States," says Robert Spencer, who has trained FBI and military authorities on Islam and founded Jihad Watch, which monitors radical Islam.

Honor killings are generally defined as murders of women by relatives who claim the victim brought shame to the family. Thousands of such killings have occurred in Muslim countries such as Egypt, Jordan, Pakistan and Palestinian territories, according to the World Health Organization.

Some clerics and even lawmakers in these countries have said families have the right to commit honor killings as a way of maintaining values, according to an analysis by Yotam Feldner in the journal Middle East Quarterly.

In the USA, police allege the latest "honor killing" was that of Noor Almaleki, 20, who died Nov. 2 after she and her boyfriend’s mother were run over in a Peoria, Ariz., parking lot. Prosecutors charged Almaleki’s father, Faleh Almaleki, with murder, saying the Iraqi immigrant was upset that his daughter rejected a husband she married in Iraq and moved in with an American.

"By his own admission, this was an intentional act, and the reason was that his daughter had brought shame on him and his family," says Maricopa County prosecutor Stephanie Low, according to The Arizona Republic.

Many Muslim leaders in the USA say that Islam does not promote honor killings and that the practice stems from sexism and tribal behavior that predates the religion.

"You’re always going to get problems with chauvinism and suppressing vulnerable populations and gender discrimination," says Salam Al-Marayati, executive director of the Muslim Public Affairs Council.

Not all agree. Zuhdi Jasser says some Muslim communities have failed to spell out how Islam deals with issues that can lead to violence.

"How should young adult women be treated who want to assimilate more than their parents want them to assimilate?" asks Jasser, founder of the American Islamic Forum for Democracy, which advocates a separation of mosque and state. "How does an imam treat a woman who comes in and says she wants a divorce … or how to deal with your daughter that got pregnant, and she’s in high school?"

Phyllis Chesler, who wrote about honor killings in her book Woman’s Inhumanity to Woman, says police need to focus on the crimes’ co-conspirators if they wish to reverse the trend. Before 2008, there were six honor killings in the USA in the previous 18 years, according to her research.

"It’s usually the father, brother or first male cousin who is charged with the actual shooting or stabbing, (but not) the mother who lures the girl home," Chesler says. "The religion has failed to address this as a problem and failed to seriously work to abolish it as un-Islamic."

Jasser says his community needs to address how to treat young women who want to assimilate. "Until we have women’s liberation … we’re going to see these things increase."

Voir encore:

Q&A; Women Are Nurturing? How About Cruel, Especially to One Another
The New York Times
August 24, 2002

Phyllis Chesler is a feminist psychotherapist, author of several books about women and the founder of the Association for Women in Psychology. In her latest book, "Woman’s Inhumanity to Woman" (Thunder’s Mouth Press/Nation Books, 2002) she explores the often cruel relationships between women. Felicia R. Lee spoke with her.

There have been several books in the past year about how women and girls treat one another badly. Why is this topic receiving so much attention now?

I began working on this 20 years ago so I think I anticipated the curve. Had I published it sooner I would not have been able to back it up with the extraordinary research that has only begun to gather steam in the last 10 to 15 years.

The media are now willing, for whatever reason, to pay attention to the subject. I think that as women we’re strong enough now to not only acknowledge our racism, our class bias and our homophobia but our sexism. The coming generation, and second-wave feminists as well, can acknowledge that women, like men, are aggressive and, like men, are as close to the apes as the angels. Our lived realities have never conformed to the feminist view that women are morally superior to men, are compassionate, nurturing, maternal and also very valiant under siege. This is a myth.

You are known as a radical feminist who has written extensively about how the courts and the medical system mistreat women. Are you afraid that this book will be used against women?

Women don’t have to be better than anyone else to deserve human rights. Our failure to look at our own sexism lost us a few inches in our ability to change history in our lifetime. The first thing we do is acknowledge what the truth is, and then we have to not have double standards. We have to try not to use gossip to get rid of a rival, we have to try not to slander the next woman because we’re jealous that she’s pretty or that she got a scholarship. I think we have to learn some of the rules of engagement that men are good at.

Women coerce dreadful conformity from each other. I would like us to embrace diversity. Then we could have a more viable, serious feminist movement.

Why did so many feminists make the mistake of believing in what you call the myth of female superiority?

Because the stereotypes of women have been so used to justify our subordination and since it was a heady moment in history to suddenly come together with other women in quantum numbers around issues of women’s freedom and human rights, it took a while before each of us in turn started looking at how we treated each other. The unacknowledged aggression and cruelty and sexism among women in general — and that includes feminists — is what drove many an early activist out of what was a real movement.

Isn’t there conflict and psychological warfare in any social justice movement or workplace?

I think it gets worse when it’s women only. Men are happy in a middle-distance ground toward all others. They don’t take anything too personally, and they don’t have to get right into your face, into your business, into your life. Women need to do that. Women, the minute they meet another woman, it’s: she’s going to be my fairy godmother, my best friend, the mother I never had. And when that’s not the case we say, "well, she’s the evil stepmother."

We don’t serve ourselves so well with our depth-charged levels of capacity for intimacy because then we can only be close to a small group. We can’t command a nation-state.

Isn’t that just an extension of arguments that have created glass-ceilings in workplaces?

No. I think the conclusion is not that women should be kept barefoot and pregnant and at home because they have no executive capacity. The conclusion is that there is something about the workplace that is deadly to all living things and men adapt more.

I do have a chapter that says if you have a situation that is male-dominated with a few token women, women will not like each other, they will be particularly vicious in how they compete and keep other women down and out. We can’t say how women as a group would behave if overnight they had all the positions that men now have.

The cruelty you document ranges from mothers-in-law burning their daughters-in-law because of dowry disagreements to women stealing each other’s boyfriends. Can it all really be lumped together?

It helps to understand that in these non-Western countries where you have mothers-in-law dousing daughters-in-law with kerosene for their dowries and we say "how shocking," we have a version here. You have here mothers who think their daughters have to be thin, their daughters have to be pretty and their daughters need to have plastic surgery and their daughters have to focus mainly on the outward appearance and not on inner strength or inner self. It’s not genital mutilation but it’s ultimately a concern with outward appearance for the sake of marriageability.

Although you note that women don’t have as much power as men, you view them as equally culpable for many of society’s ills.

I’m thinking back to the civil rights era and the faces of white mothers who did not want little black children to integrate schools. What should we say about those women who joined the Ku Klux Klan or the Nazi party? You have a lot of women groaning under the yoke of oppression. Nevertheless, there are women who warm the beds and are the partners of men who create orphans. Women are best at collaborating with men who run the world because then we can buy pretty trinkets and have safe homes and nests for ourselves.

You say that women are the ones who police and monitor one another and silence dissent.

Women are silenced not because men beat up on us but because we don’t want to be shunned by our little cliques. That applies to all age groups. That’s one of the reasons that women are so conformist and so indirect: we end up sabotaging her rather than risking the loss of her intimate companionship. Women stealing each other’s lovers and spouses and jobs is pandemic.

Voir aussi:

Banaz: An ‘honour’ killing
November 3, 2012 "Honour" based violence (HBV), Blog 1

Artist and activist Deeyah explains the motivation behind her documentary film Banaz: A love story which features IKWRO. A shortened version of this documentary was shown on ITV on 31st October.

Deeyah writes:

I grew up in a community where honour is a form of social currency which is a source of concern from the moment we are born. ‘Honour’ can be the most sought after, protected and prized asset that defines the status and reputation of a family within their community. This burden weighs most heavily upon women’s behaviour. This collective sense of honour and shame has for centuries confined our movement, freedom of choice and restricted our autonomy. You cannot be who you are, you cannot express your needs, hopes and opinions as an individual if they are in conflict with the greater good and reputation of the family, the community, the collective. If you grow up in a community defined by these patriarchal concepts of honour and social structures these are the parameters you are expected to live by. This is true for my own life and experiences.

Autonomy, is not acceptable and can be punished by a variety of consequences from abuse, threats, intimidation, exclusion by the group, violence of which the most extreme manifestation is taking someone’s life; murdering someone in the name of ‘honour’. This is something that has interested me through much of my life especially because of my own experiences of meeting resistance and opposition for my expression and life choices which at the time strayed from the acceptable moral norms afforded to women of my background and I understand what it is like when people want to silence your voice. I have addressed these honour concepts in various forms through the years but I have always wanted to do more, especially about the most extreme form of guarding this “honour” known as honour killings. The medium I felt would allow me the room to explore this topic most in-depth is the documentary film format.

This is why I set out, almost 4 years ago, to make a documentary film about honour killings. My intent was to shed light on this topic and to learn about through reviewing an extensive list of cases across Europe that could help us to understand the extent of this issue and its existence within the European and American diaspora. The purpose of this project being to create a film that would serve primarily to educate and inform, and to help us understand the issue better and to consider what can be done to prevent or reduce these crimes. As I started researching and delving further into various cases, I came across the story of Banaz Mahmod. I realized that this case would best illustrate the constructs of honour, the lack of understanding around this topic in the Western world, and the severe need to do more across social, political and community lines. As a result, Banaz’ story has become the anchor for the topic in the film and shows the lessons needed to be learned from her tragic death.

Banaz Mahmod’s life was marked by betrayal. As a child she underwent FGM at the hands of her grandmother. At age 17 she was married off to a man she had met only once in order to strengthen family alliances. In her marriage she was abused, beaten, raped and forced to endure isolation. At age 19, she left her husband and returned to her family home hoping for safety and security, only to be betrayed again: first by the British authorities who didn’t take her pleas for help seriously when she suspected she was in danger, then by her family, who took her disobedience as an unforgivable act. At age 20 she disappeared and was never heard from again until she was discovered buried under a patio, wedged in a fetal position inside a muddy suitcase— a victim of so-called ‘Honour’ Killing.

After her death, Banaz found another family in the unlikeliest of places: the Metropolitan Police. It took Detective Chief Inspector Caroline Goode and her team five years to find and prosecute the perpetrators of this brutal crime, which included her father, uncle and a male cousin. This case spanned two continents and resulted in the only extradition from Iraq by Britain in modern history. In death, Banaz found a family willing to do whatever it took to protect her memory.

Banaz’s life and murder is just one among thousands of stories around the world where families chose to obey their community and peer pressure instead of honouring their duty to love and protect their children. Through Banaz’s story, which covers many of the classic patterns of Honour Crimes and oppression, we explore the broader topic of honour killings that is becoming particularly prevalent within diaspora communities in Europe and the US. 3000 honour crimes were reported in the UK alone in 2010. Despite these staggering figures being considered the “tip of the iceberg”, many young women, like Banaz, are let down by officials in the West because of their lack of understanding and training in identifying the signs of an honour crime as well as for fear of upsetting cultural sensitivities—and at times from a sense of a general apathy surrounding violence against minority community women. Honour Killings are an ongoing genocide where the murders of women and girls are considered ‘justified’ for the protection of a a family’s reputation. Although , for Banaz, justice did eventually prevail, she was still found dead in a suitcase.

Caroline’s extraordinary dedication shows that effective action can be taken, and that a new benchmark for detection can be set.

During the process of making this film, there were two points that stood out as particular needs that I could concretely do something about. The first, was to create a place where people interested in the subject and in need of information about honour violence could go to find out more. The second, was to create a place where the victims, whose families intended to erase them from the world, could be remembered. So I created The Honour-Based Violence Awareness Network (HBVA) and the Memini Memorial initiatives in collaboration with volunteers and experts from around the world.

During the process of making the film I found that after exhaustively searching the web for information on the subject, my need for research and data was unfulfilled. I continued interviewing experts in the field, ranging from policy makers to NGOs, activists, police officers and legal professionals and realised that they also shared my frustration at the lack of accessible and comprehensive information about Honour Based Violence. During these interviews, I quickly became aware that Honour Based Violence is little understood in the West–with alarming consequences. We know that Honour Based Violence is far more widespread than current figures indicate because it is under-reported, under-researched and under-documented; and therefore, easily misunderstood, overlooked and mis-recognised. I found this absolutely unacceptable. As a result I developed the Honour Based Violence Awareness Network (HBVA).

In collaboration with international experts, HBVA is an international digital resource centre working to advance understanding and awareness of Honour Killings and Honour Based Violence through research, training and information for professionals; teachers, health workers, social services, police, politicians, and others who may encounter individuals at risk. HBVA builds and promotes a network of experts, activists, and NGOs from around the world, establishing international partnerships to facilitate greater collaboration and education. HBVA draws on the expertise of its international partners, collaborators and experts from Pakistan, Iraq, UK, Netherlands, Sweden, Germany, India, Norway, Denmark, Bangladesh, Jordan, Palestine, France. Some of the esteemed HBVA experts are Unni Wikan, Asma Jahangir, Yakin Erturk, Rana Husseini, Serap Cileli, Ayse Onal, Yanar Mohammad, Dr. Shahrzad Mojab, Aruna Papp, Hina Jilani, Dr. Tahira S. Khan, Sara Hossain. WWW.HBV-AWARENESS.COM

Additionally, born as a result of this film project, is WWW.MEMINI.CO. Memini is an online remembrance initiative set up to ensure that the stories of victims of honour killings are told, defying the intent of those who wanted to erase them. Our personal and community silence allows these violent expressions of honour to survive and is what makes these murders possible in the first place. Memini is a small and humble step towards ending that silence.

Although the story of Banaz is filled with so much darkness, Detective Chief Inspector Caroline Goode shows us what can be achieved if we just simply care. Caroline went above and beyond the call of duty, going to the ends of the earth to find justice for Banaz–not just to fulfill her obligation as a police officer, but from feeling duty bound and seeing Banaz with a mother’s eyes and feeling with a mother’s heart.. I am grateful to have found Caroline and Banaz through this journey. For me, Caroline’s dedication and integrity, her compassion and her professionalism, represents the highest expression of truly honourable behaviour. The core lesson I have learned is that there is hope, but more has to be done – and I am committed to doing what I can, however small the action. I believe one thing we can do is to remember the victims. I believe if their own blood relatives discarded, betrayed, exterminated and forgot them, then we should adopt these girls as our own children, our own sisters, our own mothers and as fellow human beings. We will mourn, we will remember, we will honour their memory and we will not forget!

If we worry about offending communities by criticising honour killings, then we are complicit in the perpetuation of violence and abuse, in the restriction of women’s lives. Our silence provides the soil for this oppression and violence to thrive. It is not racist to protest against honour killings. We have a duty to stand up for individual human rights for all people, not for just men and not just for groups. We shall not sacrifice the lives of ethnic minority women for the sake of so-called political correctness.

I’d rather hurt feelings than see women die because of our fear, apathy and silence. We need to stand in solidarity. In order to create change we need to care. We need authorities, decision makers and politicians to provide the same protections and robust actions for women of ethnic minority communities affected by honour based violence and oppression as they would for any other crimes in any other part of society. It is not acceptable to shy away from abuses happening against women in some communities for fears of being labelled racist or insensitive– the very notion of turning a blind eye or walking on egg shells and avoiding to protect basic human rights of some women because they are of a certain ethnic background is not only fatal, but represents true racism.

We cannot continue to allow this slaughter of women in the name of culture, in the name of religion, in the name of tradition and in the name of political correctness. If we allow this to continue, we are betraying not only Banaz but thousands of other women and girls in her situation. Surely we should do all we can to protect all individuals in our societies regardless of skin colour, cultural heritage or gender, without fear?

We must challenge these paradigms in every way we can. Centuries old mindsets, entrenched gender roles and power relations will take time to change, but we can make a real and immediate difference in challenging the lack of awareness, the lack of political will, the lack of sufficient training and understanding when it comes to front line people who can help individuals at risk. This includes police, doctors, nurses, school teachers, social services and so on. At the very least the ignorance of authorities and lack of their understanding and training in European countries should not be a contributing factor in the continuing abuse of thousands of women (and men). We can not allow it to be the reason why these young people continue to suffer in silence because they fear they won’t be understood and won’t get the help they need.

Banaz is among the people who dared to ask for help; the majority of young people at risk of the various forms of honour based violence may not come forward at all.

All of the honour killings I researched are horrifying, heartbreaking and devastating, and no one case felt any less sad and tragic than any other. The reason I ended up choosing the story of Banaz was not because of the horror but because of the love. Banaz’s story was different in my eyes from most other stories because there was love in spite of the hatred she faced in her life, after death there were people who loved her and cared about her, one of whom was the most unexpected person I could have imagined, a police officer, of all people, DCI Caroline Goode. The other was Banaz’s sister Bekhal, who sacrificed her own safety and peace of mind for the sake of her love for her sister and her need to honour her memory through achieving justice. I have the greatest respect for Bekhal, her courage and determination defines true honour for me.

I was most saddened, from the very beginning of this project, to see how absent Banaz was from her own story. Normally a biographical film will feature family members, friends, and other people who knew the person sharing their love, their memories and thoughts about the person who has died, showing home videos and photographs and the other mementoes of loving relationships. In this film that was just not the case at all. The only person in the film speaking about Banaz and who had known Banaz when she was alive was her sister. Everyone else in the film came to know Banaz after she had passed away. We even put out calls in local newspapers and reached out through facebook and other social media to find anyone who would have known her and would be willing to share their memories of her, but no one came forward. This hurt my heart until I came across the footage of Banaz herself, showing us the suffocating reality of her life. Watching this tape for the first time was one of the most painful experiences of my life. I had spent three and a half years working on this documentary, learning everything I could about this young women’s life — and her death, and we were in the final editing process, and then suddenly here she was present on this tape. No one else would come forward to speak about her, but here she was herself in the final momemts of the process of making this film. It was a harrowing experience to finally be able to hear and see her tell her own story.

I found it excruciatingly sad to see her and at the same time I felt so glad and privileged to finally get a chance to see her and hear her. No one listened to her in her life, so the least we can do is listen to her now.

As a society we have let down Banaz, and as her community we have let her down, so the least we can now paying her the respect to listen to her and to learn from her experiences, and to honour Banaz we through addressing this issue with complete honesty and courage.

I deeply regret the fact that it took her death for people to start the process of learning more about this problem, although measures have been taken to improve the understanding around this, in my personal opinion, reflected in the research I have done, there is a very long way to go before we can adequately understand, protect and support women at risk. We don’t need empty slogans or lip service; we need real effective action on this issue. Living in Western societies, we need our lives as “brown” women to matter as much as any white British, Norwegian, French, German, Swedish, American, European or any other woman and fellow human being.

It feels surreal but deeply satisfying to finally stand at the point of completion. It has been a very long, hard and emotionally difficult process. It is my first film ever, and I feel proud to have had the opportunity to work on a project like this, and honoured to get to tell the story of such remarkable women such as Banaz, Bekhal and Caroline.

One of the things that has been very moving about this project is that, every single person who has been involved with the film has done so out of love for Banaz and for this project, and I have a deep feeling of gratitude for everyone who took part..Even though I did not have the budget to make a film like this, the time and commitment of my team made it possible — not only have people worked for significantly reduced rates, but often they have also worked for free. For example, the master musician Dr. Subramaniam contributed a soundtrack for the film because he believed in the project and wanted to contribute even though I was unable to pay him his usual fees. The entire process of this film has been like this and I have nothing but gratitude for the hard work, care and passion of everyone involved.

The tragic story of Banaz Mahmod: she fell in love at 19, so her family killed her
Fiona Barton
Daily Mail
12 June 2007

As one of five daughters in a strictly-traditional Kurdish family, Banaz Mahmod’s future was ordained whether she liked it or not.

She was kept away from Western influences, entered an arranged marriage at the age of 16 with a member of her clan and was expected to fulfil the role of subservient wife and mother.

But Banaz, a bright, pretty 19-year-old, fell in love with another man.

And for that, she was murdered by her father, uncle and a group of family friends. The very people who should have protected her from harm plotted her killing, garrotted her with a bootlace, stuffed her body in a suitcase and buried her under a freezer.

Banaz’s crime was to "dishonour" her father, Mahmod Mahmod, an asylum seeker from Iraqi Kurdistan, by leaving her abusive marriage and choosing her own boyfriend – a man from a different Kurdish clan.

Her punishment was discussed at a family "council of war" attended by her father, uncle Ari and other members of the clan. In the living room of a suburban semi in Mitcham, South London, it was decided that this young woman’s life was to be snuffed out so that her family would not be shamed in the eyes of the community.

Banaz was only ten when she came to Britain with her father, who had served in the Iraqi army, her mother Behya, brother Bahman and sisters Beza, Bekhal, Payman and Giaband.

The family, who came from the mountainous and rural Mirawaldy area, close to the Iranian border, were escaping Saddam Hussein’s regime and were granted asylum.

But Banaz’s move to a western country changed nothing about the life she was made to lead.

She had met her husband-tobe only three times before her wedding day, once on her father’s allotment. He was ill-educated and old-fashioned but her family described him as ‘the David Beckham of husbands’.

The teenage bride, who was taken to live in the West Midlands, was to tell local police in September 2005 that she had been raped at least six times and routinely beaten by her husband.

In one assault, she claimed, one of her teeth was almost knocked out because she called him by his first name in public.

To leave the arranged marriage would have brought dishonour on the Mahmod family and Banaz’s parents apparently preferred their child to suffer abuse rather than be shamed.

But after two years of marriage, she insisted on returning home to seek sanctuary. It was there, at a family party in the late summer of 2005, that she met Rahmat Sulemani.

For the first time in her blighted existence, Banaz fell in love. She was besotted with Rahmat, 28, calling him ‘my prince’ and sending endless loving text messages. Her father and uncle Ari were furious; the young woman was not yet formally divorced by her husband and her boyfriend was neither from their clan nor religious. More importantly, perhaps, he had not been chosen by her family.

Mahmod became enraged when his daughter refused to give up her boyfriend and talked of being in love.

The threat to family honour was immense and made worse by the fact that Banaz’s elder sister, Bekhal, had already brought "shame" on the family by moving out of the house at the age of 15, to escape her father’s violence.

Bekhal’s defiance meant that Mahmod lost status in the community because he was seen to

have failed to control his women and his younger brother Ari, a wealthy entrepreneur who ran a money transfer business, took over as head of the family.

It was he who telephoned Banaz on December 1, 2005 to tell her to end the affair with Rahmat or face the consequences.

The following day, Ari called a council of war to plan her murder and the disposal of her body. She was secretly warned by her mother that the lives of her and her boyfriend were in danger, and she went to Mitcham Police Station to report the death threat. But she was so terrified of her family’s reaction that she asked police to take no action and refused to move to a refuge.

The next day, an officer called at the family home but Banaz would not let him in.

She believed that her mother would protect her from harm but as an insurance against her disappearance, went back to the police station a week later to make a full statement, naming the men she believed would kill her.

One of the men was Mohamad Hama, who has admitted murder and two of the others named fled back to Iraq after the killing. On New Year’s Eve 2005, she was lured to her grandmother’s house in nearby Wimbledon for a meeting with her father and uncle to sort out her divorce.

When her father appeared wearing surgical gloves, ready to kill her, she ran out barefoot, broke a window to get into a neighbour’s house and then ran to a nearby cafe, covered in blood from cuts to her hands and screaming: "They’re trying to kill me".

The officers who attended the scene and accompanied Banaz to hospital did not believe her story.

However, the distressed and injured victim was able to give her own testimony about the attack to the jury in a short video recorded on Rahmat’s mobile phone at St George’s Hospital, Tooting.

The terrified lovers pretended they had parted but they continued to meet in secret. Tragically, they were spotted together in Brixton on January 21 and the Mahmods were informed.

Mohamad Hama and three other men tried to kidnap Rahmat and, when his friends intervened, told him he would be killed later.

When he phoned to warn Banaz, she went to the police and said she would co- operate in bringing charges against her family and other members of the community.

The policewoman who saw Banaz tried to persuade her to go into a hostel or safe house but she thought she would be safe at home because her mother was there.

On January 24, Banaz was left on her own at the family house and her assassins, Hama and two associates, were alerted.

The full details of what happened to her are still not known but two of the suspects, Omar Hussein and Mohammed Ali, who fled back to Iraq after the killing, are said to have boasted that Banaz was raped before she was strangled, "to show her disrespect".

There followed a "massively challenging" investigation into her disappearance by detectives, fearing the worst. The family’s appalling crime was finally exposed when, three months after she went missing, Banaz’s remains were found, with the bootlace still around her neck.

The discovery of her body provoked no emotion in her father and uncle. Even at her funeral, the only tears were from Banaz’s brother.

"She had a small life," a detective on the case said. "There is no headstone on her grave, nothing there to mark her existence."

Yesterday, her devastated boyfriend, who has been given a new identity by the Home Office under the witness protection programme, said: "Banaz was my first love. She meant the world to me."

The dead girl’s older sister, Bekhal, urged other women in the same position as her and her sister to seek help before it is too late.

Even today she continues to fear for her life, lives at a secret address and never goes out without wearing a long black veil that covers her entire body and face apart from her eyes.

She strongly rejected the suggestion that Banaz had brought "shame" on her Kurdish family by falling in love with a man they did not approve of, saying her sister simply wanted to live her own life.

"There’s a lot of evil people out there. They might be your own blood, they might be a stranger to you, but they are evil.

"They come over here, thinking they can still carry on the same life and make people carry on how they want them to live life."

Asked what was in her father’s mind on the day that Banaz died, Bekhal replied: "All I can say is devilishness. How can somebody think that kind of thing and actually do it to your own flesh and blood? It’s disgusting."

Bekhal says she is scared whenever she sees somebody from the same background as her.

"I watch my back 24/7."

Voir de plus:

‘They’re following me': chilling words of girl who was ‘honour killing’ victim
The murder of Banaz Mahmod by her family in 2006 shocked the country. A documentary now tells her story
Tracy McVeigh
The Observer
22 September 2012

On police videotape, a 19-year-old girl named those she believed had intended to kill her. They would try again, she said. "People are following me, still they are following me. At any time, if anything happens to me, it’s them," she told the officers calmly. "Now I have given my statement," she asked an officer, "what can you do for me?"

The answer was very little. Banaz Mahmod went back to her family in Mitcham, south London. Three months later she disappeared. It was several months before her raped and strangled body was found and four years before all those responsible for killing her were tracked down and jailed. Her father and uncle planned her death because the teenager had first walked out of a violent and sexually abusive arranged marriage, and later had fallen in love with someone else.

Now a documentary is to be premiered at the Raindance film festival, which opens this week, that includes for the first time some of the recordings made both by Banaz herself in the runup to her murder and the videotapes of some of the five visits she made to police to report the danger she felt herself to be in and name, before the event, her murderers. She told how her husband was "very strict. Like it was 50 years ago."

"When he raped me it was like I was his shoe that he could wear whenever he wanted to. I didn’t know if this was normal in my culture, or here. I was 17." Her family were furious when she finally left him.

The so-called honour killing of Banaz, who was murdered on 24 January 2006, shocked not only the country but also the police team, who faced a daunting task in bringing her killers to justice. They faced an investigation within an Iraqi Kurdish community, many of whom believed Banaz had deserved her fate for bringing shame on her father – a former soldier who fled Saddam Hussein and had sought asylum in the UK with his wife and five daughters. Mahmod Mahmod and his brother, Ari, were jailed for life for their part in the murder in 2007, but two other men involved fled to Iraq and were extradited back before being jailed for life in 2010.

Detective Chief Inspector Caroline Goode, who won a Queen’s Award for her dedicated efforts in getting justice for Banaz, said she found the case harrowing. In most cases police get justice after a murder for the family. "In this case the family had no interest whatsoever in the investigation. It was an absolute outrage that this girl was missing and nobody cared."

The film also shows the continuing effects of the killing, with both Banaz’s boyfriend and her sister, Bekhal, still living in hiding and in fear. Bekhal has put her own life at risk by her decision to give evidence against her family in court. She now "watches her back 24/7".

Remembering her sister, she tells the film-makers: "She was a very calm and quiet person. She loved to see people happy and didn’t like arguments, she didn’t like people raising their voices, she hated it. She just wanted a happy life, she just wanted a family."

The film, Banaz: A Love Story, was made by the former pop star and now music producer and film-maker Deeyah. Norwegian-born, but of Punjabi and Pashtun heritage, Deeyah has herself been subject to honour-related abuse and her singing career was marred by endless death threats that, in part, led to her giving up touring. The story of Banaz, who died because she just wanted to be an ordinary British teenager, she said, struck an immediate chord with her.

"Despite the horror, what emerges is a story of love," said Deeyah. "What has upset me greatly from the very beginning of this project is how absent Banaz was from her own story. Whenever you see a film about someone who has passed you will always have family, friends, people who knew the person, sharing their love, their memories and thoughts about the person who has died; they have home videos, photos. That was just not the case here at all. The only person speaking for Banaz who had known her alive was her sister. Other than that, everyone else in the film came to know Banaz after she had died."

A search for other witnesses to her life proved fruitless. "We tried to find anyone who would have known her, no one came forward," said Deeyah. "Then I came across the videotape with Banaz herself, telling us what her suffocating reality was like. Watching this tape for the first time was among the most difficult things I have ever experienced. I had spent three-and-a-half years working on this film, learning everything I could about this young woman’s life and her death, we were in the final editing process and suddenly here she was, when no one else would come forward to speak about her.

"I found it excruciatingly sad to see her and at the same time I felt so glad to finally get a chance to see her and hear her. No one listened to her in her life. As a society we let down Banaz, as her community we let her down. I am sorry she had to die for people to start learning more about this problem, although measures have been taken to improve the understanding around this.

"There is a very long way to go before we can adequately understand, protect and support women at risk. We don’t need empty slogans or lip service, we need real concise action on this issue. Living in western societies, we need our lives as ‘brown’ women to matter as much as any fellow human being."

Voir enfin:

Crime d’honneur -Elif Shafak
Patrice
Cultura
le 28/04/2013

Roman sensible et émouvant d’une auteure turque adulée dans son pays, Crime d’honneur tisse les relations complexes d’une famille écartelée entre sa culture traditionnelle et le désir d’émancipation né du passage à l’occident.
Un village près de l’Euphrate, dans un monde patriarcal où l’honneur des hommes est la valeur suprême. Là, une femme qui implore Allah pour la naissance d’un fils après avoir mis au monde six filles voit sa requête ignorée. Ce seront deux filles de plus : Pembe et Jamila, jumelles aux caractères aussi dissemblables que leurs destins. L’une se marie avec le Turc Adem et part vivre avec lui à Londres, dans un pays hostile et providentiel. L’autre se retire dans une cabane isolée et devient la sage-femme vierge. C’est Pembe, la voyageuse, qui réalisera le rêve maternel en accouchant en Angleterre d’un fils : Iskender, aîné de la fratrie, sultan, petit dieu. Mais les amours contrariés pèsent de tout leur poids dans les malheurs à venir. Car amoureux de Jamila, Adem a dû se résoudre à épouser Pembe qu’il n’aimera jamais et quittera. Le champ est libre pour mettre l’honneur à l’épreuve, car chacun sait chez les kurdes que les femmes ne peuvent apporter que la honte. Et qu’en l’absence du mari, c’est sur le fils, aussi jeune soit-il, que pèse la responsabilité de défendre, par tous les moyens, l’honneur du clan.

EXTRAIT

ESMA Londres, septembre 1992

Ma mère est morte deux fois. Je me suis promis de ne pas permettre qu’on oublie son histoire, mais je n’ai jamais trouvé le temps, la volonté ou le courage de la coucher par écrit. Jusqu’à récemment, je veux dire. Je ne crois pas être en mesure de devenir un véritable écrivain, et ça n’a plus d’importance. J’ai atteint un âge qui me met davantage en paix avec mes limites et mes échecs. Il fallait pourtant que je raconte cette histoire, ne serait-ce qu’à une personne. Il fallait que je l’envoie dans un coin de l’univers où elle pourrait flotter librement, loin de nous. Je la devais à maman, cette liberté. Et il fallait que je termine cette année. Avant qu’il soit libéré de prison.
Dans quelques heures, je retirerai du feu le halva au sésame, je le mettrai à refroidir près de l’évier et j’embrasserai mon époux, feignant de ne pas remarquer l’inquiétude dans ses yeux. Je quitterai alors la maison avec mes jumelles – sept ans, nées à quatre minutes d’intervalle – pour les conduire à une fête d’anniversaire. Elles se disputeront en chemin et, pour une fois, je ne les gronderai pas. Elles se demanderont s’il y aura un clown, à la fête, ou mieux : un magicien.
– Comme Harry Houdini, suggérerai-je.
– Harry Wou-quoi ?
– Woudini, elle a dit, idiote !
– C’est qui, maman ?
Ça me fera mal. Une douleur de piqûre d’abeille. Pas grand-chose en surface, mais une brûlure tenace à l’intérieur. Je me rendrai compte, comme à tant d’occasions, qu’elles ne connaissent rien de l’histoire de la famille, parce que je leur en ai raconté si peu. Un jour, quand elles seront prêtes. Quand je serai prête.
Après avoir déposé les petites, je bavarderai un moment avec les autres mères. Je rappellerai à l’hôtesse qu’une de mes filles est allergique aux noix et que, comme il est difficile de distinguer les jumelles, il vaut mieux les garder à l’œil toutes les deux, et s’assurer que ni l’une ni l’autre n’ingère d’aliments contenant des noix, y compris le gâteau d’anniversaire. C’est un peu injuste pour mon autre fille, mais entre jumelles ça arrive parfois – l’injustice, je veux dire.
Je retournerai alors à ma voiture, une Austin Montego que mon mari et moi conduisons à tour de rôle. La route de Londres à Shrewsbury prend trois heures et demie. Il est possible que je doive faire le plein d’essence juste avant Birmingham. J’écouterai la radio. Ça m’aidera à chasser les fantômes, la musique.
Bien des fois, j’ai envisagé de le tuer. J’ai élaboré des plans complexes mettant en action un pistolet, du poison, voire un couteau à cran d’arrêt – une justice poétique, en quelque sorte. J’ai même pensé lui pardonner, tout à fait, en toute sincérité. En fin de compte, je n’ai rien accompli.
*
En arrivant à Shrewsbury, je laisserai la voiture devant la gare et je parcourrai à pied en cinq minutes la distance me séparant du sinistre bâtiment de la prison. Je ferai les cent pas sur le trottoir ou je m’adosserai au mur, face au portail, pour attendre qu’il sorte. Je ne sais pas combien de temps ça prendra. Je ne sais pas non plus comment il réagira en me voyant. Je ne l’ai pas revu depuis plus d’un an. Au début, je lui rendais visite régulièrement mais, alors qu’approchait le jour de sa libération, j’ai cessé de venir.
À un moment, le lourd battant s’ouvrira et il sortira. Il lèvera le regard vers le ciel couvert, lui qui a perdu l’habitude d’une aussi vaste étendue au-dessus de lui, en quatorze années d’incarcération. Je l’imagine plissant les yeux pour se protéger de la lumière du jour, comme une créature de la nuit. Pendant ce temps, je ne bougerai pas, je compterai jusqu’à dix, ou cent, ou trois mille. On ne s’embrassera pas. On ne se serrera pas la main. Un hochement de tête et un salut murmuré de nos voix fluettes et étranglées. Arrivé à la gare, il sautera dans la voiture. Je serai surprise de constater qu’il est toujours musclé. C’est encore un jeune homme, après tout.
S’il veut une cigarette, je ne m’y opposerai pas, bien que j’en déteste l’odeur et que je ne laisse mon mari fumer ni dans la voiture ni à la maison. Je roulerai à travers la campagne anglaise, entre des prairies paisibles et des champs cultivés. Il m’interrogera sur mes filles. Je lui dirai qu’elles sont en bonne santé, qu’elles grandissent vite. Il sourira comme s’il avait la moindre idée de ce que c’est d’être parent. Je ne lui poserai aucune question en retour.
J’aurai apporté une cassette pour la route. « Les plus grands succès d’ABBA » – toutes les chansons que ma mère aimait fredonner en cousant, en faisant la cuisine ou le ménage : Take a Chance on Me, Mamma Mia !, Dancing Queen, The Name of the Game… Parce qu’elle nous regardera, j’en suis certaine. Les mères ne montent pas au paradis, quand elles meurent. Elles obtiennent la permission de Dieu de rester un peu plus longtemps dans les parages pour veiller sur leurs enfants, quoi qu’il se soit passé entre eux au cours de leurs brèves vies mortelles.
De retour à Londres, on gagnera Barnsbury Square et je chercherai une place de stationnement en grognant. Il se mettra à pleuvoir – des petites gouttes cristallines – et je réussirai à me garer. Je me demande s’il me dira en riant que j’ai la conduite typique des femmes au volant. Il l’aurait fait, jadis.
On se dirigera ensemble vers la maison, dans la rue silencieuse et lumineuse devant et derrière nous. Pendant un court instant, je comparerai ce qui nous entoure à notre maison de Hackney, celle de Lavender Grove, et je n’en reviendrai pas de trouver tout si différent, désormais – combien le temps a progressé, alors même que nous ne progressions pas !
Une fois à l’intérieur, on retirera nos chaussures et on enfilera des pantoufles, une paire de charentaises anthracite pour lui, empruntée à mon mari, et pour moi des mules bordeaux à pompon. Son visage se crispera en les voyant. Pour l’apaiser, je lui dirai qu’elles sont un cadeau de mes filles. Il se détendra en comprenant que ce ne sont pas les siennes à elle, que la ressemblance n’est que pure coïncidence.
Depuis la porte, il me regardera faire du thé, que je lui servirai sans lait mais avec beaucoup de sucre, à condition que la prison n’ait pas changé ses habitudes. Puis je sortirai le halva au sésame. On s’assoira tous les deux près de la fenêtre, nos tasses et nos assiettes à la main, comme des étrangers polis observant la pluie sur les jonquilles du jardin. Il me complimentera sur mes talents de cuisinière et me confiera que le halva au sésame lui a manqué, tout en refusant d’en reprendre. Je lui dirai que je respecte la recette de maman à la lettre, mais que jamais il n’est aussi bon que le sien. Ça le fera taire. On se regardera dans les yeux, dans un silence lourd. Puis il s’excusera, prétextera de la fatigue pour demander à aller se reposer, si c’est possible. Je le conduirai à sa chambre et je refermerai lentement la porte.
Je le laisserai là. Dans une pièce de ma maison. Ni loin ni trop près. Je le confinerai entre ces quatre murs, entre la haine et l’amour, sentiments que je ne peux m’empêcher d’éprouver, piégés dans une boîte au fond de mon cœur.
C’est mon frère.
Lui, un meurtrier.

EXTRAIT BAC :

Together they focused on the film.

Pembe watched The Kid with wide-open eyes, the look of surprise on her countenance deepening with each scene. When Chaplin found an abandoned baby in a rubbish bin, and raised him like his own son, she smiled with appreciation. When the child flung stones at the neighbours’ windows so that the tramp–disguised as a glazier–could fix them and earn some money, she chuckled. When social services took the boy away, her eyes welled up with tears.

And, finally, as father and son were reunited, her face lit up with contentment, and a trace of something that Elias took to be melancholy. So absorbed did she seem in the film that he felt a twinge of resentment. What a funny thing it was to be jealous of Charlie Chaplin. Elias observed her as she unpinned her hair, and then pinned it back. He caught a whiff of jasmine and rose, a heady, charming mixture. Only minutes before the film came to an end, he found the nerve to reach out for her fingers, feeling like a teenager on his first date. To his relief, she didn’t move her hand away. They sat still–two sculptures carved out of the dark, both scared of making a move that would disrupt the tenderness of the moment.

When the lights came back on, it took them a few seconds to grow accustomed to real life. Quickly, he took out a notepad and wrote down the name of another cinema in another part of the town. “Next week, same day, same time, will you come?”
“Yes”, she faltered. Before he’d found a chance to say anything else, Pembe leaped to her feet and headed towards the exit, running away from him and everything that had taken place between them, or would have taken place, had they been different people.

She held in her palm the name of the place they were to meet next time, grasping it tightly, as if it were the key to a magic world, a key she would use right now were it in her power to decide. And so it began. They started to meet every Friday at the same time, and occasionally on other afternoons. They frequented the Phoenix more than any other place, but they also met at several other cinemas, all far-away from their home, all unpopular.
[. . .]
In time he found out more things about her, pieces of a jigsaw puzzle that he would complete only long after she had gone.
[..]
Slowly he was beginning to make sense of the situation. This unfathomable, almost enigmatic attraction that he felt for her, a woman so alien to the life he had led, was like a childhood memory coming back.

Elif Shafak, Honour, 2012

Voir par ailleurs:

Bac 2013: shocking confusion à l’épreuve d’anglais
Marie Caroline Missir
L’Express
20/06/2013

Les concepteurs du sujet d’anglais LV1 se seraient risqués à comparer le prestigieux ‘"Oxford Union" avec une vulgaire association étudiante…

Lorsque le journaliste anglais Peter Gumbel a découvert le sujet d’anglais première langue du bac 2013, son sang n’a fait qu’un tour. Les concepteurs du sujet auraient confondu "Oxford Union", prestigieux cercle de discussion et de débats bien connu Outre-manche, avec l"‘Oxford’s Student Union", l’équivalent du bureau des élèves. Shocking!

Le texte sur lequel devaient en effet plancher les lycéens est tiré d’une oeuvre de Jeffrey Archer, First Among Equal. Le récit en question met en scène un jeune homme très ambitieux, et qui pourrait, selon sa mère, aspirer à présider le prestigieux "Oxford Union". A partir de la lecture de ce texte, les élèves sont alors invités à disserter en imaginant le discours de campagne de Simon, le héros de Archer, pour devenir président "of the University’s Student Union", soit l’association des étudiants d’Oxford…rien à voir avec l’Oxford Union, évoquée dans le texte du sujet! "Cette confusion, absolument incroyable pour un examen tel que le bac exigerait que l’épreuve soit annulée!", estime-t-il.

Pour l’Inspection générale d’anglais, il n’y a aucune erreur dans ce sujet. "Dans le texte de compréhension, il est en effet fait référence à la prestigieuse société de réflexion et de débats Oxford Union. Il est vraisemblable que relativement peu de candidats la connaissent. L’un des sujets d’expression proposés au choix du candidat envisage une autre situation: le personnage du texte décide d’être candidat à la présidence de the University’s Student Union. Pour éviter toute confusion, Oxford n’est pas mentionné. Les candidats sont invités à tenir compte de ce qu’ils connaissent du personnage pour l’imaginer dans une situation différente du texte", justifie l’inspection. Much Ado about nothing donc, comme dirait Sheakespeare.

Peter Gumbel est l’auteur de "Elite Academy, La France malade de ses grandes écoles", Denoël, 2013.

COMPLEMENT:

Honor’ Killings: A New Kind of American Tragedy
A new kind of American tragedy is taking place in a Brooklyn Federal Courthouse.
Dr. Phyllis Chesler
Breitbart
30 Jun 2014

Both the defendant, standing trial for conspiracy to commit murder abroad in Pakistan, and the main witness against him, his daughter Amina, wept when they first saw each other. Amina’s extended family stared at her with hostility. As she testified, Amina paused, hesitated, and sobbed. She and her father had been very close until he decided that she had become too “Americanized.”

This Pakistani-American father of five, a widower, worked seven days a week driving a cab in order to support his children; this included sending his daughter, Amina, to Brooklyn College.

This is a successful American immigrant story—and yet, it is also a unique and unprecedented story as well, one which demands that Western law prevail over murderously misogynistic tribal honor codes.

At some point, Mohammad Ajmal Choudry sent Amina to Pakistan so that she might re-connect with her “roots”—but he had her held hostage there for three years. During that time, Amina, an American citizen, was forced into an arranged marriage, ostensibly to her first cousin, who probably expected this marriage to lead to his American citizenship. Such arranged marriages, and arranged specifically for this purpose, are routine. They are also factors in a number of high profile honor killing cases in the United States, Canada, and Europe.

For example, the Texas born and raised Said sisters, Aminah and Sarah, refused to marry Egyptian men as their Egyptian cab-driver father Yasir wanted them to do and he killed them for it. Canadian-Indian, Jaswinder Kaur, refused to marry the man her mother had chosen for her and instead married someone she loved. Her widowed mother and maternal uncle had her killed in India. They have been fighting extradition from Canada for more than a decade.

Amina, who grew up in New York from the time she was nine years old, did not want to be held hostage to this marriage. Indeed, Amina had found a man whom she loved and wished to marry.

Plucky Americanized Amina fled the arranged marriage within a month. With the help of a relative, the U.S. State Department, and ultimately, the Department of Homeland Security, Amina left Pakistan and went into hiding in the United States.

She had to. Her father had threatened to kill her if she did not return to her husband, give up her boyfriend, or return to her father. Mohammad may have pledged Amina’s hand without her knowledge, long, long ago.

A female relative’s sexual and reproductive activities are assets that belong to her father’s family, her tribe, her religion. They are not seen as individual rights.

Acting as if one is “free” to choose whom to marry and whom not to marry means that a woman has become too Westernized, or, in Amina’s case, too “Americanized.” This is a capital crime.

From Mohammad’s point of view, his beloved daughter had betrayed and dishonored him. She had “un-manned” him before his family. The desire to marry whom you want or to leave a violent marriage are viewed as filthy and selfish desires. Many Muslims in the Arab and Muslim world; Hindus and Muslims in India; and Muslims and, to a lesser extent, Sikhs in the West share this view and accordingly, perpetrate “honor killings.”

I do not like this phrase. An honor killing is dishonorable and it is also murder, plain and simple. It is a form of human sacrifice. It is also femicide–although sometimes boys and men are also murdered. I would like to call them “horror” murders.

American federal statutes have allowed prosecutors to charge and convict American citizens and residents while they are in the United States for having committed crimes abroad. This includes conspiracy to commit murder, incite terrorism, launder money, engage in racketeering, etc.

What did Mohammad Choudry do? According to the Indictment filed in United States District Court/the Eastern District of New York on September 20, 2013, Choudry “knowingly and intentionally conspired” to commit one or more murders. He contacted and wired money to at least four conspirators in Pakistan, including some relatives. Since Amina would not come out of hiding, their job was to murder the father and sister of Amina’s boyfriend. And they did just that. An eyewitness “observed Choudry’s brother standing over the victims, holding a gun and desecrating the bodies.”

The murders were committed in Pakistan “between January 2013 and February 2013.” Mohammad Ajmal Choudry was arrested in New York on February 25, 2013. The trial began last week, in June, 2014. Amina testified that her father vowed to kill her and every member of her new lover’s family if she did not do the right thing.

The price of love or of freedom for Amina—and for other women in her position–is very high. She will have no family of origin. If she ever weakens and tries to seek them out, she risks being killed by one of her siblings, uncles, or cousins. After all, Amina entrapped her father on the phone by allowing him to death threaten her and others.

I have published three studies about honor killing and am at work on a fourth such study. I have also written countless articles about this subject and submitted affidavits in cases where girls and women have fled honor killing families and are seeking political asylum.

I am beginning to think that, like female genital mutilation, honor murder is so entrenched a custom that, in addition to prevention and prosecution,  (at least in the West), what may be required is this: People may need to be taught courage, the art of resisting tribal barbarism. Families need to learn to go against tradition, withstand ostracism and mockery, withstand being cut off by their families and villages—for the sake of their daughters.

One fear that a “dishonored” family has is that they will not be able to marry off their other daughters or sons. Perhaps educating a pool of potential marriage mates into understanding that murder is not “honorable;” that daughters’ lives are valuable, that such horror murders are not religiously sanctioned (if indeed, that is the case), and that enacting tribal honor codes are high crimes in the West.

The Choudry trial continues today in Brooklyn. Stay tuned for breaking news.


Irak: Avec Assad, on voit bien ce qui arrive quand on laisse un dictateur en place (Blair: The problems don’t go away)

15 juin, 2014
https://scontent-a-fra.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfa1/v/t1.0-9/p526x296/10251955_4331484382353_3709743704406357175_n.jpg?oh=bf66b56099fe1878d3887fba6fb45110&oe=5428A333
L’Irak (…) pourrait être l’un des grands succès de cette administration. Joe Biden (10.02.10)
To begin withdrawing before our commanders tell us we are ready … would mean surrendering the future of Iraq to al Qaeda. It would mean that we’d be risking mass killings on a horrific scale. It would mean we’d allow the terrorists to establish a safe haven in Iraq to replace the one they lost in Afghanistan. It would mean increasing the probability that American troops would have to return at some later date to confront an enemy that is even more dangerous. George Bush (2007)
A number of scholars and former government officials take strong issue with the administration’s warning about a new caliphate, and compare it to the fear of communism spread during the Cold War. They say that although Al Qaeda’s statements do indeed describe a caliphate as a goal, the administration is exaggerating the magnitude of the threat as it seeks to gain support for its policies in Iraq. NYT (2005)
More than 600,000 Iraqi children have died due to lack of food and medicine and as a result of the unjustifiable aggression (sanction) imposed on Iraq and its nation. The children of Iraq are our children. You, the USA, together with the Saudi regime are responsible for the shedding of the blood of these innocent children.  (…) The latest and the greatest of these aggressions, incurred by the Muslims since the death of the Prophet (ALLAH’S BLESSING AND SALUTATIONS ON HIM) is the occupation of the land of the two Holy Places -the foundation of the house of Islam, the place of the revelation, the source of the message and the place of the noble Ka’ba, the Qiblah of all Muslims- by the armies of the American Crusaders and their allies.   (…) there is no more important duty than pushing the American enemy out of the holy land. Osama Bin Laden (1996)
Le peuple comprend maintenant les discours des oulémas dans les mosquées, selon lesquels notre pays est devenu une colonie de l’empire américain. Il agit avec détermination pour chasser les Américains d’Arabie saoudite. [...] La solution à cette crise est le retrait des troupes américaines. Leur présence militaire est une insulte au peuple saoudien. Ben Laden
Tuer les Américains et leurs alliés, qu’ils soient civils ou militaires, est un devoir qui s’impose à tout musulman qui le pourra, dans tout pays où il se trouvera. Ben Laden (février 1998)
27 août 1992 : les Etats-Unis, la Grande-Bretagne et la France mettent en place une autre zone d’exclusion aérienne, au sud du 32eme parallèle, avec l’objectif d’observer les violations de droits de l’homme à l’encontre de la population chiite.
3 septembre 1996 : en représailles à un déploiement de troupes irakiennes dans la zone nord, les Etats-Unis et la Grande-Bretagne ripostent militairement dans le sud et étendent la zone d’exclusion aérienne sud, qui passe du 32eme au 33eme parallèle. La France refuse cette extension, mais continue à effectuer des missions de surveillance aérienne au sud du 32ème parallèle..
27 décembre 1996 : Jacques Chirac décide de retirer la France du contrôle de la zone d’exclusion aérienne nord. Il justifie cette décision par le fait que le dispositif a changé de nature avec les bombardements de septembre, et que le volet humanitaire initialement prévu n’y est plus inclus. La France proteste par ailleurs contre la décision unilatérale des Etats-Unis et de la Turquie (avec l’acceptation de la Grande-Bretagne) d’augmenter la zone d’exclusion aérienne sud.
Michel Wéry
Les Etats-Unis n’ont pas envahi l’Irak mais sont intervenus dans un conflit déjà en cours.  Kiron Skinner (conseillère à la sécurité du président Bush)
Since a wounded Saddam could not be left unattended and an oil-rich Saudi Arabia could not be left unprotected, U.S. troops took up long-term residence in the Saudi kingdom, a fateful decision that started the clock ticking toward 9/11. As bin Laden himself explained in his oft-quoted 1996 fatwa, his central aim was “to expel the occupying enemy from the country of the two Holy places.”… Put another way, bin Laden’s casus belli was an unintended and unforeseen byproduct of what Saddam Hussein had done in 1990. The presence of U.S. troops in the land of Mecca and Medina had galvanized al-Qaeda, which carried out the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, which triggered America’s global war on terror, which inevitably led back to Iraq, which is where America finds itself today. In a sense, occupation was inevitable after Desert Storm; perhaps the United States ended up occupying the wrong country. … If the U.S. presence in Saudi Arabia sparked bin Laden’s global guerrilla war, America’s low threshold for casualties would serve as the fuel to keep it raging. … From bin Laden’s vantage point, America’s retreats from Beirut in the 1980s, Mogadishu in the 1990s and Yemen in 2000 were evidence of weakness. “When tens of your soldiers were killed in minor battles and one American pilot was dragged in the streets of Mogadishu, you left the area carrying disappointment, humiliation, defeat and your dead with you,” he recalled. “The extent of your impotence and weaknesses became very clear. It was a pleasure for the heart of every Muslim and a remedy to the chests of believing nations to see you defeated in the three Islamic cities of Beirut, Aden and Mogadishu.” … Hence, quitting Iraq could have dramatic and disastrous consequences – something like the fall of Saigon, Desert One, and the Beirut and Mogadishu pullouts all rolled into one giant propaganda victory for the enemy. Not only would it leave a nascent democracy unprotected from bin Laden’s henchmen, it would serve to confirm their perception that America is a paper tiger lacking the will to fight or to stand with those who are willing to fight. Who would count on America the next time? For that matter, on whom would America be able to count as the wars of 9/11 continue? … Finally, retreat also would re-energize the enemy and pave the way toward his ultimate goal. Imagine Iraq spawning a Balkan-style ethno-religious war while serving as a Taliban-style springboard for terror. Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, al-Qaeda’s top terrorist in Iraq, already has said, “We fight today in Iraq, and tomorrow in the land of the two Holy Places, and after there the West.” Alan W. Dowd
De même que les progressistes européens et américains doutaient des menaces de Hitler et de Staline, les Occidentaux éclairés sont aujourd’hui en danger de manquer l’urgence des idéologies violentes issues du monde musulman. Les socialistes français des années 30 (…) ont voulu éviter un retour de la première guerre mondiale; ils ont refusé de croire que les millions de personnes en Allemagne avaient perdu la tête et avaient soutenu le mouvement nazi. Ils n’ont pas voulu croire qu’un mouvement pathologique de masse avait pris le pouvoir en Allemagne, ils ont voulu rester ouverts à ce que les Allemands disaient et aux revendiquations allemandes de la première guerre mondiale. Et les socialistes français, dans leur effort pour être ouverts et chaleureux afin d’éviter à tout prix le retour d’une guerre comme la première guerre mondiale, ont fait tout leur possible pour essayer de trouver ce qui était raisonnable et plausible dans les arguments d’Hitler. Ils ont vraiment fini par croire que le plus grand danger pour la paix du monde n’était pas posé par Hitler mais par les faucons de leur propre société, en France. Ces gesn-là étaient les socialistes pacifistes de la France, c’était des gens biens. Pourtant, de fil en aiguille, ils se sont opposés à l’armée française contre Hitler, et bon nombre d’entre eux ont fini par soutenir le régime de Vichy et elles ont fini comme fascistes! Ils ont même dérapé vers l’anti-sémitisme pur, et personne ne peut douter qu’une partie de cela s’est reproduit récemment dans le mouvement pacifiste aux Etats-Unis et surtout en Europe. Un des scandales est que nous avons eu des millions de personnes dans la rue protestant contre la guerre en Irak, mais pas pour réclamer la liberté en Irak. Personne n’a marché dans les rues au nom des libertés kurdes. Les intérêts des dissidents libéraux de l’Irak et les démocrates kurdes sont en fait également nos intérêts. Plus ces personnes prospèrent, plus grande sera notre sécurité. C’est un moment où ce qui devrait être nos idéaux — les idéaux de la démocratie libérale et de la solidarité sociale — sont également objectivement notre intérêt. Bush n’a pas réussi à l’expliquer clairement, et une grande partie de la gauche ne l’a même pas perçu. Paul Berman
Ce n’est pas parce qu’une équipe de juniors porte le maillot des Lakers que cela en fait des Kobe Bryant. Je pense qu’il y a une différence entre les moyens et la portée d’un Ben Laden, d’un réseau qui planifie activement des attaques terroristes de grande envergure contre notre territoire, et ceux de jihadistes impliqués dans des luttes de pouvoir locales, souvent de nature ethnique. Barack Obama (janvier 2014)
Who Lost Iraq? You know who. (…) The military recommended nearly 20,000 troops, considerably fewer than our 28,500 in Korea, 40,000 in Japan, and 54,000 in Germany. The president rejected those proposals, choosing instead a level of 3,000 to 5,000 troops. A deployment so risibly small would have to expend all its energies simply protecting itself — the fate of our tragic, missionless 1982 Lebanon deployment — with no real capability to train the Iraqis, build their U.S.-equipped air force, mediate ethnic disputes (as we have successfully done, for example, between local Arabs and Kurds), operate surveillance and special-ops bases, and establish the kind of close military-to-military relations that undergird our strongest alliances. The Obama proposal was an unmistakable signal of unseriousness. It became clear that he simply wanted out, leaving any Iraqi foolish enough to maintain a pro-American orientation exposed to Iranian influence, now unopposed and potentially lethal. (…) The excuse is Iraqi refusal to grant legal immunity to U.S. forces. But the Bush administration encountered the same problem, and overcame it. Obama had little desire to. Indeed, he portrays the evacuation as a success, the fulfillment of a campaign promise. Charles Krauthammer
The prospect of Iraq’s disintegration is already being spun by the Administration and its media friends as the fault of George W. Bush and Mr. Maliki. So it’s worth understanding how we got here. Iraq was largely at peace when Mr. Obama came to office in 2009. Reporters who had known Baghdad during the worst days of the insurgency in 2006 marveled at how peaceful the city had become thanks to the U.S. military surge and counterinsurgency. In 2012 Anthony Blinken, then Mr. Biden’s top security adviser, boasted that, "What’s beyond debate" is that "Iraq today is less violent, more democratic, and more prosperous. And the United States is more deeply engaged there than at any time in recent history." Mr. Obama employed the same breezy confidence in a speech last year at the National Defense University, saying that "the core of al Qaeda" was on a "path to defeat," and that the "future of terrorism" came from "less capable" terrorist groups that mainly threatened "diplomatic facilities and businesses abroad." Mr. Obama concluded his remarks by calling on Congress to repeal its 2001 Authorization to Use Military Force against al Qaeda. If the war on terror was over, ISIS didn’t get the message. The group, known as Tawhid al-Jihad when it was led a decade ago by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, was all but defeated by 2009 but revived as U.S. troops withdrew and especially after the uprising in Syria spiraled into chaos. It now controls territory from the outskirts of Aleppo in northwestern Syria to Fallujah in central Iraq. The possibility that a long civil war in Syria would become an incubator for terrorism and destabilize the region was predictable, and we predicted it. "Now the jihadists have descended by the thousands on Syria," we noted last May. "They are also moving men and weapons to and from Iraq, which is increasingly sinking back into Sunni-Shiite civil war. . . . If Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki feels threatened by al Qaeda and a Sunni rebellion, he will increasingly look to Iran to help him stay in power." We don’t quote ourselves to boast of prescience but to wonder why the Administration did nothing to avert the clearly looming disaster. Contrary to what Mr. Blinken claimed in 2012, the "diplomatic surge" the Administration promised for Iraq never arrived, nor did U.S. weapons. "The Americans have really deeply disappointed us by not supplying the Iraqi army with the weapons and support it needs to fight terrorism," the Journal quoted one Iraqi general based in Kirkuk. That might strike some readers as rich coming from the commander of a collapsing army, but it’s a reminder of the price Iraqis and Americans are now paying for Mr. Obama’s failure to successfully negotiate a Status of Forces Agreement with Baghdad that would have maintained a meaningful U.S. military presence. A squadron of Apache attack helicopters, Predator drones and A-10 attack planes based in Iraq might be able to turn back ISIS’s march on Baghdad. WSJ
The president is in fact implementing the policy he promised. It was retrenchment by one word, retreat by another.[Obama’s policy is also what the American public showed in polls that it wants right now] ”It wants it, at least until it gets queasy by looking at the pictures they’ve been seeing tonight. George Will
 Affirmer, au bout de onze ans, que ce à quoi on assiste actuellement est le résultat de ce qui s’est produit à l’époque est aussi simpliste qu’insultant. Dans ce qui s’assimile à une perspective néocolonialiste postmoderne, ceci revient à suggérer que les Irakiens ne sont toujours pas en mesure d’assumer la responsabilité de leur propre pays. Abstraction faite de toutes les autres conséquences, l’invasion de 2003 n’en a pas moins donné aux Irakiens une possibilité d’autodétermination démocratique qu’ils n’auraient jamais eue sous Saddam Hussein. C’est cette démocratie imparfaite qui est menacée ; il faut à présent la conserver et l’améliorer. The Observer
Mosul’s fall matters for what it reveals about a terrorism whose threat Mr. Obama claims he has minimized. For starters, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) isn’t a bunch of bug-eyed "Mad Max" guys running around firing Kalashnikovs. ISIS is now a trained and organized army. The seizures of Mosul and Tikrit this week revealed high-level operational skills. ISIS is using vehicles and equipment seized from Iraqi military bases. Normally an army on the move would slow down to establish protective garrisons in towns it takes, but ISIS is doing the opposite, by replenishing itself with fighters from liberated prisons. An astonishing read about this group is on the website of the Washington-based Institute for the Study of War. It is an analysis of a 400-page report, "al-Naba," published by ISIS in March. This is literally a terrorist organization’s annual report for 2013. It even includes "metrics," detailed graphs of its operations in Iraq as well as in Syria. One might ask: Didn’t U.S. intelligence know something like Mosul could happen? They did. The February 2014 "Threat Assessment" by the Pentagon’s Defense Intelligence Agency virtually predicted it: "AQI/ISIL [aka ISIS] probably will attempt to take territory in Iraq and Syria . . . as demonstrated recently in Ramadi and Fallujah." AQI (al Qaeda in Iraq), the report says, is exploiting the weak security environment "since the departure of U.S. forces at the end of 2011." But to have suggested any mitigating steps to this White House would have been pointless. It won’t listen. In March, Gen. James Mattis, then head of the U.S. Central Command, told Congress he recommended the U.S. keep 13,600 support troops in Afghanistan; he was known not to want an announced final withdrawal date. On May 27, President Obama said it would be 9,800 troops—for just one year. Which guarantees that the taking of Mosul will be replayed in Afghanistan. Let us repeat the most quoted passage in former Defense Secretary Robert Gates’s memoir, "Duty." It describes the March 2011 meeting with Mr. Obama about Afghanistan in the situation room. "As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his," Mr. Gates wrote. "For him, it’s all about getting out." Daniel Henninger
Avec Assad, on voit justement ce qui arrive quand on laisse un dictateur en place. Les problèmes ne disparaissent pas tout seuls. Tony Blair
L’un des arguments des adversaires de l’intervention de 2003 est de dire que, puisque Saddam Hussein ne possédait aucune arme de destruction massive, l’invasion de l’Irak était injustifiée. D’après les rapports des inspecteurs internationaux, nous savons que, même si Saddam s’était débarrassé de ses armes chimiques, il avait conservé l’expertise et les capacités d’en produire. En 2011, si nous avions laissé Saddam au pouvoir, l’Irak aurait été lui aussi emporté par la vague des révolutions arabes. En tant que sunnite, Saddam aurait tout fait pour préserver son régime face à la révolte de la majorité chiite du pays. Pendant ce temps, de l’autre côté de la frontière, en Syrie, une minorité bénéficiant de l’appui des chiites s’accrocherait au pouvoir et tenterait de résister à la révolte de la majorité sunnite. Le risque aurait donc été grand de voir la région sombrer dans une conflagration confessionnelle généralisée dans laquelle les Etats ne se seraient pas affrontés par procuration, mais directement, avec leurs armées nationales. Tout le Moyen-Orient est en réalité engagé dans une longue et douloureuse transition. Nous devons nous débarrasser de l’idée que " nous " avons provoqué cette situation. Ce n’est pas vrai. (…) Nous avons aujourd’hui trois exemples de politique occidentale en matière de changement de régime dans la région. En Irak, nous avons appelé à un changement de régime, renversé la dictature et déployé des troupes pour aider à la reconstruction du pays. Mais l’intervention s’est révélée extrêmement ardue, et aujourd’hui le pays est à nouveau en danger. En Libye, nous avons appelé au changement de régime, chassé Kadhafi grâce à des frappes aériennes mais refusé d’envoyer des troupes au sol. Aujourd’hui, la Libye, ravagée par la violence, a exporté le désordre et de vastes quantités d’armes à travers l’Afrique du Nord et jusqu’en Afrique subsaharienne. En Syrie, nous avons appelé au changement de régime mais n’avons rien fait, et c’est le pays qui se trouve dans la situation la pire. (…) Il n’est pas raisonnable pour l’Occident d’adopter une politique d’indifférence. Car il s’agit, que nous le voulions ou pas, d’un problème qui nous concerne. Les agences de sécurité européennes estiment que la principale menace pour l’avenir proviendra des combattants revenant de Syrie. Le danger est réel de voir le pays devenir pour les terroristes un sanctuaire plus redoutable encore que ne l’était l’Afghanistan dans les années 1990. Mais n’oublions pas non plus les risques que fait peser la guerre civile syrienne sur le Liban et la Jordanie. Il était impossible que cet embrasement reste confiné à l’intérieur des frontières syriennes .Je comprends les raisons pour lesquelles, après l’Afghanistan et l’Irak, l’opinion publique est si hostile à une intervention militaire. Mais une intervention en Syrie n’était pas et n’est pas nécessairement obligée de prendre les formes qu’elle a prises dans ces deux pays. Et, chaque fois que nous renonçons à agir, les mesures que nous serons fatalement amenés à prendre par la suite devront être plus violente. (…) Nous devons prendre conscience que le défi s’étend bien au-delà du Moyen-Orient. L’Afrique, comme le montrent les tragiques événements au Nigeria, y est elle aussi confrontée. L’Extrême-Orient et l’Asie centrale également.L’Irak n’est qu’une facette d’une situation plus générale. Tous les choix qui s’offrent à nous sont inquiétants. Mais, depuis trois ans, nous regardons la Syrie s’enfoncer dans l’abîme et, pendant qu’elle sombre, elle nous enserre lentement et sûrement dans ses rets et nous entraîne avec elle. C’est pourquoi nous devons oublier les différends du passé et agir maintenant pour préserver l’avenir. Tony Blair

Attention: une débâcle peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où, suite au refus du premier ministre Maliki de tenir ses engagements pour l’intégration des Sunnites à la gestion du pays comme à la précipitation du président Obama d’évacuer les troupes américaines,  l’Irak est sur le point de rebasculer dans la plus violente des guerres civiles voire de passer sous la coupe de djihadistes qui, pour plus de 400 millions de dollars, viennent de se faire les banques de la deuxième ville du pays …

Et où, dans la logique de racisme caché qui leur est habituelle (certains peuples, on le sait, n’ont pas droit à la démocratie), nos belles âmes et stratèges en fauteuil ont bien sûr pour l’occasion ressorti leurs arguments contre l’option changement de régime qu’avaient il y a 11 ans choisie le président Bush et ses alliés britanniques ainsi qu’une coalition d’une  quarantaine de pays …

Pendant que de l’Afghanistan à l’Iran et à l’Ukraine, le Munichois en chef de la Maison Blanche multiplie les gestes d’apaisement …

Et que les différents pays occidentaux commencent à recevoir les premières fournées de diplômés du bourbier syrien

Remise des pendules à l’heure avec Tony Blair …

Qui rappelant à juste titre tant l’impéritie irakienne qu’américaine …

Mais ni la situation irakienne d’avant 2003 (les mêmes Alliés contraints d’assurer seuls de leurs bases en Arabie saoudite un embargo que personne, France comprise, ne respectait et fournissant de ce fait le prétexte aux attentats du 11/9) …

Ni hélas, de la Syrie au Nigéria ou ailleurs, les efforts habituels en coulisse de nos amis qataris ou syriens dans le financement des djihadistes …

A le mérite de mettre le doigt sur le noeud du problème …

A savoir, outre l’évident raté libyen, la Syrie qui justement avec Assad montre parfaitement ce qui arrive quand on laisse un dictateur en place …

 

Iraq, Syria and the Middle East
Tony Blair
Office of Tony Blair
Jun 14, 2014

The civil war in Syria with its attendant disintegration is having its predictable and malign effect. Iraq is now in mortal danger. The whole of the Middle East is under threat.

We will have to re-think our strategy towards Syria; support the Iraqi Government in beating back the insurgency; whilst making it clear that Iraq’s politics will have to change for any resolution of the current crisis to be sustained. Then we need a comprehensive plan for the Middle East that correctly learns the lessons of the past decade. In doing so, we should listen to and work closely with our allies across the region, whose understanding of these issues is crucial and who are prepared to work with us in fighting the root causes of this extremism which goes far beyond the crisis in Iraq or Syria.

It is inevitable that events in Mosul have led to a re-run of the arguments over the decision to remove Saddam Hussein in 2003. The key question obviously is what to do now. But because some of the commentary has gone immediately to claim that but for that decision, Iraq would not be facing this challenge; or even more extraordinary, implying that but for the decision, the Middle East would be at peace right now; it is necessary that certain points are made forcefully before putting forward a solution to what is happening now.

3/4 years ago Al Qaida in Iraq was a beaten force. The country had massive challenges but had a prospect, at least, of overcoming them. It did not pose a threat to its neighbours. Indeed, since the removal of Saddam, and despite the bloodshed, Iraq had contained its own instability mostly within its own borders.

Though the challenge of terrorism was and is very real, the sectarianism of the Maliki Government snuffed out what was a genuine opportunity to build a cohesive Iraq. This, combined with the failure to use the oil money to re-build the country, and the inadequacy of the Iraqi forces have led to the alienation of the Sunni community and the inability of the Iraqi army to repulse the attack on Mosul and the earlier loss of Fallujah. And there will be debate about whether the withdrawal of US forces happened too soon.

However there is also no doubt that a major proximate cause of the takeover of Mosul by ISIS is the situation in Syria. To argue otherwise is wilful. The operation in Mosul was planned and organised from Raqqa across the Syria border. The fighters were trained and battle-hardened in the Syrian war. It is true that they originate in Iraq and have shifted focus to Iraq over the past months. But, Islamist extremism in all its different manifestations as a group, rebuilt refinanced and re-armed mainly as a result of its ability to grow and gain experience through the war in Syria.

As for how these events reflect on the original decision to remove Saddam, if we want to have this debate, we have to do something that is rarely done: put the counterfactual i.e. suppose in 2003, Saddam had been left running Iraq. Now take each of the arguments against the decision in turn.

The first is there was no WMD risk from Saddam and therefore the casus belli was wrong. What we now know from Syria is that Assad, without any detection from the West, was manufacturing chemical weapons. We only discovered this when he used them. We also know, from the final weapons inspectors reports, that though it is true that Saddam got rid of the physical weapons, he retained the expertise and capability to manufacture them. Is it likely that, knowing what we now know about Assad, Saddam, who had used chemical weapons against both the Iranians in the 1980s war that resulted in over 1m casualties and against his own people, would have refrained from returning to his old ways? Surely it is at least as likely that he would have gone back to them.

The second argument is that but for the invasion of 2003, Iraq would be a stable country today. Leave aside the treatment Saddam meted out to the majority of his people whether Kurds, Shia or marsh Arabs, whose position of ‘stability’ was that of appalling oppression. Consider the post 2011 Arab uprisings. Put into the equation the counterfactual – that Saddam and his two sons would be running Iraq in 2011 when the uprisings began. Is it seriously being said that the revolution sweeping the Arab world would have hit Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Yemen, Bahrain, Syria, to say nothing of the smaller upheavals all over the region, but miraculously Iraq, under the most brutal and tyrannical of all the regimes, would have been an oasis of calm?

Easily the most likely scenario is that Iraq would have been engulfed by precisely the same convulsion. Take the hypothesis further. The most likely response of Saddam would have been to fight to stay in power. Here we would have a Sunni leader trying to retain power in the face of a Shia revolt. Imagine the consequences. Next door in Syria a Shia backed minority would be clinging to power trying to stop a Sunni majority insurgency. In Iraq the opposite would be the case. The risk would have been of a full blown sectarian war across the region, with States not fighting by proxy, but with national armies.

So it is a bizarre reading of the cauldron that is the Middle East today, to claim that but for the removal of Saddam, we would not have a crisis.

And it is here that if we want the right policy for the future, we have to learn properly the lessons not just of Iraq in 2003 but of the Arab uprisings from 2011 onwards.

The reality is that the whole of the Middle East and beyond is going through a huge, agonising and protracted transition. We have to liberate ourselves from the notion that ‘we’ have caused this. We haven’t. We can argue as to whether our policies at points have helped or not; and whether action or inaction is the best policy and there is a lot to be said on both sides. But the fundamental cause of the crisis lies within the region not outside it.

The problems of the Middle East are the product of bad systems of politics mixed with a bad abuse of religion going back over a long time. Poor governance, weak institutions, oppressive rule and a failure within parts of Islam to work out a sensible relationship between religion and Government have combined to create countries which are simply unprepared for the modern world. Put into that mix, young populations with no effective job opportunities and education systems that do not correspond to the requirements of the future economy, and you have a toxic, inherently unstable matrix of factors that was always – repeat always – going to lead to a revolution.

But because of the way these factors interrelate, the revolution was never going to be straightforward. This is the true lesson of Iraq. But it is also the lesson from the whole of the so-called Arab Spring. The fact is that as a result of the way these societies have developed and because Islamism of various descriptions became the focal point of opposition to oppression, the removal of the dictatorship is only the beginning not the end of the challenge. Once the regime changes, then out come pouring all the tensions – tribal, ethnic and of course above all religious; and the rebuilding of the country, with functioning institutions and systems of Government, becomes incredibly hard. The extremism de-stabilises the country, hinders the attempts at development, the sectarian divisions become even more acute and the result is the mess we see all over the region. And beyond it. Look at Pakistan or Afghanistan and the same elements are present.

Understanding this and analysing properly what has happened, is absolutely vital to the severe challenge of working out what we can do about it. So rather than continuing to re-run the debate over Iraq from over 11 years ago, realise that whatever we had done or not done, we would be facing a big challenge today.

Indeed we now have three examples of Western policy towards regime change in the region. In Iraq, we called for the regime to change, removed it and put in troops to try to rebuild the country. But intervention proved very tough and today the country is at risk again. In Libya, we called for the regime to change, we removed it by airpower, but refused to put in troops and now Libya is racked by instability, violence and has exported vast amounts of trouble and weapons across North Africa and down into sub- Saharan Africa. In Syria we called for the regime to change, took no action and it is in the worst state of all.

And when we do act, it is often difficult to discern the governing principles of action. Gaddafi, who in 2003 had given up his WMD and cooperated with us in the fight against terrorism, is removed by us on the basis he threatens to kill his people but Assad, who actually kills his people on a vast scale including with chemical weapons, is left in power.

So what does all this mean? How do we make sense of it? I speak with humility on this issue because I went through the post 9/11 world and know how tough the decisions are in respect of it. But I have also, since leaving office, spent a great deal of time in the region and have studied its dynamics carefully.

The beginning of understanding is to appreciate that resolving this situation is immensely complex. This is a generation long struggle. It is not a ‘war’ which you win or lose in some clear and clean-cut way. There is no easy or painless solution. Intervention is hard. Partial intervention is hard. Non-intervention is hard.

Ok, so if it is that hard, why not stay out of it all, the current default position of the West? The answer is because the outcome of this long transition impacts us profoundly. At its simplest, the jihadist groups are never going to leave us alone. 9/11 happened for a reason. That reason and the ideology behind it have not disappeared.

However more than that, in this struggle will be decided many things: the fate of individual countries, the future of the Middle East, and the direction of the relationship between politics and the religion of Islam. This last point will affect us in a large number of ways. It will affect the radicalism within our own societies which now have significant Muslim populations. And it will affect how Islam develops across the world. If the extremism is defeated in the Middle East it will eventually be defeated the world over, because this region is its spiritual home and from this region has been spread the extremist message.

There is no sensible policy for the West based on indifference. This is, in part, our struggle, whether we like it or not.

Already the security agencies of Europe believe our biggest future threat will come from returning fighters from Syria. There is a real risk that Syria becomes a haven for terrorism worse than Afghanistan in the 1990s. But think also of the effect that Syria is having on the Lebanon and Jordan. There is no way this conflagration was ever going to stay confined to Syria. I understand all the reasons following Afghanistan and Iraq why public opinion was so hostile to involvement. Action in Syria did not and need not be as in those military engagements. But every time we put off action, the action we will be forced to take will ultimately be greater.

On the immediate challenge President Obama is right to put all options on the table in respect of Iraq, including military strikes on the extremists; and right also to insist on a change in the way the Iraqi Government takes responsibility for the politics of the country.

The moderate and sensible elements of the Syria Opposition should be given the support they need; Assad should know he cannot win an outright victory; and the extremist groups, whether in Syria or Iraq, should be targeted, in coordination and with the agreement of the Arab countries. However unpalatable this may seem, the alternative is worse.

But acting in Syria alone or Iraq, will not solve the challenge across the region or the wider world. We need a plan for the Middle East and for dealing with the extremism world-wide that comes out of it.

The starting point is to identify the nature of the battle. It is against Islamist extremism. That is the fight. People shy away from the starkness of that statement. But it is because we are constantly looking for ways of avoiding facing up to this issue, that we can’t make progress in the battle.

Of course in every case, there are reasons of history and tribe and territory which add layers of complexity. Of course, too, as I said at the outset, bad governance has played a baleful role in exacerbating the challenges. But all those problems become infinitely tougher to resolve, when religious extremism overlays everything. Then unity in a nation is impossible. Stability is impossible. Therefore progress is impossible. Government ceases to build for the future and manages each day as it can. Division tears apart cohesion. Hatred replaces hope.

We have to unite with those in the Muslim world, who agree with this analysis to fight the extremism. Parts of the Western media are missing a critical new element in the Middle East today. There are people – many of them – in the region who now understand this is the battle and are prepared to wage it. We have to stand with them.

Repressive systems of Government have played their part in the breeding of the extremism. A return to the past for the Middle East is neither right nor feasible. On the contrary there has to be change and there will be. However, we have to have a more graduated approach, which tries to help change happen without the chaos.

We were naïve about the Arab uprisings which began in 2011. Evolution is preferable to revolution. I said this at the time, precisely because of what we learnt from Iraq and Afghanistan.

Sometimes evolution is not possible. But where we can, we should be helping countries make steady progress towards change. We should be actively trying to encourage and help the reform process and using the full weight of the international community to do so.

Where there has been revolution, we have to be clear we will not support systems or Governments based on sectarian religious politics.

Where the extremists are fighting, they have to be countered hard, with force. This does not mean Western troops as in Iraq. There are masses of responses we can make short of that. But they need to know that wherever they’re engaged in terror, we will be hitting them.

Longer term, we have to make a concerted effort to reform the education systems, formal and informal which are giving rise to the extremism. It should be part of our dialogue and partnership with all nations that we expect education to be open-minded and respectful of difference whether of faith culture or race. We should make sure our systems reflect these values; they should do the same. This is the very reason why, after I left office I established a Foundation now active in the education systems of over 20 different countries, including in the Middle East, promoting a programme of religious and cultural co-existence.

We should make this a focal point of cooperation between East and West. China, Russia, Europe and the USA all have the same challenge of extremism. For the avoidance of doubt, I am neither minimising our differences especially over issues like Ukraine, nor suggesting a weakening of our position there; simply that on this issue of extremism, we can and should work together.

We should acknowledge that the challenge goes far further afield than the Middle East. Africa faces it as the ghastly events in Nigeria show. The Far East faces it. Central Asia too.

The point is that we won’t win the fight until we accept the nature of it.

Iraq is part of a much bigger picture. By all means argue about the wisdom of earlier decisions. But it is the decisions now that will matter. The choices are all pretty ugly, it is true. But for 3 years we have watched Syria descend into the abyss and as it is going down, it is slowly but surely wrapping its cords around us pulling us down with it. We have to put aside the differences of the past and act now to save the future.

 Voir aussi:

Tony Blair: ‘We didn’t cause Iraq crisis’

The 2003 invasion of Iraq is not to blame for the violent insurgency now gripping the country, former UK prime minister Tony Blair has said.
BBC
15 June 2014

Speaking to the BBC’s Andrew Marr, he said there would still be a "major problem" in the country even without the toppling of Saddam Hussein in 2003.

Mr Blair said the current crisis was a "regional" issue that "affects us all".

And he warned against believing that if we "wash our hands of it and walk away, then the problems will be solved".

"Even if you’d left Saddam in place in 2003, then when 2011 happened – and you had the Arab revolutions going through Tunisia and Libya and Yemen and Bahrain and Egypt and Syria – you would have still had a major problem in Iraq," Mr Blair said.

"Indeed, you can see what happens when you leave the dictator in place, as has happened with Assad now. The problems don’t go away.

"So, one of the things I’m trying to say is – you know, we can rerun the debates about 2003 – and there are perfectly legitimate points on either side – but where we are now in 2014, we have to understand this is a regional problem, but it’s a problem that will affect us."

Syria is three years into a civil war in which tens of thousands of people have died and millions more have been displaced.

In August last year, a chemical attack near the capital Damascus killed hundreds of people.

In August, UK MPs rejected the idea of air strikes against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s government to deter the use of chemical weapons.

Writing on his website, the former prime minister warned that every time the UK puts off action, "the action we will be forced to take will be ultimately greater".
‘Hitting them’

He said the current violence in Iraq was the "predictable and malign effect" of inaction in Syria.

"We have to liberate ourselves from the notion that ‘we’ have caused this," he wrote. "We haven’t."

He said the takeover of Mosul by Sunni insurgents was planned across the Syrian border.

"Where the extremists are fighting, they have to be countered hard, with force," Mr Blair said.

The Sunni insurgents, from the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS), regard Iraq’s Shia majority as "infidels".

After taking Mosul late on Monday, and then Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit, the Sunni militants have pressed south into the ethnically divided Diyala province.

On Friday, they battled against Shia fighters near Muqdadiya – just 50 miles (80km) from Baghdad’s city limits.

Reinforcements from both the Iraqi army and Shia militias have arrived in the city of Samarra, where fighters loyal to ISIS are trying to enter from the north.

US deploys warship amid Iraq crisis

Mr Blair also told the BBC that the UK and its allies had to "engage" and try to "shape" the situation in Iraq and Syria.

"If you talk to security services in France and Germany and the UK, they will tell you their single biggest worry today are returning Jihadist fighters, our own citizens, by the way, from Syria," he said.

"So, we have to look at Syria and Iraq and the region in context. We have to understand what’s going on there and we have to engage".
‘Battle-hardened’

Civil war in Syria was "having its predictable and malign effect" and there was "no doubt that a major proximate cause of the takeover of Mosul by ISIS" was the situation in the country, Mr Blair said.

He said the operation in Mosul was planned and organised from Raqqa across the Syria border.

"The fighters were trained and battle-hardened in the Syrian war," he said.
Members of Iraqi security forces and tribal fighters take part in an intensive security deployment on the outskirts of Diyala province June 13, 2014. Thousands of Shias are reported to have volunteered to help halt the advance of ISIS
Iraqi policemen stand guard at a railway station in the capital Baghdad on June 14, 2014 The capital Baghdad is a tense place following the reverses for Iraqi government forces

The 2003 invasion of Iraq by British and US forces, on the basis that it had "weapons of mass destruction", has come back into focus as a result of the insurgency in the country.

The Iraq War has been the subject of several inquiries, including the Chilcot inquiry – which began in 2009 – into the UK’s participation in military action against Saddam Hussein and its aftermath.

Last month, the inquiry said details of the "gist" of talks between Tony Blair and former US president George Bush before the Iraq war are to be published.

Mr Blair has said he wants the Chilcot report to be published and he "resented" claims he was to blame for its slow progress.

Voir également:

Blair: Don’t blame me for meltdown in Iraq: Astonishing ‘essay’ by ex-PM: he says Obama quit too soon… and the UK should launch attacks
Former PM claims bungling Iraqi government has allowed Al Qaeda return
Blair said the alternative to not intervening in Iraq was a far worse option
Blair said West was wrong to topple Gadaffi instead of Bashar al-Assad
Mail On Sunday Reporter
14 June 2014

Tony Blair last night attacked ‘bizarre’ claims that his decision to go to war with Iraq in 2003 caused the current wave of violence in the country – and blamed everyone but himself for the crisis.

The former Prime Minister insisted he was right to topple Saddam Hussein with the US and said things would have been worse if the dictator had not been ousted from power a decade ago.

Mr Blair ended a week-long silence after mounting claims by diplomats and Labour MPs that his and Mr Bush’s handling of the Iraq War sowed the seeds of the attempt by the Al Qaeda-backed ISIS terror group to conquer Iraq. In a 2,800-word ‘essay’ on the new Middle East conflagration, Mr Blair refused to apologise and argued:

Barack Obama ordered US troops to leave Iraq too soon.
Britain and America must launch renewed military attacks in Iraq and Syria.
Al Qaeda was ‘beaten’ in Iraq thanks to the Blair-Bush war, but the bungling Iraqi government let them back in.

‘But every time we put off action, the action we will be forced to take will ultimately be greater. Instead of re-running the debate over Iraq from 11 years ago, we have to realise that whatever we had done or not done, we would be facing a big challenge today.

‘It is bizarre to claim that, but for the removal of Saddam, we would not have a crisis. We have to re-think our strategy towards Syria and support the Iraqi government in beating back the insurgency.

‘Extremist groups, whether in Syria or Iraq, should be targeted. However unpalatable this may seem, the alternative is worse.’

Mr Blair hit back at critics who say false claims that Saddam had deadly chemical weapons fatally undermined the Blair-Bush justification for the Iraq War. Turning the argument on its head, he said it was essential to picture Iraq with Saddam still in power: he had used chemical weapons before and would have done so again.

And, confronted by the ‘Arab Spring’ of 2011, Saddam would have provoked ‘a full-blown sectarian war across the region with national armies’. ‘We have to liberate ourselves from the notion that “we” have caused this – we haven’t,’ said Mr Blair.

And he pointed the finger of blame at Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki – and more pointedly at Mr Obama – for leaving Iraq defenceless.

‘Three or four years ago, Al Qaeda in Iraq was a beaten force. The sectarianism of the Maliki government snuffed out a genuine opportunity to build a cohesive Iraq. And there will be debate about whether the withdrawal of US forces happened too soon.’

Mr Blair poured scorned on the West’s decision to topple Libya’s Colonel Gaddafi who ‘gave up WMDs and co-operated in the fight against terrorism’ while letting Syria’s President Assad, who ‘kills his people on a vast scale including with chemical weapons’, off the hook.

‘There is no easy or painless solution. The Jihadist groups are never going to leave us alone. 9/11 happened for a reason.

‘This is, in part, our struggle, whether we like it or not.’

Obama was ‘right to put all options on the table in Iraq, including military strikes. The choices are all pretty ugly, but Syria is slowly but surely wrapping its cords around us, pulling us down with it. We have to act now to save the future.’

Reg Keys, whose ‘Red Cap’ soldier son Tom was killed in the Iraq War, told The Mail on Sunday last night: ‘I wondered when Blair would surface to try to justify himself. Before he and Bush kicked down the door on Iraq, Sunnis and Shias lived side by side. Now there is a power vacuum, which allows terrorists to walk into the country.

‘Saddam may have been an evil dictator, but Iraq needs a strong leader to keep the tensions in check. Blair installed a weak puppet government. When Tom was killed, the Iraqi police meant to be protecting the Red Caps’ position dropped their guns and ran. That is what the Iraqi forces did this week.’

Mr Keys added: ‘It is lamentable that Blair is still banging the WMD drum. He and Bush must take ultimate responsibility.’

Voir encore:

No Mr Blair. Your naive war WAS a trigger for this savage violence, writes CHRISTOPHER MEYER, Ambassador to the US during Iraq War

Christopher Meyer, Former British Ambassador To Washington
14 June 2014

Last year, on the 10th anniversary of the invasion of Iraq by American and British forces, Tony Blair sought to justify his decision to go to war by arguing that Iraq was a far better place for the removal of Saddam Hussein. ‘Think,’ he said ‘of the consequences of leaving that regime in power.’

In an echo of his former master’s voice, Alastair Campbell added for good measure: ‘Britain… should be really proud of the role we played in changing Iraq from what it was to what it is becoming.’

Today, neither Mr Blair nor Mr Campbell could utter such things without arousing the world’s bemusement and incredulity. Iraq is descending into such violence and disorder that its very existence as a sovereign country is under threat.

A savage, battle-hardened group of Sunni fundamentalists called ISIS (the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) have seized great swathes of territory in northern and central Iraq and are threatening Baghdad itself. By the time you read this, they may be inside the city walls. They have driven through the Iraqi army – trained and equipped by the US at vast expense – like a knife through butter.

At Friday prayers last week, the most senior Shia cleric in Iraq issued a call to arms. The scene is therefore set for outright civil war. Meanwhile, the Kurdish people of the north have exploited the chaos to seize the oil-producing city of Kirkuk and take another step forward in their ambition to become an independent nation.

There are many reasons for this disastrous state of affairs. Perhaps the most significant is the decision taken more than ten years ago by President George W Bush and Prime Minister Tony Blair to unseat Saddam Hussein without thinking through the consequences for Iraq of the dictator’s removal.

Like the entire Islamic world, Iraq is divided between two historic branches of the Muslim faith, the Sunni and the Shia. Though there have been periods of relative harmony, today the two denominations are in brutal competition with each other around the world, especially in the neighbouring Syria, where civil war has been raging for the past three years. The Syrian dictator, Bashar Al Assad, is Shia. The Syrian rebels are Sunni. In Iraq the government is Shia-dominated.

Underwriting the violence in both countries is the intense struggle for advantage between the two Middle Eastern superpowers, Saudi Arabia (Sunni) and Iran (Shia).

The situation is not unlike the violent rivalry of the 17th Century between Catholics and Protestants, which led to the ravaging of central Europe in the bloody 30 Years’ War.

ISIS have emerged from the cauldron of civil war in Syria where they control much of the east of the country. Their declared aim is to create from this territory and the neighbouring Sunni areas of northern and central Iraq a single fundamentalist state or ‘caliphate’, lying athwart the frontier between Iraq and Syria.

ISIS have proved so violent that they have been disowned even by Al Qaeda, the Sunni terrorist group from which they have sprung. But it is not through fanaticism and violence alone that they have been able to scatter the Iraqi army with such ease. ISIS have been operating in fertile territory.

For years, the Sunni provinces of Iraq have become increasingly disaffected from the Shia-controlled central government in Baghdad. The authoritarian Prime Minister al-Maliki has trampled on Sunni sensitivities and denied them the spoils of government. This has gone down very badly, given that under Saddam and the old Ottoman empire it was the Sunni who were on top.

Without the world really noticing, ISIS and its Sunni allies had already seized the town of Fallujah (scene of epic battles between the US Marines and insurgents ten years ago).

ISIS have benefited also from something that takes us back to the earliest days of the US/UK occupation – and to one of its greatest blunders. It appears that ISIS are fighting alongside, or even partly comprise, former members of Saddam Hussein’s army.

In the summer of 2003, the American Paul Bremer, who ran Iraq as President Bush’s representative and head of the Coalition Provisional Authority, issued two orders: The first sacked 50,000 members of Saddam’s ruling Ba’ath Party from their jobs as civil servants, teachers and administrators.

This made Iraq well-nigh ungovernable since it had been impossible under Saddam to hold a job of any responsibility without being a member of the Ba’ath party. Bremer’s order went further than de-Nazification in Germany after World War II.

The second order disbanded the Iraqi army, throwing 400,000 angry men on to the streets with their weapons. The order directly fuelled the eight-year insurgency against American and allied troops.

Some of the former Iraqi soldiers were recruited by the Iraqi branch of Al Qaeda, have been fighting in Syria and have now returned to Iraq with ISIS.

As the ISIS army marches south towards Baghdad, young men from the city scramble aboard a military truck to enlist in the army to help defend their homes

So, we are reaping what we sowed in 2003. This is not hindsight. We knew in the run-up to war that the overthrow of Saddam Hussein would seriously destabilise Iraq after 24 years of his iron rule.

For all his evil, he kept a lid on sectarian violence. Bush and Blair were repeatedly warned by their advisers and diplomats to make dispositions accordingly.

But, as we now know, very little was done until the last minute; and what was done, as in the case of Bremer’s edicts, simply made things far worse.

The White House and Downing Street were suffused with the naïve view that the introduction of parliamentary democracy would solve all Iraq’s problems. But you can’t introduce democracy like a fast-growing shrub. It takes generations to embed. Because political parties in Iraq have tended to form along ethnic and religious lines, democracy has, if anything, deepened the sectarianism.

The situation is full of ironies. The UK went along with the neocon claim after 9/11 that Saddam and Al Qaeda were collaborating, though there was not a shred of proof. Now an offshoot of Al Qaeda controls perhaps a third of the country and may yet enter Baghdad.

The unintended consequence of our invasion was to give Iran, a member of Bush’s ‘Axis of Evil’, dominant influence in Baghdad. Yet, on the principle that my enemy’s enemy is my friend, we in the West should welcome any efforts by Iran to halt the advance of ISIS.

None of this is nostalgia for Saddam Hussein (though women and religious minorities like Christians might take a different view). But, if the past 13 years have taught us anything, it is that we mess in other countries’ internal affairs at our peril.

Even with meticulous preparation, deep local knowledge and proper articulation between political goals and military means – all absent in Iraq and Afghanistan – military intervention will usually make things worse and create hatreds which are then played out in our own streets.

In 1999, in a speech in Chicago, Blair proclaimed his doctrine of intervention abroad in the name of liberal values. It became the philosophical underpinning for Britain’s invasion of Iraq.

The time has surely come to consign the Blair doctrine to the dustbin of history.

Voir de plus:

Iraq: Isis can be beaten and democracy restored
The Maliki government must win back the trust of its Sunni population to see off the threat of Islamic militants
The Observer
15 June 2014

The security situation in the northern half of Iraq is grave and worrying, but its wider dangers should not be exaggerated. Last week’s rapid advance of Sunni Muslim fighters of the hardline Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Isis) jihadist militia took Iraq’s army, politicians and western governments by surprise. In this fragile neighbourhood, surprises are always unnerving. The fall of Mosul, Iraq’s second city, undoubtedly dealt a body blow to the authority of the Baghdad government. The ensuing humanitarian problems are alarming, as are UN reports of atrocities committed by the Islamists. US weapons supplied to the Iraqi army have been seized by the militants, more cities and towns closer to the capital are under threat, and Kurdish forces are exploiting the turmoil to extend their territorial control around Kirkuk. The spectre of renewed sectarian warfare has been raised as Iraq’s majority Shia Muslim population is urged to take up arms. Beyond Iraq’s borders, national leaders from Tehran to Washington have begun to talk of direct military intervention, spurred by fears that Iraq may disintegrate – and by a sharp rise in the international oil price.

All serious stuff, for sure. Yet this is a moment to pause and think, not rush blindly in. On the ground, the Isis forces have made significant gains. But in total they are said to number no more than 7,000 men. They have no heavy weapons, no fighter aircraft, no attack helicopters. The further south they advance, the stiffer the resistance and the more stretched their lines of supply. They do not enjoy unanimous support among Sunnis, let alone Iraq’s other minorities. The city of Samarra, well to the north of Baghdad and a holy place for Shia Muslims, has become a first rallying point for government forces and volunteers. Iraq’s army, humiliated last week, nevertheless numbers more than 250,000 active service personnel. Once they recover from their Mosul funk, they should be more than a match for Isis. Despite what Isis says, Iraq is not Syria. With determination and the right kind of leadership, its always delicate balance of power may be restored in time.

In terms of the bigger picture, the suggestion that Iraq is about to implode as a unified nation state appears similarly overcooked. After the usual 48-hour delay while America caught up with events, Barack Obama signalled strong, albeit conditional, support for embattled Baghdad. So, too, did Iran, briefly raising the quixotic fantasy of a Tehran-Washington axis. Iran has its own interests to protect, of course, including its close alliance with the Shia-led government of prime minister Nouri al-Maliki. But like the US, it views the prospect of an unchecked Sunni insurgency raging through Iraq and Syria with alarm. China, often absent from the stage during international crises, also swiftly voiced its backing. As the biggest investor in Iraq’s oil industry, Beijing knows instability is bad for business. Even Saudi Arabia, Iran’s regional rival and foremost supporter of Syria’s armed Sunni opposition, could not abide the chaos that would follow an Iraqi implosion.

All these powers have a stake in holding Iraq together. In all probability, they will succeed. Efforts to keep events in Iraq in perspective have been further handicapped by overheated attempts in newsdesks far removed from the frontlines of Samarra and Tikrit to settle old scores. With barely disguised glee, some who opposed the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq now claim to see in the Isis phenomenon the final, cast-iron proof that George W Bush and Tony Blair were both reckless and wrong. Many who supported the war at the time have since changed their minds about the wisdom of that decision, including this newspaper.

But to claim, 11 years on, that what is happening now can be attributed to what was done then is both facile and insulting. It suggests, in a sort of inverted, postmodern neo-colonialism, that Iraqis remain incapable of assuming responsibility for their own country. The invasion, whatever else it did, gave Iraq the chance of democratic self-governance that it would never have experienced under Saddam Hussein. It is this imperfect democracy that is now under threat – and which must now be improved, even as it is preserved.

Iraq faces three immediate challenges. The first is how to win back the trust of Iraq’s Sunni population, largely alienated by the divisive, sectarian politics of the Maliki government. Isis did not succeed in Mosul and elsewhere by military superiority alone. It succeeded because it had the approval, or at least the temporary acquiescence, of Sunni tribal leaders and communities marginalised by Baghdad. In many cases, these are the same people who switched sides in 2007 to help the US defeat al-Qaida in Anbar province, during General David Petraeus’s "surge". Now they have switched back. But generally speaking, they do not support the extreme forms of Islamist rule advocated by Isis. To beat the jihadists, Baghdad’s Shia bosses must regain the Sunnis’ confidence.

A second challenge is to prevent Iraq’s Kurds discarding the post-Saddam agreements that facilitated the creation of the semi-autonomous Kurdish regional government in the north. Their bloodless takeover of Kirkuk, a city and oil-rich territory disputed through the ages by various ethnic and religious groups, represents a giant if unpremeditated step towards full independence for Kurdistan. That may or may not be a desirable long-term goal. But the way to achieve it is through negotiation and the ballot box, not via backdoor landgrabs. Third, as Obama made brutally clear, Iraq’s government can no longer rely upon an American or western security umbrella. Help may be forthcoming but, first, Iraq’s political leaders must help themselves.

A traumatic week has thus presented Iraq with an opportunity. It must defuse the time-bomb Isis has placed under the Iraqi state. This wholly attainable task should be undertaken primarily by Iraq’s armed forces. International security assistance should be offered, as well as humanitarian help – but immediate, direct western military intervention would be unwise. Iraq is also entitled to demand support from its regional neighbours, including improved co-operation in tackling the terrorist threat they all face. Most of all, however, Iraqis must seize this opportunity to renew, strengthen and broaden the country’s political leadership in order to end further destructive sectarian schisms. In this process, Maliki, as prime minister, has a key role to play. If he cannot do so, he should stand aside.

Voir par ailleurs:

Who’s to blame for Iraq crisis
Derek Harvey and Michael Pregent
CNN
June 12, 2014

Editor’s note: Derek Harvey is a former senior intelligence official who worked on Iraq from 2003-2009, including numerous assignments in Baghdad. Michael Pregent is a former U.S. Army officer and former senior intelligence analyst who worked on Iraq from 2003-2011, including in Mosul 2005-2006 and Baghdad in 2007-2010. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the authors.

(CNN) — Observers around the world are stunned by the speed and scope of this week’s assaults on every major city in the upper Tigris River Valley — including Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city — by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS. But they shouldn’t be. The collapse of the Iraqi government’s troops in Mosul and other northern cities in the face of Sunni militant resistance has been the predictable culmination of a long deterioration, brought on by the government’s politicization of its security forces.

The politicization of the Iraqi military

For more than five years, Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki and his ministers have presided over the packing of the Iraqi military and police with Shiite loyalists — in both the general officer ranks and the rank and file — while sidelining many effective commanders who led Iraqi troops in the battlefield gains of 2007-2010, a period during which al Qaeda in Iraq (the forerunner of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) was brought to the brink of extinction.

Al-Maliki’s "Shiafication" of the Iraqi security forces has been less about the security of Iraq than the security of Baghdad and his regime. Even before the end of the U.S.-led "surge" in 2008, al-Maliki began a concerted effort to replace effective Sunni and Kurdish commanders and intelligence officers in the key mixed-sect areas of Baghdad, Diyala and Salaheddin provinces to ensure that Iraqi units focused on fighting Sunni insurgents while leaving loyal Shiite militias alone — and to alleviate al-Maliki’s irrational fears of a military coup against his government.

In 2008, al-Maliki began replacing effective Kurdish commanders and soldiers in Mosul and Tal Afar with Shiite loyalists from Baghdad and the Prime Minister’s Dawa Party, and even Shiite militia members from the south. A number of nonloyalist commanders were forced to resign in the face of trumped up charges or reassigned to desk jobs and replaced with al-Maliki loyalists. The moves were made to marginalize Sunnis and Kurds in the north and entrench al-Maliki’s regime and the Dawa Party ahead of provincial and national elections in 2009, 2010 and 2013.

The dismantling of the ‘Awakening’

It’s no accident that there exists today virtually no Sunni popular resistance to ISIS, but rather the result of a conscious al-Maliki government policy to marginalize the Sunni tribal "Awakening" that deployed more than 90,000 Sunni fighters against al Qaeda in 2007-2008.

These 90,000 "Sons of Iraq" made a significant contribution to the reported 90% drop in sectarian violence in 2007-2008, assisting the Iraqi security forces and the United States in securing territory from Mosul to the Sunni enclaves of Baghdad and the surrounding Baghdad "belts." As the situation stabilized, the Iraqi government agreed to a plan to integrate vetted Sunni members of the Sons of Iraq into the Iraqi army and police to make those forces more representative of the overall Iraqi population.

But this integration never happened. Al-Maliki was comfortable touting his support for the Sons of Iraq in non-Shiite areas such as Anbar and Nineveh provinces, but he refused to absorb Sunnis into the ranks of the security forces along Shiite-Sunni fault lines in central Iraq.

In areas with (or near) Shiite populations, al-Maliki saw the U.S.-backed Sons of Iraq as a threat, and he systematically set out to dismantle the program over the next four years. As this process played out, we saw its effects firsthand in our interactions with Iraqi government officials and tribal leaders in Baghdad, where it was clear the Sons of Iraq were under increasing pressure from both the government and al Qaeda. By 2013, the Sons of Iraq were virtually nonexistent, with thousands of their sidelined former members either neutral or aligned with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in its war against the Iraqi government.

The disappearance of the Sons of Iraq meant that few Sunnis in western and northern Iraq had a stake in the defense of their own communities. The vast system of security forces and Sunni tribal auxiliaries that had made the Sunni provinces of Iraq hostile territory for al Qaeda was dismantled.

The militant gains in Mosul and other cities of the north and Anbar are the direct result of the removal of the Iraqi security forces commanders and local Sons of Iraq leaders who had turned the tide against al Qaeda in 2007-2008. Those commanders who had a reason to secure and hold territory in the north were replaced with al-Maliki loyalists from Baghdad who, when the bullets began to fly, had no interest in dying for Sunni and Kurdish territory. And when the commanders left the battlefield this week, their troops melted away as well.

What can be done?

The problem will only get worse in the coming months. Now that the Iraqi government’s weakness in Sunni territories has been exposed, other Sunni extremist groups are joining forces with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria to exploit the opening. The Baathist-affiliated Naqshbandi Army and the Salafist Ansar al-Sunna Army are reportedly taking part in the offensive as well, and they are drawing support from a Sunni population that believes itself persecuted and disenfranchised by al-Maliki’s government and threatened by Shiite militias that are his political allies.

For six months, Shiite militants have been allowed or encouraged by the government to conduct sectarian cleansing in mixed areas around Baghdad, particularly in Diyala province between Baghdad and the Iranian border. These events contributed to the motivation of Sunnis who have taken up arms or acquiesced in the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s offensive.

Even as the ISIS tide rolls southward down the Tigris, there is probably little danger of Baghdad and other Shiite areas falling into Sunni insurgent hands. The Shiite troops unwilling to fight to hold onto Mosul will be far more motivated to fight to protect Shiite territories in central and southern Iraq and to defend the sectarian fault line. This is their home territory, where they have the advantage of local knowledge, and where they have successfully fought the Sunni insurgency for years.

In the north, however, al-Maliki now has two military options. He can reconsolidate his shattered forces along sectarian fault lines to defend Shiite territories in central Iraq, ceding Sunni areas to the insurgency, or he can regroup his security forces at their bases north of Baghdad and mount expeditions to conduct "cordon and search" operations in Sunni areas lost to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

If al-Maliki chooses to regroup and move on Sunni population centers controlled by the ISIS, we are likely to see Shiite troops unfamiliar with Sunni neighborhoods employing heavy-handed tactics, bluntly targeting Sunni military-age males (12-60) not affiliated with the insurgency and further inflaming sectarian tensions as they do so — reminiscent of the situation in many parts of Iraq in 2005-2006.

The problem at its core is not just a matter of security, but politics. The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and its allies would not have had the opportunity to seize ground in the Sunni Arab-dominated provinces of Salaheddin, Nineveh and Anbar if there had been more inclusive and sincere political outreach to the mainstream Sunni Arab community.

In the end, the solution to the ISIS threat is a fundamental change in Iraq’s political discourse, which has become dominated by one sect and one man, and the inclusion of mainstream Sunni Arabs and Kurds as full partners in the state.

If al-Maliki truly wishes to restore government control to the Sunni provinces, he must reach out to Sunni and Kurdish leaders and ask for their help, and he must re-enlist former Sons of Iraq leaders, purged military commanders and Kurdish Peshmerga to help regain the territory they once helped the Iraqi government defend.

But these are steps a-Maliki has shown himself unwilling and unlikely to take. At this point, al-Maliki does not have what it takes to address Iraq’s problem — because he is the problem.

Voir encore:

While Obama Fiddles
The fall of Mosul is as big as Russia’s seizure of Crimea.
Daniel Henninger
WSJ

June 11, 2014

The fall of Mosul, Iraq, to al Qaeda terrorists this week is as big in its implications as Russia’s annexation of Crimea. But from the Obama presidency, barely a peep.

Barack Obama is fiddling while the world burns. Iraq, Pakistan, Ukraine, Russia, Nigeria, Kenya, Syria. These foreign wildfires, with more surely to come, will burn unabated for two years until the United States has a new president. The one we’ve got can barely notice or doesn’t care.

Last month this is what Barack Obama said to the 1,064 graduating cadets at the U.S. Military Academy: "Four and a half years later, as you graduate, the landscape has changed. We have removed our troops from Iraq. We are winding down our war in Afghanistan. Al Qaeda’s leadership on the border region between Pakistan and Afghanistan has been decimated."

That let-the-sunshine-in line must have come back to the cadets, when news came Sunday that the Pakistani Taliban, who operate in that border region between Pakistan and Afghanistan, had carried out a deadly assault on the main airport in Karachi, population 9.4 million. To clarify, the five Taliban Mr. Obama exchanged for Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl are Afghan Taliban who operate on the other side of the border.

Within 24 hours of the Taliban attack in Pakistan, Boko Haram’s terrorists in Nigeria kidnapped 20 more girls, adding to the 270 still-missing—"our girls," as they were once known.

Then Mosul fell. The al Qaeda affiliate known as ISIS stormed and occupied the northern Iraqi city of Mosul, population 1.8 million and not far from Turkey, Syria and Iran. It took control of the airport, government buildings, and reportedly looted some $430 million from Mosul’s banks. ISIS owns Mosul.

Iraq’s army in tatters, ISIS rolled south Wednesday and took the city of Tikrit. It is plausible that this Islamic wave will next take Samarra and then move on to Baghdad, about 125 miles south of Tikrit. They will surely stop outside Baghdad, but that would be enough. Iraq will be lost.

Now if you want to vent about " George Bush’s war," be my guest. But George Bush isn’t president anymore. Barack Obama is because he wanted the job and the responsibilities that come with the American presidency. Up to now, burying those responsibilities in the sand has never been in the job description.

Mosul’s fall matters for what it reveals about a terrorism whose threat Mr. Obama claims he has minimized. For starters, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) isn’t a bunch of bug-eyed "Mad Max" guys running around firing Kalashnikovs. ISIS is now a trained and organized army.

The seizures of Mosul and Tikrit this week revealed high-level operational skills. ISIS is using vehicles and equipment seized from Iraqi military bases. Normally an army on the move would slow down to establish protective garrisons in towns it takes, but ISIS is doing the opposite, by replenishing itself with fighters from liberated prisons.

An astonishing read about this group is on the website of the Washington-based Institute for the Study of War. It is an analysis of a 400-page report, "al-Naba," published by ISIS in March. This is literally a terrorist organization’s annual report for 2013. It even includes "metrics," detailed graphs of its operations in Iraq as well as in Syria.

One might ask: Didn’t U.S. intelligence know something like Mosul could happen? They did. The February 2014 "Threat Assessment" by the Pentagon’s Defense Intelligence Agency virtually predicted it: "AQI/ISIL [aka ISIS] probably will attempt to take territory in Iraq and Syria . . . as demonstrated recently in Ramadi and Fallujah." AQI (al Qaeda in Iraq), the report says, is exploiting the weak security environment "since the departure of U.S. forces at the end of 2011." But to have suggested any mitigating steps to this White House would have been pointless. It won’t listen.

In March, Gen. James Mattis, then head of the U.S. Central Command, told Congress he recommended the U.S. keep 13,600 support troops in Afghanistan; he was known not to want an announced final withdrawal date. On May 27, President Obama said it would be 9,800 troops—for just one year. Which guarantees that the taking of Mosul will be replayed in Afghanistan.

Let us repeat the most quoted passage in former Defense Secretary Robert Gates’s memoir, "Duty." It describes the March 2011 meeting with Mr. Obama about Afghanistan in the situation room. "As I sat there, I thought: The president doesn’t trust his commander, can’t stand Karzai, doesn’t believe in his own strategy and doesn’t consider the war to be his," Mr. Gates wrote. "For him, it’s all about getting out."

The big Obama bet is that Americans’ opinion-polled "fatigue" with the world (if not his leadership) frees him to create a progressive domestic legacy. This Friday Mr. Obama is giving a speech to the Sioux Indians in Cannon Ball, N.D., about "jobs and education."

Meanwhile, Iraq may be transforming into (a) a second Syria or (b) a restored caliphate. Past some point, the world’s wildfires are going to consume the Obama legacy. And leave his successor a nightmare.

Voir enfin:

Iraq: Fall of Mosul Spells Disaster for U.S. Counterterrorism Policy

James Phillips

The Daily signal

June 11, 2014

James Phillips is the senior research fellow for Middle Eastern affairs at the Douglas and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign Policy Studies at The Heritage Foundation. He has written extensively on Middle Eastern issues and international terrorism since 1978.

The sudden rout of Iraqi security forces in Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city, is a humiliating defeat for the Iraqi government, a severe blow to U.S. policy in Iraq, and a strategic disaster that will amplify the threat posed by al-Qaeda-linked terrorists to the United States and its allies.

The swift victory of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), formerly known as al-Qaeda in Iraq, demonstrates the growing threat posed by Islamist militants in the region and the risks inherent in the Obama Administration’s failure to maintain a residual U.S. military training and counterterrorism presence after the withdrawal of U.S. troops in 2011.

Iraqi security forces collapsed and retreated from Mosul in the face of ISIS militants recruited from Iraq, Syria, and foreign Sunni extremist movements. The defeat underscored the weakness of Iraq’s armed forces, which was apparent long before the U.S. withdrawal.

The insurgents not only captured significant amounts of arms and equipment abandoned by the demoralized security forces; they also seized about 500 billion Iraqi dinars (approximately $429 million) from Mosul’s central bank. This will make ISIS the richest terrorist group ever and enable it to further expand its power by buying the support of Sunni Iraqis disenchanted with the sectarian policies of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s Shia-dominated government.

Although the resurgence of ISIS has been enabled by Maliki’s heavy-handed rule and the spillover of the increasingly sectarian civil war in Syria, the Obama Administration also played a counterproductive role in downplaying the prospects for an al-Qaeda comeback in Iraq.

The Administration early on made it clear to Iraqis that it was more interested in “ending” rather than winning the war against al-Qaeda in Iraq. As Heritage Foundation analysts repeatedly warned, the abrupt U.S. troop withdrawal in 2011 deprived the Iraqi government of important counterterrorism, intelligence, and training capabilities that were needed to keep the pressure on al-Qaeda and allowed it to regain strength in a much more permissive environment.

Now ISIS, whose leader in 2012 threatened to attack the “heart” of America, poses a rising threat to U.S. security. The bottom line is that the Obama Administration’s rush to “end” the war in Iraq has helped create the conditions for losing the war against al-Qaeda.


Islam: Un universitaire égyptien prédit l’effondrement du monde musulman (The collapse of a house is a dangerous matter – and not just for its residents, warns Egyptian-German scholar)

31 mai, 2014
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/infocus/syria040513/s02_RTR3DAR3.jpg
http://www.jihadwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Muslims-in-Sweden.jpgMontre-moi que Mahomet ait rien institué de neuf : tu ne trouverais rien que de mauvais et d’inhumain, tel ce qu’il statue en décrétant de faire progresser par l’épée la croyance qu’il prêchait. Manuel II Paléologue (empereur byzantin, 1391)
Dans le septième entretien (dialexis — controverse) édité par le professeur Khoury, l’empereur aborde le thème du djihad, de la guerre sainte. Assurément l’empereur savait que dans la sourate 2, 256 on peut lire : « Nulle contrainte en religion ! ». C’est l’une des sourates de la période initiale, disent les spécialistes, lorsque Mahomet lui-même n’avait encore aucun pouvoir et était menacé. Mais naturellement l’empereur connaissait aussi les dispositions, développées par la suite et fixées dans le Coran, à propos de la guerre sainte. Sans s’arrêter sur les détails, tels que la différence de traitement entre ceux qui possèdent le « Livre » et les « incrédules », l’empereur, avec une rudesse assez surprenante qui nous étonne, s’adresse à son interlocuteur simplement avec la question centrale sur la relation entre religion et violence en général, en disant : « Montre-moi donc ce que Mahomet a apporté de nouveau, et tu y trouveras seulement des choses mauvaises et inhumaines, comme son mandat de diffuser par l’épée la foi qu’il prêchait ». L’empereur, après s’être prononcé de manière si peu amène, explique ensuite minutieusement les raisons pour lesquelles la diffusion de la foi à travers la violence est une chose déraisonnable. La violence est en opposition avec la nature de Dieu et la nature de l’âme. « Dieu n’apprécie pas le sang — dit-il —, ne pas agir selon la raison, sun logô, est contraire à la nature de Dieu. La foi est le fruit de l’âme, non du corps. Celui, par conséquent, qui veut conduire quelqu’un à la foi a besoin de la capacité de bien parler et de raisonner correctement, et non de la violence et de la menace… Pour convaincre une âme raisonnable, il n’est pas besoin de disposer ni de son bras, ni d’instrument pour frapper ni de quelque autre moyen que ce soit avec lequel on pourrait menacer une personne de mort… L’affirmation décisive dans cette argumentation contre la conversion au moyen de la violence est : ne pas agir selon la raison est contraire à la nature de Dieu. Benoit XVI (université de Ratisbonne, 1é septembre 2006)
La condition préalable à tout dialogue est que chacun soit honnête avec sa tradition. (…) les chrétiens ont repris tel quel le corpus de la Bible hébraïque. Saint Paul parle de " greffe" du christianisme sur le judaïsme, ce qui est une façon de ne pas nier celui-ci . (…) Dans l’islam, le corpus biblique est, au contraire, totalement remanié pour lui faire dire tout autre chose que son sens initial (…) La récupération sous forme de torsion ne respecte pas le texte originel sur lequel, malgré tout, le Coran s’appuie. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard
Quand les phénomènes s’exaspèrent, c’est qu’ils vont disparaitre. René Girard
Dire que l’islamisme n’est pas l’islam, qu’il n’a rien à voir avec l’islam, est faux. Pour le musulman d’hier et d’aujourd’hui il n’y a qu’un seul Coran comme il n’y a qu’un seul prophète. L’islamiste est autant musulman que le mystique car il s’appuie sur ces deux fondements. Et dans ces deux fondements il y a l’appel au combat. Ici-bas la guerre pour la victoire de l’islam doit être poursuivie tant que l’islam n’est pas entièrement victorieux. La paix n’est envisageable que si la victoire paraît, pour le moment, impossible ou douteuse (sourate 47, verset 35/37). Mais la paix sera plutôt une récompense du paradis, quand toute la terre aura été pacifiée. Comment passer sous silence que pour les musulmans le monde se partage entre le territoire de l’islam (dâr al-Islam) et le territoire non musulman, qualifié de territoire de la guerre (dâr al-harb). (…) Entre l’islam et l’islamisme, il n’y a pas de différence de nature mais de degré. L’islamisme est présent dans l’islam comme le poussin l’est dans l’oeuf. Il n’y a pas de bon ou mauvais islam, pas plus qu’il n’y a d’islam modéré. En revanche il y a des musulmans modérés, ceux qui n’appliquent que partiellement l’islam. (…) Pour accepter l’islam, l’Europe a forgé le mythe de l’Andalousie tolérante qui aurait constitué un âge d’or pour les trois religions. Tout ce qui concerne les combats, le statut humiliant du non musulman a été soigneusement gommé. Il s’agit d’une véritable falsification de l’histoire réelle. (…) Là où l’islam est particulièrement dangereux, c’est qu’il englobe toute la vie du croyant, du berceau jusqu’à la tombe, dans tous les domaines et qu’il n’y a pas de séparation entre le public et le privé, pas plus qu’il n’y a de séparation entre le politique et le religieux. L’islam est total, global, il englobe la totalité car tout comportement obéit à une règle. Mais en même temps chaque règle est une règle de comportement religieux, que cette règle soit dans le domaine juridique, politique ou intime. C’est le religieux qui recouvre tout. Le système pleinement réalisé devrait s’appeler théocratie et jamais «démocratie». On nous ment quand on nous affirme que l’islam serait une foi qui se pratique dans la sphère privée, comme le christianisme. L’islam est à la fois une foi, une loi, un droit (fiqh), lequel est l’application de la Loi qu’est la charî’a. Et cette charî’a a prescrit de combattre l’infidèle (jihâd ou qitâl), de lui réserver un traitement inégalitaire (dhimmî), d’appliquer aux musulmans des peines fixes (hudûd) pour des crimes bien définis (adultère (zinâ), apostasie (ridda), blasphème(tajdîf), vol (sariqah), brigandage (qat’ al-tarîq), meurtre (qatl) et bien sûr consommation d’alcool. (…) Pour expliquer les attentats, il suffit de se reporter à la vie du prophète, lequel a justifié l’assassinat politique pour le bien de l’islam. De même, faire peur, inspirer la terreur (rahbat) -dont on a tiré le mot moderne “terrorisme” (irhâb)- était la méthode que le noble modèle préconisait pour semer la panique chez les ennemis de l’islam. Anne-Marie Delcambre
L’idée selon laquelle la diffusion de la culture de masse et des biens de consommation dans le monde entier représente le triomphe de la civilisation occidentale repose sur une vision affadie de la culture occidentale. L’essence de la culture occidentale, c’est le droit, pas le MacDo. Le fait que les non-Occidentaux puissent opter pour le second n’implique pas qu’ils acceptent le premier. Samuel Huntington
Le titre m’est venu de la lecture de l’Apocalypse, du chapitre 20, qui annonce qu’au terme de mille ans, des nations innombrables venues des quatre coins de la Terre envahiront « le camp des saints et la Ville bien-aimée. Jean Raspail
Le 17 février 2001, un cargo vétuste s’échouait volontairement sur les rochers côtiers, non loin de Saint-Raphaël. À son bord, un millier d’immigrants kurdes, dont près de la moitié étaient des enfants. « Cette pointe rocheuse faisait partie de mon paysage. Certes, ils n’étaient pas un million, ainsi que je les avais imaginés, à bord d’une armada hors d’âge, mais ils n’en avaient pas moins débarqué chez moi, en plein décor du Camp des saints, pour y jouer l’acte I. Le rapport radio de l’hélicoptère de la gendarmerie diffusé par l’AFP semble extrait, mot pour mot, des trois premiers paragraphes du livre. La presse souligna la coïncidence, laquelle apparut, à certains, et à moi, comme ne relevant pas du seul hasard. Jean Raspail
Ce qui m’a frappé, c’est le contraste entre les opinions exprimées à titre privé et celles tenues publiquement. Double langage et double conscience… À mes yeux, il n’y a pire lâcheté que celle devant la faiblesse, que la peur d’opposer la légitimité de la force à l’illégitimité de la violence. Jean Raspail
Les pays arabes enregistrent un retard par rapport aux autres régions en matière de gouvernance et de participation aux processus de décision. La vague de démocratisation, qui a transformé la gouvernance dans la plupart des pays d’Amérique latine et d’Asie orientale dans les années quatre-vingts, en Europe centrale et dans une bonne partie de l’Asie centrale à la fin des années quatre-vingt et au début des années quatre-vingt-dix, a à peine effleuré les États arabes. Ce déficit de liberté va à l’encontre du développement humain et constitue l’une des manifestations les plus douloureuses du retard enregistré en terme de développement politique. La démocratie et les droits de l’homme sont reconnus de droit, inscrits dans les constitutions, les codes et les déclarations gouvernementales, mais leur application est en réalité bien souvent négligée, voire délibérément ignorée. Le plus souvent, le mode de gouvernance dans le monde arabe se caractérise par un exécutif puissant exerçant un contrôle ferme sur toutes les branches de l’État, en l’absence parfois de garde-fous institutionnels. La démocratie représentative n’est pas toujours véritable, et fait même parfois défaut. Les libertés d’expression et d’association sont bien souvent limitées. Des modèles dépassés de légitimité prédominent.(…) La participation politique dans les pays arabes reste faible, ainsi qu’en témoignent l’absence de véritable démocratie représentative et les restrictions imposées aux libertés. Dans le même temps, les aspirations de la population à davantage de liberté et à une plus grande participation à la prise de décisions se font sentir, engendrées par l’augmentation des revenus, l’éducation et les flux d’information. La dichotomie entre les attentes et leur réalisation a parfois conduit à l’aliénation et à ses corollaires, l’apathie et le mécontentement. (…) Deux mécanismes parallèles sont en jeu. La position de l’État tutélaire va en s’amenuisant, en partie du fait de la réduction des avantages qu’il est en mesure d’offrir aujourd’hui sous forme de garantie de l’emploi, de subventions et autres mesures incitatives. Par contre, les citoyens se trouvent de plus en plus en position de force étant donné que l’État dépend d’eux de manière croissante pour se procurer des recettes fiscales, assurer l’investissement du secteur privé et couvrir d’autres besoins essentiels. Par ailleurs, les progrès du développement humain, en dotant les citoyens, en particulier ceux des classes moyennes, d’un nouvel éventail de ressources, les ont placés en meilleure position pour contester les politiques et négocier avec l’État. Rapport arabe sur le développement humain 2002
C’est une expérience profondément émouvante d’être à Jérusalem, la capitale d’Israël. Nos deux nations sont séparées par plus de 5 000 miles. Mais pour un Américain à l’étranger, il n’est pas possible de ressentir un plus grande proximité avec les idéaux et les convictions de son propre pays qu’ici, en Israël. Nous faisons partie de la grande fraternité des démocraties. Nous parlons la même langue de liberté et de justice, et nous incarnons le droit de toute personne à vivre en paix. Nous servons la même cause et provoquons les mêmes haines chez les mêmes ennemis de la civilisation. C’est ma ferme conviction que la sécurité d’Israël est un intérêt vital de la sécurité nationale des États-Unis. Et notre alliance est une alliance fondée non seulement sur des intérêts communs, mais aussi sur des valeurs partagées. (…) Quand on vient ici en Israël et qu’on voit que le PIB par habitant est d’environ 21.000 dollars, alors qu’il est de l’ordre de 10.000 dollars tout juste de l’autre côté dans les secteurs gérés par l’Autorité palestinienne, on constate une différence énorme et dramatique de vitalité économique. (…) C’est la culture qui fait toute la différence. Et lorsque je regarde cette ville (Jérusalem) et tout ce que le peuple de cette nation (Israël) a accompli, je reconnais pour le moins la puissance de la culture et de quelques autres choses. Mitt Romney
Le discours de Mitt Romney à Jérusalem, et les déclarations à la presse qui l’ont accompagné n’en finissent décidément pas de faire des vagues. Mitt Romney a parlé du fait que le développement économique et la liberté qui règnent en Israël étaient dues à la culture, et que les handicaps qui marquent le monde musulman et qui touchent les « Palestiniens » auraient aussi une dimension culturelle. Des accusations de racisme ont aussitôt commencé à fuser. (…) Oui, certaines cultures sont plus propices que d’autres au développement économique et à la liberté sous toutes ses formes, et, n’en déplaise aux relativistes, la culture juive est une culture particulièrement propice. La culture du christianisme protestant est plus propice au développement économique et à la liberté que la culture du christianisme catholique, et lorsque des substrats culturels viennent s’ajouter, tels le caudillisme en Amérique latine, les handicaps peuvent devenir écrasants. Oui, les cultures marquées par le confucianisme peuvent susciter le développement économique, mais se trouver confrontées à des obstacles lorsqu’il s’agit de liberté, et cela explique les difficultés de sociétés asiatiques à passer à un fonctionnement post-industriel et post-asiatique. Et oui, hélas, le monde musulman, et en lui tout particulièrement le monde arabe, sont dans une situation de blocage culturel qui ne cesse de s’aggraver et prennent des allures cataclysmiques. Le monde arabe est aujourd’hui dans une phase d’effondrement économique qui s’accompagne d’un effondrement de ses structures politiques et d’une destruction de ses repères culturels. Il ne reste au milieu des décombres qu’une infime minorité de gens ouverts à l’esprit de civilisation et aux sociétés ouvertes, et une immense déferlante islamiste où se mêlent dans le ressentiment, le sectarisme et le tribalisme des gens désireux de revenir à une lecture littéraliste du Coran, des radicaux mélangeant Coran et texte de Marx, Lénine ou Franz Fanon, d’autres qui relisent leurs textes sacrés à la lumière noire de Hitler. Cet effondrement ne fait que commencer. Il va se poursuivre. La situation qui prévaut en Syrie n’en est qu’un fragment. D’autres fragments sont visibles en Libye, dans le Nord du Mali, au Nigeria où agissent les Boko Haram, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Yemen. Il est criminel de ne pas le comprendre. C’est suicidaire aussi. La Russie et la Chine essaient cyniquement de voir quels avantages elles peuvent tirer de l’effondrement et en quoi il peut leur permettre de parasiter le monde occidental. Les dirigeants européens s’essaient à rafistoler une zone euro et une Union Européenne qui sont elles-mêmes au bord de l’effondrement, et font semblant de croire encore aux « promesses du printemps arabe ». Manuel Valls, qui sortait sans doute d’un hôpital où il venait de subir une lobotomie, a parlé le 6 juillet en inaugurant de manière très laïque une mosquée à Cergy Pontoise de l’islam contemporain comme de l’hériter de celui de Cordoue où foisonnait la connaissance. Les dirigeants européens entendent aussi flatter les « Palestiniens » : s’ils ouvraient les yeux (c’est impossible, je sais), et s’ils actionnaient leurs neurones (ce qui est plus impossible encore, je ne l’ignore pas), ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » est en train de mourir et ne survit que grâce aux injections financières européennes et, pour partie, américaines. Ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » s’est développé dans les années mille neuf cent soixante quand le nationalisme arabe était soutenu par l’Union Soviétique. L’Union Soviétique n’existe plus. Le nationalisme arabe agonise dans les décombres de Damas. Guy Millière
La Scandinavie est un ensemble qui a connu une très forte émigration au XIXe siècle, contribuant notamment à peupler les Etats-Unis. Mais il n’y avait jamais eu de vrai phénomène d’immigration. Il est très amusant de comparer la diversité des noms de famille en France, où elle est infinie, et en Scandinavie, où il y a très peu de souches. Là-bas, l’immigration débute, même pas dans les années 50 comme au Royaume-Uni, mais seulement dans les années 70. Au début, ces social-démocraties qui n’ont pas eu de colonies ont accueilli à bras ouverts les immigrés avec des conditions très avantageuses. A ceci près que la masse d’arrivants s’est concentrée dans des zones déjà très peuplées : à l’échelle d’un pays, c’est peu, mais à celle de certains quartiers d’Oslo ou de Copenhague, l’équilibre s’est rompu. Par ailleurs, dans une société très ouverte et très égalitaire, la question du statut des femmes a vite posé problème. Les habitants n’ont pas supporté de voir ces femmes avec le voile noir intégral. Même si ces immigrés ne font rien de mal et vont faire leurs courses chez Ikea, la situation est devenue explosive. (…) [aux élections européennes] …Attendons de voir ces résultats pour en tirer des conclusions, mais on peut s’attendre à une poussée. Le suffrage se fait à la proportionnelle. Beaucoup de partis d’extrême droite sous-représentés en raison d’un scrutin majoritaire national vont donc se révéler. La France n’a que deux députés frontistes pour représenter 16% de la population. Le phénomène est le même en Grande-Bretagne, qui a connu une immigration record ces dernières années. Entre 1991 et 2011, la proportion de la population née à l’étranger est passée de 5,8 à 12,5%. Cela risque d’avoir des répercussions dans les urnes fin mai pour le British National Party [BNP] et le Parti pour l’indépendance du Royaume-Uni [Ukip]. Le vote Front national concerne seulement la partie ouest du Nord-Pas-de-Calais, c’est-à-dire, paradoxalement, la zone la plus développée, la mieux réaménagée, la plus agréable. Les centres-villes de Béthune ou de Lens sont devenus des endroits presque riants, alors qu’ils étaient plutôt déprimants. Tout a bougé, on a cassé des corons, et on a également beaucoup redistribué d’aides sociales. En revanche, la partie nord-est de la région est restée en l’état, fidèle au vote communiste. Cette stagnation n’a pas généré de frustrations. Car si personne n’évolue socialement, il n’y a pas non plus, contrairement à la partie ouest, de sentiment de déclassement. Béatrice Giblin
Les Français ont redit hier que la crise économique et sociale n’était rien à côté de la crise identitaire, liée à l’immigration massive et à la déculturation organisée. Les socialistes corsetés n’ont pas de réponse: Manuel Valls a répété qu’il ne changerait pas sa "feuille de route" et qu’il "demandait du temps". L’UMP, pour sa part,  avait un temps touché du doigt la bonne stratégie avec la "ligne Buisson", qui consistait à se dégager des interdits de penser. C’est elle qui s’avère plus nécessaire que jamais si la droite veut regagner la confiance. Pour l’UMP, c’est désormais une question de survie. Il n’est en tout cas pas pensable de répondre par l’immobilisme à cette crise de régime. Ceux qui dénoncent dans le FN le "rejet de l’autre" ne peuvent rejeter ce parti devenu majoritaire, à moins d’ostraciser "La France FN" (titre de Libération, ce lundi). D’autant que le procès en antisémitisme qui est fait par certains au mouvement de Marine Le Pen masque la réalité de la haine antijuive  qui s’observe dans des cités (deux jeunes frères portant la kippa ont été agressés samedi soir devant la synagogue de Créteil). Le "populisme" ne menace aucunement la démocratie, comme l’assurent les oligarques contestés par le peuple et qui s’accrochent, eux, à leur pouvoir. Le vrai danger est l’obscurantisme qui, à Bruxelles samedi, a assassiné quatre personnes, dont deux israéliens, au Musée Juif de la ville; or cette menace-là mobilise beaucoup moins les belles âmes. La diabolisation du mouvement de Marine Le Pen est une paresse intellectuelle des politiques et des médias. Ceux-là ont été ses meilleurs alliés, en instituant son parti comme unique formation à l’écoute des gens. L’échec confirmé de cette méthode oblige à y renoncer. Il est devenu, par la volonté des citoyens, un parti comme un autre. Il doit être jugé sur son programme. L’UMP devra s’en inspirer quand le FN parle de la France. Ivan Rioufol
Si les tendances à la fragmentation perdurent, le mouvement islamiste sera condamné, comme le fascisme et le communisme, à n’être rien de plus qu’une menace pour la civilisation, capable de causer des dommages considérables mais sans jamais pouvoir triompher. Ce frein potentiel au pouvoir islamiste, devenu manifeste seulement en 2013, ouvre la voie à l’optimisme mais pas à la complaisance. Même si les choses semblent meilleures qu’il y a un an, la tendance peut à nouveau s’inverser rapidement. La tâche ardue qui consiste à vaincre l’islamisme demeure une priorité. Daniel Pipes
Abdel-Samad avait prédit, avant le déclenchement des révolutions arabes, l’effondrement du monde musulman sous le poids d’un islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, et l’immigration massive vers l’Occident qui s’en suivrait. L’Occident a intérêt à soutenir les forces laïques et démocratiques dans le monde musulman. Et chez nous, il faut encourager la critique de l’islam au lieu de la réprimer sous prétexte de discours de haine. En apaisant les islamistes et en accommodant leurs demandes obscurantistes dans nos institutions, on ne fait que retarder un processus qui serait salutaire pour les musulmans eux-mêmes, et pour l’humanité. Al Masrd
In the western world, an astounding number of people believe that Islam is overpowering and on the rise. Demographic trends, along with bloody attacks and shrill tones of Islamist fundamentalists, seem to confirm that notion. In reality, however, it is the Islamic world which feels on the defensive and determined to protest vehemently against what it perceives as a western, aggressive style of power politics, including in the economic sphere. In short, a stunning pattern of asymmetric communication and mutual paranoia determines the relationship between (Muslim) East and (Christian) West — and has done so for generations. Regarding Islam, I think that in its present condition it may be many things, except for one — that it is powerful. Indeed, I view today’s Islam as seriously ill — and, both culturally and socially, as in retreat. It can offer few, if any, constructive answers to the questions of the 21st century and instead barricades itself behind a wall of anger and protest. The religiously motivated violence, the growing Islamization of public space and the insistence on the visibility of Muslim symbols are merely nervous reactions to this retreat. The rise of Islamism reflects little more than the profound lack of self-awareness and constructive real-life options for many young Muslims. For all the supposed glory and dynamism in the eyes of its acolytes, it is little more than the desperate act to paint a house in seemingly resplendent colors, while the house itself is about to topple onto itself. But no doubt about it, the collapse of a house is a dangerous matter — and not just for its residents. (…)  As far as I can tell, the “clash of civilizations” seized upon by the late Samuel Huntington has long become reality. But it is important to realize that it takes place not only between Islam and the West, as many suspected it, but also within the Islamic world itself. It is an inner-Islamic clash between individualism and conformity pressure, between continuity and innovation, modernity and the past. (…) Perversely, but predictably, the directly related lack of economic productivity and the growing popular discontent over the inability to tap into a gainful economic life help the radical Islamists to advance their cause. (…) When it comes to the future of Islam, I fear that the road to transformation and modernization will only be reached following a period of collapse. This is especially true in the Arab world, where the prospects for both regional and global advancement appear rather daunting, if not — for now — illusory. A rapidly growing, poor and oppressed population, a lagging educational sector, shrinking oil reserves and drastic climate change undermine any prospects for economic progress. In addition, these factors further intensify the existing regional and religious conflicts. The net effect of this could well be an increasing loss of relevance and authority of the state itself, which could lead to a significant spread of violence. The civil wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Algeria, Pakistan, Somalia and Sudan are just the beginning of it — although already a most ominous one. The present form of spiritual and material calcification leads me to make a prediction: Many Islamic countries will tumble, and Islam will have a hard time surviving as a political and social idea, and as a culture. What this does to the world community is difficult to assess. However, it is quite clear that this disintegration will result in one of the largest migrations in history. (And this is precisely where the circle of fear is getting closed again — from New York to Germany.) The downfall of the Islamic world would automatically mean that the waves of migration to Europe would increase significantly. For young Muslim immigrants, fleeing poverty and terrorism, Europe does indeed represent a hope for them, as does the United States. Still, they will not manage to shed themselves of their friend-foe thinking. They will migrate into a continent that they by and large despise — and that they hold responsible for their plight. Worse, neither the recipient country’s government institutions nor the long-established Muslim immigrants there can help them to integrate themselves. The spreading violence that came to the fore in the wake of the downfall of their home countries will simply be outsourced, mainly to Europe, because of its non-shielded immigrant situation. Saying so has nothing to do with scaremongering, but is an act of recognizing what’s real. In the ultimate analysis, it is the natural result of the imbalance in the world in which we live. The many sins of the West and the corresponding failures of the Islamic world itself, which are already the stuff of history for centuries, will become very visible again. This is the downside of the globalization process. Hard times await us on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea. Meanwhile, we are all running out of time. Hamed Abdel-Samad
Les musulmans ne cessent de se vanter d’avoir transmis la civilisation grecque et romaine aux Occidentaux, mais s’ils étaient vraiment porteurs de cette civilisation pourquoi ne l’ont-ils pas préservée, valorisée et enrichie afin d’en tirer le meilleur profit ? (…)  les diverses cultures contemporaines se fécondent mutuellement et s’épanouissent tout en se faisant concurrence, alors que la culture islamique demeure pétrifiée et hermétiquement fermée à la culture occidentale qu’elle qualifie et accuse d’être infidèle? (…) le caractère infidèle de la civilisation occidentale n’empêche pas les musulmans de jouir de ses réalisations et de ses produits, particulièrement dans les domaines scientifiques, technologiques et médicaux. Ils en jouissent sans réaliser qu’ils ont raté le train de la modernité lequel est opéré et conduit par les infidèles sans contribution aucune des musulmans, au point que ces derniers sont devenus un poids mort pour l’Occident et pour l’humanité entière. (…) comment l’élite éclairée dans le monde islamique et arabe saura-t-elle affronter cette réalité ? Hamed Abdel-Samad

Islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, absence de structures économiques assurant un réel développement, absence d’un système éducatif efficace, limitation sévère de la créativité intellectuelle  …

Alors qu’avance chaque jour un peu plus dans les marges de nos villes la contre-colonisation islamique …

Et qu’alimentées, de la Syrie à l’Afrique, par les pires conflits de la planète, les vagues d’immigration sauvages et massives prophétisées par Jean Raspail ont déjà commencé à atteindre nos rivages …

Pendant qu’entre Mohamed Merah en France et son possible émule il y  a une semaine à Bruxelles, les "soldats perdus du jihad" ont peut-être déjà commencé eux aussi à rapatrier leur violence dans nos centre-villes …

Et qu’après le discours de vérité de Benoit XVI sur l’islam et face à l’inquiétude qui monte de nos populations de souche, le Pape François comme nos belles âmes et nos médias nous ramènent à l’apaisement le plus servile …

Petite remise des pendules à l’heure avec l’universitaire égypto-allemand Hamed Abd el Samad

Qui, bien solitaire et au péril de sa vie, rappelait il y a trois ans  le caractère illusoire de l’apparente résurgence du monde islamique ..

Et confirmant, après le fameux rapport des Nations Unies d’il y a douze ans, les analyses tant critiquées de Huntington sur le choc des civilisations comme le lien décrit par René Girard entre l’exaspération et la disparition prochaine d’un phénomène …

Montrait que ledit conflit se joue aussi à l’intérieur du monde musulman lui-même et prédisait un effondrement dans les décennies à venir de la Maison-islam …

Aussi nécessaire et salutaire qu’hélas hautement risqué et dangereux …

Et ce pas seulement pour ses résidents …

Un universitaire égyptien prédit l’effondrement du monde musulman
Un article paru le 1er décembre 2010 dans le journal Al Marsd au sujet d’un livre du politologue allemand d’origine égyptienne, Abdel-Samad.

Abdel-Samad avait prédit, avant le déclenchement des révolutions arabes, l’effondrement du monde musulman sous le poids d’un islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, et l’immigration massive vers l’Occident qui s’en suivrait.L’Occident a intérêt à soutenir les forces laïques et démocratiques dans le monde musulman. Et chez nous, il faut encourager la critique de l’islam au lieu de la réprimer sous prétexte de discours de haine. En apaisant les islamistes et en accommodant leurs demandes obscurantistes dans nos institutions, on ne fait que retarder un processus qui serait salutaire pour les musulmans eux-mêmes, et pour l’humanité.

Hamed Abd el Samad, chercheur et professeur d’université résidant en Allemagne, a publié en décembre 2010 un ouvrage qu’il a intitulé «la chute du monde islamique». Dans son livre il pose un diagnostic sans concessions sur l’ampleur de la catastrophe qui frappera le monde islamique au cours des trente prochaines années. L’auteur s’attend à ce que cet évènement coïncide avec le tarissement prévisible des puits de pétrole au Moyen-Orient. La désertification progressive contribuerait également au marasme économique tandis qu’on assistera à une exacerbation des nombreux conflits ethniques, religieux et économiques qui ont actuellement cours. Ces désordres s’accompagneront de mouvements massifs de population avec une recrudescence des mouvements migratoires vers l’Occident, particulièrement en direction de l’Europe.

Fort de sa connaissance de la réalité du monde islamique, le professeur Abd el Samad en est venu à cette vision pessimiste. L’arriération intellectuelle, l’immobilisme économique et social, le blocage sur les plans religieux et politiques sont d’après lui les causes principales de la catastrophe appréhendée. Ses origines remontent à un millénaire et elle est en lien avec l’incapacité de l’islam d’offrir des réponses nouvelles ou créatives pour le bénéfice de l’humanité en général et pour ses adeptes en particulier.

À moins d’un miracle ou d’un changement de cap aussi radical que salutaire, Abd el Samad croit que l’effondrement du monde islamique connaîtra son point culminant durant les deux prochaines décennies. L’auteur égyptien a relevé plusieurs éléments lui permettant d’émettre un tel pronostic :

Absence de structures économiques assurant un réel développement
Absence d’un système éducatif efficace
Limitation sévère de la créativité intellectuelle

Ces déficiences ont fragilisé à l’extrême l’édifice du monde islamique, le prédisposant par conséquent à l’effondrement. Le processus de désintégration comme on l’a vu plus haut a débuté depuis longtemps et on serait rendu actuellement à la phase terminale.

L’auteur ne ménage pas ses critiques à l’égard des musulmans : «Ils ne cessent de se vanter d’avoir transmis la civilisation grecque et romaine aux Occidentaux, mais s’ils étaient vraiment porteurs de cette civilisation pourquoi ne l’ont-ils pas préservée, valorisée et enrichie afin d’en tirer le meilleur profit ?» Et il pousse le questionnement d’un cran : «Pourquoi les diverses cultures contemporaines se fécondent mutuellement et s’épanouissent tout en se faisant concurrence, alors que la culture islamique demeure pétrifiée et hermétiquement fermée à la culture occidentale qu’elle qualifie et accuse d’être infidèle?» Et il ajoute : «le caractère infidèle de la civilisation occidentale n’empêche pas les musulmans de jouir de ses réalisations et de ses produits, particulièrement dans les domaines scientifiques, technologiques et médicaux. Ils en jouissent sans réaliser qu’ils ont raté le train de la modernité lequel est opéré et conduit par les infidèles sans contribution aucune des musulmans, au point que ces derniers sont devenus un poids mort pour l’Occident et pour l’humanité entière.»

L’auteur constate l’impossibilité de réformer l’islam tant que la critique du coran, de ses concepts, de ses principes et de son enseignement demeure taboue ; cet état de fait empêche tout progrès, stérilise la pensée et paralyse toute initiative. S’attaquant indirectement au coran. l’auteur se demande quels changements profonds peut-on s’attendre de la part de populations qui sacralisent des textes figés et stériles et qui continuent de croire qu’ils sont valables pour tous les temps et tous les lieux. Ce blocage n’empêche pas les leaders religieux de répéter avec vantardise et arrogance que les musulmans sont le meilleur de l’humanité, que les non-musulmans sont méprisables et ne méritent pas de vivre ! L’ampleur de la schizophrénie qui affecte l’oumma islamique est remarquable.

L’auteur s’interroge : «comment l’élite éclairée dans le monde islamique et arabe saura-t-elle affronter cette réalité ? Malgré le pessimisme qui sévit parmi les penseurs musulmans libéraux, ceux-ci conservent une lueur d’espoir qui les autorise à réclamer qu’une autocritique se fasse dans un premier temps avec franchise, loin du mensonge, de l’hypocrisie, de la dissimulation et de l’orgueil mal placé. Cet effort doit être accompagné de la volonté de se réconcilier avec les autres en reconnaissant et respectant leur supériorité sur le plan civilisationnel et leurs contributions sur les plans scientifiques et technologiques. Le monde islamique doit prendre conscience de sa faiblesse et doit rechercher les causes de son arriération, de son échec et de sa misère en toute franchise afin de trouver un remède à ses maux.

Le professeur Abd el Samad ne perçoit aucune solution magique à la situation de l’oumma islamique tant que celle-ci restera attachée à la charia qui asservit, stérilise les esprits, divise le monde entre croyants musulmans et infidèles non-musulmans ; entre dar el islam et dar el harb (les pays islamiques et les pays à conquérir). L’auteur croit qu’il est impossible pour l’oumma islamique de progresser et d’innover avant qu’elle ne se libère de ses démons, de ses complexes, de ses interdits et avant qu’elle ne transforme l’islam en religion purement spirituelle invitant ses adeptes à une relation personnelle avec le créateur sans interférence de la part de quiconque fusse un prophète, un individu, une institution ou une mafia religieuse dans sa pratique de la religion ou dans sa vie quotidienne.

Source : أستاذ جامعي مصري يتنبأ بسقوط العالم الإسلامي خلال 30 سنة, Al-Masrd, 1 décembre 2010. Traduction de l’arabe par Hélios d’Alexandrie

Voir aussi:

Globalization and the Pending Collapse of the Islamic World

With which tools can Islam, in the eyes of the Islamists, actually conquer the world of today? Or can it?
Hamed Abdel-Samad

The Globalist

September 15, 2010

In the western world, an astounding number of people believe that Islam is overpowering and on the rise. Demographic trends, along with bloody attacks and shrill tones of Islamist fundamentalists, seem to confirm that notion.

In reality, however, it is the Islamic world which feels on the defensive and determined to protest vehemently against what it perceives as a western, aggressive style of power politics, including in the economic sphere.

In short, a stunning pattern of asymmetric communication and mutual paranoia determines the relationship between (Muslim) East and (Christian) West — and has done so for generations.

Regarding Islam, I think that in its present condition it may be many things, except for one — that it is powerful. Indeed, I view today’s Islam as seriously ill — and, both culturally and socially, as in retreat.

It can offer few, if any, constructive answers to the questions of the 21st century and instead barricades itself behind a wall of anger and protest.

The religiously motivated violence, the growing Islamization of public space and the insistence on the visibility of Muslim symbols are merely nervous reactions to this retreat.

The rise of Islamism reflects little more than the profound lack of self-awareness and constructive real-life options for many young Muslims.

For all the supposed glory and dynamism in the eyes of its acolytes, it is little more than the desperate act to paint a house in seemingly resplendent colors, while the house itself is about to topple onto itself.

But no doubt about it, the collapse of a house is a dangerous matter — and not just for its residents.

The key question is this: With which tools can Islam, in the eyes of the Islamists, actually conquer the world of today? After all, in the era of nanotechnology, demographics alone is no longer sufficient to determine the fate of the world.

To the contrary, the rise of half-educated masses without any real prospects for economic and social advancement in too many Muslim countries, in my view, is more of a burden on Islam than on the West.

True, there is a widespread trend which has much of the Islamic world disassociate itself from secular and scientific knowledge in a drastic manner — and which chooses to adopt a profoundly irreconcilable attitude to the spirit of modernity.

At the same time, for all their presumed backwardness and lack of perspective, young Muslims in many countries undergo a distinct individualization process.

True, that development primarily concerns those who are quite intense users of the Internet and who, depending on their personal financial situation, also tend to be devoted to buying modern consumer goods.

Either way, the outcome is a profound shift from the pre-Internet past: They no longer trust the old traditional structures.

These trends can ultimately bring about one of two possible outcomes — a move toward democratization or a step back toward mass fanaticism and violence.

Which outcome it will be depends first and foremost on the frameworks in which these young individuals find themselves.

What is as perplexing as it is remarkable is that, in key countries such as Iran and Egypt, the trend toward radicalization and the opposite outcome of young people managing to free themselves from outdated structures occur simultaneously.

Meanwhile, the battle lines between these two opposing outcomes have hardened more than ever before — and a bitter confrontation has become inevitable.

As far as I can tell, the “clash of civilizations” seized upon by the late Samuel Huntington has long become reality. But it is important to realize that it takes place not only between Islam and the West, as many suspected it, but also within the Islamic world itself.

It is an inner-Islamic clash between individualism and conformity pressure, between continuity and innovation, modernity and the past.

It would be naïve to assume that real political reform — and, along with it, a modernizing reform of Islam — are anything but in the rather distant future.

That will be the case as long as the education systems still favor pure loyalty over freer forms of thinking.

Perversely, but predictably, the directly related lack of economic productivity and the growing popular discontent over the inability to tap into a gainful economic life help the radical Islamists to advance their cause.

Even in the socially and politically better-off Gulf countries, the process of opening up is primarily undertaken by "virtue" of introducing modern consumer culture — rather than as a dynamic renewal of thought. (Hello China.)

The so-called reformers of Islam still dare not approach the fundamental problems of culture and religion. Reform debates are triggered frequently, but never completed.

Hardly anyone asks, “Is there possibly a fundamental shortcoming of our faith?” Hardly anyone dares to attack the sanctity of the Koran.

The Muslim World and the Titanic

Does Islam share the same fate as the Titanic?
Hamed Abdel-Samad

The Globalist

September 16, 2010

Comparing the Muslim world of today with the Titanic just before its sinking, some powerful parallels come to mind — sadly so.

That ship was all alone in the ocean, was considered invincible by its proud makers and yet suddenly became irredeemably tarnished in its oversized ambitions. Within a few seconds, it moved in its self-perception from world dominator to sailing helplessly in the icy ocean of modernity, without any concept of where a rescue crew could come from.

The passengers in the third-class cabins remained asleep, effectively imprisoned, clueless about the looming catastrophe. The rich, meanwhile, managed to rescue themselves in the few lifeboats that were available, while the traveling clergy excelled with heartfelt but empty appeals to those caught in between not to give up fighting.

The so-called Islamic reformers remind me of the salon orchestra, which — in a heroic display of giving the passengers the illusion of normalcy — continued to play on the deck of the Titanic until it went down. Likewise, the reformers are playing an alluring melody, but know full well that no one is listening anyway.

All around the world, we live in times of significant global transformation. The disorienting pressures stemming from that need find a real-life expression in such events as the fight in New York City over the location of a mosque, the abandoned burning of Korans in Florida, or German debates about the presumed economic inferiority of Muslim immigrants (advanced by a central banker, who has since resigned from office).

When it comes to the future of Islam, I fear that the road to transformation and modernization will only be reached following a period of collapse.

This is especially true in the Arab world, where the prospects for both regional and global advancement appear rather daunting, if not — for now — illusory.

A rapidly growing, poor and oppressed population, a lagging educational sector, shrinking oil reserves and drastic climate change undermine any prospects for economic progress. In addition, these factors further intensify the existing regional and religious conflicts.

The net effect of this could well be an increasing loss of relevance and authority of the state itself, which could lead to a significant spread of violence.

The civil wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Algeria, Pakistan, Somalia and Sudan are just the beginning of it — although already a most ominous one.

The present form of spiritual and material calcification leads me to make a prediction: Many Islamic countries will tumble, and Islam will have a hard time surviving as a political and social idea, and as a culture.

What this does to the world community is difficult to assess. However, it is quite clear that this disintegration will result in one of the largest migrations in history. (And this is precisely where the circle of fear is getting closed again — from New York to Germany.)

The downfall of the Islamic world would automatically mean that the waves of migration to Europe would increase significantly. For young Muslim immigrants, fleeing poverty and terrorism, Europe does indeed represent a hope for them, as does the United States.

Still, they will not manage to shed themselves of their friend-foe thinking. They will migrate into a continent that they by and large despise — and that they hold responsible for their plight.

Worse, neither the recipient country’s government institutions nor the long-established Muslim immigrants there can help them to integrate themselves.

The spreading violence that came to the fore in the wake of the downfall of their home countries will simply be outsourced, mainly to Europe, because of its non-shielded immigrant situation.

Saying so has nothing to do with scaremongering, but is an act of recognizing what’s real. In the ultimate analysis, it is the natural result of the imbalance in the world in which we live.

The many sins of the West and the corresponding failures of the Islamic world itself, which are already the stuff of history for centuries, will become very visible again.

This is the downside of the globalization process. Hard times await us on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea. Meanwhile, we are all running out of time.

Voir également:

L’islamisme probablement condamné à disparaître
Daniel Pipes
The Washington Times
22 juillet 2013

Version originale anglaise: Islamism’s Likely Doom
Adaptation française: Johan Bourlard

Pas plus tard qu’en 2012, les islamistes semblaient pouvoir coopérer en surmontant leurs nombreuses dissensions internes – religieuses (sunnites et chiites), politiques (monarchistes et républicains), tactiques (politiques et violentes), ou encore sur l’attitude face à la modernité (salafistes et Frères musulmans). En Tunisie, par exemple, les salafistes et les Frères musulmans (FM) ont trouvé un terrain d’entente. Les différences entre tous ces groupes étaient réelles mais secondaires car, comme je le disais alors, « tous les islamistes poussent dans la même direction, vers l’application pleine et sévère de la loi islamique (la charia) ».

Ce genre de coopération se poursuit à un niveau relativement modeste, comme on a pu le voir lors de la rencontre entre un membre du parti au pouvoir en Turquie et le chef d’une organisation salafiste en Allemagne. Mais ces derniers mois, les islamistes sont entrés subitement et massivement en conflit les uns avec les autres. Même s’ils constituent toujours un mouvement à part entière caractérisé par des objectifs hégémoniques et utopistes, les islamistes diffèrent entre eux quant à leurs troupes, leurs appartenances ethniques, leurs méthodes et leurs philosophies.

Les luttes intestines que se livrent les islamistes ont éclaté dans plusieurs autres pays à majorité musulmane. Ainsi, on peut observer des tensions entre sunnites et chiites dans l’opposition entre la Turquie et l’Iran due aussi à des approches différentes de l’islamisme. Au Liban, on assiste à une double lutte, d’une part entre sunnites et islamistes chiites et d’autre part entre islamistes sunnites et l’armée. En Syrie c’est la lutte des sunnites contre les islamistes chiites, comme en Irak. En Égypte, on voit les islamistes sunnites contre les chiites alors qu’au Yémen ce sont les houthistes qui s’opposent aux salafistes.

La plupart du temps, toutefois, ce sont les membres d’une même secte qui s’affrontent : Khamenei contre Ahmadinejad en Iran, l’AKP contre les Gülenistes en Turquie, Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq contre Moqtada al-Sadr en Irak, la monarchie contre les Frères musulmans en Arabie Saoudite, le Front islamique de libération contre le Front al-Nosra en Syrie, les Frères musulmans égyptiens contre le Hamas au sujet des hostilités avec Israël, les Frères musulmans contre les salafistes en Égypte, ou encore le choc entre deux idéologues et hommes politiques de premier plan, Omar el-Béchir contre Hassan al-Tourabi au Soudan. En Tunisie, les salafistes (dénommés Ansar al-charia) combattent l’organisation de type Frères musulmans (dénommée Ennahda).

Des différences apparemment mineures peuvent revêtir un caractère complexe. À titre d’exemple, essayons de suivre le récit énigmatique d’un journal de Beyrouth à propos des hostilités à Tripoli, ville du nord du Liban :

Des heurts entre les différents groupes islamistes à Tripoli, divisés entre les mouvements politiques du 8 Mars et du 14 Mars, sont en recrudescence. … Depuis l’assassinat, en octobre, du Général de Brigade Wissam al-Hassan, figure de proue du mouvement du 14 Mars et chef du service des renseignements, des différends entre groupes islamistes à Tripoli ont abouti à une confrontation majeure, surtout après le meurtre du cheikh Abdel-Razzak al-Asmar, un représentant du Mouvement d’unification islamique, quelques heures seulement après la mort d’al-Hassan. Le cheikh a été tué par balles… pendant un échange de tirs survenu lorsque des partisans de Kanaan Naji, islamiste indépendant associé à la Rencontre nationale islamique, ont tenté de s’emparer du quartier général du Mouvement d’unification islamique.

Cet état de fragmentation rappelle les divisions que connaissaient, dans les années 1950, les nationalistes panarabes. Ces derniers aspiraient à l’unification de tous les peuples arabophones « du Golfe [Persique] à l’Océan [Atlantique] » pour reprendre l’expression d’alors. Malgré la grandeur de ce rêve, ses leaders se sont brouillés au moment où le mouvement grandissait, condamnant un nationalisme panarabe qui a fini par s’effondrer sous le poids d’affrontements entre factions toujours plus morcelées. Parmi ces conflits, on note :

Gamal Abdel Nasser en Égypte contre les partis Baas (ou Ba’ath) au pouvoir en Syrie et en Irak.
Le parti Baas syrien contre le parti Baas irakien.
Les baasistes syriens sunnites contre les baasistes syriens alaouites.
Les baasistes syriens alaouites jadidistes contre les baasistes syriens alaouites assadistes.

Et ainsi de suite. En réalité tous les efforts en vue de former une union arabe ont échoué – en particulier la République arabe unie rassemblant l’Égypte et la Syrie (1958-1961) mais également des tentatives plus modestes comme la Fédération arabe (1958), les États arabes unis (1958-1961), la Fédération des Républiques arabes (1972-1977), la domination syrienne du Liban (1976-2005) et l’annexion du Koweït par l’Irak (1990-1991).

Reflet de modèles bien ancrés au Moyen-Orient, les dissensions qui surgissent parmi les islamistes les empêchent en outre de travailler ensemble. Une fois que le mouvement émerge, que ses membres accèdent au pouvoir et l’exercent réellement, les divisions deviennent de plus en plus profondes. Les rivalités, masquées quand les islamistes languissent dans l’opposition, se dévoilent quand ils conquièrent le pouvoir.

Si les tendances à la fragmentation perdurent, le mouvement islamiste sera condamné, comme le fascisme et le communisme, à n’être rien de plus qu’une menace pour la civilisation, capable de causer des dommages considérables mais sans jamais pouvoir triompher. Ce frein potentiel au pouvoir islamiste, devenu manifeste seulement en 2013, ouvre la voie à l’optimisme mais pas à la complaisance. Même si les choses semblent meilleures qu’il y a un an, la tendance peut à nouveau s’inverser rapidement. La tâche ardue qui consiste à vaincre l’islamisme demeure une priorité.

Addendum, 22 juillet 2013. Les subdivisions parmi les nationalistes panarabes des années 1950 me rappellent une parodie du comédien américain Emo Philips (légèrement adaptée pour la lecture) :

Un jour, j’ai vu un type sur un pont, prêt à sauter.

Je lui ai dit. « Ne fais pas ça ! ». Il a répondu : « Personne ne m’aime. »

« Dieu t’aime. Crois-tu en Dieu ? ». Il a répondu : « Oui. »

« Moi aussi ! Es-tu juif ou chrétien ? » Il a répondu : « Chrétien. »

« Moi aussi ! Protestant ou catholique ? » Il a répondu : « Protestant. »

« Moi aussi ! Quelle dénomination ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord ou du Sud? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur ou libéral ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs ou de l’Est ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs du Conseil de 1879 ou du Conseil de 1912 ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs du Conseil de 1912. »

J’ai répondu : « Meurs, hérétique ! » Et je l’ai poussé en bas du pont.

Voir encore:

Le monde arabe est en phase d’effondrement total
Guy Millière
Dreuz.info
02 août 2012

Le discours de Mitt Romney à Jérusalem, et les déclarations à la presse qui l’ont accompagné n’en finissent décidément pas de faire des vagues. Mitt Romney a parlé du fait que le développement économique et la liberté qui règnent en Israël étaient dues à la culture, et que les handicaps qui marquent le monde musulman et qui touchent les « Palestiniens » auraient aussi une dimension culturelle. Des accusations de racisme ont aussitôt commencé à fuser.

Les gens qui profèrent ces accusations sont-ils si idiots qu’ils confondent race et culture ? Pensent-ils vraiment qu’un Africain noir né chrétien et qui se convertit à l’islam change de race, ou qu’un Suédois blond devenu musulman va soudain devenir un Arabe du Proche-Orient ? Je ne peux imaginer que ces gens sont des idiots, je les pense plutôt pervers et imprégnés de haine envers la réussite. Et je les considère animés d’une aversion envers ce qui peut permettre au genre humain de s’émanciper et de s’accomplir.

L’une des notions économiques essentielles développées ces dernières années par des économistes qui vont de David Landes, auteur de « La richesse et la pauvreté des nations », un livre fondamental, à Thomas Sowell auteur de Migrations and Cultures, Race and Cultures, et Conquests and Cultures, de Lawrence Harrison, auteur de Underdevelopment Is A State of Mind à Samuel Huntington, auteur avec Harrison de Culture Matters, est celle de « capital culturel ». J’ai moi-même introduit et exposé l’importance de cette notion dans La Septième dimension.

Ignorer cette notion est ne rien comprendre au monde contemporain et, dans un contexte de guerre, de famines et de fanatisme, il est criminel de ne rien comprendre au monde contemporain.

Oui, certaines cultures sont plus propices que d’autres au développement économique et à la liberté sous toutes ses formes, et, n’en déplaise aux relativistes, la culture juive est une culture particulièrement propice.

La culture du christianisme protestant est plus propice au développement économique et à la liberté que la culture du christianisme catholique, et lorsque des substrats culturels viennent s’ajouter, tels le caudillisme en Amérique latine, les handicaps peuvent devenir écrasants.

Oui, les cultures marquées par le confucianisme peuvent susciter le développement économique, mais se trouver confrontées à des obstacles lorsqu’il s’agit de liberté, et cela explique les difficultés de sociétés asiatiques à passer à un fonctionnement post-industriel et post-asiatique.

Et oui, hélas, le monde musulman, et en lui tout particulièrement le monde arabe, sont dans une situation de blocage culturel qui ne cesse de s’aggraver et prennent des allures cataclysmiques.

Le monde arabe est aujourd’hui dans une phase d’effondrement économique qui s’accompagne d’un effondrement de ses structures politiques et d’une destruction de ses repères culturels. Il ne reste au milieu des décombres qu’une infime minorité de gens ouverts à l’esprit de civilisation et aux sociétés ouvertes, et une immense déferlante islamiste où se mêlent dans le ressentiment, le sectarisme et le tribalisme des gens désireux de revenir à une lecture littéraliste du Coran, des radicaux mélangeant Coran et texte de Marx, Lénine ou Franz Fanon, d’autres qui relisent leurs textes sacrés à la lumière noire de Hitler.

Cet effondrement ne fait que commencer. Il va se poursuivre. La situation qui prévaut en Syrie n’en est qu’un fragment. D’autres fragments sont visibles en Libye, dans le Nord du Mali, au Nigeria où agissent les Boko Haram, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Yemen.

Il est criminel de ne pas le comprendre. C’est suicidaire aussi.

La Russie et la Chine essaient cyniquement de voir quels avantages elles peuvent tirer de l’effondrement et en quoi il peut leur permettre de parasiter le monde occidental.

Les dirigeants européens s’essaient à rafistoler une zone euro et une Union Européenne qui sont elles-mêmes au bord de l’effondrement, et font semblant de croire encore aux « promesses du printemps arabe ». Manuel Valls, qui sortait sans doute d’un hôpital où il venait de subir une lobotomie, a parlé le 6 juillet en inaugurant de manière très laïque une mosquée à Cergy Pontoise de l’islam contemporain comme de l’hériter de celui de Cordoue où foisonnait la connaissance.

Les dirigeants européens entendent aussi flatter les « Palestiniens » : s’ils ouvraient les yeux (c’est impossible, je sais), et s’ils actionnaient leurs neurones (ce qui est plus impossible encore, je ne l’ignore pas), ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » est en train de mourir et ne survit que grâce aux injections financières européennes et, pour partie, américaines. Ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » s’est développé dans les années mille neuf cent soixante quand le nationalisme arabe était soutenu par l’Union Soviétique. L’Union Soviétique n’existe plus. Le nationalisme arabe agonise dans les décombres de Damas.

Les membres de l’administration Obama font preuve d’autant de stupidité que les dirigeants européens. C’est pour cela qu’on les aime bien en Europe.

C’est ainsi en tout cas : les dirigeants de l’Autorité Palestinienne ne représentent plus rien que leur propre imposture et le rôle que les Européens et l’administration Obama veulent bien leur accorder par pur crétinisme.

Le Hamas régit la bande de Gaza qui va peu à peu se fondre dans l’Egypte islamiste et délabrée. Et le Hamas est prêt à s’emparer de l’Autorité Palestinienne. Or, le Hamas n’en a que faire d’un « Etat palestinien » : il rêve de califat. Il raisonne en termes de dar el islam et de dar el harb. Il n’en a rien à faire de la Judée-Samarie que ses larbins appellent Cisjordanie. Il fait partie intégrante de la déferlante islamiste présente.

Au terme de la tempête qui prend forme, le monde musulman sera en ruines, décomposé, chaotique. Une recomposition s’enclenchera peut-être. Il n’y aura pas de place dans cette reconstruction pou