Révolution numérique: Comment le logiciel dévore le monde (How software is eating the world)

15 avril, 2014
http://colin-verdier.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/pacman.pnghttp://colin-verdier.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Development.jpgWe are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy. More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not. Why is this happening now? Six decades into the computer revolution, four decades since the invention of the microprocessor, and two decades into the rise of the modern Internet, all of the technology required to transform industries through software finally works and can be widely delivered at global scale. Over two billion people now use the broadband Internet, up from perhaps 50 million a decade ago, when I was at Netscape, the company I co-founded. In the next 10 years, I expect at least five billion people worldwide to own smartphones, giving every individual with such a phone instant access to the full power of the Internet, every moment of every day. On the back end, software programming tools and Internet-based services make it easy to launch new global software-powered start-ups in many industries—without the need to invest in new infrastructure and train new employees. (…) With lower start-up costs and a vastly expanded market for online services, the result is a global economy that for the first time will be fully digitally wired—the dream of every cyber-visionary of the early 1990s, finally delivered, a full generation later. Perhaps the single most dramatic example of this phenomenon of software eating a traditional business is the suicide of Borders and corresponding rise of Amazon. In 2001, Borders agreed to hand over its online business to Amazon under the theory that online book sales were non-strategic and unimportant. Today, the world’s largest bookseller, Amazon, is a software company—its core capability is its amazing software engine for selling virtually everything online, no retail stores necessary. On top of that, while Borders was thrashing in the throes of impending bankruptcy, Amazon rearranged its web site to promote its Kindle digital books over physical books for the first time. Now even the books themselves are software. Today’s largest video service by number of subscribers is a software company: Netflix. How Netflix eviscerated Blockbuster is an old story, but now other traditional entertainment providers are facing the same threat. Comcast, Time Warner and others are responding by transforming themselves into software companies with efforts such as TV Everywhere, which liberates content from the physical cable and connects it to smartphones and tablets. Today’s dominant music companies are software companies, too: Apple’s iTunes, Spotify and Pandora. Traditional record labels increasingly exist only to provide those software companies with content. (…) Today’s fastest growing entertainment companies are videogame makers—again, software—with the industry growing to $60 billion from $30 billion five years ago. And the fastest growing major videogame company is Zynga (maker of games including FarmVille), which delivers its games entirely online. (…) Meanwhile, traditional videogame powerhouses like Electronic Arts and Nintendo have seen revenues stagnate and fall. The best new movie production company in many decades, Pixar, was a software company. Disney—Disney!—had to buy Pixar, a software company, to remain relevant in animated movies. Photography, of course, was eaten by software long ago. It’s virtually impossible to buy a mobile phone that doesn’t include a software-powered camera, and photos are uploaded automatically to the Internet for permanent archiving and global sharing. Companies like Shutterfly, Snapfish and Flickr have stepped into Kodak’s place. Today’s largest direct marketing platform is a software company—Google. Now it’s been joined by Groupon, Living Social, Foursquare and others, which are using software to eat the retail marketing industry. (…) Today’s fastest growing telecom company is Skype, a software company that was just bought by Microsoft for $8.5 billion. (…) Meanwhile, the two biggest telecom companies, AT&T and Verizon, have survived by transforming themselves into software companies, partnering with Apple and other smartphone makers. LinkedIn is today’s fastest growing recruiting company. Software is also eating much of the value chain of industries that are widely viewed as primarily existing in the physical world. In today’s cars, software runs the engines, controls safety features, entertains passengers, guides drivers to destinations and connects each car to mobile, satellite and GPS networks. (…) Today’s leading real-world retailer, Wal-Mart, uses software to power its logistics and distribution capabilities, which it has used to crush its competition. Likewise for FedEx, which is best thought of as a software network that happens to have trucks, planes and distribution hubs attached. And the success or failure of airlines today and in the future hinges on their ability to price tickets and optimize routes and yields correctly—with software. Oil and gas companies were early innovators in supercomputing and data visualization and analysis, which are crucial to today’s oil and gas exploration efforts. Agriculture is increasingly powered by software as well, including satellite analysis of soils linked to per-acre seed selection software algorithms. The financial services industry has been visibly transformed by software over the last 30 years. Practically every financial transaction, from someone buying a cup of coffee to someone trading a trillion dollars of credit default derivatives, is done in software. And many of the leading innovators in financial services are software companies, such as Square, which allows anyone to accept credit card payments with a mobile phone, and PayPal, which generated more than $1 billion in revenue in the second quarter of this year, up 31% over the previous year. Health care and education, in my view, are next up for fundamental software-based transformation. (…) Even national defense is increasingly software-based. The modern combat soldier is embedded in a web of software that provides intelligence, communications, logistics and weapons guidance. Software-powered drones launch airstrikes without putting human pilots at risk. Intelligence agencies do large-scale data mining with software to uncover and track potential terrorist plots (…) It’s not an accident that many of the biggest recent technology companies—including Google, Amazon, eBay and more—are American companies. Our combination of great research universities, a pro-risk business culture, deep pools of innovation-seeking equity capital and reliable business and contract law is unprecedented and unparalleled in the world. Still, we face several challenges. (…) many people in the U.S. and around the world lack the education and skills required to participate in the great new companies coming out of the software revolution. This is a tragedy since every company I work with is absolutely starved for talent. Qualified software engineers, managers, marketers and salespeople in Silicon Valley can rack up dozens of high-paying, high-upside job offers any time they want, while national unemployment and underemployment is sky high. This problem is even worse than it looks because many workers in existing industries will be stranded on the wrong side of software-based disruption and may never be able to work in their fields again. There’s no way through this problem other than education, and we have a long way to go. Marc Andreessen
L’ère du pure playing est terminée ; désormais le logiciel va s’immiscer dans tous les secteurs de l’économie, s’hybrider avec le matériel et affecter les positions et les niveaux de marge de tous les acteurs en place. (…) Le logiciel est donc la solution à l’un des plus graves problèmes auxquels sont exposées nos finances publiques : à la clef de ces innovations, il y a des milliards d’euros de réduction des dépenses publiques ; l’administration elle-même n’échappera pas à ce rouleur compresseur : animée de la volonté d’améliorer la qualité du service rendu aux administrés, convaincue du rôle qu’elle peut jouer dans l’amorçage d’un écosystème d’innovation ou simplement contrainte par l’impératif de la réduction des coûts, elle viendra progressivement à la stratégie de government as a platform – et laissera des sociétés logicielles opérer à sa place des services publics sous une forme plus innovante et mieux adaptée aux besoins particuliers des administrés. Il est important de prendre la mesure de ces bouleversements. Aucun secteur ne sera épargné. A toutes les industries, il arrivera ce qui est arrivé à la musique, à la presse, à la publicité et à la vente de détail. Le fait que les autres secteurs ne puissent être exclusivement immatériels ne change rien à l’affaire. Apple et surtout Amazon ne sont déjà pas des pure players. Ces deux entreprises couronnées de succès ont su développer une offre composite, mi-matérielle, mi-logicielle, qui fait jouer à plein, sur un marché essentiellement matériel, le potentiel de disruption du logiciel connecté en réseau. D’où vient ce potentiel de disruption ? Lorsqu’un logiciel s’insère dans la chaîne de valeur, il capte à terme l’essentiel de la marge, pour quatre raisons : parce que le logiciel se positionne littéralement over the top et devient le maillon qui détermine l’allocation des ressources dans la chaîne de valeur ; parce que le logiciel s’insère dans la chaîne de valeur prioritairement au contact du client ou de l’utilisateur, ce qui lui confère un avantage supplémentaire dans la captation de la valeur ; enfin, parce que le logiciel permet de connecter les utilisateurs en réseau et d’incorporer au processus de production leurs traces d’utilisation et contributions. C’est le maillon logiciel qui permet à une chaîne de valeur de faire levier de la multitude et de parvenir aux rendements d’échelle considérables qui font la scalabilité des modèles économiques d’aujourd’hui. (…) Bien sûr, il n’y a là rien de nouveau depuis l’ouvrage fondateur de Clayton Christensen : les grands groupes éprouvent les plus grandes difficultés à anticiper et à s’emparer des innovations de rupture. Mais la France, avec sa tradition colbertiste et la discipline d’exécution de ses champions nationaux, si proches du pouvoir politique, n’est-elle pas la seule (avec la Corée du Sud peut-être) à pouvoir forcer ses grands groupes à se faire violence et à relever les défis d’après la révolution numérique ? Il faut en effet considérer la thèse de Scott D. Anthony : puisqu’une poignée de sociétés logicielles, devenues des géants, ont pris une avance impossible à rattraper, l’innovation de rupture doit maintenant retrouver sa place dans les stratégies des grands groupes, seuls à pouvoir mobiliser suffisamment de ressources dans de courts délais pour forcer des disruptions sur leurs marchés… plutôt que d’être dévorés par un logiciel développé par d’autres ! Nos sociétés logicielles (Dassault Systèmes, Atos, CapGemini…) affirmeront avec force que, bien sûr, elles s’efforcent de mieux se positionner dans la chaîne de valeur. Mais les problèmes sont systémiques. Il y a maintes raisons à cette incapacité de sociétés françaises à s’imposer sur des marchés logiciels globaux. Par exemple, pour innover en rupture dans les grands groupes comme pour les startups, il faut des investissements considérables, réalisés dans des délais très courts. C’est ce genre d’efforts que font les géants du logiciel aux Etats-Unis pour acquérir et consolider leurs positions : Facebook a investi depuis sa création près de 1,5 milliard de dollars, sans avoir prouvé sa capacité à générer des revenus à hauteur de son cours d’introduction en bourse. Palantir, société fondée par Peter Thiel, a levé, depuis sa création en 2004, 301 millions de dollars sans encore avoir stabilisé son modèle économique. C’est la finalité du venture capital que de mobiliser de telles sommes en dehors des grandes organisations pour aider des entreprises innovantes à prendre des positions stratégiques sur d’immenses marchés qu’elles contribuent à transformer voire à créer, avant même de prouver leur profitabilité. (…) Pour faire émerger des champions logiciels, il ne faut pas seulement du venture capital, il faut aussi un environnement juridique favorable à l’émergence d’applications innovantes, qui sont les plateformes logicielles mondiales de demain. Même si la disruption vient d’un grand groupe, ce dernier est souvent aiguillonné par une startup (laquelle est alors rachetée par le second mover), comme le montre l’exemple d’AT&T et de Twilio. Or de nombreux indices nous suggèrent que la France entrave l’essor de l’innovation logicielle : confusion entre recherche et développement et innovation ; obsession du brevet et de la propriété intellectuelle ; frilosité des grands groupes (voyez le parcours du combattant de Capitaine Train pour mettre en place son application de réservation de billets de train) ; captation des compétences informatiques, par ailleurs dévalorisées, par les SSII ; fonctionnement du marché du travail et des assurances sociales inadapté aux cycles courts d’innovation ; multiplication des obstacles juridiques au référencement des contenus ou à l’exploitation des données (dans l’éducation, dans la santé et peut-être bientôt dans les médias) ; fiscalité défavorable au venture capital ; multiples réglementations sectorielles constituant des barrières à l’entrée infranchissables pour les nouveaux acteurs, par ailleurs sous-financés. Tout cela mis ensemble forme un écosystème hostile à l’innovation : les innovateurs français doivent surmonter plus d’obstacles que leurs concurrents étrangers, et les venture capitalists préfèrent parier sur ces derniers plutôt que sur nos startups françaises. Qui, dans ces conditions, prendra les positions dominantes sur les marchés logiciels globaux de demain ? Les Microsoft, Apple, Google et Amazon de la santé, de l’éducation, de l’automobile seront-ils français ou américains ? La deuxième série de conséquences est d’ordre fiscal. Ce n’est pas ici le lieu pour s’étendre sur ce sujet, mais il est facile de comprendre que si la partie logicielle des activités dans tous les secteurs est opérée par des sociétés étrangères, alors l’impôt sur les sociétés et la TVA (jusqu’en 2019 sur les prestations de service immatériel) sur ces activités, qui captent l’essentiel de la marge, seront payés à l’étranger plutôt qu’en France. Comme le secteur financier, le secteur logiciel, parce que ses actifs et ses prestations sont immatériels, se prête tout particulièrement à l’optimisation fiscale. Dans la bataille pour la localisation des bases fiscales, mieux vaut favoriser l’émergence en France d’acteurs dominants sur les marchés logiciels globaux plutôt que de laisser les marges de toutes les chaînes de valeur dans tous les secteurs, y compris ceux dans lesquels nous sommes aujourd’hui les plus forts (voyez Veolia, Renault ou nos géants de la grande distribution), s’échapper dans les comptes de sociétés étrangères à la suite de disruptions logicielles et d’une restructuration en profondeur de la chaîne de valeur. Nicolas Colin

Netscape, Google, Apple, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, iTunes, Spotify, Pandora, Neflix, Twilio, Zynga, Shutterfly, Snapfish, Flickr, ebay, Paypal, AdWords, Kindle, TripAdvisor, Expedia, Booking.com, AirNnB, Waze, GPS, Amadeus, Groupon, Linkedin, Skype, Foursquare, Pixar …

Alors qu’au pays aux éternels trois millions de chômeurs, un jeune entrepreneur  et l’organe de presse qui publiait sa tribune libre se voient assigner en justice pour avoir osé remettre en question les méthodes anticoncurrentielles d’une compagnie de taxis …

Et qu’une simple pub pour une berline hybride américaine moquant gentiment la patrie des 35 h tourne quasiment à l’incident diplomatique …

Pendant que, sur fond d’exil fiscal à la fois extérieur et intérieur,  toutes nos industries sont peu à peu happées (et nous-mêmes fichés mieux que ne le ferait la NSA elle-même !)  par la numérisation du pop store et du airbnb

Et que sur la seule force de son innovation technologique un petit pays comme Israël a quasiment rattrapé, en PIB par capita,  un pays comme la France …

Retour, avec ledit entrepreneur Nicolas Colin, sur la révolution numérique, fameusement décrite par l’un de ses plus grands chantres, Marc Andriessen, co-créateur du premier moteur de recherche Mosaic, comme une dévoration …

Et une dévoration largement américaine …

Le logiciel dévore le monde… depuis les États-Unis
Nicolas Colin
L’age de la multittude
4 novembre 2012

Marc Andreessen, concepteur du premier navigateur graphique, Mosaic, et désormais l’un des plus influents venture capitalists du marché, a pour habitude de déclarer que « le logiciel dévore le monde ». Il a explicité sa formule dans un article paru l’année dernière dans le Wall Street Journal : l’ère du pure playing est terminée ; désormais le logiciel va s’immiscer dans tous les secteurs de l’économie, s’hybrider avec le matériel et affecter les positions et les niveaux de marge de tous les acteurs en place.

Apple, Google et Amazon sont exemplaires des disruptions que le logiciel inflige à différents secteurs de l’économie. Avec l’iPod et iTunes, Apple a imposé un nouveau modèle économique à l’industrie de la musique. Avec son moteur de recherche et la régie AdWords, Google a capté une part croissante des recettes publicitaires en ligne et généralisé la mesure de la performance dans ce secteur, bouleversant au passage les modèles économiques de tous les acteurs qui dépendent de la publicité, notamment les médias. Amazon a déployé une infrastructure globale et ouverte pour la vente en ligne et, en raccourcissant sans cesse ses délais de livraison, s’apprête à s’attaquer aux positions des géants de la grande distribution. Wal-Mart l’a bien compris et a décidé de prendre les devants en cessant de vendre les terminaux Kindle, suggérant une guerre à venir entre le géant de la grande distribution et celui de la vente en ligne. Le vainqueur, heureusement ou malheureusement, est connu d’avance – après tout, Wal-Mart a, à l’époque, lui-même provoqué la faillite de la plupart de ses concurrents dans la distribution alimentaire aux Etats-Unis.

Le logiciel a donc d’ores et déjà transformé quatre grands secteurs de l’économie : les industries culturelles, la publicité, les médias et la vente de détail. Mais, comme nous le rappelle Marc Andreessen, il ne va pas s’arrêter là. Toutes les industries sont concernées par la voracité du logiciel, y compris celles dont la composante matérielle est irréductible :

le marché du tourisme est depuis longtemps transformé par le logiciel. Nous connaissons les TripAdvisor, Expedia et autres Booking.com, sans lesquels nous ne saurions plus planifier nos voyages ni réserver de billets d’avions ou de chambres d’hôtels. Nous connaissons moins les plateformes de gestion de réservations telles qu’Amadeus, qui forment l’infrastructure logicielle mondiale du marché du transport aérien. Et le tourisme n’a pas fini d’être bouleversé par le logiciel : par exemple, HipMunk ou Capitaine Train le bouleversent par le design, ou encore la déferlante AirBnB agrandit considérablement le marché en mettant les hôtels en concurrence avec les particuliers qui louent leurs chambres inoccupées ; les transports sont l’une des autres transformations en cours. A l’aide d’une application simple et séduisante, la société Uber, succès quasi-instantané, prépare une rude concurrence aux sociétés de taxi en imposant une disponibilité et une qualité de service jusqu’ici réservée aux clients des chauffeurs de maître. Waze, GPS collaboratif, propose d’optimiser les trajets en ville en s’appuyant exclusivement sur les données d’utilisation de la communauté, y compris pour dessiner les fonds de cartes. La Google Car montre la voie aux constructeurs automobiles pour la mise au point des futures voitures sans chauffeur. Et, comme nous le suggère Rob Coneybeer, une multitude de voitures sans chauffeur, mises bout à bout et circulant sur des voies réservées, forment une solution de transport collectif bien plus efficiente que le train ; les infrastructures urbaines font l’objet d’un considérable effort de disruption de la part d’IBM, qui réorganise progressivement son offre de services autour de la thématique des smart cities – jusqu’à supplanter les Veolia ou GDF-Suez dans le redéploiement du réseau de gestion de l’eau sur l’île de Malte. Dans son sillage, de nombreuses startups inventent les objets connectés qui vont nous aider à mieux suivre et maîtriser notre consommation d’énergie, notre consommation d’eau, notre gestion des déchets, etc. Les smart grids propulsés par des innovations logicielles vont donc progressivement révolutionner la production et la consommation d’énergie. Comme nous l’explique Tim Wu dans The New Republic, ces smart grids, formés par une multitude d’objets connectés, vont devenir l’infrastructure distribuée de la production d’énergie de demain, une infrastructure plus résiliente que nos réseaux actuels, qui n’aurait probablement pas fait défaut après le passage de l’ouragan Sandy ; les banques sont saisies depuis longtemps par le logiciel, mais elles se sont protégées jusqu’ici de toute disruption par des efforts de lobbying fondés sur la sensibilité des données qu’elles manipulent et le caractère essentiel de leur activité pour les économies nationales. Malgré tout, le secteur bancaire n’en a plus pour longtemps : le prêt entre particuliers s’attaque aux positions des banques sur le marché du crédit ; le crowdfunding vient pallier aux déficiences de leurs activités de prêt aux entreprises et d’investissement ; les solutions de paiement conçues en marge du système bancaire se multiplient, y compris via l’introduction de monnaies alternatives ; même les services de banque de détail vont être transformés à terme grâce aux efforts acharnés de sociétés prometteuses telles que Simple ; un consensus se forme déjà sur les prochains secteurs candidats à la disruption. L’éducation est l’un d’entre eux. L’endettement des étudiants des universités américaines a atteint un niveau insoutenable, accélérant la péremption du modèle universitaire actuel et intensifiant les efforts d’innovation pour le soumettre à l’ascendant du logiciel. L’université de Stanford a récemment pris une initiative qui pourrait creuser encore plus l’écart entre les universités les plus prestigieuses et les autres sur le marché mondial de l’enseignement supérieur. La société Clever a mis au point une API pour faciliter la connexion au réseau des écoles et l’ouverture des données du système éducatif ; la santé est l’autre secteur bientôt exposé à une prise en main par l’industrie du logiciel. La e-santé commence avec le Quantified Self, cette pratique consistant à permettre aux individus de mesurer leurs données personnelles, notamment de santé, et de suivre leur évolution dans le temps pour en tirer des leçons et rétroagir sur leur comportement. Elle se poursuit par des disruptions de l’exercice de la médecine ou du remboursement des soins qui sont probablement, bien plus que les médicaments génériques ou la chimérique « responsabilisation des assurés », la meilleure promesse de maîtrise des dépenses publiques de santé sur le long terme. Le logiciel est donc la solution à l’un des plus graves problèmes auxquels sont exposées nos finances publiques : à la clef de ces innovations, il y a des milliards d’euros de réduction des dépenses publiques ; l’administration elle-même n’échappera pas à ce rouleur compresseur : animée de la volonté d’améliorer la qualité du service rendu aux administrés, convaincue du rôle qu’elle peut jouer dans l’amorçage d’un écosystème d’innovation ou simplement contrainte par l’impératif de la réduction des coûts, elle viendra progressivement à la stratégie de government as a platform – et laissera des sociétés logicielles opérer à sa place des services publics sous une forme plus innovante et mieux adaptée aux besoins particuliers des administrés.

Il est important de prendre la mesure de ces bouleversements. Aucun secteur ne sera épargné. A toutes les industries, il arrivera ce qui est arrivé à la musique, à la presse, à la publicité et à la vente de détail. Le fait que les autres secteurs ne puissent être exclusivement immatériels ne change rien à l’affaire. Apple et surtout Amazon ne sont déjà pas des pure players. Ces deux entreprises couronnées de succès ont su développer une offre composite, mi-matérielle, mi-logicielle, qui fait jouer à plein, sur un marché essentiellement matériel, le potentiel de disruption du logiciel connecté en réseau.

D’où vient ce potentiel de disruption ? Lorsqu’un logiciel s’insère dans la chaîne de valeur, il capte à terme l’essentiel de la marge, pour quatre raisons :

parce que le logiciel se positionne littéralement over the top et devient le maillon qui détermine l’allocation des ressources dans la chaîne de valeur ;
parce que le logiciel s’insère dans la chaîne de valeur prioritairement au contact du client ou de l’utilisateur, ce qui lui confère un avantage supplémentaire dans la captation de la valeur ;
enfin, parce que le logiciel permet de connecter les utilisateurs en réseau et d’incorporer au processus de production leurs traces d’utilisation et contributions. C’est le maillon logiciel qui permet à une chaîne de valeur de faire levier de la multitude et de parvenir aux rendements d’échelle considérables qui font la scalabilité des modèles économiques d’aujourd’hui. Nous en voyons déjà de nombreux exemples : le moteur de recommandation d’Amazon, fondé sur nos historiques d’achat ; la régie publicitaire AdWords, fondée sur nos clics ; l’application Facebook tout entière, fondée sur le partage de notre intimité. Parce qu’il permet d’incorporer des milliards d’utilisateurs à la chaîne de production, le logiciel atteint des rendements d’échelle sans précédent dans l’histoire. Il est donc compréhensible qu’il capte l’essentiel de la marge ;
combinées, ces trois caractéristiques suggèrent pourquoi les marchés logiciels sont toujours concentrés. Nous l’avons appris avec Microsoft dès les années 1980. Nous en avons la confirmation avec Google depuis le milieu des années 2000. Amazon est en train de balayer toute concurrence sur le marché de la vente en ligne, comme le confirme le repli en bon ordre de la FNAC. Il en va de même sur le marché de l’Internet mobile, que Google et Apple sont vouées à se partager en duopole. Les acteurs du logiciel dominent leurs marchés et leur position dominante leur permet de capter l’essentiel de la marge.

Il n’y a pas d’opposition entre la thèse d’Andreessen et celle des tenants de la renaissance du hardware, tels Rob Coneybeer ou Paul Graham, lequel confirme que les nouvelles promotions de Y Combinator comptent de plus en plus d’innovateurs dans le hardware. Il n’y a pas d’opposition car le hardware nouveau est du hardware connecté : un nouveau point de contact entre le réseau et ses utilisateurs, mesuré et commandé par du logiciel. En revanche, il y a à cela une conséquence majeure : de plus en plus, le fabricant du hardware va être un sous-traitant d’un opérateur logiciel. Sa marge sera celle d’un sous-traitant, contraint de sans cesse baisser ses prix et de réaliser des gains de productivité. Le logiciel est aux acteurs de l’économie traditionnelle ce que Wal-Mart est à ses fournisseurs : un rouleau compresseur qui réduit à néant la marge d’exploitation et force la délocalisation des chaînes de production dans des pays où le prix de la main-d’oeuvre est plus faible. Dans le partage de la valeur entre les activités traditionnelles et les nouveaux maillons logiciels, ce sont les seconds qui se tailleront la part du lion.

Il y a deux séries de conséquences à cela.

La première est d’ordre industriel. Comme déjà évoqué, sur ces marchés concentrés il n’y a pas beaucoup de places à prendre. Un marché logiciel est un monopole ou un duopole qui ne ménage qu’à sa marge un peu de place pour des acteurs de niche. Il s’agit par ailleurs de marchés globaux, car c’est à l’échelle globale qu’on peut parvenir aux rendements d’échelle qui font l’essentiel de la valeur… et le pouvoir de marché. La question est donc celle de la place des entreprises françaises sur ce marché : certaines s’imposeront-elles comme les géants mondiaux du logiciel dans tel ou tel secteur, ou bien laisseront-elles les entreprises américaines occuper ces positions stratégiques en se repliant sur la fabrication de matériel à bas coûts et à faibles marges (id est la perspective que nous offre le rapport Gallois) ?

L’état des choses est peu rassurant. Confrontées aux menaces de disruption issues du secteur du logiciel, la plupart des entreprises françaises comprennent qu’il se passe quelque chose mais préfèrent, pour affronter le danger, nouer des partenariats… avec des sociétés américaines ! Voyages-SNCF n’est pas une position prise par la SNCF sur le marché du logiciel dans le secteur du tourisme, mais une joint-venture avec la société américaine Expedia. De même, Veolia n’a pas investi dans une nouvelle activité de gestion d’infrastructure logicielle, mais a préféré pour cela conclure un partenariat avec IBM. La FNAC est en partenariat avec Kobo, société canadienne, pour la vente de liseuses et donc de livres électroniques. On sait comment tout cela finit : à terme, l’essentiel de la marge sera dans la partie logicielle, donc dans les comptes de sociétés américaines (ou canadiennes) et sur les feuilles de paie de salariés américains, tandis que nos ex-champions nationaux se seront transformés en vulgaires sous-traitants à faibles marges d’exploitation.

Au-delà de ces accords par lesquels nos sociétés abandonnent la valeur future à leurs partenaires étrangers, un autre danger est d’être tout simplement à côté de la plaque. Il n’est pas certain, c’est le moins que l’on puisse dire, que nos géants industriels aient réalisé qu’ils avaient affaire à une concurrence bien plus intense, féroce et imprévisible que tout ce qu’ils ont connu par le passé. Les géants du logiciel, ceux-là même qui dévorent les secteurs de l’économie les uns après les autres, jouent plusieurs coups à l’avance, mobilisent des quantités considérables de capital, ne versent pas de dividendes car ils réinvestissent tout (ou presque) en R&D, et surtout font levier de la multitude pour atteindre des rendements d’échelle sans précédent dans l’histoire de l’industrie.

Face à cela, Renault travaille à mettre au point une plateforme logicielle, R-link, qui est une option payante proposée sur certains nouveaux modèles seulement. A ce rythme-là, bon courage pour concurrencer Google et Apple sur le marché des voitures connectées ! Pour se préparer à la disruption logicielle, Renault devrait frapper beaucoup plus vite et plus fort, équiper gratuitement tous les modèles dans toutes les gammes, et même rappeler les modèles anciens pour les connecter en même temps qu’on fait la vidange. De même, alors qu’AT&T vient d’enrichir son offre d’une API déployée en 90 jours pour rendre son réseau téléphonique programmable (en réaction à l’effort d’innovation de la startup Twilio, du portefeuille de 500startups), on attend en vain les innovations sur le marché français des télécommunications en dehors de la diversification des forfaits téléphoniques ou de la baisse des prix forcée par l’entrée de Free sur le marché.

Bien sûr, il n’y a là rien de nouveau depuis l’ouvrage fondateur de Clayton Christensen : les grands groupes éprouvent les plus grandes difficultés à anticiper et à s’emparer des innovations de rupture. Mais la France, avec sa tradition colbertiste et la discipline d’exécution de ses champions nationaux, si proches du pouvoir politique, n’est-elle pas la seule (avec la Corée du Sud peut-être) à pouvoir forcer ses grands groupes à se faire violence et à relever les défis d’après la révolution numérique ? Il faut en effet considérer la thèse de Scott D. Anthony : puisqu’une poignée de sociétés logicielles, devenues des géants, ont pris une avance impossible à rattraper, l’innovation de rupture doit maintenant retrouver sa place dans les stratégies des grands groupes, seuls à pouvoir mobiliser suffisamment de ressources dans de courts délais pour forcer des disruptions sur leurs marchés… plutôt que d’être dévorés par un logiciel développé par d’autres !

Nos sociétés logicielles (Dassault Systèmes, Atos, CapGemini…) affirmeront avec force que, bien sûr, elles s’efforcent de mieux se positionner dans la chaîne de valeur. Mais les problèmes sont systémiques. Il y a maintes raisons à cette incapacité de sociétés françaises à s’imposer sur des marchés logiciels globaux.

Par exemple, pour innover en rupture dans les grands groupes comme pour les startups, il faut des investissements considérables, réalisés dans des délais très courts. C’est ce genre d’efforts que font les géants du logiciel aux Etats-Unis pour acquérir et consolider leurs positions : Facebook a investi depuis sa création près de 1,5 milliard de dollars, sans avoir prouvé sa capacité à générer des revenus à hauteur de son cours d’introduction en bourse. Palantir, société fondée par Peter Thiel, a levé, depuis sa création en 2004, 301 millions de dollars sans encore avoir stabilisé son modèle économique. C’est la finalité du venture capital que de mobiliser de telles sommes en dehors des grandes organisations pour aider des entreprises innovantes à prendre des positions stratégiques sur d’immenses marchés qu’elles contribuent à transformer voire à créer, avant même de prouver leur profitabilité. Comme nous le rappelle Scott D. Anthony dans l’article référencé plus haut,

The restless individualism of baby boomers clashed with increasingly hierarchical organizations. Innovators began to leave companies, band with like-minded “rebels,” and form new companies. Given the scale required to innovate, however, these rebels needed new forms of funding. Hence the emergence of the VC-backed start-up.

Pour faire émerger des champions logiciels, il ne faut pas seulement du venture capital, il faut aussi un environnement juridique favorable à l’émergence d’applications innovantes, qui sont les plateformes logicielles mondiales de demain. Même si la disruption vient d’un grand groupe, ce dernier est souvent aiguillonné par une startup (laquelle est alors rachetée par le second mover), comme le montre l’exemple d’AT&T et de Twilio. Or de nombreux indices nous suggèrent que la France entrave l’essor de l’innovation logicielle : confusion entre recherche et développement et innovation ; obsession du brevet et de la propriété intellectuelle ; frilosité des grands groupes (voyez le parcours du combattant de Capitaine Train pour mettre en place son application de réservation de billets de train) ; captation des compétences informatiques, par ailleurs dévalorisées, par les SSII ; fonctionnement du marché du travail et des assurances sociales inadapté aux cycles courts d’innovation ; multiplication des obstacles juridiques au référencement des contenus ou à l’exploitation des données (dans l’éducation, dans la santé et peut-être bientôt dans les médias) ; fiscalité défavorable au venture capital ; multiples réglementations sectorielles constituant des barrières à l’entrée infranchissables pour les nouveaux acteurs, par ailleurs sous-financés.

Tout cela mis ensemble forme un écosystème hostile à l’innovation : les innovateurs français doivent surmonter plus d’obstacles que leurs concurrents étrangers, et les venture capitalists préfèrent parier sur ces derniers plutôt que sur nos startups françaises. Qui, dans ces conditions, prendra les positions dominantes sur les marchés logiciels globaux de demain ? Les Microsoft, Apple, Google et Amazon de la santé, de l’éducation, de l’automobile seront-ils français ou américains ?

La deuxième série de conséquences est d’ordre fiscal. Ce n’est pas ici le lieu pour s’étendre sur ce sujet, mais il est facile de comprendre que si la partie logicielle des activités dans tous les secteurs est opérée par des sociétés étrangères, alors l’impôt sur les sociétés et la TVA (jusqu’en 2019 sur les prestations de service immatériel) sur ces activités, qui captent l’essentiel de la marge, seront payés à l’étranger plutôt qu’en France. Comme le secteur financier, le secteur logiciel, parce que ses actifs et ses prestations sont immatériels, se prête tout particulièrement à l’optimisation fiscale. Dans la bataille pour la localisation des bases fiscales, mieux vaut favoriser l’émergence en France d’acteurs dominants sur les marchés logiciels globaux plutôt que de laisser les marges de toutes les chaînes de valeur dans tous les secteurs, y compris ceux dans lesquels nous sommes aujourd’hui les plus forts (voyez Veolia, Renault ou nos géants de la grande distribution), s’échapper dans les comptes de sociétés étrangères à la suite de disruptions logicielles et d’une restructuration en profondeur de la chaîne de valeur. C’est ce message que j’ai cherché à faire passer dans mon intervention mardi dernier aux Rencontres parlementaires sur l’économie numérique. A suivre !

EDIT, 15 novembre 2012, une présentation de cette intervention téléchargeable sur slideshare.
Vous êtes la multitude !

Voir aussi:

L’industrie du taxi à la frontière de l’innovation
Nicolas Colin
L’âge de la multitude
15 avril 2014

Jacques Rosselin avait publié l’information il y a quelques jours, mais un éditorial du 11 avril dernier écrit par Jean-Christophe Tortora, président-directeur général de La Tribune, lui a donné beaucoup plus d’ampleur : suite à une plainte contre X déposée par Nicolas Rousselet, PDG du groupe G7, Jean-Christophe Tortora et moi-même sommes mis en examen pour diffamation. L’origine de cette plainte est un texte intitulé « Les fossoyeurs de l’innovation », publié le 15 octobre 2013 sur le blog de L’Âge de la multitude et reproduit le même jour sur le site de La Tribune à la demande d’Eric Walther, directeur de la rédaction. Ce texte, qui discute la vision de l’innovation de Nicolas Rousselet, a été écrit dans le contexte de la préparation du fameux décret dit des « 15 minutes », dont il était l’un des défenseurs les plus visibles.

L’annonce de cette mise en examen a déclenché un débat de fond autour de la question de l’innovation – tant la surprise a été grande à l’idée qu’une prise de position sur cette question cruciale pour l’avenir de la Nation puisse donner lieu à un procès pénal. Une multitude de personnes, connues ou inconnues, m’ont exprimé des marques de soutien, et je les en remercie chaleureusement. Un #hashtag a même pris son envol. Des arbitres se sont curieusement interposés pour essayer de renvoyer les protagonistes dos à dos. Quant à moi, je voudrais saisir cette occasion pour refaire le point sur la question de l’innovation.

Lorsque nous avons entrepris d’écrire L’Âge de la multitude, Henri Verdier et moi-même avions l’ambition, immodeste, d’expliquer la révolution numérique et ses conséquences aux décideurs de notre pays. Notre objectif était de démontrer que l’économie numérique n’est pas un phénomène marginal indigne d’intérêt pour nos responsables politiques et nos capitaines d’industrie, mais au contraire une économie en plein essor dominée par quelques grandes entreprises américaines, géants industriels qui jouent plusieurs coups à l’avance sur le grand échiquier de l’économie globale. Bref, une question très sérieuse qui mérite l’attention prioritaire de nos dirigeants au plus haut niveau. Pour l’instant, le numérique dévore le monde exclusivement depuis les Etats-Unis. Mais d’autres pays peuvent désormais prendre leur part de cette voracité, pourvu que la compréhension de l’économie numérique soit partagée par leurs élites – c’est à cet effort de compréhension qu’Henri et moi avons souhaité contribuer avec L’Âge de la multitude.

Ce qui est en jeu, dans l’économie numérique, c’est l’avenir de notre pays : notre croissance, nos emplois, nos services publics, notre protection sociale. Si nous réussissons la transition numérique de l’économie française, alors nous resterons l’un des pays les plus développés du monde ; si, au contraire, nous échouons, nous devrons renoncer à notre modèle social et deviendrons progressivement pour les Etats-Unis ce que les anciennes colonies françaises ont été pour la France prospère des Trente glorieuses : une source de matière première (dans l’économie numérique = de la R&D et des données) et un simple marché de débouchés où plus aucune entreprise ne paiera d’impôts – les entreprises étrangères parce qu’elles n’auront même pas besoin de s’établir sur notre territoire pour y faire des affaires ; les entreprises françaises parce que leurs marges seront anéanties par de vains efforts de compétitivité.

Voir encore:

Why Software Is Eating The World
Marc Andreessen
The Wall Street Journal
August 20,2011

This week, Hewlett-Packard (where I am on the board) announced that it is exploring jettisoning its struggling PC business in favor of investing more heavily in software, where it sees better potential for growth. Meanwhile, Google plans to buy up the cellphone handset maker Motorola Mobility. Both moves surprised the tech world. But both moves are also in line with a trend I’ve observed, one that makes me optimistic about the future growth of the American and world economies, despite the recent turmoil in the stock market.

In an interview with WSJ’s Kevin Delaney, Groupon and LinkedIn investor Marc Andreessen insists that the recent popularity of tech companies does not constitute a bubble. He also stressed that both Apple and Google are undervalued and that « the market doesn’t like tech. »

In short, software is eating the world.

More than 10 years after the peak of the 1990s dot-com bubble, a dozen or so new Internet companies like Facebook and Twitter are sparking controversy in Silicon Valley, due to their rapidly growing private market valuations, and even the occasional successful IPO. With scars from the heyday of Webvan and Pets.com still fresh in the investor psyche, people are asking, « Isn’t this just a dangerous new bubble? »

I, along with others, have been arguing the other side of the case. (I am co-founder and general partner of venture capital firm Andreessen-Horowitz, which has invested in Facebook, Groupon, Skype, Twitter, Zynga, and Foursquare, among others. I am also personally an investor in LinkedIn.) We believe that many of the prominent new Internet companies are building real, high-growth, high-margin, highly defensible businesses.

Today’s stock market actually hates technology, as shown by all-time low price/earnings ratios for major public technology companies. Apple, for example, has a P/E ratio of around 15.2—about the same as the broader stock market, despite Apple’s immense profitability and dominant market position (Apple in the last couple weeks became the biggest company in America, judged by market capitalization, surpassing Exxon Mobil). And, perhaps most telling, you can’t have a bubble when people are constantly screaming « Bubble! »

But too much of the debate is still around financial valuation, as opposed to the underlying intrinsic value of the best of Silicon Valley’s new companies. My own theory is that we are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not.

Why is this happening now?

Six decades into the computer revolution, four decades since the invention of the microprocessor, and two decades into the rise of the modern Internet, all of the technology required to transform industries through software finally works and can be widely delivered at global scale.

Over two billion people now use the broadband Internet, up from perhaps 50 million a decade ago, when I was at Netscape, the company I co-founded. In the next 10 years, I expect at least five billion people worldwide to own smartphones, giving every individual with such a phone instant access to the full power of the Internet, every moment of every day.

On the back end, software programming tools and Internet-based services make it easy to launch new global software-powered start-ups in many industries—without the need to invest in new infrastructure and train new employees. In 2000, when my partner Ben Horowitz was CEO of the first cloud computing company, Loudcloud, the cost of a customer running a basic Internet application was approximately $150,000 a month. Running that same application today in Amazon’s cloud costs about $1,500 a month.

With lower start-up costs and a vastly expanded market for online services, the result is a global economy that for the first time will be fully digitally wired—the dream of every cyber-visionary of the early 1990s, finally delivered, a full generation later.

Perhaps the single most dramatic example of this phenomenon of software eating a traditional business is the suicide of Borders and corresponding rise of Amazon. In 2001, Borders agreed to hand over its online business to Amazon under the theory that online book sales were non-strategic and unimportant.

Today, the world’s largest bookseller, Amazon, is a software company—its core capability is its amazing software engine for selling virtually everything online, no retail stores necessary. On top of that, while Borders was thrashing in the throes of impending bankruptcy, Amazon rearranged its web site to promote its Kindle digital books over physical books for the first time. Now even the books themselves are software.

Today’s largest video service by number of subscribers is a software company: Netflix. How Netflix eviscerated Blockbuster is an old story, but now other traditional entertainment providers are facing the same threat. Comcast, Time Warner and others are responding by transforming themselves into software companies with efforts such as TV Everywhere, which liberates content from the physical cable and connects it to smartphones and tablets.

Today’s dominant music companies are software companies, too: Apple’s iTunes, Spotify and Pandora. Traditional record labels increasingly exist only to provide those software companies with content. Industry revenue from digital channels totaled $4.6 billion in 2010, growing to 29% of total revenue from 2% in 2004.

Today’s fastest growing entertainment companies are videogame makers—again, software—with the industry growing to $60 billion from $30 billion five years ago. And the fastest growing major videogame company is Zynga (maker of games including FarmVille), which delivers its games entirely online. Zynga’s first-quarter revenues grew to $235 million this year, more than double revenues from a year earlier. Rovio, maker of Angry Birds, is expected to clear $100 million in revenue this year (the company was nearly bankrupt when it debuted the popular game on the iPhone in late 2009). Meanwhile, traditional videogame powerhouses like Electronic Arts and Nintendo have seen revenues stagnate and fall.

The best new movie production company in many decades, Pixar, was a software company. Disney—Disney!—had to buy Pixar, a software company, to remain relevant in animated movies.

Photography, of course, was eaten by software long ago. It’s virtually impossible to buy a mobile phone that doesn’t include a software-powered camera, and photos are uploaded automatically to the Internet for permanent archiving and global sharing. Companies like Shutterfly, Snapfish and Flickr have stepped into Kodak’s place.

Today’s largest direct marketing platform is a software company—Google. Now it’s been joined by Groupon, Living Social, Foursquare and others, which are using software to eat the retail marketing industry. Groupon generated over $700 million in revenue in 2010, after being in business for only two years.

Today’s fastest growing telecom company is Skype, a software company that was just bought by Microsoft for $8.5 billion. CenturyLink, the third largest telecom company in the U.S., with a $20 billion market cap, had 15 million access lines at the end of June 30—declining at an annual rate of about 7%. Excluding the revenue from its Qwest acquisition, CenturyLink’s revenue from these legacy services declined by more than 11%. Meanwhile, the two biggest telecom companies, AT&T and Verizon, have survived by transforming themselves into software companies, partnering with Apple and other smartphone makers.

LinkedIn is today’s fastest growing recruiting company. For the first time ever, on LinkedIn, employees can maintain their own resumes for recruiters to search in real time—giving LinkedIn the opportunity to eat the lucrative $400 billion recruiting industry.

Software is also eating much of the value chain of industries that are widely viewed as primarily existing in the physical world. In today’s cars, software runs the engines, controls safety features, entertains passengers, guides drivers to destinations and connects each car to mobile, satellite and GPS networks. The days when a car aficionado could repair his or her own car are long past, due primarily to the high software content. The trend toward hybrid and electric vehicles will only accelerate the software shift—electric cars are completely computer controlled. And the creation of software-powered driverless cars is already under way at Google and the major car companies.

Today’s leading real-world retailer, Wal-Mart, uses software to power its logistics and distribution capabilities, which it has used to crush its competition. Likewise for FedEx, which is best thought of as a software network that happens to have trucks, planes and distribution hubs attached. And the success or failure of airlines today and in the future hinges on their ability to price tickets and optimize routes and yields correctly—with software.

Oil and gas companies were early innovators in supercomputing and data visualization and analysis, which are crucial to today’s oil and gas exploration efforts. Agriculture is increasingly powered by software as well, including satellite analysis of soils linked to per-acre seed selection software algorithms.

The financial services industry has been visibly transformed by software over the last 30 years. Practically every financial transaction, from someone buying a cup of coffee to someone trading a trillion dollars of credit default derivatives, is done in software. And many of the leading innovators in financial services are software companies, such as Square, which allows anyone to accept credit card payments with a mobile phone, and PayPal, which generated more than $1 billion in revenue in the second quarter of this year, up 31% over the previous year.

Health care and education, in my view, are next up for fundamental software-based transformation. My venture capital firm is backing aggressive start-ups in both of these gigantic and critical industries. We believe both of these industries, which historically have been highly resistant to entrepreneurial change, are primed for tipping by great new software-centric entrepreneurs.

Even national defense is increasingly software-based. The modern combat soldier is embedded in a web of software that provides intelligence, communications, logistics and weapons guidance. Software-powered drones launch airstrikes without putting human pilots at risk. Intelligence agencies do large-scale data mining with software to uncover and track potential terrorist plots.

Companies in every industry need to assume that a software revolution is coming. This includes even industries that are software-based today. Great incumbent software companies like Oracle and Microsoft are increasingly threatened with irrelevance by new software offerings like Salesforce.com and Android (especially in a world where Google owns a major handset maker).

In some industries, particularly those with a heavy real-world component such as oil and gas, the software revolution is primarily an opportunity for incumbents. But in many industries, new software ideas will result in the rise of new Silicon Valley-style start-ups that invade existing industries with impunity. Over the next 10 years, the battles between incumbents and software-powered insurgents will be epic. Joseph Schumpeter, the economist who coined the term « creative destruction, » would be proud.

And while people watching the values of their 401(k)s bounce up and down the last few weeks might doubt it, this is a profoundly positive story for the American economy, in particular. It’s not an accident that many of the biggest recent technology companies—including Google, Amazon, eBay and more—are American companies. Our combination of great research universities, a pro-risk business culture, deep pools of innovation-seeking equity capital and reliable business and contract law is unprecedented and unparalleled in the world.

Still, we face several challenges.

First of all, every new company today is being built in the face of massive economic headwinds, making the challenge far greater than it was in the relatively benign ’90s. The good news about building a company during times like this is that the companies that do succeed are going to be extremely strong and resilient. And when the economy finally stabilizes, look out—the best of the new companies will grow even faster.

Secondly, many people in the U.S. and around the world lack the education and skills required to participate in the great new companies coming out of the software revolution. This is a tragedy since every company I work with is absolutely starved for talent. Qualified software engineers, managers, marketers and salespeople in Silicon Valley can rack up dozens of high-paying, high-upside job offers any time they want, while national unemployment and underemployment is sky high. This problem is even worse than it looks because many workers in existing industries will be stranded on the wrong side of software-based disruption and may never be able to work in their fields again. There’s no way through this problem other than education, and we have a long way to go.

Finally, the new companies need to prove their worth. They need to build strong cultures, delight their customers, establish their own competitive advantages and, yes, justify their rising valuations. No one should expect building a new high-growth, software-powered company in an established industry to be easy. It’s brutally difficult.

I’m privileged to work with some of the best of the new breed of software companies, and I can tell you they’re really good at what they do. If they perform to my and others’ expectations, they are going to be highly valuable cornerstone companies in the global economy, eating markets far larger than the technology industry has historically been able to pursue.

Instead of constantly questioning their valuations, let’s seek to understand how the new generation of technology companies are doing what they do, what the broader consequences are for businesses and the economy and what we can collectively do to expand the number of innovative new software companies created in the U.S. and around the world.

That’s the big opportunity. I know where I’m putting my money.

—Mr. Andreessen is co-founder and general partner of the venture capital firm Andreessen-Horowitz. He also co-founded Netscape, one of the first browser companies.

Voir enfin:

Brain scan
Disrupting the disrupters
Marc Andreessen made his name taking on Microsoft in the browser wars. Now he is stirring things up again as a venture capitalist
The Economist
Sep 3rd 2011

“SOFTWARE is eating the world,” proclaims Marc Andreessen, the 40-year-old co-founder of Andreessen Horowitz, a venture-capital firm in Silicon Valley that has leapt to prominence since he set it up in mid-2009 with his partner, Ben Horowitz. That alimentary analogy is shorthand, in Andreessen-speak, for the phenomenon in which industry after industry, from media to financial services to health care, is being chewed up by the rise of the internet and the spread of smartphones, tablet computers and other fancy electronic devices. Mr Andreessen and his colleagues are doing their best to speed up this digital digestion process—and make money from it as they do so.

Andreessen Horowitz has raised piles of cash from investors—it has some $1.2 billion under management—and has been eagerly putting the money to work both in large deals, such as a $50m investment in Skype, an internet-calling service recently acquired by Microsoft, and in a host of smaller companies, such as TinyCo, a maker of mobile games. It has also taken stakes in several of the biggest social-networking firms, including Twitter, Facebook and Foursquare (a service that lets people broadcast their whereabouts to their friends). Along the way it has attracted some prominent supporters. Larry Summers, a former treasury secretary, is a special adviser to the firm and Michael Ovitz, a former Hollywood power-broker, is among its investors.

Some rivals argue that by making big bets on relatively mature companies such as Facebook, Mr Andreessen’s firm is acting more like a private-equity firm than as a nurturer of fledgling businesses—and is contributing to a bubble in tech valuations too. “They’re behaving in ways that will not be helpful to them in the long run,” gripes a financier at a competing venture firm, who insists on anonymity for fear of alienating Andreessen Horowitz’s influential founders.

Pooh-poohing such criticisms, Mr Andreessen argues that “growth” investments, such as the one in Skype—which was sold to Microsoft for $8.5 billion in May, netting Andreessen Horowitz a return of over three times its original stake—make sense because profound changes in the technological landscape mean some relatively big companies can still grow to many times their current size. He reckons that talk of overheated valuations among social-media firms is being driven by people who got their fingers burned in the dotcom bust and can’t see that the world has changed since then. “All this bubble stuff is people fighting the last war,” he says.

Mr Andreessen is also frustrated with Cassandras who occasionally predict that innovation in computer science is pretty much over. Andreessen Horowitz’s partners believe there are still plenty more “black swans”—ideas with the potential to trigger dramatic changes in technology—to come in computing, which explains why they have resisted the temptation to copy other big venture outfits that have diversified into new areas such as biotech and clean tech. “This is an evergreen area. Just when you think computer science is stabilising, everything changes,” he says.

For instance, he believes that networking and storage technology is about to go through the same kind of fundamental transition that the server business experienced in the late 1990s, when expensive, proprietary servers were replaced by much cheaper ones that used new technology. That shift made possible the explosive growth of firms such as Google and Facebook, who bought large numbers of cheap servers to power their businesses. Mr Andreessen reckons a similar change in the networking and storage world will lead to the creation of many more new companies.

He is also convinced that there will be dramatic changes in the realm of personal technology. One of the companies that Andreessen Horowitz has invested in is Jawbone. Best known for its Bluetooth-equipped headsets and portable speakers, the firm is developing plans for a range of wearable smart devices that operate on a single software platform, or “body-area network”. “Jawbone is the new Sony,” claims Mr Andreessen, who predicts that its future products will prove wildly successful as people carry more and more networked gadgets around with them.

From boom to bust

It is tempting to discount such a grandiose claim as typical venture-capital puffery. But Mr Andreessen is hardly a typical venture capitalist. Raised in small towns in Iowa and Wisconsin, he started playing around on the internet while at university and co-created Mosaic, which became the first widely used web browser. After moving to Silicon Valley, he started Netscape Communications when he was 22 years old. Its stockmarket flotation in 1995 marked the beginning of the dotcom boom and made Mr Andreessen a celebrity in the business world.

Having at first dismissed Netscape, Microsoft sought to crush the fledgling company, whose browser posed a threat to the dominance of Microsoft’s Windows platform. Mr Andreessen maintains that most big companies are painfully slow to react to upstarts that might threaten their business—a point made in Clayton Christensen’s book, “The Innovator’s Dilemma”, which is one of the few business-school texts Mr Andreessen thinks is worth reading. But he admits Microsoft “did a remarkably good job” in the 1990s.

After a bruising battle a much-diminished Netscape was sold to AOL in 1999 and Mr Andreessen went on to found Loudcloud, a cloud-computing firm, with Mr Horowitz and other executives. But Loudcloud was soon caught up in the fallout from the dotcom bust. To survive, it shed staff, renamed itself Opsware and focused on software development before being sold to Hewlett-Packard for $1.6 billion in 2007. Mr Andreessen then spent some time as an angel investor before launching Andreessen Horowitz.

Mr Andreessen’s own experience as practising entrepreneur makes him ideally placed to counsel the bosses of start-ups that his firm has funded, including Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Mark Pincus of Zynga, a social-gaming company. Mr Andreessen seems especially fond of what he calls “founder CEOs”, perhaps because he was once one himself. Many venture firms tend to back young entrepreneurs for a period before replacing them with professional managers. But Mr Andreessen argues that founders who stuck with their businesses for a long while were often the ones who created many of the biggest successes in technology, including Microsoft (Bill Gates), Amazon (Jeff Bezos) and Oracle (Larry Ellison).

“Just when you think computer science is stabilising, everything changes.”

Another reason that Mr Andreessen has become something of an entrepreneur-magnet is his extensive network of contacts in Silicon Valley. He sits on the boards of Hewlett-Packard, eBay and Facebook, among others. This gives him an ideal perch from which to spot trends forming. “Marc has a view of the entire tech ecosystem that very few people have,” says David Lieb, the boss of Bump, a wireless start-up in which Andreessen Horowitz has invested.

His fans claim that Mr Andreessen’s ability to draw insightful conclusions from these trends helps Andreessen Horowitz stand out from the crowd. “In a world where there is a lot of dreaming, hoping and guessing, Marc takes a really analytical approach,” says Mr Summers, who signed on as a part-time adviser to the firm after meeting with a number of other venture outfits. Mr Andreessen’s symbiotic relationship with Mr Horowitz, a highly experienced manager, is also said to be central to the firm’s success. Tim Howes, a co-founder of RockMelt, a browser company in which Andreessen Horowitz has invested, jokes that the two men have worked together for so long that they are like an old married couple who complement one another perfectly.

The Hollywood treatment

Their partnership has spawned a bold new approach to firm-building in Silicon Valley. Most venture firms employ a skeleton staff of in-house experts in areas such as recruiting and marketing to help advise start-ups. Andreessen Horowitz, which has a total staff of 36, has taken a different approach. In addition to its six general partners, the firm has hired a bevy of executives who are specialists in particular areas, including 11 dedicated to recruitment. This set-up, says Mr Andreessen, is inspired by Creative Artists Agency, which used to be run by Mr Ovitz. It and other Hollywood talent-management companies spend a great deal of time nurturing directors and film stars, and helping them to find jobs. Andreessen Horowitz wants to do the same thing for talented tech folk, whose career paths might one day involve a stint at one of the firms it backs.

This in-house entourage also reflects Mr Andreessen’s firm belief that many start-ups today are damaging their prospects by starving areas such as sales and marketing of investment on the often misguided assumption the internet will magically guarantee them a sizeable market. Mr Andreessen says he really wants to back “full-spectrum firms” that aim to be outstanding in every operational area, rather than just a few. Andreessen Horowitz’s team will provide advice and guidance on how best to achieve this.

Many of these firms will be American ones. Mr Andreessen won’t rule out investing in other countries—Skype, for example, started in Estonia and is now based in Luxembourg—but says his firm has a preference for America because he believes it remains the best place in the world to build companies. Still, many internet start-ups need to think global early on these days, which is one reason why Andreessen Horowitz has engaged Mr Summers to give it advice on everything from pricing strategies to geopolitics.

Yet Mr Andreessen is especially bullish about Silicon Valley, where the process of knowledge-sharing that drives innovation has been greatly accelerated by the internet and the rise of social networking. “It now feels like we were operating in the Stone Age when I first came out here,” he says. Another notable change is a democratisation of entrepreneurialism in the Valley. Entrepreneurs no longer simply follow a well-worn path to venture funds’ doors from a handful of giant technology companies such as HP and Intel; today they come from a much wider range of backgrounds. In addition, says Mr Andreessen, there has recently been “a massive brain drain from Boston to the Valley, which has all but gutted Boston as a place for high-tech entrepreneurship”.

This narrow geographic focus means that Andreessen Horowitz could be in danger of missing out on the fat profits to be made backing entrepreneurial outfits founded in some of the world’s largest and fastest-growing markets. But Mr Andreessen likes to point out that it is no accident that Silicon Valley has produced a string of success stories from Netscape to eBay, Google, Facebook and Twitter. China, India and other markets may be exciting places, but a large proportion of the software that is “eating the world” still seems to come from California.


Délinquance numérique: Ne cliquez pas si vous aimez Jésus (There shall arise false Christs: How your love for Jesus can help scammers)

2 avril, 2014
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/29/Luca_signorelli%2C_cappella_di_san_brizio%2C_predica_e_punizione_dell%27anticristo_01.jpg/800px-Luca_signorelli%2C_cappella_di_san_brizio%2C_predica_e_punizione_dell%27anticristo_01.jpgIl s’élèvera de faux Christs et de faux prophètes; ils feront de grands prodiges et des miracles, au point de séduire, s’il était possible, même les élus. Voici, je vous l’ai annoncé d’avance. Si donc on vous dit: Voici, il est dans le désert, n’y allez pas; voici, il est dans les chambres, ne le croyez pas. Jésus (Matthew 24: 24)
Que dirait-on si, dans un pays qui n’est pas la France, le principal adversaire du pouvoir en place, sur la base de soupçons que rien n’est venu étayer, était durant des mois surveillé, géolocalisé, espionné jusque dans les conversations qu’il entretient avec son propre avocat? On fustigerait fermement la dérive policière de ce triste régime, et l’on aurait raison. Que dirait-on si, dans une République moins «exemplaire» que celle dont Mme Taubira se veut la virulente égérie, le gouvernement, pris en flagrant délit de tentative d’élimination d’un rival politique, ne trouvait à opposer à l’évidence de ses turpitudes qu’un lamentable brouet de contradictions et de contrevérités? On dénoncerait hautement un scandale d’État, et l’on aurait raison. Mais nous sommes en France, et Mme Taubira peut «les yeux dans les yeux» mentir éhontément en direct à ses concitoyens et plaider deux jours plus tard le simple «malentendu». Nous sommes en France, et M. Valls peut prétendre, sans déclencher un ouragan de rires, qu’il a appris dans le journal – lui, l’homme censément le mieux informé de France – ce que ses subordonnés mobilisés par dizaines pour les écoutes et les perquisitions savaient pour certains depuis des mois! Nous sommes en France, et M. Hollande jurera ses grands dieux, comme dans l’affaire Cahuzac, qu’évidemment il ne savait rien, mais rien de rien, de ce que savaient ses ministres et le premier d’entre eux… sans doute parce que, comme le dit Mme Taubira, on n’aura pas voulu «l’importuner» avec une affaire d’aussi piètre importance. Alexis Brezet
If it sounds too good to be true, don’t click on it. If it’s something that’s obviously geared toward tugging on the heartstrings, check it out first. Tim Senft
Facebook will NOT donate money to any cause based on the number of likes or shares that a photo receives. Several photos of injured or sick children and animals are circulating on Facebook claiming that Facebook will donate a certain amount of money for each like or share the photo receives. Please do not share these photos with your friends. So many people have the mentality of, “What if it’s real.” Although they have good intentions, they probably don’t realize that spreading these photos can be painful to the parents and families of the children exploited by these hoaxes. Many of the children have passed, and imagine how devastating it would be for the parent to see the likeness of their child being misused in this way. Facecrooks
Often, Facebook pages are created with the sole purpose of spreading viral content that will get lots of likes and shares. Once the page creators have piled up hundreds of thousands of likes and shares, they’ll strip the page and promote something else, like products that they get a commission for selling. Or, they may turn around and sell the page through black-market websites to someone who does the same. It’s a way to trick Facebook’s algorithm, which is designed to give more value to popular pages than the ones, like scams and spam, that pop up overnight. « The more likes and shares and comments and that sort of thing you have, the more likely it is to be seen by other people, » Senft said. « If they’re looking to sell the page in a black-hat forum somewhere, that’s what the value of the page is. » Sometimes, the threat is more direct. The « new » page may be used to spread malware — software that attacks the user’s computer — or for phishing, the act of trying to gather credit card numbers, passwords or other personal information through links to phony giveaways or contests. Simply liking a post, or the page itself, can’t spread a virus or phish a user. But malicious Facebook apps can, as can external links that page owners may choose to share to their followers. If the page owner has access to Facebook’s developer tools, they can collect data on the people who like the page. Personal information like gender, location and age can be used to target more personalized attacks. The kind of posts used run a gamut from cute to tasteless, from manipulative to misleading. (…) « It’s anything that’s going to kind of tug at the heartstrings: the sick kids, the animal abuse, acting like it’s some kind of pet shelter, » Senft said. « That’s the bad part with the scammers. They hit people where they’re vulnerable, play on their emotions. » CNN
Célébrité à la réputation sulfureuse, sexe, scènes insolites… Les ingrédients pour fabriquer un article « prêt à partager » ne sont pas particulièrement originaux. Avec son titre aguicheur et sa photo suggestive, « Mon ex a posté; 21 photos de moi nue sur Facebook » a été particulièrement partagé sur le réseau social lors du week-end du 30 mars 2014. La pratique n’est pas récente. Au printemps 2011, le site PCInpact faisait état de la circulation ultra-rapide d’une vidéo frauduleuse appelée « Une femme complètement bourrée lors d’un jeu TV », hébergée par le bien nommé cdrole.fr (qui a fermé depuis). Aux Etats-Unis, des vidéos comme « Oh mon Dieu, je déteste Rihanna maintenant que j’ai vu cela » ou « EXCLU : la preuve que Lady Gaga est un homme » ont connu un relatif succès en mars 2012, rapporte ZDNet.com (en anglais). Que se passe-t-il si je clique dessus ? Dans tous les cas, vous n’aurez pas accès immédiatement à la vidéo croustillante que vous mourez d’envie de voir. Pour « Mon ex a posté 21 photos de moi nue sur Facebook », un avertissement ressemblant à un message de Facebook vous demandera de fermer deux fenêtres avant d’arriver enfin sur l’article. Pour, semble-t-il, prouver que vous êtes âgé de plus de 13 ans. Le problème, c’est que le bouton « Fermer » – le seul sur lequel il est possible de cliquer – ne ferme pas vraiment la fenêtre. En inspectant le code HTML de zzub.fr (ci-dessous), qui héberge l’article, on s’aperçoit qu’il s’agit d’un bouton « J’aime » déguisé. Il vous fera « liker » à votre insu des pages Facebook comme « Les pires montages », « Humour adulte +18″ ou encore « Les photos prises au bon moment ». Les pages en question raflent ainsi des centaines de milliers de fans sans que vous ne le remarquiez. Créée vendredi 28 mars, la page intitulée « Humour adulte +18″ a ainsi accumulé en un peu plus d’un week-end près de 220 000 « J’aime », soit autant que celle de francetv info en deux ans et demi d’existence. Le tout sans avoir publié le moindre contenu D’autres sites frauduleux utilisent cette méthode, appelée « clickjacking », pour placer un bouton « J’aime » invisible sur le bouton « Play » d’une vidéo racoleuse, comme le notait en mars 2011 le blog MyCommunityManager.fr. Mais quel est l’intérêt de me faire « aimer » ces pages ? Gagner de l’argent. « Une fois que les créateurs de la page auront amassé des centaines de milliers de ‘J’aime’ et de partages, ils pourront la renommer et l’utiliser pour faire de la publicité, par exemple pour des produits sur lesquels ils toucheront une commission », explique CNN.com (en anglais). « Ils pourront aussi se débarrasser de la page en question en la revendant à quelqu’un d’autre », bien que cette méthode soit strictement interdite par Facebook, poursuit le site américain. D’autres arnaqueurs peuvent avoir des intentions encore plus malveillantes, ajoute CNN. Ils peuvent utiliser la page pour faire la promotion d’un site de « phishing ». Les victimes sont alors redirigées vers une contrefaçon d’un site connu, comme celui d’une banque. Les internautes sont ensuite invités à remplir un formulaire, qui permettra aux escrocs de mettre la main sur les coordonnées bancaires de leurs victimes. Vincent Matalon

Au lendemain d’un 1er avril qui a eu comme d’habitude son lot de canulars et fausses nouvelles …

Et à l’heure où avec le dernier jeu de chaises musicales de son gouvernement, la France de Valls et Taubira repart comme si de rien n’était pour un nouveau tour de mensonges

Retour, avec le site spécialisé des fraudes numériques Facecrooks et Vincent Matalon, sur certaines des techniques des arnaqueurs numériques telles que le likefarming (pêche au j’aime) ou click jacking (détournement de clic) …

A qui votre amour immodéré de la chose ou de Jésus (comme vos instincts de bon samaritain ou de saint-bernard) peuvent rapporter gros …

« Mon ex a posté 21 photos de moi nue sur Facebook », ou comment repérer un article sur lequel il ne faut pas cliquer
Des articles aux titres aguicheurs circulent régulièrement sur le réseau social. Ces contenus viraux visent à faire « aimer » des pages à l’insu des utilisateurs.

Vincent Matalon

FranceTV info

01/04/2014

« Nabilla : son incroyable transformation physique ! », « PHOTO. Rihanna choque tout le web en se mettant entièrement nue sur un rappeur, regardez ! » Il y a de fortes chances que l’un de vos amis Facebook ait partagé un de ces articles durant le week-end du dimanche 30 mars.

Vous avez peut-être vous-même essayé de cliquer dessus. Qui pourrait vous le reprocher ? Le titre était mystérieux, l’image accrocheuse… Pourtant, derrière ces articles qui circulent à vitesse grand V sur Facebook se cachent souvent des arnaques qui peuvent rapporter gros à leurs auteurs. Francetv info vous explique comment.

A quoi ressemblent les articles frauduleux ?

Tous ces contenus ont pour point commun d’être hébergés par des sites dont personne n’a entendu parler, et d’avoir un titre et une photo racoleurs au possible, afin d’inciter le petit démon qui sommeille en vous à cliquer dessus, « juste pour voir ». Célébrité à la réputation sulfureuse, sexe, scènes insolites… Les ingrédients pour fabriquer un article « prêt à partager » ne sont pas particulièrement originaux.

L’article suivant, hébergé par un site appelé zzub.fr, a ainsi été particulièrement partagé samedi et dimanche.

Avec son titre aguicheur et sa photo suggestive, « Mon ex a posté; 21 photos de moi nue sur Facebook » a été particulièrement partagé sur le réseau social lors du week-end du 30 mars 2014.
La pratique n’est pas récente. Au printemps 2011, le site PCInpact faisait état de la circulation ultra-rapide d’une vidéo frauduleuse appelée « Une femme complètement bourrée lors d’un jeu TV », hébergée par le bien nommé cdrole.fr (qui a fermé depuis).

Aux Etats-Unis, des vidéos comme « Oh mon Dieu, je déteste Rihanna maintenant que j’ai vu cela » ou « EXCLU : la preuve que Lady Gaga est un homme » ont connu un relatif succès en mars 2012, rapporte ZDNet.com (en anglais).
Que se passe-t-il si je clique dessus ?

Dans tous les cas, vous n’aurez pas accès immédiatement à la vidéo croustillante que vous mourez d’envie de voir. Pour « Mon ex a posté 21 photos de moi nue sur Facebook », un avertissement ressemblant à un message de Facebook vous demandera de fermer deux fenêtres avant d’arriver enfin sur l’article. Pour, semble-t-il, prouver que vous êtes âgé de plus de 13 ans.

Le problème, c’est que le bouton « Fermer » – le seul sur lequel il est possible de cliquer – ne ferme pas vraiment la fenêtre. En inspectant le code HTML de zzub.fr (ci-dessous), qui héberge l’article, on s’aperçoit qu’il s’agit d’un bouton « J’aime » déguisé. Il vous fera « liker » à votre insu des pages Facebook comme « Les pires montages », « Humour adulte +18″ ou encore « Les photos prises au bon moment ».

Les pages en question raflent ainsi des centaines de milliers de fans sans que vous ne le remarquiez. Créée vendredi 28 mars, la page intitulée « Humour adulte +18″ a ainsi accumulé en un peu plus d’un week-end près de 220 000 « J’aime », soit autant que celle de francetv info en deux ans et demi d’existence. Le tout sans avoir publié le moindre contenu

D’autres sites frauduleux utilisent cette méthode, appelée « clickjacking », pour placer un bouton « J’aime » invisible sur le bouton « Play » d’une vidéo racoleuse, comme le notait en mars 2011 le blog MyCommunityManager.fr.

Mais quel est l’intérêt de me faire « aimer » ces pages ?

Gagner de l’argent. « Une fois que les créateurs de la page auront amassé des centaines de milliers de ‘J’aime’ et de partages, ils pourront la renommer et l’utiliser pour faire de la publicité, par exemple pour des produits sur lesquels ils toucheront une commission », explique CNN.com (en anglais). « Ils pourront aussi se débarrasser de la page en question en la revendant à quelqu’un d’autre », bien que cette méthode soit strictement interdite par Facebook, poursuit le site américain.

D’autres arnaqueurs peuvent avoir des intentions encore plus malveillantes, ajoute CNN. Ils peuvent utiliser la page pour faire la promotion d’un site de « phishing ». Les victimes sont alors redirigées vers une contrefaçon d’un site connu, comme celui d’une banque. Les internautes sont ensuite invités à remplir un formulaire, qui permettra aux escrocs de mettre la main sur les coordonnées bancaires de leurs victimes.

Que puis-je faire si j’ai cliqué sur un de ces articles ?

Pas de panique. Rendez-vous vite sur Facebook pour inspecter les pages que vous avez récemment « aimées ». Pour cela, allez sur votre profil, puis cliquez sur « historique personnel ». C’est ici :

Dans la colonne de gauche, cliquez ensuite sur « Mentions J’aime », puis sur « Pages et intérêts ». Vous pourrez ainsi passer en revue les différentes pages que vous avez aimées au fil de votre activité sur Facebook.

Une fois que vous avez identifié une page à laquelle vous êtes abonné à votre insu, ne cliquez pas immédiatement sur le petit crayon et « Je n’aime plus ». Passez d’abord votre souris dessus, et signalez-la à Facebook. L’équipe de modération du réseau social pourra ainsi la supprimer si de nombreuses alertes lui parviennent.
En signalant une page frauduleuse Facebook, le réseau social pourra la supprimer. En signalant une page frauduleuse à Facebook, le réseau social pourra la supprimer.


Voir aussi:

On Facebook, clicking ‘like’ can help scammers
Doug Gross
CNN
January 22, 2014

(CNN) — It’s an image that tugs at the heartstrings. A smiling 7-year-old girl poses in her cheerleading uniform, circled by a ring of pompons, her bald head a telltale sign of her chemotherapy treatments.

The photo hit Facebook last year and popped up all over with messages of support. « Like » to show this little girl you care. « Share » to tell her she’s beautiful. Pray for her to beat cancer.

But here’s the truth. The photo was nearly six years old. And neither the girl, nor her parents — who never posted it to Facebook — had any idea it was being used that way.

Welcome to the world of Facebook « like farming. »

Those waves of saccharin-sweet posts that sometimes fill your news feed may seem harmless. But all too often, they’re being used for nefarious purposes. At best, a complete stranger may be using the photos to stroke their own ego. At worst, experts say, scammers and spammers are using Facebook, often against the site’s rules, to make some easy cash.

And they’re wiling to play on the good intentions of Facebook users to do it.

« The average user doesn’t know any better, » said Tim Senft, founder of Facecrooks.com, a website that monitors scams and other illegal or unethical behavior on Facebook. « I think their common sense tells them it’s not true, but in the back of their minds, they think ‘What if it is true? What does it hurt if I press like?’ or whatever. »

What does it hurt?

« I was first shocked, » said Amanda Rieth of Northampton, Pennsylvania, whose daughter was the subject of that photo. « And then infuriated. »
Facebook royalty talks surveillance
Facebook to start video ads
Mother learns of son’s death on Facebook
How Facebook makes money

After being notified by a friend who recognized the girl in a Facebook post, Rieth tracked the image back to a link she’d posted to her Photobucket account in a community forum in 2009, two years after it was taken.

Her daughter, who was diagnosed with Stage IV neuroblastoma in early 2007, has been featured in local news segments for her fundraising efforts to fight cancer through Alex’s Lemonade Stand. But her mom said she was always part of the decision and was happy to help publicize the fight.

« This? This was entirely different and entirely out of our control, » Rieth said. « That’s the most gut-wrenching part: the total lack of control. »

Hurting the people featured in the posts, and their families, isn’t the only risk of sharing such content. Sometimes, a single click can help people who are up to no good.

Often, Senft said, Facebook pages are created with the sole purpose of spreading viral content that will get lots of likes and shares.

Once the page creators have piled up hundreds of thousands of likes and shares, they’ll strip the page and promote something else, like products that they get a commission for selling. Or, they may turn around and sell the page through black-market websites to someone who does the same.

It’s a way to trick Facebook’s algorithm, which is designed to give more value to popular pages than the ones, like scams and spam, that pop up overnight.

« The more likes and shares and comments and that sort of thing you have, the more likely it is to be seen by other people, » Senft said. « If they’re looking to sell the page in a black-hat forum somewhere, that’s what the value of the page is. »

It gets worse

Sometimes, the threat is more direct.

The « new » page may be used to spread malware — software that attacks the user’s computer — or for phishing, the act of trying to gather credit card numbers, passwords or other personal information through links to phony giveaways or contests.

Simply liking a post, or the page itself, can’t spread a virus or phish a user. But malicious Facebook apps can, as can external links that page owners may choose to share to their followers.

If the page owner has access to Facebook’s developer tools, they can collect data on the people who like the page. Personal information like gender, location and age can be used to target more personalized attacks.

The kind of posts used run a gamut from cute to tasteless, from manipulative to misleading.

Rieth said she still finds her daughter’s photo on Facebook from time to time, even though Facebook eventually deleted the original after she and others reported it.

On the most recent page she found, the picture appears in a feed alongside posts such as « Who loves French fries? Like & share if you do » and multiple images encouraging people to like and share if they love Jesus.

There’s an image of a premature baby, pictures of military troops cuddling puppies and an image of a young boy pouring water on a man’s cigarette with the text « Sorry papa … I need you. »

« It’s anything that’s going to kind of tug at the heartstrings: the sick kids, the animal abuse, acting like it’s some kind of pet shelter, » Senft said. « That’s the bad part with the scammers. They hit people where they’re vulnerable, play on their emotions. »

What to do

Because of Facebook’s sheer size, he said it sometimes takes lots of reports for the site to delete an offensive or misleading image, or shut down the page it came from. The best approach, Senft said, is to think before sharing.

« If it sounds too good to be true, don’t click on it, » he said. « If it’s something that’s obviously geared toward tugging on the heartstrings, check it out first. »

Facebook said it continues to work to make sure high-quality content surfaces for users and low-quality posts don’t. That includes trying to diminish the reach of posts that appear to be « like farming » attempts.

« People have told us they associate requests to like or share a post with lower quality content, and receiving that type of feedback helps us adjust our systems to get better at showing more high quality posts, » a Facebook spokesperson said via e-mail.

« If you see a post that’s low quality and seems to be focused only on gaining traffic, hover over the top-right corner of the post and click the arrow to report it. »

Facebook uses « automated and manual methods to swiftly remove links and pages that violate our policies, » the spokesperson said. « We’re always making improvements to our detection and blocking systems to stay ahead of threats. »

‘Truly angry’

Today, Rieth’s daughter is 13 — an eighth-grader who has shown no signs of her cancer since September 2007.

But her mom compares that cheerleading photo to the mythical hydra, a monster with many heads that sprouts two more each time one is cut off. Based just on the images she’s found and reported, the photo has been liked and shared on Facebook hundreds of thousands of times.

A search Monday also found it popping up on Pinterest, as well as one site where it was wrongly used alongside a 2010 article about actor Jackie Chan helping a girl with leukemia find a bone-marrow donor.

« What makes me truly angry, though, is knowing that they’re using it as an insidious way to make money, » Rieth said. « That’s not what her survival is about to us. »

For this article, CNN sent a Facebook message to the owner of the last page where Rieth found the photo.

When asked whether he planned to sell his page, the owner replied with two words:

« How much? »

Voir également:

Facebook Like-Farming Scams

Hoaxslayer

Overview
An increasing number of bogus Pages appearing on Facebook are designed to do nothing more than artificially increase their popularity by tricking users into « liking » them. This tactic has come to be known as « like-farming ». The goal of these unscrupulous like-farmers is to increase the value of Facebook Pages so that they can be sold on the black market to other scammers and/or used to market dubious products and services and distribute further scams. The more likes a Page has, the more resale and marketing value it commands.

How like-farming works
Here’s how a typical like-farming scam operates. The scammers first create a new Facebook Page geared to a certain product or service such as smartphones, gaming consoles, beauty products, or theme parks. The Page may state or imply that it is an official Page endorsed by a company such as Samsung, Apple, Sony or Disneyland and include stolen graphics that depict the targeted company’s products.
Like Farming Page

The Page then begins posting messages claiming that it will be giving away free products to selected users:
Like Farming Bogus Giveaway

But, nobody actually wins anything. Ever. The prizes do not even exist. The promised prizes are just the bait used to entice users into liking the page and sharing the promotional posts. By getting people to click the like button as well as spam out the bogus promotions by sharing them with their friends, these fake Pages can accumulate many thousands of likes, often within just a few hours.

Generally, a few days after the initial posting, when the first liking frenzy has died down, the scammers operating the Page will post a second – equally bogus – promotion thereby initiating a whole new round of like-harvesting. The scammers will continue posting new promotions every few days until they have gained enough likes to suit their needs.

What scammers gain out of creating like-farming Pages
When they have accumulated a large number of likes – perhaps 100,000 or more – the scammers can then sell the Page to unscrupulous marketers. These marketers can then re-purpose the Page to suit their needs and use its large « like » base to blast out spam messages promoting their products or services. Selling Facebook Pages is clearly against Facebook’s Terms of Service. Nevertheless, there is a thriving underground market for established Facebook Pages and the more likes the Page has the more that it can potentially be sold for. There are even marketplace websites and forums set up specifically to buy and sell Facebook Pages. The marketplace for Pages is quite volatile and there are significant variations in listed prices. But, a Page with 100,000 Likes can sell for $1000 or more. Often, prices are calculated on a « $ per K » basis, i.e., the seller might set a base price of – for example – $2 per thousand likes.

Like-farmers might have dozens of scam promotion Pages operating at the same time. Thus, they can make significant amounts of money out of their farming activities.

In some cases, like-farmers might rebrand the pages themselves and use them to promote products or launch further scam campaigns.

How to tell a like-farming scam from a genuine promotion or giveaway
Companies and organizations may operate legitimate Facebook driven promotions in which users receive a chance to win a prize in exchange for liking, sharing or otherwise participating. So, how can you tell if a promotion you come across on Facebook is genuine? Here’s a rundown:

Do the math!

Bogus promotions typically offer hundreds or even thousands of expensive prizes. If real, such promotions would cost very significant sums of money for the promoting company. In reality, it is vastly unlikely that any organization would give away many thousands of dollars worth of products for nothing more than a few Facebook Page « Likes ». Do some quick calculations. For example, suppose that the Page is claiming that it will give iPad’s to 2500 randomly chosen participants. That would work out to be several hundred thousand dollars in value for nothing more tangible than a few thousand Page likes. Such promotions are simply not economically viable.

Genuine promotions will typically offer participants a CHANCE to win a prize. They do NOT claim that several thousand participants will each receive an expensive prize. In genuine promotions, the number of prizes is likely to be limited to just a few.

Absurdity
The fake pages often make ridiculous assertions such as the claim that they are giving away the products because they are « unsealed ». It is of course nonsensical to suggest that any company would simply give away hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of products just because their packaging had been opened. The Pages often make other illogical claims that can be red flags for more astute observers. For example, the Page discussed above bills itself as a Samsung Galaxy promotion, but claims to be giving away products created by arch-rival Apple. The chances of that happening in real life are virtually nil. Some use very poor grammar and spelling in their posts, which is unlikely to occur on a genuine company Facebook Page. One recent like-farming Page supposedly offering free Disneyland tickets even misspelled « Disney » in its page address.

Terms and Conditions?

These bogus promotions are generally very vague about what company or organization is actually offering the prizes, what the promotion is hoping to achieve, how long the promotion will run, how winners will be chosen and how they will be notified. No conditions of entry are specified. Contact details for the entity running the supposed promotion are not made available. No legal terms are outlined.

On the other hand, genuine promotions are likely to include easily accessible terms and conditions of entry, set clear limits for the duration and giveaway values of the prizes, and make it clear what entity is responsible for the promotion.

Newly Created Pages

Scrolling down to the bottom of many like-farming Pages reveals that they were only created a few days or weeks earlier. Big brands offering promotions are likely to have older and very well established Facebook Pages that work hand in glove with the company’s official websites. Often, promotions aired on a company’s Facebook Page will also be mentioned on its main website as well as its other social media streams.

Do not give the unethical people who create these pages any satisfaction. Do not like their bogus Pages. Do not share their lies. And make sure that your Facebook friends are aware of how these scams operate so that they won’t get caught out either.

Sermon and Deeds of the Antichrist (Luca Signorelli, Fresco Chapel of San Brizio, Duomo, Orvieto, 1499-1502)

Voir enfin:
Le premier avril : rigolade certifiée depuis 1564 (?)
Jean-Christophe Piot

FranceTVinfo

1 avril 2014

Vérifiez bien votre dos aujourd’hui : il y a des chances que tôt ou tard vienne y pendouiller un poisson de papier plus ou moins convaincant, attaché là par un collègue ou un de vos proches particulièrement fier de son coup. Et ça fait quelques siècles que ça dure, sans que personne ne soit franchement fichu de savoir d’où est partie l’habitude de se payer la fiole de ses contemporains. Retour arrière sur différentes pistes, toutes authentiques. Ou non.

Passion, poissons et tribunaux

La première explication de l’origine du poisson d’avril est religieuse, comme souvent : il s’agirait d’une référence à la Passion du Christ et au sort de Jésus de Nazareth, baladé d’un tribunal à l’autre en Palestine, de Caïphe à Ponce Pilate et réciproquement, au début du mois d’avril. La scène, mainte fois reprise et racontée, faisait partie des grands archétypes des spectacles mis en scène par l’Eglise pour raconter la vie du Christ au peuple, en particulier dans le cadre des Mystères, ces représentations théâtrales des moments de la vie du Christ. Quelques farceurs impies se seraient au fil des décennies amusés à transposer l’histoire dans leur quotidien et à promener les naïfs d’un lieu à l’autre pour un motif quelconque. Le temps aidant, le mot Passion aurait glissé vers celui de poisson. Moui. L’explication, classique au 19e siècle, me semble à titre personnel légèrement tirée par les cheveux.

Permis de pêche

La deuxième explication renvoie à la pêche : en avril, celle-ci était généralement interdite par les autorités, soucieuses de laisser truites, carpes et brochets se reproduire tranquillement au début du printemps. Autrement dit, les amateurs de poisson pouvaient s’attendre à patienter un bon bout de temps avant d’y goûter à nouveau. Parvenir à offrir ou à vendre un (faux) poisson aux plus crédules, en plein mois d’avril, serait alors devenu un grand classique de la farce. L’expression « manger du poisson d’avril », synonyme de croire naïvement à n’importe quoi, a bel et bien existé.
Perdus dans le calendrier

La piste la plus crédible, cela dit, touche à une question de calendrier : j’avais déjà raconté ici-même la manière dont le 1er janvier finit par s’imposer partout en France comme date du Nouvel An, après quelques siècles de flottements variés. Un peu partout dans le pays, cette dernière commençait plutôt autour du 1er avril (le nom même du mois pourrait venir du latin aperire, ouvrir) date donc des étrennes, ces petits cadeaux en famille et entre amis. En août 1564, Charles IX finit par trancher et annonça que le Nouvel An serait fixé une bonne fois pour toutes au premier janvier. Sauf qu’il y a loin d’un décret royal aux coutumes populaires et que longtemps encore, bien des gens gardèrent l’habitude de s’offrir des cadeaux le 1er avril. Petit à petit pourtant, leur nombre diminua et leur habitude fut progressivement tournée en ridicule par quelques farceurs qui se firent un plaisir de leur offrir de faux présents ou des messages trompeurs.
Cartes postales et mystérieux prétendants

Avec le temps, les poissons d’avril se répandirent : canulars, fausses nouvelles, courriers mystérieux… Le début du 20e siècle en fit même une industrie, le poisson d’avril devenant un grand classique des cartes postales échangées entre amoureux ou prétendants, chacun envoyant à sa chacune une carte postale « anonyme », agrémentée d’un petit poème parfaitement cucul en général. La preuve.

carte-poisson-avril-amour

« Me reconnaissez-vous ?

Je n’oserais le croire

Si votre coeur jaloux

N’avait tant de mémoire. »

Bonus vidéo et arbres à spaghettis

Finissons sur un beau cadeau : ce très joli reportage du 1er avril 1957, dû à la vénérable BBC qu’on n’imaginait pas aussi potache.

C’est en anglais, mais disons que ce beau documentaire de 3 minutes raconte qu’en raison d’un hiver clément, les fermiers suisses profitent joyeusement d’une récolte abondante de spaghettis, cueillis directement sur l’arbre. Aux téléspectateurs (nombreux) qui appelèrent ensuite, avides d’apprendre comment faire pousser leurs propres arbres à nouilles, la BBC répondit par la voix de ses standardistes dûment formées qu’il « suffisait de mettre un brin de spaghetti dans une boite de sauce tomate et d’espérer que ça prenne. »

Manifestement, ça a pris.


Ecoutes américaines: Beau comme la rencontre fortuite de l’insigne incompétence et de la plus totalitaire des capacités d’interception (Lamb horns and dragon voice – the most ineffectual drone president and an apparatus that aspires to monitor no less than the entirety of the human race’s electronic communications !)

31 octobre, 2013
Photo : BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING US (Lamb horns and dragon voice - the most ineffectual drone president and an apparatus that aspires to monitor no less than the entirety of the human race's electronic communications !)And I beheld another beast coming up out of the earth; and he had two horns like a lamb, and he spake as a dragon. And he exerciseth all the power of the first beast before him, and causeth the earth and them which dwell therein to worship the first beast, whose deadly wound was healed. And he doeth great wonders, so that he maketh fire come down from heaven on the earth in the sight of men, and deceiveth them that dwell on the earth by the means of those miracles which he had power to do in the sight of the beast; saying to them that dwell on the earth, that they should make an image to the beast, which had the wound by a sword, and did live.  And he had power to give life unto the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak, and cause that as many as would not worship the image of the beast should be killed. And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: and that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his nameRevelation 13: 11-17The magnitude of the eavesdropping is what shocked us, Let’s be honest, we eavesdrop too. Everyone is listening to everyone else. The difference is that we don’t have the same means as the United States - which makes us jealous.Bernard KouchnerOf course, Brazil, France, Germany, and Mexico do exactly the same thing. They want their leaders to gain a decision advantage in the give and take between countries. They want to know what U.S. policymakers will do before the Americans do it. And in the case of Brazil and France, they aggressively spy on the United States, on U.S. citizens and politicians, in order to collect that information. The difference lies in the scale of intelligence collection: The U.S. has the most effective, most distributed, most sophisticated intelligence community in the West. It is Goliath. And other countries, rightly in their mind, are envious.Marc Ambiderhttp://theweek.com/article/index/251628/why-the-nsa-spies-on-france-and-germanyBefore his disclosures, most experts already assumed that the United States conducted cyberattacks against China, bugged European institutions, and monitored global Internet communications. Even his most explosive revelation -- that the United States and the United Kingdom have compromised key communications software and encryption systems designed to protect online privacy and security -- merely confirmed what knowledgeable observers have long suspected.The deeper threat that leakers such as Manning and Snowden pose is more subtle than a direct assault on U.S. national security: they undermine Washington’s ability to act hypocritically and get away with it. Their danger lies not in the new information that they reveal but in the documented confirmation they provide of what the United States is actually doing and why. ... "Hypocrisy is central to Washington’s soft power—its ability to get other countries to accept the legitimacy of its actions—yet few Americans appreciate its role, The reason the United States has until now suffered few consequences for such hypocrisy is that other states have a strong interest in turning a blind eye. Given how much they benefit from the global public goods Washington provides, they have little interest in calling the hegemon on its bad behavior. Public criticism risks pushing the U.S. government toward self-interested positions that would undermine the larger world order. Moreover, the United States can punish those who point out the inconsistency in its actions by downgrading trade relations or through other forms of direct retaliation. Allies thus usually air their concerns in private.http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/140155/henry-farrell-and-martha-finnemore/the-end-of-hypocrisy#http://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/140155/henry-farrell-and-martha-finnemore/the-end-of-hypocrisy#Hypocrisy is crucial because the world order functions through a set of American-built institutions, such as the UN and the World Trade Organisation, which depend on America's commitment to their ideals to hold legitimacy. However, America, like other countries, is in practice often unable to pursue its national interests while adhering to these ideals. Because America is more important to the global order than other countries, its need to practise hypocrisy is greater. And, in general, allies have been willing to abet such hypocrisy:The Economisthttp://www.economist.com/blogs/democracyinamerica/2013/10/nsa-and-euhttp://www.nationalreview.com/article/362404/obama-still-president-victor-davis-hanson/page/0/1Puis je vis monter de la terre une autre bête, qui avait deux cornes semblables à celles d’un agneau, et qui parlait comme un dragon. Elle exerçait toute l’autorité de la première bête en sa présence, et elle faisait que la terre et ses habitants adoraient la première bête, dont la blessure mortelle avait été guérie. Elle opérait de grands prodiges, même jusqu’à faire descendre du feu du ciel sur la terre, à la vue des hommes.Et elle séduisait les habitants de la terre par les prodiges qu’il lui était donné d’opérer en présence de la bête, disant aux habitants de la terre de faire une image à la bête qui avait la blessure de l’épée et qui vivait. Et il lui fut donné d’animer l’image de la bête, afin que l’image de la bête parlât, et qu’elle fît que tous ceux qui n’adoreraient pas l’image de la bête fussent tués. Et elle fit que tous, petits et grands, riches et pauvres, libres et esclaves, reçussent une marque sur leur main droite ou sur leur front, et que personne ne pût acheter ni vendre, sans avoir la marque, le nom de la bête ou le nombre de son nom.  Apocalypse 13: 11-17
Beau comme la rencontre fortuite sur une table de dissection d’une machine à coudre et d’un parapluie! Lautréamont
L’Iran devrait probablement atteindre une capacité nucléaire indétectable à la mi-2014 et peut-être même avant. Dennis Ross
C’est l‘importance des écoutes qui nous a choqué, mais soyons honnêtes, nous espionnons aussi. Tout le monde écoute tout le monde. La différence, c’est qu’on n’a pas les moyens des Etats-Unis, ce qui nous rend jaloux.  Bernard Kouchner
Pour ce qui est de l’espionnage par des moyens technologiques, les écoutes précisément ou les interceptions de flux internet, 2001 n’a pas vraiment changé les choses. 2001 a juste donné aux Etats-Unis un motif nouveau pour habiller leurs pratiques d’interception. Ce nouveau motif, c’est la guerre contre le terrorisme. Mais sur le plan des pratiques, depuis les années 1950, en pleine guerre froide, les Etats-Unis ont en permanence intercepté des communications, y compris celles de leurs partenaires et celles de leurs alliés. (…)  La NSA, d’un point de vue très pratique, en matière d’interception en dehors des Etats-Unis, a deux moyens. D’une part, elle se sert dans les grands serveurs des fournisseurs d’accès à internet, c’est une première façon d’aller directement puiser à la source. Ou alors, elle a un accès, je dirais plus pratique encore, qui est de se brancher sur les câbles eux-mêmes, et non pas sur les fermes (serveurs de données) dans lesquelles sont contenues toutes les données. Ensuite, comme d’autres agences, comme l’agence britannique et d’autres agences, toutes ces données ne sont pas exploitées par l’intelligence humaine mais sont exploitées grâce à des algorithmes, par des capacités informatiques, qui essaient de cibler des mots-clés. Alors, c’est tout l’enjeu du débat aujourd’hui. Est-ce que, comme le disent les Etats-Unis dans une défense mezzo voce, ils ne cherchent dans ces données que ce qui a trait à la lutte contre le terrorisme et à la sécurité des Etats-Unis? Ou est-ce que, sans le dire, ils utilisent aussi ces interceptions pour repérer les mots-clés touchant à des pratiques commerciales, à des brevets, à des litiges juridiques ? Ce que l’on peut dire, étant donné ce que l’on sait aujourd’hui du passé, c’est que la capacité d’interception de la NSA a servi, bien sûr, la sécurité des Etats-Unis mais elle a aussi servi les Etats-Unis dans la guerre économique mondiale qui est devenue une réalité plus forte après la fin de la guerre froide. (…) C’est un jeu de dupes, mais comme les relations entre les Etats sont un jeu de dupes. (…) en même temps il faut bien regarder ce qui est en cause, de la part de la NSA c’est quand même à l’égard de ses grands partenaires commerciaux et politiques, le Brésil, la France ou l’Allemagne. Et là, le jeu de dupes, qui est en partie dévoilé, peut avoir des incidences sur ce qui est la base de la relation entre des alliés et des partenaires : cela s’appelle la confiance. Sébastien Laurent
Of course, Brazil, France, Germany, and Mexico do exactly the same thing. They want their leaders to gain a decision advantage in the give and take between countries. They want to know what U.S. policymakers will do before the Americans do it. And in the case of Brazil and France, they aggressively spy on the United States, on U.S. citizens and politicians, in order to collect that information. The difference lies in the scale of intelligence collection: The U.S. has the most effective, most distributed, most sophisticated intelligence community in the West. It is Goliath. And other countries, rightly in their mind, are envious. Marc Ambider
Before his disclosures, most experts already assumed that the United States conducted cyberattacks against China, bugged European institutions, and monitored global Internet communications. Even his most explosive revelation — that the United States and the United Kingdom have compromised key communications software and encryption systems designed to protect online privacy and security — merely confirmed what knowledgeable observers have long suspected. … The deeper threat that leakers such as Manning and Snowden pose is more subtle than a direct assault on U.S. national security: they undermine Washington’s ability to act hypocritically and get away with it. Their danger lies not in the new information that they reveal but in the documented confirmation they provide of what the United States is actually doing and why. … « Hypocrisy is central to Washington’s soft power—its ability to get other countries to accept the legitimacy of its actions—yet few Americans appreciate its role, …The reason the United States has until now suffered few consequences for such hypocrisy is that other states have a strong interest in turning a blind eye. Given how much they benefit from the global public goods Washington provides, they have little interest in calling the hegemon on its bad behavior. Public criticism risks pushing the U.S. government toward self-interested positions that would undermine the larger world order. Moreover, the United States can punish those who point out the inconsistency in its actions by downgrading trade relations or through other forms of direct retaliation. Allies thus usually air their concerns in private. Foreign Affairs
Hypocrisy is crucial because the world order functions through a set of American-built institutions, such as the UN and the World Trade Organisation, which depend on America’s commitment to their ideals to hold legitimacy. However, America, like other countries, is in practice often unable to pursue its national interests while adhering to these ideals. Because America is more important to the global order than other countries, its need to practise hypocrisy is greater. And, in general, allies have been willing to abet such hypocrisy … The Economist

Pour ceux qui n’avaient pas encore compris qu’à l’instar de la politique de Clausewitz, l’économie est devenue la continuation de la guerre par d’autres moyens …

Et à l’heure ou, pour donner le change à leurs opinions publiques, nos dirigeants et médias font mine de découvrir le secret de polichinelle des écoutes américaines …

Pendant que derrière son bluff nucléaire, Téhéran pourrait sous peu passer le point de non-retour concernant son insistante promesse de rayer Israel de la carte …

Comment ne pas s’émerveiller, derrière le jeu de dupes officiel, de l’incroyable combinaison qui aurait ravi Lautréamont lui-même ?

A savoir mis à part le droit de vie ou de mort via ses drones sur tout ce que le monde peut compter de terroristes …

Celle du président américain, dument confirmé par Forbes, probablement le plus incompétent depuis Carter …

Et d’un appareillage qui, entre les interceptions téléphoniques, satellitaires et électroniques, prétend surveiller rien moins que la totalité des communications électroniques de la race humaine ?

Is Obama Still President?

His cadences soar on, through scandal after fiasco after disaster.­

Victor Davis Hanson

National review

October 29, 2013

We are currently learning whether the United States really needs a president. Barack Obama has become a mere figurehead, who gives speeches few listen to any more, issues threats that scare fewer, and makes promises that almost no one believes he will keep. Yet America continues on, despite the fact that the foreign and domestic policies of Barack Obama are unraveling, in a manner unusual even for star-crossed presidential second terms.

Abroad, American policy in the Middle East is leaderless and in shambles after the Arab Spring — we’ve had the Syrian fiasco and bloodbath, leading from behind in Libya all the way to Benghazi, and the non-coup, non-junta in Egypt. This administration has managed to unite existential Shiite and Sunni enemies in a shared dislike of the United States. While Iran follows the Putin script from Syria, Israel seems ready to preempt its nuclear program, and Obama still mumbles empty “game changers” and “red line” threats of years past.

We have gone from reset with Russia to Putin as the playmaker of the Middle East. The Persian Gulf sheikhdoms are now mostly anti-American. The leaders of Germany and the people of France resent having their private communications tapped by Barack Obama — the constitutional lawyer and champion of universal human rights. Angela Merkel long ago grasped that President Obama would rather fly across the Atlantic to lobby for a Chicago Olympic Games — or tap her phone — than sit through a 20th-anniversary commemoration of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan are beginning to see that the U.S. is more a neutral than a friend, as Obama negotiates with Putin about reducing the nuclear umbrella that protects America’s key non-nuclear allies. Perhaps they will soon make the necessary adjustments. China, Brazil, and India care little that Barack Obama still insists he is not George W. Bush, or that he seems to be trying to do to America what they seek to undo in their own countries.

The world’s leaders do not any longer seem much impressed by the president’s cat-like walk down the steps of Air Force One, or the soaring cadences that rechannel hope-and=change themes onto the world scene. They acknowledge that their own publics may like the American president, and especially his equivocation about the traditional role of American power in the world. But otherwise, for the next three years, the world is in a holding pattern, wondering whether there is a president of the United States to reckon with or a mere teleprompted functionary. Certainly, the Obama Nobel Peace Prize is now the stuff of comedy.

At home, the signature Affordable Care Act is proving its sternest critics prescient. The mess can best be summed up by Republicans’ being demonized for trying to delay or defund Obamacare — after the president himself chose not to implement elements of his own law — followed immediately by congressional Democrats’ seeking to parrot the Republicans. So are the Democrats followers of Ted Cruz or Barack Obama? Is Obama himself following Ted Cruz?

The problem is not just that all the president’s serial assurances about Obamacare proved untrue — premiums and deductibles will go up, many will lose their coverage and their doctors, new taxes will be needed, care will be curtailed, signups are nearly impossible, and businesses will be less, not more, competitive — but that no one should ever have believed they could possibly be true unless in our daily lives we usually get more and better stuff at lower cost.

More gun control is dead. Comprehensive immigration legislation depends on Republicans’ trusting a president who for two weeks smeared his House opponents as hostage-takers and house-breakers. Moreover, just as no one really read the complete text of the Obamacare legislation, so too no one quite knows what is in the immigration bill. There are few assurances that the border will be first secured under an administration with a record of nullifying “settled law” — or that those who have been convicted of crimes or have been long-time recipients of state or federal assistance will not be eligible for eventual citizenship. If the employer mandate was jettisoned, why would not border security be dropped once a comprehensive immigration bill passed? Or for that matter, if it is not passed, will the president just issue a blanket amnesty anyway?

In the age of Obama, we just ran up a $700 billion annual deficit and called it restraint, as if success were to be defined as not adding another $1 trillion each year to the national debt. The strange thing is that after the end of the Iraq War and the winding down in Afghanistan, forced sequestration, new taxes on high earners, and a supposedly recovering and revenue-producing economy, we are still running up near-record deficits. Stranger still, Obama is bragging that the deficit has been cut by billions — as if the 400-pound heart patient can be content that he lost 50 pounds in record time and so trimmed down to a manageable 350 pounds.

The Federal Reserve is pretty well stuck with near-zero interest rates. Even a slight rise would make servicing the huge debt nearly unmanageable. Yet continued record low interest, along with Obamacare, is strangling the economy. Millions of older Americans are learning that a mid-level government employee draws more in pension compensation than a private retiree receives in interest on 40 years’ worth of life savings.

“Millions of green jobs,” “cash for clunkers,” and “stimulus” are all now recognized as cruel jokes. Oddly, the more scandals come to light, the more immune the virtual president becomes. After the politicization of the IRS, the snooping on AP reporters, the Benghazi mess, the NSA eavesdropping, Fast and Furious, the multibillion-dollar overpayment in income-tax credits by the IRS, the Lisa Jackson fake e-mail identities, and the Pigford payments, the public has become numb — as if it to say, “Of course the Obama administration is not truthful. So what else is new?”

Three considerations are keeping the U.S. afloat without an active president. First, many working Americans have tuned the president out and simply go on about their business despite rather than because of this administration. If gas and oil leases have been curtailed on federal lands, there is record production on private land. Farmers are producing huge harvests and receiving historically high prices. Wall Street welcomes in capital that can find no return elsewhere. American universities’ science departments and professional schools still rate among the world’s best. There is as yet no French or Chinese Silicon Valley. In other words, after five years of stagnation, half the public more or less ignores the Obama administration and plods on.

Second, the other half of Americans gladly accept that Obama is an iconic rather than a serious president. Given his emblematic status as the nation’s first African-American president and his efforts to craft a vast coalition of those with supposed grievances against the majority, he will always have a strong base of supporters. With huge increases in federal redistributive support programs, and about half the population not paying federal income taxes, Obama is seen as the protector of the noble deserving, who should receive more from a government to which the ignoble undeserving must give far more. And if it is a question of adding another million or so people to the food-stamp or disability rolls, or ensuring that Iran does not obtain a nuclear weapon or that China does not bully Japan, the former wins every time.

Finally, the media accept that Obama represents a rare confluence of forces that promotes a progressive agenda. His youth, his charisma, his background, his exotic nomenclature, and his “cool” all have allowed a traditionally unpopular leftist ideology to enter the mainstream. Why endanger all that with a focus on Benghazi or the disaster of Obamacare? We have had, in the course of our history, plenty of Grants, McKinleys, Hardings, Nixons, and Clintons, but never quite an administration of scandal so exempt from media scrutiny.

As far as his image goes, it does not really matter to what degree Obama actually “fundamentally transforms America.” For the media, that he seeks to do so, and that he drives conservatives crazy trying, is seen as enough reason to surrender their autonomy and become ancillary to the effort. The media believe that once he is out of office, they can regain their credibility by going after the next president with renewed vigor as recompense.

In other words, the presidency has become a virtual office. Almost half the people and most of the media do not mind, and those who do just plod onward.

— NRO contributor Victor Davis Hanson is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. His latest book is The Savior Generals, published this spring by Bloomsbury Books.

Voir aussi:

The NSA and the EU

Who do I wiretap if I want to wiretap Europe?

M.S.

The Economist

Oct 25th 2013

HENRY KISSINGER never actually asked who he should call when he wanted to call Europe; in fact, Gideon Rachman pointed out a few years ago, he probably didn’t even want there to be such a person, since he generally thought European leaders would be more tractable to American diplomacy if they remained divided. So he may well have been pleased to see, as Charlemagne observes, that European leaders’ reactions to recent spying revelations have been as fractured and tentative as they often were during his own era at the top. Edward Snowden’s revelations of the breadth of NSA spying have certainly damaged America’s reputation among its allies, and they may yet force Barack Obama to finally push back against his intelligence agencies on an issue. But the uproar in Europe seems softer than might have been predicted.

The most interesting explanation of how Mr Snowden’s revelations are likely to affect American foreign policy is the contention by Henry Farrell and Martha Finnemore, in an article in Foreign Affairs, that they reduce America’s space for hypocrisy. « Hypocrisy is central to Washington’s soft power—its ability to get other countries to accept the legitimacy of its actions—yet few Americans appreciate its role, » they write. Hypocrisy is crucial because the world order functions through a set of American-built institutions, such as the UN and the World Trade Organisation, which depend on America’s commitment to their ideals to hold legitimacy. However, America, like other countries, is in practice often unable to pursue its national interests while adhering to these ideals. Because America is more important to the global order than other countries, its need to practise hypocrisy is greater. And, in general, allies have been willing to abet such hypocrisy:

The reason the United States has until now suffered few consequences for such hypocrisy is that other states have a strong interest in turning a blind eye. Given how much they benefit from the global public goods Washington provides, they have little interest in calling the hegemon on its bad behavior. Public criticism risks pushing the U.S. government toward self-interested positions that would undermine the larger world order. Moreover, the United States can punish those who point out the inconsistency in its actions by downgrading trade relations or through other forms of direct retaliation. Allies thus usually air their concerns in private.

The problem with Mr Snowden’s revelations is that they bring such hypocrisy into the open, which puts democratic pressure on allies to criticise it.

This, at least, is the theory. In fact, there has been a curiously gleeful tone to much of the European public’s reception of America’s spying on their leaders. Coverage in Le Monde has been divided between editorials demanding that « the work of security agencies be delimited by effective parliamentary or judicial procedures of control », and breathless accounts of communications between French and American security forces over whether the Americans were behind the cyberattacks on the French president’s office in 2012. Mark Ambinder cites a radio interview with Bernard Kouchner, the former French foreign minister: « Let’s be honest, we eavesdrop too. Everyone is listening to everyone else… [The difference is that] we don’t have the same means as the United States—which makes us jealous. »

Reactions in the Netherlands have been similarly ambiguous. The most aggressive and well-informed Dutch political response on issues of digital freedom tends to come from the left-liberal D66 party. Yesterday on Dutch TV, Sophie in ‘t Veld, who in addition to leading the D66 delegation at the European Parliament has one of the coolest names in international politics, took a sharp line against NSA surveillance and demanded a full explanation from America of whom it is spying on and why. At the same time, she joked in a self-deprecating fashion about how much leverage a Dutch European Parliament member could hope to have over the global superpower, shaking her fist and declaiming with a mock grin: « Ms in ‘t Veld is warning America for the last time! » In the laughs she got from the audience, one could hear a bit of resigned satisfaction, as though they enjoyed confirming the secondary global rank that makes it ill-advised for the Dutch to get too worked up about issues over which they are unlikely to exercise much control. The exchange put me in mind of the great European-American conflict of the post-Kissinger era, over the deployment of short-range nuclear missiles, an issue that served as a mobilising touchstone for the European left for years without any real need to ever affect policy in any noticeable way.

Dutch reactions to the NSA scandal may be atypical for Europe, because the Dutch generally have a higher tolerance for government surveillance than many other countries. And none of this is to say that anyone in Europe is defending NSA wiretapping, or that the revelations have done anything but harm to the public image of America and of Barack Obama personally. It’s just that there is a certain ambiguity in the European public reaction, and for that matter in the American one. In America too, one can often sense an emotional « double-feeling », as the Dutch would call it, between the public’s dread of the government’s all-embracing surveillance capabilities, and the public’s vicarious awe at the perspective afforded by an apparatus that aspires to monitor the entirety of the human race’s electronic communications. Perhaps, to update Walter Benjamin, mankind’s self-alienation has reached such a degree that we can experience our own wiretapping as an aesthetic pleasure of the first order.

Voir egalement:

How to negotiate with Iran

A deal struck for its own sake on Tehran’s nuclear program would be worse than no deal at all.

Dennis Ross, Eric Edelman and Michael Makovsky

Los Angeles Times

October 29, 2013

This month in Geneva, at the first negotiations over its nuclear program since the election of President Hassan Rouhani, Iran took an unprecedented step: It negotiated. For the first time, Tehran presented an actual vision of the endgame for the talks with six world powers, and how to get there. However, contrary to expectations, it offered no concessions, leaving serious questions about Iranian purposes. With another round of talks scheduled for next week, U.S. negotiators would do well to follow principles that signify the core interests at stake.

FOR THE RECORD:

Diplomacy: In an Oct. 29 Op-Ed article regarding Iran, the affiliation for Dennis Ross, one of the authors, was incomplete. It is the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

The most pressing national security threat facing the United States remains preventing a nuclear-capable Iran. The preferred way to achieve that objective is through a diplomatic agreement. But diplomacy can only be that — a means to an end.

As Secretary of State John F. Kerry has said, a « bad deal is worse than no deal. » A deal struck for its own sake would still allow for a nuclear Iran; undermine the legitimacy of any subsequent U.S. attempts or, much more likely, Israeli attempts to arrest Iran’s progress by military action; discredit and compromise U.S. credibility; and weaken, if not destroy, the decades-old international nonproliferation regime.

Therefore, the United States should only pursue an agreement within certain parameters, to ensure the deal actually furthers the interests of the U.S. and its allies. As we explain in a new JINSA Gemunder Center report, there are six such principles that should guide the negotiations with Iran.

First, Iran must resolve outstanding international concerns. The International Atomic Energy Agency has repeatedly complained that Iran has not been forthcoming about its nuclear activities. Indeed, the IAEA in 2011 expressed its « deep and increasing concern about the unresolved issues regarding the Iranian nuclear program, including those which need to be clarified to exclude the existence of possible military dimensions. » Iran must quickly address all outstanding IAEA concerns as part of any deal.

Second, Iran must adhere to international legal requirements. The IAEA’s repeated condemnations of Iran have spurred the U.N. Security Council to pass six resolutions requiring Tehran to « suspend all enrichment-related and reprocessing activities » and « to implement without delay all transparency measures as the IAEA may request in support of its ongoing investigations. »

Iran has repeatedly disputed the legality of these resolutions, claiming the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, or NPT, grants it a right to enrich uranium. But no such right exists. Iran’s defiance and distortion of international legal demands threatens to unravel the nonproliferation regime. To preserve it, negotiators must reassert the Security Council’s authority and the NPT’s true purpose.

Third, deny Iran nuclear weapons capability. The main concern about Iran’s nuclear program is that it is on the verge of producing enough weapons-grade uranium for a nuclear device. An acceptable deal must not just freeze but tangibly roll back its ability to do so. This will require limits on size and enrichment level of its uranium stockpile, number and type of operating and installed centrifuges, design of enrichment facilities and possible plutonium production at the Arak heavy-water reactor.

Fourth, impose a strict inspections regime. Just because Iran agrees to a deal does not mean it will stick to it. It has tried to build each of its current enrichment facilities covertly. To prevent it from attempting to do so again, negotiators should require Iran to agree to more rigorous monitoring of its nuclear program.

Fifth, negotiate from a position of strength. Too often, Iran has used negotiations to extract concessions, undermine international resolve and play for time. In the few instances it has compromised, it has been because of the threat of force. The success of these talks will hinge on Iran understanding that there will be very real and damaging consequences if negotiations fail.

This will require at least these U.S. actions: Intensify sanctions and incentivize other countries to do the same, issue more forceful and credible statements that all options are on the table, initiate new military deployments and make clear the support for Israeli military action if conducted.

Finally, do not waste time. Iran will likely attain an undetectable nuclear capability by mid-2014, and perhaps even earlier, leaving scant time to both negotiate and verifiably implement a deal. It appears that Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif may have offered a timeline at Geneva for wrapping up negotiations. But given Iranian nuclear progress over the last 18 months and earlier unexplained activities, negotiators ought not accept a schedule that stretches beyond the point when it becomes impossible to prevent a nuclear Iran by other means. Implementing and making known a strict deadline for talks can dissuade Iran from using diplomacy as a cover while sprinting for the bomb, and reassure Israel so it does not feel compelled to act alone.

Negotiators should hew to these principles to avoid mistaking rhetoric for action, and must walk away from any agreement that violates them.

Dennis Ross is counselor at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and was a senior Middle East advisor to President Obama from 2009 to 2011. Eric Edelman was undersecretary of Defense for policy in 2005-09. Michael Makovsky is chief executive of the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs, or JINSA, and served in the Office of Secretary of Defense in 2002-06. They are members of JINSA’s Gemunder Center Iran Task Force.

Voir encore:

«L’espionnage entre Etats: un jeu de dupes qui, dévoilé, peut avoir des incidences»

Chantal Lorho

RFI

2013-10-24

La NSA, la National Security Agency en anglais, est au coeur de nombreuses polémiques ces derniers mois, de Edward Snowden à l’espionnage supposé de pays de l’Union européenne ou de ses dirigeants, comme Angela Merkel… Comment travaille cette fameuse agence de renseignements américains ? Sébastien Laurent, professeur à l’université de Bordeaux et à Sciences Po, spécialiste des questions de renseignements et de sécurité, propose son analyse.

RFI: Est-ce qu’on peut rappeler comment est née cette fameuse NSA ?

Sébastien Laurent : La NSA, c’est un peu une vieille dame. Elle est née il y a un peu plus de 60 ans et ça a été la réunion, aux Etats-Unis, de toutes les composantes de l’administration américaine qui procédaient à des interceptions téléphoniques puis plus tard, bien plus tard, des interceptions satellitaires, et aujourd’hui des interceptions sur les câbles du réseau internet. Donc aujourd’hui, c’est certes une vieille dame, mais c’est une vieille dame qui se tient toujours à la page, qui actualise en permanence ses compétences techniques, qui sait coopérer avec d’autres pays qui sont parties prenantes de la coopération de la NSA. Et c’est surtout, on le sait aujourd’hui, la plus riche de toutes les agences de renseignements américaines.

Peut-on dire qu’il y a un avant et un après 11-Septembre dans la façon dont les Américains pratiquent l’espionnage ?

Pas vraiment. Pour ce qui est de l’espionnage par des moyens technologiques, les écoutes précisément ou les interceptions de flux internet, 2001 n’a pas vraiment changé les choses. 2001 a juste donné aux Etats-Unis un motif nouveau pour habiller leurs pratiques d’interception. Ce nouveau motif, c’est la guerre contre le terrorisme. Mais sur le plan des pratiques, depuis les années 1950, en pleine guerre froide, les Etats-Unis ont en permanence intercepté des communications, y compris celles de leurs partenaires et celles de leurs alliés.

Très concrètement, comment travaille la NSA, qui surveille-t-elle, quels sont les mots-clés qu’elle utilise pour intercepter telle ou telle communication ?

On pouvait jusqu’alors faire des suppositions, mais maintenant on a les documents publiés par Edward Snowden, et le fait qu’il soit pourchassé par les autorités américaines permet de donner du crédit aux documents que Snowden a diffusé dans différents supports de presse. La NSA, d’un point de vue très pratique, en matière d’interception en dehors des Etats-Unis, a deux moyens. D’une part, elle se sert dans les grands serveurs des fournisseurs d’accès à internet, c’est une première façon d’aller directement puiser à la source. Ou alors, elle a un accès, je dirais plus pratique encore, qui est de se brancher sur les câbles eux-mêmes, et non pas sur les fermes (serveurs de données) dans lesquelles sont contenues toutes les données. Ensuite, comme d’autres agences, comme l’agence britannique et d’autres agences, toutes ces données ne sont pas exploitées par l’intelligence humaine mais sont exploitées grâce à des algorithmes, par des capacités informatiques, qui essaient de cibler des mots-clés. Alors, c’est tout l’enjeu du débat aujourd’hui. Est-ce que, comme le disent les Etats-Unis dans une défense mezzo voce, ils ne cherchent dans ces données que ce qui a trait à la lutte contre le terrorisme et à la sécurité des Etats-Unis? Ou est-ce que, sans le dire, ils utilisent aussi ces interceptions pour repérer les mots-clés touchant à des pratiques commerciales, à des brevets, à des litiges juridiques ? Ce que l’on peut dire, étant donné ce que l’on sait aujourd’hui du passé, c’est que la capacité d’interception de la NSA a servi, bien sûr, la sécurité des Etats-Unis mais elle a aussi servi les Etats-Unis dans la guerre économique mondiale qui est devenue une réalité plus forte après la fin de la guerre froide. Donc la défense qui consiste à dire « la NSA assure la sécurité du monde libre comme au temps de la guerre froide », c’est un argument qui ne tient absolument pas la route.

D’où ce chiffre astronomique qu’on a évoqué à propos de la France. 70 millions de données interceptés par la NSA du 10 décembre 2012 au 8 janvier 2013. C’est ce que vous appelez la « méthode du chalut », on ratisse le plus large possible ?

Exactement, cette comparaison maritime est tout à fait adaptée. C’est du chalutage, on lance les filets au loin, et ensuite on tire les filets vers le navire, en l’occurrence la NSA, et on essaie de trier. Mais il est assez probable que dans l’interception pratiquée « au chalut », on recueille effectivement des éléments qui soient utiles à la sécurité des Etats-Unis. Il est tout aussi probable qu’ensuite d’autres données qui puissent être exploitées commercialement ou juridiquement, ou en termes d’ingénierie, soient aussi prises en compte. La NSA n’est pas un service de renseignement mais un service d’interception. Ensuite, la NSA fournit la « production » – les interceptions – à différentes agences américaines, notamment la CIA mais pas seulement. Donc c’est vraiment une énorme machine d’interception technique qui, en fait, ne procède pas à l’utilisation du renseignement mais qui utilise toute sa production pour la diffuser à différentes agences américaines.

Le Brésil, le Mexique, la France et aujourd’hui l’Allemagne, tous victimes présumées de la NSA, dénoncent publiquement les pratiques américaines. Mais quelqu’un comme Bernard Kouchner, l’ancien chef de la diplomatie française, affirme que nous faisons la même chose, « Nous espionnons, nous écoutons, mais avec moins de moyens ». Est-ce que tout cela n’est pas, selon vous, un jeu de dupes ?

C’est un jeu de dupes, mais comme les relations entre les Etats sont un jeu de dupes. Quand vous regardez la norme internationale qui est le droit international, depuis que les pratiques d’espionnage existent, les Etats ont signé entre eux des traités pour faciliter certaines choses et pour interdire d’autres choses. Du point de vue du droit international, l’espionnage n’est pas interdit. Donc il est licite. Et les Etats se sont, bien sûr, dès la fin du XIXe siècle, bien gardés de s’interdire mutuellement la pratique de l’espionnage à l’extérieur de leur territoire. Donc effectivement, on peut dire que c’est un jeu de dupes, en même temps il faut bien regarder ce qui est en cause, de la part de la NSA c’est quand même à l’égard de ses grands partenaires commerciaux et politiques, le Brésil, la France ou l’Allemagne. Et là, le jeu de dupes, qui est en partie dévoilé, peut avoir des incidences sur ce qui est la base de la relation entre des alliés et des partenaires : cela s’appelle la confiance.

Voir enfin:

Poutine supplante Obama comme la personne la plus puissante du monde

Le Vif

Source: Belga

30 octobre 2013

Le président russe Vladimir Poutine a évincé son homologue américain Barack Obama de la première place du classement Forbes 2013 des personnes les plus puissantes au monde, publié mercredi par le magazine américain.

Le président Obama figure à la deuxième place de cette liste, suivi du président du parti communiste chinois Xi Jinping, et du pape François, qui y fait son apparition pour la première fois.

« Poutine a solidifié son contrôle sur la Russie, et tous ceux qui ont regardé le jeu d’échecs autour de la Syrie ont une idée claire du glissement de pouvoir vers Poutine sur la scène internationale », écrit Forbes pour expliquer sa première place.

La première femme à y figurer est la chancelière allemande Angela Merkel, à la 5e place. Le président français François Hollande, dont Forbes souligne qu’il est au plus bas dans les sondages de popularité, passe de la 14e à la 18e place.

Le pouvoir des 72 personnes – dirigeants politiques, chefs d’entreprise ou philanthropes – qui figurent sur cette liste annuelle consultable sur le site du magazine (www.forbes.com) a été déterminé à partir de quatre critères: le nombre de personnes sur lesquelles elles ont du pouvoir, les ressources financières qu’elles contrôlent, l’étendue de leur influence et comment elles exercent leur pouvoir pour changer le monde.

On y trouve le cofondateur de Microsoft Bill Gates à la 6e place, Ben Bernanke, le président sortant de la réserve fédérale américaine à la 7e, le roi Abdallah d’Arabie saoudite à la 8e, le Premier ministre britannique David Cameron à la 11e.

Les autres Européens de la liste sont notamment l’Italien Mario Draghi, président de la Banque centrale européenne (9e), le président du groupe Volkswagen Martin Winterkorn qui fait son entrée à la 49e place, et Bernard Arnault, le patron du groupe français de luxe LVMH (54e).


Ecoutes NSA: Attention, un scandale peut en cacher un autre (With a little help from their friends: How GAFA and Microsoft contribute to NSA’s big brothering of us all)

13 juin, 2013
http://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/82f59-googleiswatchingyou252822529.jpg?w=300&h=260http://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/74e4c-la2bnsa2baccus25c325a9e2bd2527espionner2bnos2bcommunications2bavec2bl2527appui2bdes2bgafa2b-2bprism.jpg?w=300&h=196Sans que nous en ayons pleinement conscience, se crée à côté de nous, ce que j’appelle un « double numérique »* de nous-mêmes, composé des traces que nous laissons sur Internet, mais aussi des différents fichiers que des entreprises, un peu partout dans le monde, possèdent sur nous. Nous ignorons jusqu’à l’existence même de ce « double numérique » et savons encore moins quelles utilisations en sont faites. Ce « double numérique » peut voyager partout grâce aux réseaux de communications modernes. Il peut être déjà prêt à l’emploi, stocké quelque part sur des serveurs. Ou être constitué, à la volée, en croisant en quelques centièmes de seconde des informations existant déjà sur nous et éparpillées dans d’autres fichiers. Jacques Henno
Ce qui est véritablement nouveau ici est de deux ordres : tout d’abord d’avoir un « smoking gun » comme on dit en anglais, une preuve « fumante », flagrante. Les services américains sont pris la main dans le sac, de manière irréfutable. Cela permet une fois pour toutes de couper court aux arguments du type « vous voyez le mal partout », « vous êtes paranoïaques » et autres « théories du complot ». Et peut-être que ces éléments probants permettront de susciter un réel débat public. Ensuite, ce que Prism montre, c’est la « collaboration active » de ces entreprises géantes (Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, etc.) à la surveillance généralisée. Certes, le droit américain ne leur laisse peut-être pas vraiment le choix et c’est bien là une partie importante du problème… Mais le fait que ces entreprises coopèrent ainsi avec la NSA et le FBI montre qu’il n’est en aucun cas possible de leur faire confiance pour protéger nos libertés fondamentales, au premier rang desquelles notre liberté d’expression et la protection de notre vie privée… surtout si on a le mauvais goût de ne pas être citoyen américain ! Le problème sous-jacent est bien la centralisation de nos données. Pourquoi stocker toutes nos vies, tous nos contacts, toutes nos affinités, toute notre intimité, sur les serveurs de ces entreprises, situés aux Etats-Unis ? Nous sommes en train, plus ou moins consciemment, de bâtir ces gigantesques agrégats de données, de nous fliquer volontairement… Pourquoi ? Cette centralisation est par nature contraire à l’esprit même d’Internet, dans lequel chacun peut lire et accéder à l’information, mais également publier, participer, pour être un acteur du réseau à part entière. Prism, en montrant à quel point la limite entre surveillance des Etats et surveillance privée est ténue, sinon inexistante, pose cette question cruciale de l’architecture que nous choisissons pour nos communications et pour stocker nos données. Et cette architecture est forcément politique. Jérémie Zimmermann

Attention: un scandale peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où les révélations du lanceur d’alerte Edward Snowden nous fournissent enfin le « revolver fumant » et la confirmation irréfutable de ce que la plupart d’entre nous supposaient depuis longtemps, à savoir la mise en fiche de la planète toute entière par les oreilles de la NSA …

Retour, avec le porte-parole de la Quadrature du Net, Jérémie Zimmermann et le spécialiste du numérique Jacques Henno, sur l’habituel scandale dans le scandale …

A savoir la collaboration active, à ladite à la surveillance généralisée, de GAFA

Autrement dit les entreprises géantes sans lesquelles il n’y aurait pas d’internet mais aussi de surveillance possible (Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, etc.) …

« Pourquoi stocker toutes nos vies sur des serveurs aux Etats-Unis ? »

Le Monde

12.06.2013

Le porte-parole de la Quadrature du Net, Jérémie Zimmermann.

Jérémie Zimmermann, porte-parole de la Quadrature du Net, association de défense des droits et libertés des citoyens sur Internet, était l’invité d’un chat avec les lecteurs du Monde.fr, mercredi 12 juin.

Ark : Comment est-il possible que des programmes aussi sensibles que Prism puissent être approuvés par le Congrès américain, et que personne (le public) n’en sache rien ? Est-ce que l’objectif du programme est masqué ? Un acte du Congrès est public, me semble-t-il.

Vaste question, qui a trait en grande partie à l’attitude des Etats-Unis à la suite des attentats du 11 septembre 2001. Une politique publique basée sur la peur a donné les pleins pouvoirs à l’antiterrorisme, dans une sorte de guerre permanente (un peu comme dans 1984, de George Orwell ?).

Un ensemble de projets législatifs ont depuis sans cesse augmenté, de façon disproportionnée, les pouvoirs de la NSA et du FBI. On a l’impression aujourd’hui qu’ils ont les pleins pouvoirs, sans aucune forme de contrôle démocratique.

Depuis 2003, des lanceurs d’alerte chez AT&T (un des plus gros opérateurs télécom américains) ont indiqué que la NSA dupliquait, pour en faire ce qu’elle voulait, les communications internationales. Depuis 2008, la loi amendant le Foreign Intelligence & Surveillance Act (FISA) donnait les pleins pouvoirs aux services de renseignements pour collecter les données de citoyens non américains lorsque celles-ci sont stockées aux Etats-Unis.

Lire : Surveillance électronique : comment Washington espionne les Européens

On le savait. Le Congrès savait pour Prism, mais n’a rien dit. Désormais on a des preuves irréfutables, c’est ce qui manquait pour que puisse éclater un vrai débat public, condition indispensable à ce que l’on puisse revenir en arrière sur ces délires ultra-sécuritaires et à ce que les citoyens puissent reprendre le contrôle de ces institutions.

Mmu_man : Comment se fait-il que le gouvernement américain veuille absolument tenir un programme comme Prism secret ? Après tout, c’est bien eux qui disent « Si vous n’avez rien à vous reprocher, vous n’avez rien à cacher », non ?

La culture du secret de ces institutions est une grande partie du problème. Dans une société démocratique, il est admis que des services puissent être secrets, mais ils doivent rendre des comptes aux citoyens, après que les actions ont été menées. Ici, il s’agit de pans entiers de politiques publiques qui sont tenus secrets, complètement hors d’atteinte des citoyens. C’est un problème grave, surtout lorsque les citoyens du monde entier sont concernés.

Par ailleurs, notons cette différence essentielle : les citoyens ont le droit à la protection de leur vie privée, c’est une liberté fondamentale. Les « vies » des Etats doivent, par nature et par défaut, être publiques. Le secret n’est justifié qu’au cas par cas. On a l’impression d’assister aux Etats-Unis à une inflation de cette culture du secret, très dangereuse pour la démocratie (qui a dit « Wikileaks » ?).

Vince120 : On nous annonce (officiellement) que la France n’est pas concernée, mais comment savoir (en particulier au regard des accords, entre autre militaires, transatlantiques) dans quelle mesure c’est vrai ? Quand Amesys fournit des outils à la Libye, comment peut-on imaginer qu’ils n’ont pas déjà servi en France ?

Bien sûr que la France est concernée ! La loi d’amendement au FISA dit explicitement que « tous les citoyens non Américains » peuvent être écoutés « sans conditions » par les services américains, « lorsque les données sont stockées aux USA ». Les citoyens français sont très nombreux à utiliser les services des entreprises collaborant activement avec la NSA : Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, Microsoft, Apple, etc. Chacun utilisant ces services est concerné, quel que soit son pays de résidence et c’est bien l’un des nœuds du problème…

Après, savoir si la France a un tel mécanisme de surveillance généralisé des communications et des données de ses citoyens… C’est peu probable. Déja parce que les budgets de nos agences sont très différents de ceux de la NSA. Ensuite parce qu’il leur suffit peut-être de nouer des accords de coopération avec la NSA et le FBI… pour pouvoir accéder aux données concernant leurs citoyens ? De tels accords ont apparemment été signés entre GCHQ (les services britanniques) et la NSA. Si la France disposait d’un tel système de surveillance généralisée, j’ose espérer que des informations à son sujet finiraient par fuiter…

Visiteur : J’ai toutefois l’impression que Prism n’est pas si nouveau. Le programme Echelon fait exactement la même chose avec les conversations téléphoniques depuis de nombreuses années.

Ce qui est véritablement nouveau ici est de deux ordres : tout d’abord d’avoir un « smoking gun » comme on dit en anglais, une preuve « fumante », flagrante. Les services américains sont pris la main dans le sac, de manière irréfutable. Cela permet une fois pour toutes de couper court aux arguments du type « vous voyez le mal partout », « vous êtes paranoïaques » et autres « théories du complot ». Et peut-être que ces éléments probants permettront de susciter un réel débat public.

Ensuite, ce que Prism montre, c’est la « collaboration active » de ces entreprises géantes (Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, etc.) à la surveillance généralisée. Certes, le droit américain ne leur laisse peut-être pas vraiment le choix et c’est bien là une partie importante du problème… Mais le fait que ces entreprises coopèrent ainsi avec la NSA et le FBI montre qu’il n’est en aucun cas possible de leur faire confiance pour protéger nos libertés fondamentales, au premier rang desquelles notre liberté d’expression et la protection de notre vie privée… surtout si on a le mauvais goût de ne pas être citoyen américain !

Le problème sous-jacent est bien la centralisation de nos données. Pourquoi stocker toutes nos vies, tous nos contacts, toutes nos affinités, toute notre intimité, sur les serveurs de ces entreprises, situés aux Etats-Unis ? Nous sommes en train, plus ou moins consciemment, de bâtir ces gigantesques agrégats de données, de nous fliquer volontairement… Pourquoi ? Cette centralisation est par nature contraire à l’esprit même d’Internet, dans lequel chacun peut lire et accéder à l’information, mais également publier, participer, pour être un acteur du réseau à part entière.

Prism, en montrant à quel point la limite entre surveillance des Etats et surveillance privée est ténue, sinon inexistante, pose cette question cruciale de l’architecture que nous choisissons pour nos communications et pour stocker nos données. Et cette architecture est forcément politique.

Damien : Peut-on encore parler de vie privée sur Internet ? Je pars du principe que puisque que nous tweetons, bloguons ou commentons des choses sur Internet, notre vie privée n’existe plus, elle est devenue une vie publique.

Il y a une différence fondamentale entre vie publique et vie privée. La vie privée c’est l’intimité, c’est ce que l’on ne partage qu’avec les personnes de son choix. La vie publique c’est quelque chose qui jusqu’à il n’y a pas si longtemps de cela était principalement l’apanage de quelques personnes : politiques, journalistes, stars, etc.

Avec Internet, nous avons tous la possibilité de participer, de publier, d’écrire et donc d’avoir une vie publique. Nous commençons tout juste à apprendre l’impact que cela peut avoir sur notre société tout entière… Pour autant, cela ne veut pas dire qu’il faut renoncer à la protection de notre vie privée, qui est une liberté fondamentale.

Visiteur : Pourquoi vouloir protéger sa vie privée lorsque l’on n’a rien à cacher ?

Cet argument revient très souvent lorsque l’on évoque la question de la protection de la vie privée. Déjà, si vous n’avez véritablement « rien à cacher », vous opposeriez-vous à ce que l’on mette une caméra dans votre salle de bain ? Dans votre chambre à coucher ? Que l’on expose vos mots doux, fussent-ils envoyés via SMS, courriel ou Facebook, sur la place publique ? Vous comprenez ici qu’il existe une sphère d’intimité dont chacun doit pouvoir rester maître, et choisir ce qu’il révèle ou non au monde.

Ensuite, avec les données personnelles, nous faisons un pari sur l’avenir, un peu comme une hypothèque. Nous ne pouvons pas savoir ce qui sera faisable et ce qui sera fait avec nos données personnelles, nos profils, dans un an, cinq ans ou dix ans. Une chose est sûre : avec le temps, ces profils deviennent de plus en plus précis. Des chercheurs ont récemment démontré que juste par vos « J’aime » cliqués sur Facebook, et aucune autre information que celle-là, il était à 90 % possible de prédire votre orientation sexuelle, si vous êtes fumeur, marié ou divorcé, etc. Donc on diffuse beaucoup plus d’informations sur nous-mêmes qu’on ne le croit, parfois des informations ayant trait à notre intimité. Nous devons pouvoir rester maîtres de ce que nous laissons comme traces ou non.

Ensuite, et toujours parce que l’on ne sait pas de quoi demain sera fait, parce que l’on ne peut pas prédire si dans le futur on souhaitera se lancer en politique, ou décrocher un job dans telle entreprise ou telle institution. Ce jour-là, il sera trop tard pour effacer des informations gênantes qui auront été publiées des années auparavant.

Ensuite, parce que la surveillance généralisée est une des composantes des régimes autoritaires, et parce que l’on a vu dans l’histoire des régimes basculer très rapidement… Si cela arrivait, il serait temps de se demander si l’on souhaite passer du côté de la résistance et là encore il sera peut-être trop tard si les autorités disposent de toutes les informations sur vous.

Enfin, et parce que je me trouve dans cette noble maison qu’est Le Monde, parce que la protection des sources des journalistes est une composante essentielle d’une information libre, elle-même pilier de nos démocraties. Il faut donc que les journalistes et leurs sources puissent avoir un espace ou échanger de façon protégée… Peut-être souhaiterez-vous un jour devenir journaliste, ou le deviendrez-vous par la force des choses ?

Florian : Sachant que nos données (Facebook, Google, Amazon, etc.) sont déjà stockées sur des serveurs (et donc exploitables), dans quelle mesure peut-on réellement se protéger puisqu’un retour arrière est impossible (me semble-t-il) ?

Un jeune étudiant autrichien, Max Schrems, s’est livré à une expérience intéressante : il a voulu accéder aux données que Facebook stockait sur lui, comme le droit européen l’y autorise. Il lui a fallu deux ans et, je crois, plus de vingt procédures dans de nombreuses juridictions pour finalement y parvenir et recevoir de Facebook 900 mégaoctets (Mo) de données parmi lesquelles… toutes les informations qu’il avait « effacé » de Facebook ! Photos, messages, etc., tout y était en réalité encore !

Max Schrems, le 8 novembre, au café Ritter à Vienne.

Lire : Max Schrems : ‘L’important, c’est que Facebook respecte la loi’

Donc retourner en arrière semble difficile en effet… Mais on peut se focaliser sur ici et maintenant, afin de mieux envisager l’avenir. N’est-il pas temps de fermer votre compte Facebook ? D’utiliser une messagerie qui n’est pas stockée aux USA ? De commencer à apprendre à utiliser le chiffrement de vos communications ?

Hgwca : Quelle solution avons-nous donc ? Tout crypter ? Quitter ces géants du Net ? Faire son propre serveur de messagerie électronique ?

Nous sommes à un moment charnière de notre histoire, et nous devons questionner notre rapport, en tant que société tout entière, à la technologie. D’un côté, nous avons des technologies qui sont faites pour rendre les individus plus libres, par l’ouverture et le partage des connaissances : ce sont les logiciels libres (comme GNU/Linux, Firefox ou Bittorrent), les services décentralisés (que chacun fait tourner sur son serveur ou sur des serveurs mutualisés entre amis ou à l’échelle d’une entreprise, institution, etc.) et le chiffrement point à point (qui permet aux individus de protéger par les mathématiques leurs communications contre les interceptions).

De l’autre, nous constatons la montée en puissance de technologies qui sont conçues pour contrôler les individus, voire restreindre leurs libertés en les empêchant d’en faire ce qu’ils souhaitent. Je pense à ces pseudo « téléphones intelligents » qui ne sont ni des téléphones (ils sont avant tout des ordinateurs qui savent également téléphoner), ni intelligents, car en réalité ils permettent de faire moins de choses que des ordinateurs traditionnels et sont conçus en réalité pour empêcher à l’utilisateur de choisir d’où seront installés les programmes, d’installer les programmes de son choix, ou même d’avoir accès pour le comprendre au fonctionnement des puces cruciales qui permettent d’émettre ou recevoir des données… Si l’on devait appeler cela de « l’intelligence », cela serait peut-être au sens anglais du mot, pour parler de renseignement, d’espionnage… car de tels appareils semblent être conçus pour espionner leurs utilisateurs.

De la même façon, ces services massivement centralisés sont par essence, par leur architecture, faits pour aspirer toutes les données personnelles possibles et imaginables. Ce sont les modèles économiques de ces entreprises qui sont basés sur le fait d’entretenir un flou entre vie privée et vie publique… Toutes ces technologies ont en commun de maintenir l’utilisateur dans l’ignorance… Dans l’ignorance du fonctionnement même de la technologie (parfois en habillant cela de « cool », comme Apple qui vous vend l’ignorance, comme du confort, de la facilité, etc., au travers de produits il est vrai assez bien conçus, quoique fragiles…).

En réalité, signer un contrat avec une de ces entreprises sans comprendre les réalités sous-jacentes qu’implique l’architecture de nos outils de communication et le fonctionnement de nos appareils revient un peu à signer un contrat sans savoir lire. Je suis convaincu que la connaissance de la technologie (ou à l’inverse son ignorance) est la clé qui nous permet de basculer d’un environnement où l’on est sous contrôle à un environnement ou l’on est plus libre car l’on retrouve le contrôle de la technologie.

C’est l’humain qui doit contrôler la machine, et jamais l’inverse. Cette promesse, c’est celle du logiciel libre, c’est celle des services décentralisés, c’est celle du chiffrement. Mais toutes ces technologies ont en commun de nécessiter un effort actif de participation de la part de l’utilisateur… Eh oui, la liberté a un prix !

Je pense qu’il est urgent de repenser la façon dont nous apprenons la technologie. Allez voir le site « Codecademy » qui permet d’apprendre de façon ludique à programmer… Ou encore allez voir sur les forums des communautés de logiciels libres (comme ubuntu-fr) où vous trouverez des centaines de passionnés prêts à partager leurs connaissances pour vous aider à sortir des prisons dorées de Microsoft, d’Apple, de Google et de Facebook !

En gros : indignez-vous contre ces technologies de contrôle et rejoignez les hackers (au sens étymologique d’enthousiastes de la technologie qui aiment la maîtriser et construire, pas au sens déformé de criminels qui cassent) pour participer à la technologie qui libère !

Lire aussi : Comment passer entre les mailles de la surveillance d’Internet ?

Devant le Parlement européen, à Strasbourg.

Moonwalker : Il y a actuellement des discussions au niveau européen sur une réforme de la législation sur la protection des données personnelles. Pensez-vous que ces révélations sur Prism vont avoir un impact sur la future législation européenne ?

Très bonne question ! La réponse à Prism est en partie, comme nous venons de l’évoquer, technique… mais elle est également évidemment politique. La réforme en cours de la législation européenne sur la protection des données personnelles est un enjeu crucial. C’est un dossier ultra-complexe (4 000 amendements en commission « libertés publiques », record absolu au Parlement européen) et le fruit d’une campagne de lobbying sans précédent (décrite par Yves Eudes dans un article du Monde, « Très chères données personnelles »), mené par ces mêmes géants de la Silicon Valley (Facebook, Yahoo!, Google, etc.) qui ont ouvertement participé à la surveillance par la NSA des citoyens du monde entier ! Ils seraient sur le point d’obtenir gain de cause et de ratiboiser la moindre protection de nos données personnelles, le moindre outil que la Commission européenne prévoyait de mettre entre nos mains pour reprendre le contrôle de nos données.

Devant l’ampleur de la tâche, le dossier est en train de s’enliser au Parlement européen. On aura donc plus de temps que prévu durant lesquels les citoyens devront s’impliquer pour entrer en contact avec les élus et leur expliquer combien cette question est cruciale et combien ils doivent voter en faveur de mesures nous protégeant, plutôt qu’en obéissant aux intérêts de ces entreprises. La France aura aussi à se positionner, au niveau du Conseil de l’UE, et on attend le gouvernement au tournant.

Si le texte final n’était pas dans sa version « Facebook & Co » où nous aurions perdu tout moyen de nous défendre (et une législation bien pire que ce qu’il y a actuellement), nous pourrions faire pression sur ces entreprises : par exemple en résiliant le « safe harbour » qui les exonère (en gros) de respecter trop strictement le droit européen. Par exemple en encadrant l’export de données dans les pays tiers. Enfin, en créant les conditions de l’émergence en Europe d’un marché des services Internet non pas basés sur l’utilisation abusive, sans restrictions, de nos données personnelles, mais sur de nouvelles architectures décentralisées qui redonneraient la confiance aux citoyens en leur redonnant le contrôle sur leurs données.

De plus, il convient de noter que cet espionnage par la NSA et le FBI concerne évidemment au premier plan les libertés publiques et les citoyens, mais qu’il concerne également les entreprises, par une dimension dite « d’intelligence économique »… Combien d’entreprises stockent leurs données sensibles, non chiffrées, sur les serveurs de Google ? Quelles conséquences en matière de marchés perdus, de conséquence faussée, etc. ?

Jibé : Le « cloud » qui, aux yeux de nombreuses entreprises et de particuliers, représente une solution de flexibilité et de simplicité extrême ne représente-t-il pas paradoxalement la plus grande menace sur un Internet par définition décentralisé ?

Le « cloud » est un concept plus ou moins fumeux (arf arf)… Au point que je parle de temps en temps de « clown computing », tant le terme à la mode et le marketing prennent parfois le pas sur la raison. En réalité, le cloud rejoint deux concepts pas franchement nouveaux. D’abord, le concept technique dit de la « virtualisation », par lequel on décorrèle le matériel informatique des logiciels qui s’y exécutent (pour pouvoir changer un disque dur ou un ordinateur grillé sans tout arrêter par exemple). Ensuite, le concept juridique, économique (et politique) de l’externalisation : confier à d’autres le soin de gérer une partie de ses ressources informatiques, de ses communications, de son stockage, etc.

C’est là qu’il y a potentiellement un risque, qu’il convient d’analyser sereinement, loin du marketing. Peut-on faire confiance à des entreprises tierces (surtout américaines, au vu de Prism) pour stocker ses données personnelles ? Ses informations sensibles ? Son fichier client ? J’ai tendance à penser qu’on n’est jamais mieux servi que par soi-même et qu’il faut à tout moment pouvoir maîtriser son infrastructure et ses ressources…

Lire aussi : Le scandale FBI-NSA pourrait rebattre les cartes dans le marché du ‘cloud’

Cédric : Le livre 1984 serait-il une espèce de prémonition de ce qui se passe maintenant ?

On pourrait regarder Google, Facebook, la NSA et l’Etat policier… pardon, l’Etat « national security » américain et se dire que Big Brother, à côté, c’est de la gnognote. De l’autre, 1984 est l’histoire d’un individu qui se révolte contre cette surveillance et ce contrôle absolu, totalitaire, des populations. Et, pour cela, nous renvoie à nos responsabilités individuelles.

Nous avons tous, entre les mains, les moyens de participer à changer les choses, à peser sur le débat et les politiques publiques. Pour certains d’entre nous, nous avons même accès à des informations, tenues secrètes, qui prouvent que les gouvernements et les entreprises agissent parfois de façon contraires aux principes démocratiques et à l’intérêt général. Comme Winston dans 1984, nous avons le devoir d’user de notre sens de la justice pour aider à faire éclater la vérité. C’est pour cela que Julian Assange, Bradley Manning et Edward Snowden doivent être reconnus et protégés et servir d’inspiration aux citoyens aux quatre coins du monde.

Surveillance électronique : comment Washington espionne les Européens

Jean-Pierre Stroobants et Frédéric Lemaître

Le Monde

11.06.2013

Bruxelles, bureau européen. La Commission européenne a répété, lundi 10 juin, qu’elle était « préoccupée » par Prism, le programme américain de surveillance électronique dirigé par l’Agence nationale de sécurité (NSA) qui lui permet d’accéder aux données d’étrangers, notamment européens.

Inhabituellement discrète, Viviane Reding, la commissaire à la justice, n’a pas pointé du doigt les Etats-Unis, avec lesquels, a expliqué sa porte-parole, elle évoque « systématiquement » les droits des citoyens européens. La commissaire a plutôt visé les pays de l’Union européenne (UE) qui ont gelé, jeudi 6 juin, à Luxembourg, son projet de protection des données personnelles.*

En discussion depuis dix-huit mois et 25 réunions, le dossier DPR (Data Protection Regulation, réglementation de la protection des données) fait l’objet de 3 000 amendements et divise l’Union. Les ministres de la justice des Vingt-Sept s’étaient réunis quelques heures avant les révélations de l’ancien employé de la CIA Edward Snowden dans le quotidien britannique The Guardian, qui auraient peut-être permis de rapprocher leurs points de vue très divergents. Londres et La Haye jugent le projet Reding trop pénalisant pour les entreprises, Paris veut plus d’attention pour les réseaux sociaux, Berlin juge les textes trop flous… Confrontées aux révélations sur Prism, les capitales européennes se retrouvent au moins, aujourd’hui, pour se dire, elles aussi, « préoccupées ».

D’IMPORTANTS TRANSFERTS DE DONNÉES

C’était déjà le qualificatif utilisé par la Commission en 2000, quand furent dévoilées les activités européennes d’Echelon, un réseau anglo-saxon de surveillance globale des télécommunications. La NSA dirigeait cette stratégie d’interception en vue d’obtenir des informations économiques, commerciales, technologiques et politiques. La législation des Etats membres de l’Union était violée, les droits fondamentaux des citoyens aussi.

Londres avait, à l’époque, profité de sa relation privilégiée avec Washington pour espionner ses rivaux européens. Les deux capitales ont nié ; les dirigeants européens ont préféré oublier que le responsable du cryptage des communications de la Commission avait déclaré qu’il avait « de très bons contacts avec la NSA », qui aurait eu libre accès aux informations prétendument confidentielles de l’exécutif européen. L’intéressé a ensuite « rectifié » ses propos dans une lettre à son supérieur.

Les attentats du 11 septembre 2001 – qu’Echelon n’a pu prévenir – sont survenus et, parfois volontaires, souvent contraints, les Européens ont, depuis, concédé d’importants transferts de données aux autorités américaines, au nom de la lutte contre le terrorisme. En 2006, ils découvraient que Washington avait secrètement accès, depuis cinq ans, aux informations de Swift, une société basée en Belgique et qui sécurise les flux financiers entre les banques du monde entier.

DES LOIS EUROPÉENNES IMPUISSANTES

Une fois la stupeur passée et une difficile négociation engagée, un accord a été signé en 2010. Les Européens ont obtenu de pouvoir désormais évaluer la pertinence des demandes américaines, un responsable des Vingt-Sept est présent dans la capitale fédérale américaine pour exercer un contrôle, la procédure et d’éventuels incidents font l’objet d’une évaluation semestrielle, etc.

L’affaire des données personnelles des passagers aériens (PNR) n’a pas été moins complexe. Il aura fallu neuf années de discussion et quatre versions d’un texte pour qu’un consensus soit finalement trouvé, en avril 2012. Surtout soucieux d’éviter la signature d’accords bilatéraux qui auraient offert peu de garanties, les Européens ont fini par accepter la transmission de 19 données concernant tous les voyageurs de l’UE qui se rendent aux Etats-Unis ou les survolent. Washington avait mis dans la balance la libéralisation des autorisations d’accès au territoire américain. Les données recueillies sont rendues anonymes au bout de six mois, stockées pendant cinq ans sur une base « active », puis dix ans sur une base « dormante ».

Les Européens ne sont pas parvenus à résoudre une question-clé : trois des quatre compagnies mondiales qui stockent les données de réservation de la plupart des compagnies de la planète sont établies aux Etats-Unis et soumises à la législation de ce pays. En cas de problèmes, les lois européennes n’auraient donc aucune prise sur elles. Comme dans le cas de Prism, l’Union est forcée de reconnaître non seulement qu’elle a systématiquement du retard sur les faits mais que sa capacité d’action est limitée.

DE L’ESPIONNAGE INDUSTRIEL AUSSI

Actuellement, elle tente de négocier avec les Etats-Unis la possibilité, pour des citoyens européens, de faire corriger, par la voie judiciaire, des données personnelles détenues par des sociétés privées américaines et qui seraient erronées. Les citoyens américains vivant en Europe jouissent déjà de ce droit.

Si Sophie in’t Veld, eurodéputée libérale, espère que les révélations sur les pratiques de la NSA vont « conscientiser » les Européens et les forcer à se montrer plus exigeants, un haut fonctionnaire bruxellois tient un autre discours : « Cette affaire confirme un peu plus que les Etats-Unis sont les leaders en matière d’antiterrorisme et beaucoup d’Etats membres n’oseront les contrer. » Selon cette source, il est d’ailleurs « peu douteux » que le Royaume-Uni et d’autres pays ont bénéficié d’informations obtenues par Prism. La chancelière allemande, Angela Merkel, sera sans doute la première à évoquer directement le dossier avec Barack Obama. Le président américain se rendra en effet à Berlin les 18 et 19 juin.

L’affaire est d’autant plus sensible, dans un pays très attaché à la vie privée, que les révélations du Guardian ont montré que l’Allemagne était l’un des pays les plus ciblés par la collecte de données. Cela pourrait indiquer, selon un expert bruxellois, que les autorités américaines se livreraient aussi à de l’espionnage industriel – ce que Washington niait déjà du temps d’Echelon. Lundi, un porte-parole du ministère de la justice à Berlin faisait savoir que l’administration vérifiait de « possibles entraves aux droits de citoyens allemands ».

Le scandale FBI-NSA pourrait rebattre les cartes dans le marché du « cloud »

Le Monde

07.06.2013

Guénaël Pépin

Le site du fournisseur d’infrastructures informatiques et de services à distance Cloudwatt, qui pourrait bénéficier du scandale lié à ses concurrents américains.

La révélation de l’accès du FBI et de l’Agence nationale de sécurité américaine (NSA) aux infrastructures de neuf géants américains d’Internet jette le discrédit sur ces multinationales. Le programme Prism, révélé par le Washington Post, serait un outil permettant aux services de renseignement américains d’accéder aux données des personnes situées à l’étranger, qui ne sont pas protégées par la loi américaine contre les consultations sans ordonnance.

Potentiellement, ce sont les données de l’ensemble des utilisateurs mondiaux d’AOL, Apple, Facebook, Google (et Youtube), Microsoft (et Skype), Paltank et Yahoo qui sont concernées. Deux d’entre eux – Facebook et Google – ont démenti avoir des « portes dérobées » dans leurs services, qu’ils ont aussi refusé d’installer au Royaume-Uni à la fin d’avril. Apple affirme ne pas connaître ce programme.

LA PROTECTION DU SAFE HARBOR

Pour le site spécialisé Gigaom, cette nouvelle arrive « au mauvais moment » pour ces entreprises, dont la cote de confiance sur les données privées se fragilise. Google et Microsoft, notamment, visent de plus en plus les entreprises dans leur transition vers le « cloud » (l’hébergement à distance et à la carte des applications et des données, parfois sensibles) et critiquent ouvertement les méthodes du concurrent. Dans ce contexte, les révélations du Guardian et du Washington Post placent ces entreprises dans un même panier.

Ces entreprises sont tenues au respect du « Safe Harbor », qui leur permet de certifier elles-mêmes qu’elles respectent la législation européenne en matière de vie privée, pour être en mesure de transférer les données des internautes européens vers des serveurs situés aux Etats-Unis. Mais elle restent aussi tenues aux obligations de communication des données imposées par les Etats-Unis. Ce principe, négocié entre les Etats-Unis et la Commission européenne en 2001, repose donc finalement sur la confiance des Etats, entreprises et particuliers européens. Pour rassurer ses éventuels clients, Microsoft a ainsi choisi fin 2012 de s’associer à Bouygues Télécom pour le lancement d’une offre « cloud », surtout destinée aux entreprises. Si Microsoft fournit les technologies, Bouygues est l’entité juridique responsable, soumise au droit français.

« En utilisant les centres de données de Bouygues en France, le droit français s’applique. Microsoft est aussi présent sous sa marque en Europe à Dublin et à Amsterdam. En tant que prestataire de cloud, nous avons des clauses contractuelles européennes et nous sommes soumis au Safe Harbor, qui s’applique à toute entreprise qui a une présence aux Etats-Unis. La protection des données est importante pour Microsoft, et le Safe Harbor n’a pas vocation à outrepasser les règles de confidentialité nationales », garantissait en novembre Marc Mossé, directeur des affaires publiques et juridiques de Microsoft France, qui n’a pas répondu à nos sollicitations, vendredi 7 juin.

Le programme secret Prism peut être interprété comme une violation de ces principes, n’étant pas notifié à la Commission européenne. « C’est un problème interne aux Etats-Unis », a toutefois répondu le département des affaires intérieures de la Commission européenne, contacté par Gigaom.

LE « CLOUD À LA FRANÇAISE » ET LA SOUVERAINETÉ

Cette affaire pourrait être bénéfique à deux nouveaux acteurs français, créés par l’Etat et les opérateurs : Cloudwatt d’Orange et Thales et Numergy de SFR et Bull. Les deux projets, financés par l’Etat à hauteur de 150 millions d’euros, ont fait de la souveraineté des données leur premier argument commercial, bien avant l’efficacité technique ou les conditions commerciales. Le but affiché est d’imposer deux acteurs de dimension européenne dans ce marché mondialisé, en misant sur la sécurité légale offerte par un hébergement français. Les deux projets, annoncés en septembre et octobre 2012, sont encore en phase de lancement.

Les deux entreprises attaquent publiquement les géants américains actuels sur le thème du Patriot Act, à défaut de critiquer directement les aspect techniques ou commerciaux de ces offres mondiales. Pour Marc Mossé de Microsoft, il s’agissait en novembre d’une méthode marketing sans fondement, visant à jeter le discrédit sur un système fonctionnel. L’affaire Prism pourrait donc bien rebattre les cartes.

UNE AMÉLIORATION DE LA PROTECTION RETOQUÉE

Cette affaire intervient surtout au moment où la législation européenne est en plein bouleversement. Depuis plusieurs mois, le projet de nouveau règlement – qui doit renforcer l’information et la protection des internautes européens – est le sujet d’un « lobbyisme intense » de l’Etat et des entreprises américaines qui évoquent une menace pour l’innovation. La CNIL s’était d’ailleurs officiellement alarmée de cette situation, en demandant aux pouvoirs publics français de l’appuyer dans son combat. Le texte a été retoqué, jeudi 6 juin, par les Etats membres européens.

En France, la protection des communications est également le sujet de plusieurs polémiques. Début mai, L’Expansion a ainsi révélé les nombreux problèmes techniques et financiers de la prochaine Plateforme nationale des interceptions judiciaires, censée regrouper en septembre les moyens d’interception légale des communications téléphoniques et Internet, sous l’égide de Thales. A la mi-mai, c’était un rapport parlementaire qui accablait les méthodes des renseignements français, qui agiraient souvent dans l’illégalité. Le rapport recommande notamment de se doter d’une autorité de surveillance de ces pratiques tout en améliorant les capacités d’écoute des services.

Le cloud « à la française » sous le feu des critiques

Guénaël Pépin

Le Monde

08.11.2012

Cinq exaoctets de données, soit un milliard de gigaoctets, seront générés en dix minutes en 2013.

Depuis leur annonce en 2011, les deux projets d’informatique dématérialisée (cloud computing) « à la française » d’Orange et SFR suscitent les critiques des entreprises françaises du secteur. Ces PME, pour la plupart, voient d’un mauvais œil cette alliance entre l’Etat et des géants des télécoms, jugés inadaptés au marché du cloud, et se plaignent de tentatives de débauchage d’employés, que les consortiums nient.

Financés à hauteur de 150 millions d’euros par l’Etat, les deux consortiums, Cloudwatt pour Orange et Numergy pour SFR, doivent devenir des géants européens, à même de concurrencer les américains Amazon, Microsoft et Google. Ces deux consortiums fourniront aux entreprises des ressources informatiques, de la puissance de calcul ou de l’espace de stockage, souvent trop coûteuses à maintenir pour ces clients.

Les offres concrètes des deux projets officiellement lancés en septembre sont censées arriver dans les prochains mois. Le scepticisme n’a pourtant pas cessé, loin de là. La semaine dernière, le géant des centres de données Interxion et une PME spécialisée dans les réseaux privés, Navaho, exprimaient encore des doutes sur la pérennité de ces consortiums.

Deux projets viables ?

Au départ, un seul consortium, Andromède, composé d’Orange et Dassault était prévu. A la suite d’une série de divergences et du départ de Dassault, deux projets ont éclos : Cloudwatt par Orange et Thales, ainsi que Numergy, de SFR et Bull. Les deux actionnaires privés sont accompagnés par la Caisse des dépôts, qui détient un tiers de chaque projet.

Lire : Orange et SFR lancent leurs projets d »informatique dématérialisée’

« Il n’est pas normal de financer en parallèle deux projets. On ne finance pas tout et son contraire ! », estime Didier Soucheyre, président de l’opérateur d’infrastructures réseaux Neo Telecoms. « L’Etat doit demander aux grands acteurs choisis des garanties minimum », tance-t-il. Pour le responsable, ces deux nouvelles entreprises seraient peu à même de conquérir le marché ou d’être innovantes. « Ce sont des acteurs avec des coûts de fonctionnement élevés et, de ce que j’en vois, moins innovants que des PME comme Gandi ou Ikoula, sur qui on tire à bout portant », déplore M. Soucheyre.

Le président de Clouwatt, Patrick Starck, répond que l’actionnaire public a contribué à « définir les contours du projet et des règles de gouvernance. C’est une société qui a pour vocation de construire des offres de cloud public, sans transfert d’employés entre les actionnaires. » Un pré-requis jugé suffisant par l’entreprise. « C’est une garantie de succès. Nous avons déjà vécu l’expérience avec le Plan Calcul [qui visait à l’indépendance informatique de la France dans les années 1960] : pour qu’une entreprise garde l’écoute du client, elle doit connaître les mêmes règles de concurrence que les autres entreprises », ajoute le responsable.

L’indépendance a pourtant ses limites. Cloudwatt déclare être une entreprise neuve, sans héritage technologique ou commercial, tout en admettant des relations plus larges. « Nos relations reposent sur un triptyque. Ce sont nos actionnaires, des clients fournisseurs – par exemple Orange pour le réseau et Thales pour la sécurité – et de potentiels clients », explique Patrick Starck.

Même son de cloche pour l’autre projet. « Numergy est une entreprise indépendante. Les grandes orientations stratégiques, économiques, financières ou technologiques sont validées par le conseil de surveillance. Par ailleurs, pour commercialiser ses offres, Numergy s’appuie sur un réseau de partenaires qui, outre SFR et Bull, est constitué des acteurs de l’IT : SSII, éditeurs, cabinets de conseil, distributeurs… », explique son président, Philippe Tavernier.

Quels clients pour le cloud « à la française » ?

« Ils auront sûrement des projets publics qui vont remplir leurs infrastructures, sur l’impulsion des décideurs publics. Mais est-ce que de purs clients privés, PME et PMI y iront ? », questionne Didier Soucheyre, de Neo Telecoms, qui se développe beaucoup en région pour toucher les PME qui seraient attachées à la proximité du centre de données [datacenter] contenant leurs données. Cela, contrairement aux acteurs publics.

« Cloudwatt n’est pas une start-up. Ils ont des gros actionnaires, mais pas la flexibilité qu’offrent les autres acteurs. Ils seront adaptés pour des clients très structurés, sûrement les mêmes qu’actuellement, mais pas pour des PME qui n’entrent pas dans les cases du catalogue », analyse encore le président de Neo Telecoms.

Cloudwatt se spécialisera dans l’infrastructure en tant que service (IaaS) et la location de ressources informatiques. En plus d’éventuels acteurs publics, l’entreprise compte bien toucher les PME avec un catalogue fixe. Contrairement à Neo Telecoms, le projet public-privé estime qu' »il n’est absolument pas important d’avoir des datacenters en région ».

Numergy, qui espère compter parmi ses clients des PME, a choisi une localisation multiple de ses centres de données. « A ce jour, [Numergy dispose de] deux datacenters en France, situés pour l’un, en région parisienne et pour l’autre, en région lyonnaise. A terme, la centrale numérique comprendra une dizaine de localisations en France et d’autres en Europe en partenariat avec d’autres acteurs européens » argumente Philippe Tavernier.

Quid de la « souveraineté » des données ?

L’argument fort de ces clouds est bien la souveraineté. Le financement public est justifié par le besoin d’acteurs de confiance soumis à la législation française, contrairement aux entreprises de droit américain qui sont soumises à la loi antiterroriste américaine. Le Patriot Act permet en effet aux forces de sécurité américaines de consulter très largement les données d’entreprises ou de particuliers hébergées aux Etats-Unis ou par des entreprises dont le siège est aux Etats-Unis.

« Le poste d’investissement le plus important est l’infrastructure. Notre objectif est d’être open source [technologies au code source ouvert] et souverains dans notre architecture », explique Patrick Starck de Cloudwatt. « On prend de cette communauté [open source] et on le lui restitue. L’équipe de développement devrait atteindre une centaine d’acteurs, avec une spécialisation [sur la technologie d’infrastructure réseau ouverte] OpenStack », explique encore M. Starck.

« L’idée est d’être en conformité avec des réglementations qui existent, comme celles de la CNIL. Il faut éduquer les patrons aux contraintes liées à leur hébergement », explique Cloudwatt. Suffisant pour convaincre les entreprises ? « Cet argument n’est pas à brandir comme le chiffon rouge. Ce n’est pas avec ça qu’on fait un marché », répond Cloudwatt.

L’argument de la « souveraineté » attire d’ailleurs de nouveaux acteurs sans soutien public. Bouygues Télécom se lancera ainsi bientôt, en utilisant des technologies de l’américain Microsoft. L’opérateur explique que les données hébergées en France seront également soumises au droit français.

Et à l’international ? « Le client pourra héberger ses données à Dublin et à Amsterdam [chez Microsoft] s’il le souhaite. » Dans ce cas, le Patriot Act s’appliquera, explique Marc Mossé, directeur des affaires publiques et juridiques de Microsoft France. « Le Safe Harbor [du Patriot Act] n’évince pas les règles nationales. Le Patriot Act est devenu un argument marketing utilisé habilement par la concurrence », assène le responsable.

Des alternatives possibles ?

Les deux initiatives alternatives de Bouygues Télécom et d’IBM, annoncées après Cloudwatt et Numergy, font penser à Neo Telecoms qu’un financement public n’était pas obligatoire. Pour Cloudwatt, il s’agit plus d’un bon signe. « Voir de grands acteurs comme IBM venir héberger des données en France confirme qu’il y a un marché. C’est parfait ! », explique Patrick Starck.

Si pour Cloudwatt, la voie de deux grands projets est la bonne dans un marché en expansion, Neo Telecoms préfèrerait un autre modèle. « Dans cette période économique, c’était une occasion inespérée de mêler des sociétés très innovantes à forte croissance à la force de frappe des grandes entreprises. Cela plus ou moins coordonné par la Caisse des dépôts », imagine Didier Soucheyre. Le président de l’hébergeur Internet Gandi, Stephan Ramoin, proposait lui en août un groupement de PME chapeauté par la Caisse des dépôts.

« On avait tous les ingrédients, mais on les met dos à dos. Pour 20 % du coût, on faisait largement aussi bien », déplore, encore, le président de Neo Telecoms. Cloudwatt affirme pour sa part s’être associé à des PME sur certains points-clés, même si Patrick Starck déclare n’avoir eu aucun contact avec les entreprises spécialisées opposées au projet. Numergy, qui n’a pas eu de contact avec les PME en question, estime qu’il y a « de la place pour tous les acteurs » et indique vouloir « travailler en synergie et en complémentarité avec un écosystème de start-up innovantes et pourquoi pas avec certains de ces acteurs a priori hostiles », sans propositions concrètes pour l’instant.

http://thedailymush.wordpress.com/2013/06/12/my-prism-profile/

How Big Data Is Playing Recruiter for Specialized Workers

Matt Richtel

The New York Times

April 27, 2013

WHEN the e-mail came out of the blue last summer, offering a shot as a programmer at a San Francisco start-up, Jade Dominguez, 26, was living off credit card debt in a rental in South Pasadena, Calif., while he taught himself programming. He had been an average student in high school and hadn’t bothered with college, but someone, somewhere out there in the cloud, thought that he might be brilliant, or at least a diamond in the rough.

That someone was Luca Bonmassar. He had discovered Mr. Dominguez by using a technology that raises important questions about how people are recruited and hired, and whether great talent is being overlooked along the way. The concept is to focus less than recruiters might on traditional talent markers — a degree from M.I.T., a previous job at Google, a recommendation from a friend or colleague — and more on simple notions: How well does the person perform? What can the person do? And can it be quantified?

The technology is the product of Gild, the 18-month-old start-up company of which Mr. Bonmassar is a co-founder. His is one of a handful of young businesses aiming to automate the discovery of talented programmers — a group that is in enormous demand. These efforts fall in the category of Big Data, using computers to gather and crunch all kinds of information to perform many tasks, whether recommending books, putting targeted ads onto Web sites or predicting health care outcomes or stock prices.

Of late, growing numbers of academics and entrepreneurs are applying Big Data to human resources and the search for talent, creating a field called work-force science. Gild is trying to see whether these technologies can also be used to predict how well a programmer will perform in a job. The company scours the Internet for clues: Is his or her code well-regarded by other programmers? Does it get reused? How does the programmer communicate ideas? How does he or she relate on social media sites?

Gild’s method is very much in its infancy, an unproven twinkle of an idea. There is healthy skepticism about this idea, but also excitement, especially in industries where good talent can be hard to find.

The company expects to have about $2 million to $3 million in revenue this year and has raised around $10 million, including a chunk from Mark Kvamme, a venture capitalist who invested early in LinkedIn. And Gild has big-name customers testing or using its technology to recruit, including Facebook, Amazon, Wal-Mart Stores, Google and Twitter.

Companies use Gild to mine for new candidates and to assess candidates they are already considering. Gild itself uses the technology, which was how the company, desperate for programming talent and unable to match the salaries offered by bigger tech concerns, found this guy named Jade outside of Los Angeles. Its algorithm had determined that he had the highest programming score in Southern California, a total that almost no one achieves. It was 100.

Who was Jade? Could he help the company? What does his story tell us about modern-day recruiting and hiring, about the concept of meritocracy?

PEOPLE in Silicon Valley tend to embrace certain assumptions: Progress, efficiency and speed are good. Technology can solve most things. Change is inevitable; disruption is not to be feared. And, maybe more than anything else, merit will prevail.

But Vivienne Ming, who since late in 2012 has been the chief scientist at Gild, says she doesn’t think Silicon Valley is as merit-based as people imagine. She thinks that talented people are ignored, misjudged or fall through the cracks all the time. She holds that belief in part because she has had some experience of it.

Dr. Ming was born male, christened Evan Campbell Smith. He was a good student and a great athlete — holding records at his high school in track and field in the triple jump and long jump. But he always felt a disconnect with his body. After high school, Evan experienced a full-blown identity crisis. He flopped at college, kicked around jobs, contemplated suicide, hit the proverbial bottom. But rather than getting stuck there, he bounced. At 27, he returned to school, got an undergraduate degree in cognitive neuroscience from the University of California, San Diego, and went on to receive a Ph.D. at Carnegie Mellon in psychology and computational neuroscience.

During a fellowship at Stanford, he began gender transition, becoming, fully, Dr. Vivienne Ming in 2008.

As a woman, Dr. Ming started noticing that people treated her differently. There were small things that seemed innocuous, like men opening the door for her. There were also troubling things, like the fact that her students asked her fewer questions about math than they had when she was a man, or that she was invited to fewer social events — a baseball game, for instance — by male colleagues and business connections.

Bias often takes forms that people may not recognize. One study that Dr. Ming cites, by researchers at Yale, found that faculty members at research universities described female applicants for a manager position as significantly less competent than male applicants with identical qualifications. Another study, published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, found that people who sent in résumés with “black-sounding” names had a considerably harder time getting called back from employers than did people who sent in résumés showing equal qualifications but with “white-sounding” names.

Everybody can pretty much agree that gender, or how people look, or the sound of a last name, shouldn’t influence hiring decisions. But Dr. Ming takes the idea of meritocracy further. She suggests that shortcuts accepted as a good proxy for talent — like where you went to school or previously worked — can also shortchange talented people and, ultimately, employers. “The traditional markers people use for hiring can be wrong, profoundly wrong,” she said.

Dr. Ming’s answer to what she calls “so much wasted talent” is to build machines that try to eliminate human bias. It’s not that traditional pedigrees should be ignored, just balanced with what she considers more sophisticated measures. In all, Gild’s algorithm crunches thousands of bits of information in calculating around 300 larger variables about an individual: the sites where a person hangs out; the types of language, positive or negative, that he or she uses to describe technology of various kinds; self-reported skills on LinkedIn; the projects a person has worked on, and for how long; and, yes, where he or she went to school, in what major, and how that school was ranked that year by U.S. News & World Report.

“Let’s put everything in and let the data speak for itself,” Dr. Ming said of the algorithms she is now building for Gild.

Gild is not the only company now scouring for information. TalentBin, another San Francisco start-up firm, searches the Internet for talented programmers, trawling sites where they gather, collecting “data exhaust,” according to the company Web site, and creating lists of potential hires for employers. Another competitor is RemarkableHire, which assesses a person’s talents by looking at how his or her online contributions are rated by others.

And there’s Entelo, which tries to figure out who might be looking for a job before they even start their exploration. According to its Web site, the company uses more than 70 variables to find indications of possible career change, such as how someone presents herself on social sites. The Web site reads: “We crunch the data so you don’t have to.”

This application of Big Data to recruiting is “is absolutely worth a try,” said Susan Etlinger, an analyst of the data and analytics industries at the Altimeter Group. But she questioned whether an algorithm would be an improvement over what employers already do: gathering résumés, or referrals, and using traditional markers associated with success.

“The big hole is actual outcomes,” she said. “What I’m not buying yet is that probability equals actuality.”

Sean Gourley, co-founder and chief technology officer at Quid, a Big Data company, said that data trawling could inform recruiting and hiring, but only if used with an understanding of what the data can’t reveal. “Big Data has its own bias,” he said. “You measure what you can measure,” and “you’re denigrating what can’t be measured, like gut instinct, charisma.”

He added: “When you remove humans from complex decision-making, you can optimize the hell out of the algorithm, but at what cost?”

Dr. Ming doesn’t suggest eliminating human judgment, but she does think that the computer should lead the way, acting as an automated vacuum and filter for talent. The company has amassed a database of seven million programmers, ranking them based on what it calls a Gild score — a measure, the company says, of what a person can do. Ultimately, Dr. Ming wants to expand the algorithm so it can search for and assess other kinds of workers, like Web site designers, financial analysts and even sales people at, say, retail outlets.

“We did our own internal gold strike,” Dr. Ming said. “We found this kid in Los Angeles just kicking around his computer.”

She’s talking about Jade.

MR. DOMINGUEZ grew up in Los Angeles, the middle child of five. His mother took care of the household; his dad installed telecommunications equipment — a blue-collar guy who prized education.

But Jade had a rebellious streak. Halfway through high school, Mr. Dominguez, previously a straight-A student, began wondering whether going to school was more about satisfying requirements than real learning. “The value proposition is to go to school to get a good job,” he told me. “Philosophically, shouldn’t you go to school to learn?” His grades fell sharply, and he said he graduated from Alhambra High School in 2004 with less than a 3.0 grade-point average.

Not only did he reject college, he also wanted to prove that he could succeed wildly without it. He devoured books on entrepreneurship. He started a company that printed custom T-shirts, first from his house, then from a 1,000-square-foot warehouse space he rented. He decided that he needed a Web site, so he taught himself programming.

“I was out to prove myself on my own merit,” he said. He concedes that he might have taken it a little far. “It’s a little immature to be motivated by proving people wrong,” he said.

He got a tattoo on his arm in flowery script that read “Believe.” He sort of laughs about it now, though he still feels that he can accomplish what he puts his mind to. “It’s the great thing about code,” he said of computer language. “It’s largely merit-driven. It’s not about what you’ve studied. It’s about what you’ve shipped.”

When Gild went looking for talent, it assumed that the San Francisco and Silicon Valley areas would be picked over. So it ran its algorithm in Southern California and came up with a list of programmers. At the top was Mr. Dominguez, who had a very solid reputation on GitHub — a place where software developers gather to share code, exchange ideas and build reputations. Gild combs through GitHub and a handful of other sites, including Bitbucket and Google Code, looking for bright people in the field.

Mr. Dominguez had made quite a contribution. His code for Jekyll-Bootstrap, a function used in building Web sites, was reused by an impressive 1,267 other developers. His language and habits showed a passion for product development and several programming tools, like Rails and JavaScript, which were interesting to Gild. His blogs and posts on Twitter suggested that he was opinionated, something that the company wanted on its initial team.

A recruiter from Gild sent him an e-mail and had him come to San Francisco for an interview. The company founders met a charismatic, confident person — poised, articulate, thoughtful, with an easy smile, a tad rougher around the edges than other interview candidates, said Sheeroy Desai, Mr. Bonmassar’s co-founder at Gild and the company’s chief executive.

Mr. Dominguez wore a vibrant green hoodie to the interview. He asked pointed questions, like this one: Did the company worry that it would be perceived as violating privacy by scoring engineers without their knowledge? (It didn’t believe so, and he didn’t, either. Gild says it uses only publicly available information.)

They asked him some pointed but gentle questions, too, like whether he could work in a structured environment. He said he could. The company made Mr. Dominguez a job offer right away, and he accepted a position that pays around $115,000 a year.

“He’s a symbol of someone who is smart, highly motivated and yet, for whatever reason, wasn’t motivated in high school and didn’t see value in college,” Mr. Desai said.

Mr. Desai did go to college, at M.I.T., one of those schools that recruiters value so highly. It was there, he said, that he learned how to cope with pressure and to work with brilliant people and sometimes feel humbled. But while one’s work at school isn’t inconsequential, he said, “it’s not the whole story.” He asserts that despite his degree in computer science, “I’m a terrible developer.”

David Lewin, a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, and an expert in management of human resources, said that asking what someone could do was an important question, but so was asking whether the person could accomplish it with other people. Of all the efforts to predict whether someone will perform well in an organization, the most proven method, Dr. Lewin said, is a referral from someone already working there. Current employees know the culture, he said, and have their reputations and their work environment on the line. A recent study from the Yale School of Management that uses Big Data offers a refinement to the notion, finding that employee referrals are a great way to find good hires but that the method tends to work much better if the employee making the referral is highly productive.

For his part, Dr. Lewin is skeptical that an algorithm would be a good substitute for a good referral from a trusted employee.

One of Gild’s customers is Square, a San Francisco-based mobile payment system. Like many other high-tech companies, Square is aggressively hiring, and it’s finding the competition for great talent as intense as it was during the dot-com boom, according to Bryan Power, the company’s director of talent and a Silicon Valley veteran. Mr. Power says Gild offers a potential leg up in finding programmers who aren’t the obvious catches.

“Getting out of Stanford or Google is a very good proxy” for talent, Mr. Power said. “They have reputations for a reason.” But those prospects have many choices, and they might not choose Square. “We need more pools to draw from,” he said, “and that’s what Gild represents.”

Gild’s technology has turned up some prospects for Square, but hasn’t led directly to a hire. Mr. Power says the Gild algorithm provides a generalized programming score that is not as specific as Square needs for its job slots. “Gild has an opinion of who is good but it’s not that simple,” he said, adding that Square was talking to Gild about refining the model.

Despite the limited usefulness thus far, Mr. Power says that what Gild is doing is the start of something powerful. Today’s young engineers are posting much more of their work online, and doing open-source work, providing more data to mine in search of the diamonds. “It’s all about finding unrecognized talent,” he said.

MR. DOMINGUEZ has worked at Gild for eight months and has proved himself a talented programmer, Mr. Desai said. But he also said that Mr. Dominguez “sometimes struggles to work in a structured environment.” His co-workers try not to bug him when he’s sitting at his computer, locked into that work zone.

In meetings, Mr. Dominguez speaks his mind. He’s happier, he said, “as long as I can have a say in how the system is built,” or it’s just another system he would have to conform to. He bristles slightly at the growth of the company, which has expanded to 40 people from 10 in the last six months, adding layers of management and bureaucracy.

“The truth is that’s in my nature to do stuff in my own way; inevitably I want to start my own company,” he said, but he’s quick to add: “I do appreciate and the respect the opportunity the company’s given me because I think it’s very clear they hired me on merit. I will always appreciate that.”

Dr. Ming says the young man is both a great find and still an unknown. Of course, he is just a single example, one heralded by the company, but who cannot alone either validate or disprove the method.

“He’s got the lone-wolf thing going on,” Dr. Ming said. “It’s going well early but it could get tougher later on.”

The algorithm did a good job measuring what it can measure. It nailed Mr. Dominguez’s talent for working with computers. What is still unfolding is how he uses his talent over the long term, working with people.


Tuerie d’Istres: C’est l’imitation et les médias, imbécile ! (When monkey see monkey do meets have gun will travel)

27 avril, 2013
http://www.mondespersistants.com/images/screenshots/World_of_Warcraft-56977.jpgJe suis et demeure un combattant révolutionnaire. Et la Révolution aujourd’hui est, avant tout, islamique. Illich Ramirez Sanchez (dit Carlos)
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Il s’est mis à tirer comme dans un jeu video. Enquêteurs
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. (…) Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme. René Girard
More ink equals more blood,  newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents ». Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers ». Bruno S. Frey (University of Zurich) et Dominic Rohner (Cambridge)
Les images violentes accroissent (…) la vulnérabilité des enfants à la violence des groupes dans la mesure où ceux qui les ont vues éprouvent de sensations, des émotions et des états du corps difficiles à maîtriser et donc angoissants, et qu’ils sont donc particulièrement tentés d’adopter les repères que leur propose leur groupe d’appartenance, voire le leader de ce groupe. Serge Tisseron
Ces meurtriers sont fascinés par des jeux vidéo violents. Ces jeux consommés à haute dose provoquent une désensibilisation par rapport à l’acte criminel. Dans certains jeux, pour franchir les différents niveaux, il faut parfois tuer un policier ou une femme enceinte. Celui qui joue est par définition acteur, il n’est pas passif. Certains jeux japonais, accessibles gratuitement en ligne, permettent d’incarner un violeur en série. Le joueur devient un participant actif et exprime ses fantasmes. Là, c’est le véritable danger. (…) Le tueur de masse avance toujours de faux prétextes religieux, politiques, ce qui semble être le cas ici. Cet homme s’est défini comme un fondamentaliste chrétien. Depuis la tragédie de Columbine aux Etats-Unis en 1999, le crime de masse est devenu un crime d’imitation. Les tueurs sont souvent habillés de noir, vêtus d’un treillis ou d’un costume de l’autorité. Ils postent de nombreux messages sur des forums Internet annonçant leurs actes. Le réseau Internet où ils se mettent en scène est l’occasion pour eux de laisser un testament numérique. Stéphane Bourgoin
Le tueur de masse, et c’est important, commet un crime d’imitation. On le voit dans le cas de Breivik puisqu’il pompe des centaines de pages du manifeste de Théodor Kaczynski, Unabomber. Il se contente à certains endroits de remplacer le marxisme par multiculturalisme ou par islamisme. Il copie, c’est frappant. Pourtant, idéologiquement, ils sont à l’opposé puisque Unabomber est un terroriste écologique. Autre imitation, pour sa bombe, il utilise exactement la même recette de fabrication que Timothy McVeigh dans l’attentat de l’immeuble fédéral d’Oklahoma City, en 1995. Il a trouvé la recette sur Internet, sur des sites suprématistes blancs et de survivalistes américains. (…)  J’estime à 10 % d’entre eux ceux qui manifestent des revendications idéologiques. Mais ce ne sont pas uniquement ces revendications idéologiques qui poussent Anders Breivik ou Timothy McVeigh à commettre de tels attentats meurtriers. C’est aussi une véritable haine de la société. Ils s’estiment victimes de la société parce qu’elle ne les a pas reconnus à leur juste valeur. Et ils souffrent de troubles psychologiques voire psychiatriques profond. Là, ce n’est pas le cas pour Breivik qui ne souffre pas de troubles psychiatriques, puisqu’une personne délirante et irresponsable n’est pas capable d’organiser des attentats d’une telle envergure et avec une telle minutie. (…)  Il a choisi deux cibles qui cristallisent, l’une et l’autre, ses haines. Des immeubles du gouvernement norvégien qu’il juge responsable de l’immigration massive en Norvège et sa haine des marxistes avec le rassemblement des jeunes du Parti travailliste, qu’il savait sur une île isolée, où il pourrait commettre un carnage sans être dérangé. (…) C’est un long processus. Il commence à écrire son manifeste en 2002. En 2007, il quitte le Parti du progrès, parti populiste d’extrême droite norvégien, et indique dans plusieurs forums que l’action politique et démocratique mène à une impasse et qu’il est temps de créer un choc et mener une révolution au sein de la société norvégienne. Sans parler ouvertement de son acte. En 2008, voire 2007, il pense déjà à commettre un tel attentat. Il a loué cette ferme voici deux ans, uniquement pour qu’elle lui serve de couverture. Nullement pour subvenir à ses besoins, mais pour lui permettre d’acheter des engrais chimiques sans attirer l’attention. On sait par son journal intime qu’il avait terminé de fabriquer les engins explosifs vers le mois de mai. Il a alors attendu le moment favorable, cette réunion des jeunes du Parti travailliste où devait se rendre, avant finalement d’annuler, le Premier ministre. (…) Le phénomène est amplifié par les nouvelles technologies, notamment Internet. Depuis Columbine, les tueurs laissent tous un testament numérique. On a retrouvé de nombreuses vidéos où ils se mettent en scène, apprennent à tirer. Où ils tiennent un journal de bord. Idem pour le massacre de Virginia Tech, qui a fait une trentaine de victimes en 2007. Idem avec les deux tueurs allemands dans deux écoles (Erfurt en 2002, Winnenden en 2009, ndlr). Idem pour le tueur finlandais de Kauhajoki en 2008, etc. Depuis le massacre de Colombine, c’est pareil pour tous les tueurs de masse : on laisse un testament en vidéo ou un long post sur un blog. C’est assez frappant. C’est un crime d’imitation. D’ailleurs, j’ajoute que les médias sont également un peu responsables de la prolifération de ce type d’acte criminel en raison de la place qu’ils accordent à ces criminels. Si, par exemple, les médias décidaient de ne jamais publier l’identité des auteurs ni leur texte ou leur vidéo, je pense qu’on verrait une réduction de ce type d’actes criminels. Ce que veulent ces individus, c’est passer à la postérité, or si on ne publie pas leur identité, la frustration sera extrême. La mégalomanie et le narcissisme d’un personnage comme Anders Breivik est éloquent ! Il voulait apparaître en uniforme lors d’un procès public, pour montrer au monde entier sa puissance. Ils savent ce qui va se passer après les meurtres et s’en délectent à l’avance, comme se délecte Anders Breivik à l’idée de son procès, qui devrait se tenir d’ici un an et demi. (…) Une agence de presse a quelque peu exagéré et déformé mes propos. Ce que j’ai exactement dit sur le profil-type du tueur de masse, c’est que sur les 113 cas en vingt ans, 108 s’adonnaient quotidiennement voire parfois des heures entières à des jeux vidéo violents. Mais j’ajoutais, bien sûr, que ce n’est pas le fait de jouer à des jeux vidéo violents qui fait qu’on devient un tueur de masse. Comme pour les tueurs en série, on retrouve la plupart du temps des cas de maltraitances physiques ou psychologiques et d’abandon parental, mais ce n’est parce qu’on est un enfant abandonné qui subit des maltraitances qu’on est un serial killer. Il y en aurait malheureusement des milliers. J’ajoutais aussi que pour un adolescent qui souffre de troubles psychiatriques ou psychologiques, le fait de s’adonner de manière frénétique à des jeux vidéo violents pouvait le mener à une désensibilisation à la violence. Stéphane Bourgoin
On est dans le crime d’imitation. Ces tueurs savent qu’ils vont avoir une importante résonance médiatique. (…) On peut imaginer qu’ils s’estimaient persécutés et avaient des comptes à régler avec la société. En tuant des personnes qu’ils ne connaissaient pas, ils plongeaient dans un monde virtuel. Comme dans un jeu vidéo … Stéphane Bourgoin

Attention: un tueur peut en cacher beaucoup d’autres !

Au lendemain d’un nouvel épisode de fusillade meurtrière encore inexpliqué cette fois sur notre propre Côte d’azur …

Comment ne pas deviner, avec l’écrivain spécialisé Stéphane Bourgoin, cette forte dimension mimétique de la chose y compris d’ailleurs chez les pros de naguère à la Carlos?

Mais aussi hélas cette vague de tueurs de masse qui vient ou est en fait déjà (potentiellement) là

Qui, entre ressentiment personnel, recherche de visibilité médiatique, entrainement/conditionnement quotidien et massif à la tuerie en ligne et accessibilité en ligne des matériels et modes d’emplois, n’attendent que l’occasion propice pour passer à l’acte?

D’où la double contrainte inextricable du phénomène: si on n’en parle pas, on risque de passer à côté de quelque chose de peut-être bien plus grave (voir les frères Tsarnaev) et si on en parle, on fait le jeu du tueur en question et de ses futurs imitateurs toujours prêts à raccrocher leur wagon de ressentiment personnel à tout mouvement de haine du moment à forte valeur ajoutée médiatique …

Fusillade d’Istres : le profil psy et guerrier d’un individu nommé Rose

La Provence

26 avril 2013

Le tueur se nommerait Karl Rose, son profil Facebook donne quelques indications sur sa personnalité

Il s’appelle Karl Rose. Il a 19 ans. Il est né à Istres, habite Istres et lors de sa dernière comparution en justice, il se disait « ouvrier ». Pour l’heure, il était hier encore sans profession, précise-t-on de source proche de l’enquête.

Il est connu des services de police pour port d’armes prohibées, au moins à deux reprises, ce qui témoigne à tout le moins d’un certain goût pour elles. Jusqu’aux faits qui l’ont traîné hier à la Une des gazettes, il était aussi connu pour escroquerie et falsification de documents. Il est manifestement sujet à des problèmes psychiatriques, a prétendu répondre aux « préceptes » d’al-Qaïda.

Un individu dans son univers

Quand il a été interpellé, il a fait état aussitôt d’une « connaissance » qui s’apprêterait à agir à sa manière, dans une gare, en région parisienne… Cet homme a été arrêté plus tard dans la soirée. Pour le reste, le profil Facebook de Karl Rose est aussi éloquent que crypté.

Il y dit travailler à « braqueur de fourgon ». Il aime aussi les arts martiaux, la musculation et l’informatique. Toujours selon son profil Facebook, il étudie à « Paris Tramway Ligne 3″. Comprenne qui pourra. « La TV dirige la nation », peut-on entendre, en anglais, sur la seule chanson présente sur son profil en ligne.

Un individu manifestement dans son univers, qui, au chapitre des livres, affiche : « Le judaïsme est une escroquerie de 4 000 ans », semble faire de l’affaire Mérah un « complot » et s’autodécerne la « médaille d’honneur » du « combattant de guerre » sur un jeu vidéo qui permet, au moins virtuellement, de tuer plus facilement son prochain que de l’aimer.

Les 3 questions à Stéphane Bourgoin auteur du livre « 99 ans de serial killer » (Edition Ring)

1. La Provence a jusqu’ici été épargnée par les tueurs de masse. L’hyper médiatisation de l’affaire Merah et des attentats de Boston a-t-elle pu favoriser le passage à l’acte ?

Stéphane Bourgoin : Oui, on est dans le crime d’imitation. Ces tueurs savent qu’ils vont avoir une importante résonance médiatique.

2. Ont-ils un profil psychologique similaire ?

S.B : Ils sont souvent très jeunes et fascinés par les armes à feu. Si eux agissent sur la voie publique, les plus vieux passent généralement à l’acte sur leur lieu de travail. Dans la plupart des cas, ce sont des paranoïaques qui ont pu avoir des antécédents psychiatriques ou souffrent de troubles psychologiques.

3. Généralement, ces tueurs se suicident ou se font abattre. À Istres, il s’est rendu sans problème…

S.B : 70 % de ces tueurs ne survivent pas, c’est vrai. Mais ce n’était pas le cas du tueur d’Aurora ou de Anders Breivik en Norvège. On peut imaginer qu’ils s’estimaient persécutés et avaient des comptes à régler avec la société. En tuant des personnes qu’ils ne connaissaient pas, ils plongeaient dans un monde virtuel. Comme dans un jeu vidéo.

Denis Trossero et Frédéric Cheutin, propos recueillis par Laetitia Sariroglou

Voir aussi:

Norvège : «Ces tueurs veulent laisser une trace dans l’histoire»

Stéphane Bourgoin

Le Parisien

24.07.2011

STÉPHANE BOURGOIN spécialiste des tueurs de masse*. Ecrivain, Stéphane Bourgoin, 58 ans, est surtout un spécialiste reconnu des tueurs de masse et tueurs en série.

Peut-on considérer le suspect arrêté comme un tueur de masse?

STÉPHANE BOURGOIN. Il appartient à l’évidence à la catégorie des tueurs de masse. Il s’agit souvent d’hommes solitaires souffrant de troubles suicidaires.

Ce sont des désespérés extravertis et très narcissiques. Ils ont un désir de toute-puissance et sont souvent fascinés par les armes à feu et aussi l’autorité. Ils aiment incarner des militaires ou des policiers.

Quels sont leurs autres traits communs?

Ils ont peu de relations sociales, voire pas du tout. Leur univers amoureux est réduit à néant. Mais, surtout, ils veulent tous laisser une trace dans l’histoire pour qu’on se souvienne d’eux. Ils tuent pour qu’on ne les oublie pas. A la différence des tueurs en série, qui, eux, sont des psychopathes responsables de leurs actes qui font tout pour échapper à la police, les tueurs de masse cherchent à revendiquer leurs actes. Ils vont à la rencontre des enquêteurs, ils font face et cherchent même à se faire tuer par les policiers.

Les jeux vidéo ont-t-ils une influence dans leur passage à l’acte?

Là aussi, c’est un trait dominant chez ces meurtriers. Ils sont fascinés par des jeux vidéo violents comme World of Warcraft. Ces jeux consommés à haute dose provoquent une désensibilisation par rapport à l’acte criminel. Dans d’autres jeux, pour franchir les différents niveaux, il faut parfois tuer un policier ou une femme enceinte. Celui qui joue est par définition acteur, il n’est pas passif. Certains jeux japonais, accessibles gratuitement en ligne, permettent d’incarner un violeur en série. Le joueur devient un participant actif et exprime ses fantasmes. Là, c’est le véritable danger.

Comment analyser ce qui vient de se passer en Norvège?

Le tueur de masse avance toujours de faux prétextes religieux, politiques, ce qui semble être le cas ici. Cet homme s’est défini comme un fondamentaliste chrétien. Depuis la tragédie de Columbine aux Etats-Unis en 1999, le crime de masse est devenu un crime d’imitation. Les tueurs sont souvent habillés de noir, vêtus d’un treillis ou d’un costume de l’autorité. Ils postent de nombreux messages sur des forums Internet annonçant leurs actes. Le réseau Internet où ils se mettent en scène est l’occasion pour eux de laisser un testament numérique.

Il vient de publier « Enquête mondiale sur les tueurs en série » aux Editions Grasset.

Voir encore:

Profil de tueur

Dorothée Duchemin

Citazine

28 juill. 2011

Anders Breivik, principal suspect de la tuerie survenue en Norvège le 22 juillet dernier, possède-t-il le profil typique d’un tueur de masse ? Qui sont ces criminels ? Stéphane Bourgoin, spécialiste des tueurs en série et tueurs de masse, répond à Citazine.

Peut-on parler d’un profil-type du tueur de masse ?

Le profil d’un tueur de masse, auquel répond tout à fait Anders Breivik, est quelqu’un qui tue un grand nombre de personnes en un laps de temps très court. Peu lui importe l’âge, le sexe ou l’ethnie des victimes, contrairement au tueur en série qui tue sur des années et ne cherche pas à se faire prendre. Alors que le tueur de masse, dans 75 % des cas, va chercher soit à se suicider, soit à être abattu par les forces de l’ordre après avoir commis son acte.

Cette personne est généralement isolée de la société, marginalisée. Elle a peu d’amis, pas de relation sentimentale, est passionnée d’armes à feu et est fascinée par la chasse ainsi que par toutes formes d’autorité. Elle s’adonne à des jeux vidéo violents, est marquée par une lourde tendance suicidaire mais ne se suicidera pas seule dans son coin. Elle veut marquer l’histoire et laisser une marque indélébile en se suicidant et en emportant le plus de victimes avec elle.

Alors, puisqu’il ne s’est pas suicidé, Andres Breivik fait-il figure d’exception ?

Un gros pourcentage d’entre eux, entre 25 et 30 %, ne se suicident pas au moment où ils commettent leurs actes. Andres Breivik l’annonce, dans la partie du journal intime, à la fin de son manifeste. Il n’avait pas l’intention de se suicider et veut témoigner à son procès.

Un code, depuis Columbine

Anders Breivik est âgé de 32 ans. N’est-il pas bien plus vieux que la majorité des tueurs de masse ?

Il y a eu des tueurs de masse bien plus âgés qu’Anders Breivik. Cela n’a rien à voir avec l’âge. Les tueries de masse ont existé avant Columbine (Tuerie du lycée de Columbine, en 1999, perpétrée par Eric Harris et Dylan Klebold, ndlr). Mais depuis, un code et une imitation s’installent. Un code vestimentaire : les tueurs sont revêtus de noir, de treillis militaire ou uniforme de police. Avec ces vêtements, ils expriment le désir de toute puissance et la fascination des armes à feu. Ils s’imaginent être des héros dans une réalité virtuelle. Alors qu’ils savent que dans la réalité, ils sont des types qui n’ont jamais rien concrétisé dans leur existence. Le tueur de masse, et c’est important, commet un crime d’imitation. On le voit dans le cas de Breivik puisqu’il pompe des centaines de pages du manifeste de Théodor Kaczynski, Unabomber. Il se contente à certains endroits de remplacer le marxisme par multiculturalisme ou par islamisme. Il copie, c’est frappant. Pourtant, idéologiquement, ils sont à l’opposé puisque Unabomber est un terroriste écologique. Autre imitation, pour sa bombe, il utilise exactement la même recette de fabrication que Timothy McVeigh dans l’attentat de l’immeuble fédéral d’Oklahoma City, en 1995. Il a trouvé la recette sur Internet, sur des sites suprématistes blancs et de survivalistes américains.

Il se nourrit ça et là des tueries de masse de ses prédécesseurs.

Oui, tout à fait.

La majorité des ces tueurs agit-elle par revendications idéologiques ?

Non. Un certain nombre d’entre eux en ont, mais ils sont assez rares. J’estime à 10 % d’entre eux ceux qui manifestent des revendications idéologiques. Mais ce ne sont pas uniquement ces revendications idéologiques qui poussent Anders Breivik ou Timothy McVeigh à commettre de tels attentats meurtriers. C’est aussi une véritable haine de la société. Ils s’estiment victimes de la société parce qu’elle ne les a pas reconnus à leur juste valeur. Et ils souffrent de troubles psychologiques voire psychiatriques profond. Là, ce n’est pas le cas pour Breivik qui ne souffre pas de troubles psychiatriques, puisqu’une personne délirante et irresponsable n’est pas capable d’organiser des attentats d’une telle envergure et avec une telle minutie.

Deux lieux, deux armes

N’est-ce pas étonnant d’agir avec une bombe puis une arme à feu ?

Oui, c’est assez rare. En règle général, le crime se déroule en un lieu unique pour les tueurs de masse. Là, c’est un cas assez inhabituel. Il a choisi deux cibles qui cristallisent, l’une et l’autre, ses haines. Des immeubles du gouvernement norvégien qu’il juge responsable de l’immigration massive en Norvège et sa haine des marxistes avec le rassemblement des jeunes du Parti travailliste, qu’il savait sur une île isolée, où il pourrait commettre un carnage sans être dérangé.

Peut-il ressentir de la pitié, de la compassion et des remords ?

Absolument pas. Au moment où il commet son acte, on voit qu’il rit sur certaines images en abattant ses victimes. Il est à ce moment dans une transe et agit comme un robot. Lors de ses interrogatoires, il insiste sur le fait qu’il a effectivement commis « des actes cruels mais nécessaires » et plaide non coupable car il ne se sent pas responsable de ce qu’il a commis. Il n’éprouvera jamais de remords.

Est-il arrivé à commettre de tels actes après un long processus qui s’est mis en place petit à petit ou s’agit-il d’un déclic soudain ?

C’est un long processus. Il commence à écrire son manifeste en 2002. En 2007, il quitte le Parti du progrès, parti populiste d’extrême droite norvégien, et indique dans plusieurs forums que l’action politique et démocratique mène à une impasse et qu’il est temps de créer un choc et mener une révolution au sein de la société norvégienne. Sans parler ouvertement de son acte. En 2008, voire 2007, il pense déjà à commettre un tel attentat.

Il a loué cette ferme voici deux ans, uniquement pour qu’elle lui serve de couverture. Nullement pour subvenir à ses besoins, mais pour lui permettre d’acheter des engrais chimiques sans attirer l’attention. On sait par son journal intime qu’il avait terminé de fabriquer les engins explosifs vers le mois de mai. Il a alors attendu le moment favorable, cette réunion des jeunes du Parti travailliste où devait se rendre, avant finalement d’annuler, le Premier ministre.

Un phénomène contemporain ?

Pensez-vous que les meurtres de masse sont des phénomènes de notre époque ?

Tout à fait. Le phénomène est amplifié par les nouvelles technologies, notamment Internet. Depuis Columbine, les tueurs laissent tous un testament numérique. On a retrouvé de nombreuses vidéos où ils se mettent en scène, apprennent à tirer. Où ils tiennent un journal de bord. Idem pour le massacre de Virginia Tech, qui a fait une trentaine de victimes en 2007. Idem avec les deux tueurs allemands dans deux écoles (Erfurt en 2002, Winnenden en 2009, ndlr). Idem pour le tueur finlandais de Kauhajoki en 2008, etc.

Depuis le massacre de Colombine, c’est pareil pour tous les tueurs de masse : on laisse un testament en vidéo ou un long post sur un blog. C’est assez frappant. C’est un crime d’imitation. D’ailleurs, j’ajoute que les médias sont également un peu responsables de la prolifération de ce type d’acte criminel en raison de la place qu’ils accordent à ces criminels. Si, par exemple, les médias décidaient de ne jamais publier l’identité des auteurs ni leur texte ou leur vidéo, je pense qu’on verrait une réduction de ce type d’actes criminels. Ce que veulent ces individus, c’est passer à la postérité, or si on ne publie pas leur identité, la frustration sera extrême. La mégalomanie et le narcissisme d’un personnage comme Anders Breivik est éloquent ! Il voulait apparaître en uniforme lors d’un procès public, pour montrer au monde entier sa puissance.

Ils savent ce qui va se passer après les meurtres et s’en délectent à l’avance, comme se délecte Anders Breivik à l’idée de son procès, qui devrait se tenir d’ici un an et demi.

Ne peut-on pas y avoir une délectation d’ordre sexuel ?

Si, sans doute. J’ai interrogé quelques tueurs de masse survivants qui m’ont dit que quand ils abattaient leurs victimes, ils agissaient comme des sortes de robots et qu’ils en ressentaient une poussée d’adrénaline mais aussi une jouissance immense. Donc, on peut penser que ces meurtres peuvent avoir une connotation sexuelle. De toute façon, c’est un désir de toute puissance. Celle-ci peut s’obtenir par le sexe ou d’autres moyens.

De la même façon, les tueurs en série ne sont pas intéressés par le sexe en lui-même mais par l’envie d’humilier, de dominer leurs victimes.

Et pourquoi seuls des hommes sont-ils concernés ?

Sur 113 cas en vingt ans, il n’y a que deux femmes. Parce que les femmes ne sont pas fascinées par les armes à feu, ne vont pas ou peu s’adonner à des jeux vidéo violents, ne vont pas s’amuser à se déguiser en policier ou en soldat. Et il y a aussi fort peu de femmes tueuses en série.

Je me permets de revenir sur les jeux vidéo. La polémique rejaillit, comme à chaque fois en pareil cas, autour de la responsabilité des jeux vidéo. J’ai cru comprendre que vous les jugiez responsables ?

Une agence de presse a quelque peu exagéré et déformé mes propos. Ce que j’ai exactement dit sur le profil-type du tueur de masse, c’est que sur les 113 cas en vingt ans, 108 s’adonnaient quotidiennement voire parfois des heures entières à des jeux vidéo violents. Mais j’ajoutais, bien sûr, que ce n’est pas le fait de jouer à des jeux vidéo violents qui fait qu’on devient un tueur de masse.

Comme pour les tueurs en série, on retrouve la plupart du temps des cas de maltraitances physiques ou psychologiques et d’abandon parental, mais ce n’est parce qu’on est un enfant abandonné qui subit des maltraitances qu’on est un serial killer. Il y en aurait malheureusement des milliers. J’ajoutais aussi que pour un adolescent qui souffre de troubles psychiatriques ou psychologiques, le fait de s’adonner de manière frénétique à des jeux vidéo violents pouvait le mener à une désensibilisation à la violence. C’est exactement ce que j’ai dit.

> Stéphane Bourgoin est analyste au Centre international de sciences criminelles et pénales. Auteur de nombreux ouvrages sur les tueurs, il vient de publier aux éditions Grasset Serial Killers, enquête mondiale sur les tueurs en série. Il est également libraire et tient la librairie Au 3ème oeil.


Rencontres en ligne: Quant trop de choix tue le choix (The date not taken: is dating’s globalization the end of monogamy?)

16 février, 2013
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division (…) et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10: 34-36)
Le silence eternel des ces espaces infinis m’effraie. Pascal
This cloverleaf madness just fills me with sadness. We glide on these streams just postponing our dreams. The love that’s inside us How come it divides us? It just ain’t like Cole Porter It’s just all too short order. Michael Franks
Dans notre époque dérégulée, individualiste, où l’on se voit de moins en moins dicter sa conduite par sa famille ou par son village, c’est l’intégralité de la vie qui est entrée dans le règne de l’hyperchoix. Dans le monde actuel, libéré d’un cadre institutionnel ou coutumier très contraignant, on a le sentiment de toujours pouvoir choisir et une impression d’illimité. Gilles Lipovetsky (philosophe, université de Grenoble)
Nike propose aujourd’hui une chaussure unique, au look déterminé par le futur acheteur. Les sites de rencontres se multiplient sur la bulle, internet, en proposant un choix de plus en plus précis de la personne que l’on souhaite avoir à ses côtés : intelligent, gentil, mais aussi des caractéristiques incroyablement millimétrées (les pieds sur terre, mais pas ennuyeux, entre 1,77 mètre et 1, 82 m….). On customize à tout-va, parce que l’on a un choix insensé. Le nombre de célibataires explose littéralement dans les grandes villes, on peut donc choisir ce que l’on veut, on a le choix…Mais le paradoxe du choix, est que dès que l’on manque d’options, on parvient très facilement à attribuer sa déconvenue ou sa frustration à la Société ou à la terre entière ! Par contre, si on est malheureux dans un contexte de choix multiple et d’abondance, on s’attribue la responsabilité de l’échec. Mais l’être humain n’apprécie que très peu l’échec, surtout quand il ne le partage avec personne. In fine s’installe une certaine perplexité face à ces choix multiples, qui nous encourage à ne plus nous engager véritablement, que ce soit en amour, en amitié ou même professionnellement. Pseekliss
Le zap relationnel et de l’industrialisation de la drague sont des thèmes en lien avec celui des sites de rencontres amoureuses. L’immense possibilité des rencontres proposée par les quelques 1000 sites de rencontres en France influe sur la durée des relations. Selon une étude menée par le CSA, 62 % des personnes inscrites sur des sites de rencontres en lignes recherchent des aventures sans lendemain alors que seul 35 % désirent une relation sérieuse. Selon cette même étude, seul un tiers des désinscrits ont rencontré quelqu’un pour une durée non précisée, et plus de 70 % des personnes inscrites pensent que les sites de rencontres n’influent en rien sur l’obtention d’un rendez vous significatif. Wikipedia
Seules 5 % des rencontres déboucheraient sur une relation durable. Un chiffre à manier avec précaution, tout comme celui relatif au nombre des habitués de sites : les listes d’abonnés ne sont pas toujours remises à jour… Sciences humaines
A large array of options may diminish the attractiveness of what people actually choose, the reason being that thinking about the attractions of some of the unchosen options detracts from the pleasure derived from the chosen one. Barry Schwartz
Internet dating has made people more disposable. (…) Internet dating may be partly responsible for a rise in the divorce rates.(…) Low quality, unhappy and unsatisfying marriages are being destroyed as people drift to Internet dating sites. (…) The market is hugely more efficient … People expect to—and this will be increasingly the case over time—access people anywhere, anytime, based on complex search requests … Such a feeling of access affects our pursuit of love … the whole world (versus, say, the city we live in) will, increasingly, feel like the market for our partner(s). Our pickiness will probably increase. (…) Above all, Internet dating has helped people of all ages realize that there’s no need to settle for a mediocre relationship. Comments from dating sites managers
Online dating does nothing more than remove a barrier to meeting. Online dating doesn’t change my taste, or how I behave on a first date, or whether I’m going to be a good partner. It only changes the process of discovery. As for whether you’re the type of person who wants to commit to a long-term monogamous relationship or the type of person who wants to play the field, online dating has nothing to do with that. That’s a personality thing. Alex Mehr (Zoosk)
The future will see better relationships but more divorce. The older you get as a man, the more experienced you get. You know what to do with women, how to treat them and talk to them. Add to that the effect of online dating. I often wonder whether matching you up with great people is getting so efficient, and the process so enjoyable, that marriage will become obsolete. Dan Winchester
Historically, relationships have been billed as ‘hard’ because, historically, commitment has been the goal. You could say online dating is simply changing people’s ideas about whether commitment itself is a life value. Look, if I lived in Iowa, I’d be married with four children by now. That’s just how it is. Greg Blatt (Match.com)
I think divorce rates will increase as life in general becomes more real-time. Think about the evolution of other kinds of content on the Web—stock quotes, news. The goal has always been to make it faster. The same thing will happen with meeting. It’s exhilarating to connect with new people, not to mention beneficial for reasons having nothing to do with romance. You network for a job. You find a flatmate. Over time you’ll expect that constant flow. People always said that the need for stability would keep commitment alive. But that thinking was based on a world in which you didn’t meet that many people. Another online-dating exec hypothesized an inverse correlation between commitment and the efficiency of technology. Niccolò Formai (Badoo)
 Premarital sex used to be taboo. So women would become miserable in marriages, because they wouldn’t know any better. But today, more people have had failed relationships, recovered, moved on, and found happiness. They realize that that happiness, in many ways, depends on having had the failures. As we become more secure and confident in our ability to find someone else, usually someone better, monogamy and the old thinking about commitment will be challenged very harshly. Societal values always lose out. Noel Biderman (Ashley Madison)
You could say online dating allows people to get into relationships, learn things, and ultimately make a better selection. But you could also easily see a world in which online dating leads to people leaving relationships the moment they’re not working—an overall weakening of commitment. Gian Gonzaga (eHarmony)
You can say three things. First, the best marriages are probably unaffected. Happy couples won’t be hanging out on dating sites. Second, people who are in marriages that are either bad or average might be at increased risk of divorce, because of increased access to new partners. Third, it’s unknown whether that’s good or bad for society. On one hand, it’s good if fewer people feel like they’re stuck in relationships. On the other, evidence is pretty solid that having a stable romantic partner means all kinds of health and wellness benefits. Eli Finkel (Northwestern University)
I’ve seen a dramatic increase in cases where something on the computer triggered the breakup. People are more likely to leave relationships, because they’re emboldened by the knowledge that it’s no longer as hard as it was to meet new people. But whether it’s dating sites, social media, e‑mail—it’s all related to the fact that the Internet has made it possible for people to communicate and connect, anywhere in the world, in ways that have never before been seen. Gilbert Feibleman (divorce attorney)
The positive aspects of online dating are clear: the Internet makes it easier for single people to meet other single people with whom they might be compatible, raising the bar for what they consider a good relationship. But what if online dating makes it too easy to meet someone new? What if it raises the bar for a good relationship too high? What if the prospect of finding an ever-more-compatible mate with the click of a mouse means a future of relationship instability, in which we keep chasing the elusive rabbit around the dating track? Of course, no one knows exactly how many partnerships are undermined by the allure of the Internet dating pool. But most of the online-dating-company executives I interviewed while writing my new book, Love in the Time of Algorithms, agreed with what research appears to suggest: the rise of online dating will mean an overall decrease in commitment. (… ) At the selection stage, researchers have seen that as the range of options grows larger, mate-seekers are liable to become “cognitively overwhelmed,” and deal with the overload by adopting lazy comparison strategies and examining fewer cues. As a result, they are more likely to make careless decisions than they would be if they had fewer options, and this potentially leads to less compatible matches. Moreover, the mere fact of having chosen someone from such a large set of options can lead to doubts about whether the choice was the “right” one. No studies in the romantic sphere have looked at precisely how the range of choices affects overall satisfaction. But research elsewhere has found that people are less satisfied when choosing from a larger group: in one study, for example, subjects who selected a chocolate from an array of six options believed it tasted better than those who selected the same chocolate from an array of 30. On that other determinant of commitment, the quality of perceived alternatives, the Internet’s potential effect is clearer still. Online dating is, at its core, a litany of alternatives. And evidence shows that the perception that one has appealing alternatives to a current romantic partner is a strong predictor of low commitment to that partner. (…)  People seeking commitment—particularly women—have developed strategies to detect deception and guard against it. A woman might withhold sex so she can assess a man’s intentions. Theoretically, her withholding sends a message: I’m not just going to sleep with any guy that comes along. Theoretically, his willingness to wait sends a message back: I’m interested in more than sex. But the pace of technology is upending these rules and assumptions. Relationships that begin online, Jacob finds, move quickly. He chalks this up to a few things. First, familiarity is established during the messaging process, which also often involves a phone call. By the time two people meet face-to-face, they already have a level of intimacy. Second, if the woman is on a dating site, there’s a good chance she’s eager to connect. But for Jacob, the most crucial difference between online dating and meeting people in the “real” world is the sense of urgency. Occasionally, he has an acquaintance in common with a woman he meets online, but by and large she comes from a different social pool. “It’s not like we’re just going to run into each other again,” he says. “So you can’t afford to be too casual. It’s either ‘Let’s explore this’ or ‘See you later.’ ” Social scientists say that all sexual strategies carry costs, whether risk to reputation (promiscuity) or foreclosed alternatives (commitment). As online dating becomes increasingly pervasive, the old costs of a short-term mating strategy will give way to new ones. Jacob, for instance, notices he’s seeing his friends less often. Their wives get tired of befriending his latest girlfriend only to see her go when he moves on to someone else. Also, Jacob has noticed that, over time, he feels less excitement before each new date. “Is that about getting older,” he muses, “or about dating online?” How much of the enchantment associated with romantic love has to do with scarcity (this person is exclusively for me), and how will that enchantment hold up in a marketplace of abundance (this person could be exclusively for me, but so could the other two people I’m meeting this week)? Dan Slater

Véritable zap relationnel, surcharge cognitive, insatisfaction induite par le trop-plein de choix, obsolescence programmée des relations …

A l’heure où, avec la véritable pandémie de divorces, les inscriptions aux sites de rencontre explosent …

Pendant que (on mesure tout le chemin parcouru depuis l’époque de notre seul président jusqu’ici mort sur son lieu de travail) la pression se maintient sur nos hommes politiques ou sportifs les plus tentés de jouer avec le feu des relations tarifées ou avec mineures …

Retour en ces lendemains de Saint Valentin plus ou moins bien vécus et avec la revue américaine The Atlantic …

Sur, sans parler des innombrables arnaques généralement africaines, les effets de la mondialisation des choix sentimentaux et matrimoniaux sur nos vies amoureuses et de moins en moins maritales …

A Million First Dates

How online romance is threatening monogamy

Dan Slater

The Atlantic

After going to college on the East Coast and spending a few years bouncing around, Jacob moved back to his native Oregon, settling in Portland. Almost immediately, he was surprised by the difficulty he had meeting women. Having lived in New York and the Boston area, he was accustomed to ready-made social scenes. In Portland, by contrast, most of his friends were in long-term relationships with people they’d met in college, and were contemplating marriage.

Jacob was single for two years and then, at 26, began dating a slightly older woman who soon moved in with him. She seemed independent and low-maintenance, important traits for Jacob. Past girlfriends had complained about his lifestyle, which emphasized watching sports and going to concerts and bars. He’d been called lazy, aimless, and irresponsible with money.

Before long, his new relationship fell into that familiar pattern. “I’ve never been able to make a girl feel like she was the most important thing in my life,” he says. “It’s always ‘I wish I was as important as the basketball game or the concert.’ ” An only child, Jacob tended to make plans by negotiation: if his girlfriend would watch the game with him, he’d go hiking with her. He was passive in their arguments, hoping to avoid confrontation. Whatever the flaws in their relationship, he told himself, being with her was better than being single in Portland again.

After five years, she left.

Now in his early 30s, Jacob felt he had no idea how to make a relationship work. Was compatibility something that could be learned? Would permanence simply happen, or would he have to choose it? Around this time, he signed up for two online dating sites: Match.com, a paid site, because he’d seen the TV ads; and Plenty of Fish, a free site he’d heard about around town.

“It was fairly incredible,” Jacob remembers. “I’m an average-looking guy. All of a sudden I was going out with one or two very pretty, ambitious women a week. At first I just thought it was some kind of weird lucky streak.”

After six weeks, Jacob met a 22-year-old named Rachel, whose youth and good looks he says reinvigorated him. His friends were jealous. Was this The One? They dated for a few months, and then she moved in. (Both names have been changed for anonymity.)

Rachel didn’t mind Jacob’s sports addiction, and enjoyed going to concerts with him. But there were other issues. She was from a blue-collar military background; he came from doctors. She placed a high value on things he didn’t think much about: a solid credit score, a 40-hour workweek. Jacob also felt pressure from his parents, who were getting anxious to see him paired off for good. Although a younger girlfriend bought him some time, biologically speaking, it also alienated him from his friends, who could understand the physical attraction but couldn’t really relate to Rachel.

In the past, Jacob had always been the kind of guy who didn’t break up well. His relationships tended to drag on. His desire to be with someone, to not have to go looking again, had always trumped whatever doubts he’d had about the person he was with. But something was different this time. “I feel like I underwent a fairly radical change thanks to online dating,” Jacob says. “I went from being someone who thought of finding someone as this monumental challenge, to being much more relaxed and confident about it. Rachel was young and beautiful, and I’d found her after signing up on a couple dating sites and dating just a few people.” Having met Rachel so easily online, he felt confident that, if he became single again, he could always meet someone else.

After two years, when Rachel informed Jacob that she was moving out, he logged on to Match.com the same day. His old profile was still up. Messages had even come in from people who couldn’t tell he was no longer active. The site had improved in the two years he’d been away. It was sleeker, faster, more efficient. And the population of online daters in Portland seemed to have tripled. He’d never imagined that so many single people were out there.

“I’m about 95 percent certain,” he says, “that if I’d met Rachel offline, and if I’d never done online dating, I would’ve married her. At that point in my life, I would’ve overlooked everything else and done whatever it took to make things work. Did online dating change my perception of permanence? No doubt. When I sensed the breakup coming, I was okay with it. It didn’t seem like there was going to be much of a mourning period, where you stare at your wall thinking you’re destined to be alone and all that. I was eager to see what else was out there.”

The positive aspects of online dating are clear: the Internet makes it easier for single people to meet other single people with whom they might be compatible, raising the bar for what they consider a good relationship. But what if online dating makes it too easy to meet someone new? What if it raises the bar for a good relationship too high? What if the prospect of finding an ever-more-compatible mate with the click of a mouse means a future of relationship instability, in which we keep chasing the elusive rabbit around the dating track?

Of course, no one knows exactly how many partnerships are undermined by the allure of the Internet dating pool. But most of the online-dating-company executives I interviewed while writing my new book, Love in the Time of Algorithms, agreed with what research appears to suggest: the rise of online dating will mean an overall decrease in commitment.

“The future will see better relationships but more divorce,” predicts Dan Winchester, the founder of a free dating site based in the U.K. “The older you get as a man, the more experienced you get. You know what to do with women, how to treat them and talk to them. Add to that the effect of online dating.” He continued, “I often wonder whether matching you up with great people is getting so efficient, and the process so enjoyable, that marriage will become obsolete.”

“Historically,” says Greg Blatt, the CEO of Match.com’s parent company, “relationships have been billed as ‘hard’ because, historically, commitment has been the goal. You could say online dating is simply changing people’s ideas about whether commitment itself is a life value.” Mate scarcity also plays an important role in people’s relationship decisions. “Look, if I lived in Iowa, I’d be married with four children by now,” says Blatt, a 40‑something bachelor in Manhattan. “That’s just how it is.”

Another online-dating exec hypothesized an inverse correlation between commitment and the efficiency of technology. “I think divorce rates will increase as life in general becomes more real-time,” says Niccolò Formai, the head of social-media marketing at Badoo, a meeting-and-dating app with about 25 million active users worldwide. “Think about the evolution of other kinds of content on the Web—stock quotes, news. The goal has always been to make it faster. The same thing will happen with meeting. It’s exhilarating to connect with new people, not to mention beneficial for reasons having nothing to do with romance. You network for a job. You find a flatmate. Over time you’ll expect that constant flow. People always said that the need for stability would keep commitment alive. But that thinking was based on a world in which you didn’t meet that many people.”

“Societal values always lose out,” says Noel Biderman, the founder of Ashley Madison, which calls itself “the world’s leading married dating service for discreet encounters”—that is, cheating. “Premarital sex used to be taboo,” explains Biderman. “So women would become miserable in marriages, because they wouldn’t know any better. But today, more people have had failed relationships, recovered, moved on, and found happiness. They realize that that happiness, in many ways, depends on having had the failures. As we become more secure and confident in our ability to find someone else, usually someone better, monogamy and the old thinking about commitment will be challenged very harshly.”

Even at eHarmony—one of the most conservative sites, where marriage and commitment seem to be the only acceptable goals of dating—Gian Gonzaga, the site’s relationship psychologist, acknowledges that commitment is at odds with technology. “You could say online dating allows people to get into relationships, learn things, and ultimately make a better selection,” says Gonzaga. “But you could also easily see a world in which online dating leads to people leaving relationships the moment they’re not working—an overall weakening of commitment.”

Indeed, the profit models of many online-dating sites are at cross-purposes with clients who are trying to develop long-term commitments. A permanently paired-off dater, after all, means a lost revenue stream. Explaining the mentality of a typical dating-site executive, Justin Parfitt, a dating entrepreneur based in San Francisco, puts the matter bluntly: “They’re thinking, Let’s keep this fucker coming back to the site as often as we can.” For instance, long after their accounts become inactive on Match.com and some other sites, lapsed users receive notifications informing them that wonderful people are browsing their profiles and are eager to chat. “Most of our users are return customers,” says Match.com’s Blatt.

In 2011, Mark Brooks, a consultant to online-dating companies, published the results of an industry survey titled “How Has Internet Dating Changed Society?” The survey responses, from 39 executives, produced the following conclusions:

“Internet dating has made people more disposable.”

“Internet dating may be partly responsible for a rise in the divorce rates.”

“Low quality, unhappy and unsatisfying marriages are being destroyed as people drift to Internet dating sites.”

“The market is hugely more efficient … People expect to—and this will be increasingly the case over time—access people anywhere, anytime, based on complex search requests … Such a feeling of access affects our pursuit of love … the whole world (versus, say, the city we live in) will, increasingly, feel like the market for our partner(s). Our pickiness will probably increase.”

“Above all, Internet dating has helped people of all ages realize that there’s no need to settle for a mediocre relationship.”

Alex Mehr, a co-founder of the dating site Zoosk, is the only executive I interviewed who disagrees with the prevailing view. “Online dating does nothing more than remove a barrier to meeting,” says Mehr. “Online dating doesn’t change my taste, or how I behave on a first date, or whether I’m going to be a good partner. It only changes the process of discovery. As for whether you’re the type of person who wants to commit to a long-term monogamous relationship or the type of person who wants to play the field, online dating has nothing to do with that. That’s a personality thing.”

Surely personality will play a role in the way anyone behaves in the realm of online dating, particularly when it comes to commitment and promiscuity. (Gender, too, may play a role. Researchers are divided on the question of whether men pursue more “short-term mates” than women do.) At the same time, however, the reality that having too many options makes us less content with whatever option we choose is a well-documented phenomenon. In his 2004 book, The Paradox of Choice, the psychologist Barry Schwartz indicts a society that “sanctifies freedom of choice so profoundly that the benefits of infinite options seem self-evident.” On the contrary, he argues, “a large array of options may diminish the attractiveness of what people actually choose, the reason being that thinking about the attractions of some of the unchosen options detracts from the pleasure derived from the chosen one.”

Psychologists who study relationships say that three ingredients generally determine the strength of commitment: overall satisfaction with the relationship; the investment one has put into it (time and effort, shared experiences and emotions, etc.); and the quality of perceived alternatives. Two of the three—satisfaction and quality of alternatives—could be directly affected by the larger mating pool that the Internet offers.

At the selection stage, researchers have seen that as the range of options grows larger, mate-seekers are liable to become “cognitively overwhelmed,” and deal with the overload by adopting lazy comparison strategies and examining fewer cues. As a result, they are more likely to make careless decisions than they would be if they had fewer options, and this potentially leads to less compatible matches. Moreover, the mere fact of having chosen someone from such a large set of options can lead to doubts about whether the choice was the “right” one. No studies in the romantic sphere have looked at precisely how the range of choices affects overall satisfaction. But research elsewhere has found that people are less satisfied when choosing from a larger group: in one study, for example, subjects who selected a chocolate from an array of six options believed it tasted better than those who selected the same chocolate from an array of 30.

On that other determinant of commitment, the quality of perceived alternatives, the Internet’s potential effect is clearer still. Online dating is, at its core, a litany of alternatives. And evidence shows that the perception that one has appealing alternatives to a current romantic partner is a strong predictor of low commitment to that partner.

“You can say three things,” says Eli Finkel, a professor of social psychology at Northwestern University who studies how online dating affects relationships. “First, the best marriages are probably unaffected. Happy couples won’t be hanging out on dating sites. Second, people who are in marriages that are either bad or average might be at increased risk of divorce, because of increased access to new partners. Third, it’s unknown whether that’s good or bad for society. On one hand, it’s good if fewer people feel like they’re stuck in relationships. On the other, evidence is pretty solid that having a stable romantic partner means all kinds of health and wellness benefits.” And that’s even before one takes into account the ancillary effects of such a decrease in commitment—on children, for example, or even society more broadly.

Gilbert Feibleman, a divorce attorney and member of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, argues that the phenomenon extends beyond dating sites to the Internet more generally. “I’ve seen a dramatic increase in cases where something on the computer triggered the breakup,” he says. “People are more likely to leave relationships, because they’re emboldened by the knowledge that it’s no longer as hard as it was to meet new people. But whether it’s dating sites, social media, e‑mail—it’s all related to the fact that the Internet has made it possible for people to communicate and connect, anywhere in the world, in ways that have never before been seen.”

Since Rachel left him, Jacob has met lots of women online. Some like going to basketball games and concerts with him. Others enjoy barhopping. Jacob’s favorite football team is the Green Bay Packers, and when I last spoke to him, he told me he’d had success using Packers fandom as a search criterion on OkCupid, another (free) dating site he’s been trying out.

Many of Jacob’s relationships become physical very early. At one point he’s seeing a paralegal and a lawyer who work at the same law firm, a naturopath, a pharmacist, and a chef. He slept with three of them on the first or second date. His relationships with the other two are headed toward physical intimacy.

He likes the pharmacist most. She’s a girlfriend prospect. The problem is that she wants to take things slow on the physical side. He worries that, with so many alternatives available, he won’t be willing to wait.

One night the paralegal confides in him: her prior relationships haven’t gone well, but Jacob gives her hope; all she needs in a relationship is honesty. And he thinks, Oh my God. He wants to be a nice guy, but he knows that sooner or later he’s going to start coming across as a serious asshole. While out with one woman, he has to silence text messages coming in from others. He needs to start paring down the number of women he’s seeing.

People seeking commitment—particularly women—have developed strategies to detect deception and guard against it. A woman might withhold sex so she can assess a man’s intentions. Theoretically, her withholding sends a message: I’m not just going to sleep with any guy that comes along. Theoretically, his willingness to wait sends a message back: I’m interested in more than sex.

But the pace of technology is upending these rules and assumptions. Relationships that begin online, Jacob finds, move quickly. He chalks this up to a few things. First, familiarity is established during the messaging process, which also often involves a phone call. By the time two people meet face-to-face, they already have a level of intimacy. Second, if the woman is on a dating site, there’s a good chance she’s eager to connect. But for Jacob, the most crucial difference between online dating and meeting people in the “real” world is the sense of urgency. Occasionally, he has an acquaintance in common with a woman he meets online, but by and large she comes from a different social pool. “It’s not like we’re just going to run into each other again,” he says. “So you can’t afford to be too casual. It’s either ‘Let’s explore this’ or ‘See you later.’ ”

Social scientists say that all sexual strategies carry costs, whether risk to reputation (promiscuity) or foreclosed alternatives (commitment). As online dating becomes increasingly pervasive, the old costs of a short-term mating strategy will give way to new ones. Jacob, for instance, notices he’s seeing his friends less often. Their wives get tired of befriending his latest girlfriend only to see her go when he moves on to someone else. Also, Jacob has noticed that, over time, he feels less excitement before each new date. “Is that about getting older,” he muses, “or about dating online?” How much of the enchantment associated with romantic love has to do with scarcity (this person is exclusively for me), and how will that enchantment hold up in a marketplace of abundance (this person could be exclusively for me, but so could the other two people I’m meeting this week)?

Using OkCupid’s Locals app, Jacob can now advertise his location and desired activity and meet women on the fly. Out alone for a beer one night, he responds to the broadcast of a woman who’s at the bar across the street, looking for a karaoke partner. He joins her. They spend the evening together, and never speak again.

“Each relationship is its own little education,” Jacob says. “You learn more about what works and what doesn’t, what you really need and what you can go without. That feels like a useful process. I’m not jumping into something with the wrong person, or committing to something too early, as I’ve done in the past.” But he does wonder: When does it end? At what point does this learning curve become an excuse for not putting in the effort to make a relationship last? “Maybe I have the confidence now to go after the person I really want,” he says. “But I’m worried that I’m making it so I can’t fall in love.”

Voir aussi:

Trop de choix tue-t-il le désir ?

L’infini des possibles nous est offert

Catherine Segal

Cles

Tanya se souvient encore de l’impression de suffocation. A l’infini, des paquets de céréales s’alignaient sur des mètres et des mètres de linéaires. Des dizaines, peut-être même des centaines de sortes. Toutes subtilement différentes et toutes potentiellement parfaites.

Consommation, vie privée… Nous avons la liberté de choisir. Est-ce un privilège ou une addiction ?

Face à la multitude des options, nous sommes désemparés. Notre cerveau aussi.

Lancés dans une éternelle quête du meilleur, nous sommes stressés par le trop.

« Les yeux me sortaient de la tête, mon cerveau était comme dans du coton, je n’arrivais pas à comprendre ce que je voyais. Impossible de me décider pour quoi que ce soit. Ma sensation dans cet hypermarché de Menlo Park était terrible », raconte-t-elle. Et si nouvelle. A son arrivée en Californie, la jeune étudiante qu’elle était alors venait de passer les dix-huit premières années de sa vie dans la jungle amazonienne, sans électricité ni eau courante, dans des communautés indigènes auprès desquelles travaillaient ses parents. « Nous mangions ce que nous trouvions, explique-t-elle. Nous vivions du troc, de la pêche. Quant aux céréales, les seules que j’avais jamais vues c’étaient les corn flakes. »

Cette enfance d’une grande frugalité est loin de ce que vit aujourd’hui Tanya, mère de famille de 43 ans, dans sa maison de Philadelphie au frigo bien rempli. Et son histoire est à des années-lumière de notre quotidien d’individus du premier monde qui acceptons de nous prêter à chaque instant à un jeu décadent, certains diront à un supplice de riches : l’embarras du choix.

Nous ne le savons que trop : choisir est devenu un exercice difficile. Des milliers d’appareils électroménagers, de marques de chips ou de modèles de voitures, mais aussi de filières académiques, de romans d’amour ou de sources d’information nous sont accessibles à tout instant, et à tout instant, il nous revient de décider ce que nous allons en faire. C’est notre liberté, notre privilège, pensons-nous. « Dans notre époque dérégulée, individualiste, où l’on se voit de moins en moins dicter sa conduite par sa famille ou par son village, c’est l’intégralité de la vie qui est entrée dans le règne de l’hyperchoix, analyse le philosophe Gilles Lipovetsky, professeur à l’université de Grenoble. Dans le monde actuel, libéré d’un cadre institutionnel ou coutumier très contraignant, on a le sentiment de toujours pouvoir choisir et une impression d’illimité. »

On n’est plus obligé d’adopter le métier de ses parents, de vivre dans la même ville toute sa vie, ou d’avoir des enfants avant 30 ans simplement parce qu’il est de bon ton de le faire. Tout est a priori ouvert et cette liberté-là, conquise au cours des dernières décennies, n’a pas de prix. En revanche, on est en train de comprendre qu’elle a très certainement un coût.

Toujours pas d’hypertemps

Celui de notre temps, pour commencer. Si l’hyperchoix est furieusement tendance, l’hypertemps, lui, n’est toujours pas d’actualité : nos journées restent obstinément bloquées sur une durée de vingt-quatre heures. Notre temps libre est le premier à faire les frais de cette tension.

On aurait voulu croire que, le choix garantissant un certain bonheur, il serait de l’intérêt de tous de le diversifier, comme l’ont théorisé les économistes classiques. « On dit que le choix est essentiel au bien-être et bien entendu, c’est vrai, analyse le psychosociologue américain Barry Schwartz, auteur du “Paradoxe du choix”. En revanche, depuis une trentaine d’années, alors que les choix des individus se sont libérés, les pays développés se rendent compte, ô surprise, que plus de choix ne correspond pas forcément à plus de bonheur. » Las, l’Homo œconomicus ultrarationnel de Jean-Baptiste Say et Adam Smith, censé raisonner « utile » et « optimisé », devient simple Homo sapiens singulièrement dépourvu à l’heure de choisir entre cent dix-sept modèles de machines à café pendant une pause déjeuner minutée (exemple réel, voir http://www.darty.com). Le plus probable est qu’il y sacrifiera son samedi, pesant longuement le pour et le contre de chaque appareil, cherchant le meilleur rapport qualité-prix. Une tracasserie qu’ignoraient les économistes des Lumières dont l’époque était encore marquée par la pénurie. De leur temps, on pouvait affirmer sans risque qu’à chaque produit correspondait un besoin ; on partait de si peu !

Au fond, qu’est-ce qui nous met si mal à l’aise ? Ecartons d’emblée les bouffées de culpabilité qui pourraient assombrir nos consciences, pauvres individus gâtés alors que le reste du monde manque de tout… Ce n’est pas l’effet secondaire le plus partagé, ni le plus douloureux.

L’explication est ailleurs. « Notre erreur est de nous obstiner à rechercher ce qui est soi-disant meilleur, explique Barry Schwartz. Lorsque nous nous imaginons qu’il existe quelque part un choix optimal, nous sommes toujours déçus par le nôtre. »

On pourrait se fixer comme objectif de se contenter d’un resto, de vacances ou d’un jean dont les vertus seraient « suffisantes », et arrêter de chercher le Graal sitôt les critères essentiels réunis. Mais ce n’est pas du tout comme cela que l’on procède. Parent, on veut « ce qu’il y a de mieux » pour l’éducation de son enfant ; patient, on recherche le « meilleur spécialiste » pour se soigner – qui se contenterait d’un chirurgien « suffisamment bon » ? Devant l’abondance des possibles, les expressions « à peu près » et « plus ou moins » sont hérétiques. Ce que l’on choisit est prié de nous correspondre au plus près.

Une situation naturellement inconnue dans des pays moins favorisés, comme ceux du bloc de l’Est à l’époque soviétique. « A Varsovie, quand j’étais enfant dans les années 1970 et 1980, c’était simple : quel que soit l’objet ou le produit alimentaire, soit il y en avait, soit il n’y en avait pas ! se rappelle Agnieszka Dellfina, artiste photographe polonaise de 36 ans. Parfois c’étaient les chaussures. On attendait des semaines entières, et hop ! il y avait un arrivage. Alors tout le monde se précipitait et, à l’école, on se retrouvait tous avec les mêmes. Pareil pour les meubles : on était sur liste d’attente pour acheter un canapé ou du carrelage. Et quand notre tour arrivait, on prenait ce qu’il y avait sans se demander si on aimait la couleur ou pas. Puis le Mur est tombé, et nous avons eu progressivement accès à tout. Cela tombait bien, pile quand je devenais ado et que j’avais envie de montrer qui j’étais avec mes vêtements. »

La prétention d’être unique

Montrer qui l’on est, ne pas ressembler à son voisin : la diversification des choix répond à la prétention d’être unique et libéré des tabous sociaux ou religieux d’autrefois. « On choisit désormais avec qui l’on vit, si l’on se marie ou pas, si l’on divorce ou pas, si l’on a des enfants ou pas et si oui à quel moment, remarque Gilles Lipovetsky. La vie privée est devenue très compliquée. »

Aux Etats-Unis, une quadra, Lori Gottlieb, a transformé sa quête ratée de l’homme idéal en best-seller (« Marry Him, The case for settling for Mr. Good Enough » (« Epouse-le. Pourquoi il faut se contenter de Monsieur Suffisamment Bon »). Parmi les soixante et un critères extrêmement précis que cette femme libre de ses choix avait elle-même définis pour le futur homme de sa vie, on trouvait, outre les classiques « intelligent » ou « gentil », des précisions millimétrées comme « optimiste mais pas naïf », « les pieds sur terre mais pas ennuyeux » ou encore « plus de 1,77 mètre mais moins d’1,83 mètre ». Son psy l’a mise en garde : l’homme parfait n’existe pas. Et même si elle le rencontrait, rien ne dit qu’il la trouverait à son goût ! Elle a fini par renoncer à sa chimère.

Dans les grandes villes, le nombre de célibataires explose. D’après l’Insee, un adulte sur trois vit seul en France, et un sur deux à Paris (étude réalisée en 2008). Or, sur Internet, les sites de rencontre multicritères, qui permettent théoriquement de calibrer nos amants pour qu’ils entrent dans nos placards sur mesure, n’ont bizarrement rien résolu. Mathilde, ravissante célibataire de 42 ans, en est témoin : « J’ai testé un site sur lequel on peut sélectionner les profils des hommes intéressants pour les mettre dans son panier, comme pour faire ses courses, explique-t-elle. Sur cent cinquante profils, on en garde facilement une quinzaine. Soit beaucoup plus que le nombre moyen de rencontres intéressantes que l’on peut faire en sortant un soir ! » Quelques mois et un coup de foudre plus tard, Mathilde en a eu assez. « Je me suis rendu compte qu’il y avait un énorme biais dans cette façon d’engager une relation avec quelqu’un, avoue-t-elle. On est extrêmement tenté de se reconnecter au site, même si l’on a commencé une relation en laquelle on croit. On se dit que l’on peut toujours être déçu, et qu’il vaut mieux conserver une roue de secours en attendant d’être sûr de sa décision. »

Car tel est bien là le paradoxe du choix : lorsque l’on manque d’options, on peut facilement attribuer ses malheurs et frustrations à la terre entière. Mais si l’on est malheureux dans un contexte de choix pléthorique, on se sent seul responsable. On maudit son manque de discernement. Et notre aversion naturelle pour l’échec nous décourage de nous engager, de peur de nous tromper. La civilisation de l’hyperchoix est aussi celle de la perplexité.

Le cerveau affolé

On se rappelle la fameuse histoire de l’âne de Buridan, mort de faim et de soif entre son picotin d’avoine et son seau d’eau, faute d’avoir pu décider par lequel commencer. A vrai dire, l’être humain fait à peine mieux. Notre cerveau se montre même très décevant dès qu’il s’agit de délibérer entre plus de trois ou quatre options. « La partie frontale, celle qui prend les décisions, est apparue plus récemment dans l’évolution que la partie postérieure qui gère les routines, et sa capacité est bien plus limitée, explique Etienne Koechlin, chercheur à l’Inserm et directeur du laboratoire de neurosciences cognitives à l’Ecole normale supérieure. Nous savons sans problème gérer simultanément plusieurs tâches parfaitement maîtrisées, comme se lever le matin ou se brosser les dents. Mais devant un grand nombre de nouvelles décisions à prendre, notre système a du mal. C’est ce qui explique qu’un conducteur débutant soit stressé au volant, alors que quelqu’un qui a une voiture depuis vingt ans se montre plus détendu. »

Pas de chance, il ne nous en faut pas beaucoup pour affoler nos neurones. « Le cerveau est mal à l’aise avec les choix multiples comportant de nombreuses alternatives, explique Etienne Koechlin. Les individus sont capables d’examiner jusqu’à trois ou quatre choix en parallèle, pas plus, et quoi qu’il arrive, le cerveau procède par élimination progressive des options, jusqu’à revenir à un choix binaire. » Jusqu’à la délibération finale : ce choix que je suis en train de faire, vaut-il vraiment mieux que de ne rien faire du tout ?

Nous nous croyons libres comme l’air, mais c’est compter sans nos limites physiologiques qui, elles, sont fort têtues. L’hyperchoix, qui suppose que nous soyons en mesure de réaliser un arbitrage entre toutes les options, se résume le plus souvent à une « hyperoffre », c’est-à-dire à une avalanche de possibilités entre lesquelles nous sommes, en réalité, totalement incapables de choisir. On ne s’étonnera donc pas que, devant une situation à la limite de nos capacités physiologiques d’arbitrage, fuite et non-choix soient des solutions très prisées.

Il y a quelques années, Sheena Iyengar, chercheuse à l’université de Columbia et auteure de « The Art of Choosing », s’est livrée à une amusante expérience : dans une épicerie, elle a installé un étal avec six sortes de pots de confiture. Résultat : peu d’affluence, mais environ 30 % des personnes ayant visité le stand lui ont acheté un pot. Le lendemain, Sheena Iyengar s’est installée au même endroit, disposant cette fois-ci un choix de vingt-quatre pots de confiture aux parfums différents. Franc succès, les clients se sont pressés sur le stand, attirés par ce choix étonnant de saveurs. Mais surprise : seuls 3 % de ces curieux sont passés à l’achat.

En 2009, le cabinet britannique Aon Consulting, qui a étudié six cent cinquante entreprises dans treize secteurs d’activité différents, a remarqué que, face à une large variété de placements pour leur retraite, la grande majorité des salariés se réfugiaient dans l’option par défaut, par peur de l’inconnu ou par inertie. Même constat de l’assureur Axa qui, la même année, a publié un livre blanc suggérant que diminuer d’un tiers l’offre de fonds d’investissement avait un effet incitatif sur les particuliers, jusque-là découragés par l’abondance des possibilités. C’est à se demander si le succès planétaire du smartphone d’Apple ne réside pas dans le fait qu’il a été lancé avec très peu de déclinaisons. Si Apple en avait proposé d’emblée dix sortes différentes, l’engin aurait-il eu le même succès ?

Pourtant, contre vents et marées, le choix reste un puissant argument de vente. « C’est, depuis cinquante ans, l’un des positionnements-clés d’Auchan, explique Pascale Carle, directrice des études et de la prospective du groupe pour la France. Même si nous décidons d’avoir une offre large en produits bio ou éthiques par exemple, nous continuons à proposer tout le reste, pour vous laisser le choix. A vous consommateurs d’acheter ce que vous voulez. »

Le confort des limites

S’arracher les cheveux au rayon surgelés n’est certes pas l’indice d’une crise de civilisation. Mais l’obligation de s’interroger sur ses désirs à toutes les étapes de son existence est, pour Barry Schwartz, un facteur de stress, qu’il n’hésite pas à lier à certaines tendances suicidaires. « Les cas de dépression clinique ont augmenté en flèche dans le monde occidental alors que les gens sont de plus en plus libres et qu’ils ne manquent de rien, observe le psychosociologue. Vu le confort dans lequel ils vivent, on les imaginerait plutôt le sourire aux lèvres et pourtant ils vont voir des psys et sont sous antidépresseurs.

L’une des raisons possibles à cela est qu’ils sont accablés par le nombre de choix qu’il leur revient de faire et que, constamment, ils ont la sensation que les décisions qu’ils prennent ne sont pas les meilleures. Avec, à la clé, une avalanche de regrets, petits et grands, et de culpabilité. » Comme si trop de liberté remettait en cause leur équilibre. Alors qu’avoir des limites, « comme un poisson rouge dans son bocal », selon l’expression de Schwartz, est tellement plus confortable.

Du coup, tous les stratagèmes sont bons pour limiter les choix. Les hebdomadaires rivalisent de couvertures sur les meilleurs lycées ou hôpitaux. Classements, hit-parades, best of, bancs d’essai, comparateurs en ligne, sont autant d’outils qui nous aident à border l’océan des possibles.

Certains consommateurs s’inventent même des contraintes. Adeptes de la décroissance et du recyclage qui achètent le moins possible ou fervents locavores qui n’optent que pour des aliments de saison produits dans un périmètre de quelques dizaines de kilomètres, tous s’inscrivent dans une logique de refus de l’hyperchoix. « C’est un bocal comme un autre, observe Barry Schwartz. On décide de ne manger que de la nourriture produite localement pour des raisons éthiques, mais surtout on restreint ses possibilités de choix. » On retrouve le confort d’un univers redevenu gérable avec en prime la satisfaction d’avoir fait une bonne action.

Se structurer, avoir des critères, savoir apprécier ce que l’on a sans regretter ce que l’on aurait pu avoir, sont des forces que l’on acquiert généralement avec l’âge. Mais elles peuvent aussi résulter d’une éducation particulière. « Dans la jungle, la lecture était notre seule distraction. Or, nous n’avions pas assez de livres, raconte Tanya. On possédait une encyclopédie en plusieurs volumes. Je les ai tous lus plusieurs fois. J’ai grandi en pensant qu’il était normal de lire et relire sans arrêt la même chose. Alors, la première fois que je suis allée à la bibliothèque en Californie… » Elle sourit, les yeux brillants. « J’étais au paradis. Je ne pouvais pas tout lire, et pourtant il n’y en avait jamais trop ! »

Comme si le meilleur moyen d’être heureux face à l’hyperchoix était d’avoir appris, une fois pour toutes, à accepter la frustration. Une façon de remettre l’abondance à sa juste place : celle d’un luxe stimulant et délicieux, à condition d’être capable de s’en passer.

Mercedes Erra, présidente exécutive d’Euro-RCSG Worldwide :

“L’hyperchoix a atteint une limite”

Nous vivons dans une société d’hyperchoix, mais celui-ci répond-il encore à nos désirs ?

Il a atteint une limite. Lorsque les différences entre les produits deviennent trop sophistiquées, elles ne sont plus lisibles. Il est clair que l’innovation pour l’innovation a fait son temps. Et avec la crise, certains consommateurs ont déserté les hypermarchés puisqu’ils savent qu’ils ne pourront acheter que le premier prix. Ils veulent le produit « juste » et n’ont pas besoin d’être exposés à l’ensemble du choix.

Les marques commencent-elles, du coup, à communiquer différemment ?

Oui. Les prochaines années verront sans doute le déclin du marketing à tous crins, au profit de la créativité. Si Evian résiste un peu mieux que les autres eaux, c’est parce qu’elle raconte la jeunesse et que rien n’est plus « aspirationnel » dans un monde qui vieillit. Les marques ont intérêt à porter haut leurs produits icônes et à ne pas les laisser tomber au profit d’innovations plus discutables. Ainsi le polo Lacoste se décline-t-il aux couleurs des saisons. Les éditions spéciales, les séries limitées d’un produit consacré par le temps, permettent de cultiver le mythe en évitant le piège de l’hyperchoix.

Superchoix, hyperchoix… Quelle est la prochaine étape ?

Pour certains types de produits, ce sera le sur-mesure. C’est une tendance croissante dans le luxe, mais pas seulement : Nike iD propose une chaussure unique, au look déterminé par son acheteur. La « customisation » vient de loin : c’est la redécouverte de l’artisanat, du temps où la production de masse n’existait pas.

Voir également:

Trop de choix peut tuer le désir !

Le choix tue-t-il le désir ?

10 Juillet 2012

Nike propose aujourd’hui une chaussure unique, au look déterminé par le futur acheteur. Les sites de rencontres se multiplient sur la bulle, internet, en proposant un choix de plus en plus précis de la personne que l’on souhaite avoir à ses côtés : intelligent, gentil, mais aussi des caractéristiques incroyablement millimétrées ( les pieds sur terre, mais pas ennuyeux, entre 1,77 mètre et 1, 82 m….). On customize à tout-va, parce que l’on a un choix insensé. Le nombre de célibataires explose littéralement dans les grandes villes, on peut donc choisir ce que l’on veut, on a le choix…Mais le paradoxe du choix, est que dès que l’on manque d’options, on parvient très facilement à attribuer sa déconvenue ou sa frustration à la Société ou à la terre entière ! Par contre, si on est malheureux dans un contexte de choix multiple et d’abondance, on s’attribue la responsabilité de l’échec. Mais l’être humain n’apprécie que très peu l’échec, surtout quand il ne le partage avec personne. In fine s’installe une certaine perplexité face à ces choix multiples, qui nous encourage à ne plus nous engager véritablement, que ce soit en amour, en amitié ou même professionnellement.

Alors, face à cette négation, que faire pour se réconcilier avec sa liberté de choix ?

Ne pas tomber dans la « facilité » en se laissant prendre au piège de la multiplicité des critères proposés. Cesser sans aucun doute de rechercher systématiquement le « mieux », en songeant qu’il existe un mari ou une femme idéale. Le sommes-nous nous-même ?

Se connaître avant toute chose, car la bonne décision, le bon choix, c’est celle, ou celui, qui correspond à ses véritables aspirations, ses attentes sincères sans se voiler la face ou se mentir, sans nécessairement s’adapter au choix !

Pour ma part, je pense que le choix ne tue pas le désir, mais il l’étouffe, surtout si l’on ne se connait pas véritablement. Devant un trop grand nombre de choix ou d’options, notre système a beaucoup de mal. L’individu est capable de prendre en compte 3 ou 4 possibilités maximum, et quoi qu’il advienne le cerveau procède par élimination jusqu’à revenir à un choix binaire. Et puis, lorsqu’il s’agit de rencontrer un homme ou une femme, êtes-vous certain d’avoir déposé votre regard, sur plus de 10 hommes ou femmes dans une seule soirée ? Un homme ou une femme que vous désirez réellement ? Ou alors, aviez-vous la possibilité ou la nécessité de devoir faire, à ce moment-là, un choix qui vous engage ?….


Protection des données personnelles: C’est un ennemi qui a fait cela (Happy data privacy day: be wise as serpents)

28 janvier, 2013

Le royaume des cieux est semblable à un homme qui a semé une bonne semence dans son champ. Mais, pendant que les gens dormaient, son ennemi vint, sema de l’ivraie parmi le blé, et s’en alla. Lorsque l’herbe eut poussé et donné du fruit, l’ivraie parut aussi. Les serviteurs du maître de la maison vinrent lui dire: Seigneur, n’as-tu pas semé une bonne semence dans ton champ? D’où vient donc qu’il y a de l’ivraie? Il leur répondit: C’est un ennemi qui a fait cela. Et les serviteurs lui dirent: Veux-tu que nous allions l’arracher? Non, dit-il, de peur qu’en arrachant l’ivraie, vous ne déraciniez en même temps le blé. Laissez croître ensemble l’un et l’autre jusqu’à la moisson, et, à l’époque de la moisson, je dirai aux moissonneurs: Arrachez d’abord l’ivraie, et liez-la en gerbes pour la brûler, mais amassez le blé dans mon grenier. Jésus (Matthieu 13: 24-30)
Voici, je vous envoie comme des brebis au milieu des loups. Soyez donc prudents comme les serpents, et simples comme les colombes. Jésus (Matthieu 10: 16)
Soyez sobres, veillez. Votre adversaire, le diable, rôde comme un lion rugissant, cherchant qui il dévorera. Pierre (I Pierre 5: 8)
Soyez constamment vigilants ! Alastor Maugrey dit Fol Œil
Il y aura, d’ailleurs, des curieux, des voyageurs, des amis ou des parents des prisonniers, des connaissances de l’inspecteur et d’autres officiers de la prison qui, tous animés de motifs différents, viendront ajouter à la force du principe salutaire de l’inspection, et surveilleront les chefs comme les chefs surveillent tous leurs subalternes. Ce grand comité du public perfectionnera tous les établissements qui seront soumis à sa vigilance et à sa pénétration. Jeremy Bentham
La formule abstraite du Panoptisme n’est plus « voir sans être vu », mais « imposer une conduite quelconque à une multiplicité humaine quelconque. Gilles Deleuze
Le panoptique est un type d’architecture carcérale imaginée par le philosophe utilitariste Samuel Bentham et son frère, Jérémy Bentham, à la fin du XVIIIe siècle. L’objectif de la structure panoptique est de permettre à un gardien, logé dans une tour centrale, d’observer tous les prisonniers, enfermés dans des cellules individuelles autour de la tour, sans que ceux-ci puissent savoir s’ils sont observés. Ce dispositif devait ainsi créer un « sentiment d’omniscience invisible » chez les détenus. Le philosophe et historien Michel Foucault, dans Surveiller et punir (1975), en fait le modèle abstrait d’une société disciplinaire, inaugurant une longue série d’études sur le dispositif panoptique. (…) L’idée de Bentham est inspirée par des plans d’usine mis au point pour une surveillance et une coordination efficace des ouvriers. Ces plans furent imaginés par son frère Samuel, dans l’objectif de simplifier la prise en charge d’un grand nombre de travailleurs. Bentham compléta ce projet en y mêlant l’idée de hiérarchie contractuelle : par exemple, une administration ainsi régie (par contrat, s’opposant à la gestion de confiance) dont le directeur aurait un intérêt financier à faire baisser le taux d’accidents du travail. Le panoptique fut aussi créé pour être moins cher que les autres modèles carcéraux de l’époque tout en réclamant moins d’employés. « Laissez-moi construire une prison sur ce modèle », demanda Bentham au Comité pour la réforme pénale, « j’y serai gardien. Vous verrez […] que les gardiens ne justifieront pas de salaire, et ne coûteront rien à l’État ». (…) Les surveillants ne pouvant être vus, ils n’ont pas besoin d’être à leur poste à tout moment, ce qui permet finalement d’abandonner la surveillance aux surveillés. (…) Bentham lui-même souhaitait une mise en abîme de la surveillance, les surveillants eux-mêmes devant être surveillés par des surveillants venus de l’extérieur, afin de limiter la maltraitance des détenus et les abus de pouvoir. (…) Les surveillants ne pouvant être vus, ils n’ont pas besoin d’être à leur poste à tout moment, ce qui permet finalement d’abandonner la surveillance aux surveillés. (…) Selon Bentham, la tour centrale devait se transformer en chapelle le dimanche, afin de moraliser les criminels. Bentham consacra une large partie de son temps et presque toute sa fortune personnelle à la promotion de constructions de prisons panoptiques. Après de nombreuses années de refus, de difficultés politiques et financières, il parvint à obtenir l’accord du parlement britannique. Le projet avorta cependant en 1811, lorsque le Roi s’opposa à l’acquisition du terrain. Wikipedia
Dans sa réalisation concrète, le modèle panoptique ne fut pas convaincant : des coûts trop élevés et une mauvaise viabilité furent les principales raisons de son abandon. L’échec de Pittsburgh a signé la fin du Panoptique en tant que construction architecturale. En conséquence, le débat qui entoure aujourd’hui le projet pénitentiaire de Bentham porte davantage sur des enjeux d’ordre philosophique — le regard, l’observation, le contrôle, la surveillance, etc. — que sur des questions d’ordre purement pratique. Le Panoptique s’inscrit toutefois indiscutablement dans le contexte des réflexions de l’époque traitant des formes de châtiment et d’enfermement dans le processus de réhabilitation des criminels. Muriel Schmid
L’échec du Panoptique, du moins au début, faisait partie d’un échec plus large du mouvement de réforme pénal dans son ensemble. Ce dernier échouera à maintes reprises dans sa tentative de convaincre les milieux gouvernementaux que la construction de prisons pour forçats était préférable à la transportation de ces derniers aux colonies pénales d’outre-mer, ou à leur incarcération dans d’anciens navires de guerre reconvertis en pénitenciers flottants (les pontons), amarrés au bord de la Tamise ou près des chantiers navals. Neil Davie
Cyber crime is a fascinating field: constantly evolving, and always innovating. Meet its most latest brain child: hacking webcams without even the owner knowing! The idea is simple: they turn on your webcam and watch you. Oh no, you will not be asked to pose or say cheese. They simply capture away pictures and videos of yours or anything in the webcam’s field, when you go about doing stuff, blissfully unaware. Switching off your cam is not going to help either. The webcam hacking spyware works with a Trojan backdoor software that will turn on the web cam on its own. This can be installed in your system when you download innocent-looking picture or video or music files. (…) Of course, there are still people who tout the line « I don’t have anything to hide, so I’m not concerned about privacy protection ». To them: know the laptop sitting in your 14 year old daughter’s bedroom? A hacker who thinks it is worth the effort can hack into her webcam and watch her while she is changing. Nothing to hide, you say? Cybrosys technologies

Bonne journée de la protection des données personnelles!

En ces temps étranges où la plus insignifiante et la plus utile des inventions, une simple cybercaméra intégrée, peut, entre des mains mal intentionnées, servir à vous nuire …

DATA PRIVACY DAY and THE INTERNET PANOPTICON

Studies Says Webcam Users Under Serious Threat

So you own a webcam? Good! Welcome to being watched then.

Cyber crime is a fascinating field: constantly evolving, and always innovating. Meet its most latest brain child: hacking webcams without even the owner knowing!

The idea is simple: they turn on your webcam and watch you. Oh no, you will not be asked to pose or say cheese. They simply capture away pictures and videos of yours or anything in the webcam’s field, when you go about doing stuff, blissfully unaware.

Switching off your cam is not going to help either. The webcam hacking spyware works with a Trojan backdoor software that will turn on the web cam on its own. This can be installed in your system when you download innocent-looking picture or video or music files.

Still skeptical? Okay, let us get you some more details. If your system has a webcam, then it also requires a software to control it. Even if your webcam is connected, it need not be on. That requires the software we are talking about. Ideal case is when there is just a single software that can access the cam, and you are its sole controller.

Having said that, there are apps that access the webcam other than the ones we are talking about. Examples are Yahoo! Messenger and the like. No cause to worry because these apps require you to ‘allow’ access.

But…

There are other softwares that can be installed in your system, softwares that can access your webcam without your permission. You don’t have to be using the webcam or turning it on, consider it a job done by the software. The malicious code can be installed when you download something. Once installed, it can access your web cam, turn it on and click away! Shutter bug, did I say?

And hey, this ain’t elaborate conjectures on possible threats in the future. What we are talking about has already been done.

Some news reports: in Cyprus, a 45-year-old man was arrested in connection with hacking a teenage girl’s webcam, in order to take illicit pictures of the young woman in her bedroom. In Spain, police have arrested a man suspected of stealing online bank passwords and of writing a virus that is capable of spying on people through their webcams. More disturbing is the fact that the police found information from thousands of computers worldwide in his system. The Blake J Robbins v Lower Merion School District (PA) is legendary already, and the school used student laptop webcams to spy on them at school and home. Stories do not end here. Some of them can make Little Brother look tame.

So what do you do? Apart from panicking and biting nails, that is.

For starters, unplug your web cam cable whenever it is not in use. No software can plug your cable back and use your web cam. If you cannot unplug the webcam, like in a laptop, cover it using tape. If you do not want the tape residue on the lens, then at least cover it with an old sock.

Same goes for your internet connection too. Disable it when it is not in use. Not having a device connected to any network would be the only way to prevent broadcasting data from your system.

Stop downloading files from unknown sources like insecure websites or simply, strangers in chats. Those files are the surest way of being a victim of all sorts of hack attempts.

And if possible, get a webcam that turns on a small light, or gives a physical indication of some sort when in use. So if you ever see the web cam light go on, and if you have not executed the webcam software, you know you are being spied on. If you know your stuff well, you can insert a webcam light by simple hardware modification: check the chip’s pins with a scope, find which signals correspond with activity, and connect the suitable ones to LEDs.

If you want to be fully sure, take your laptop apart, locate the cam, and insert a physical switch.

MOST IMPORTANTLY, ensure the security of your system. Update and tighten it like mad! Better antiviruses, better firewalls and better operating systems can help tonnes. Linux tends to be more secure, especially if you know what you are doing. In any case, a decent firewall should protect your system from outsiders accessing it in the first place.

The issue of webcams being hacked is creepy at the first glance, and the implications are scary in a blood-curdling way. Think about the degree of intrusion into privacy that this can facilitate. Your credit card numbers, sensitive financial information can all be hacked; even visuals of places used to store the information can be obtained easily.

Hacking surveillance cameras in public places can yield gigantic amounts of images. One may argue that this might not be personally sensitive material, but what if the surveillance cameras within an organization are hacked? That can be a veritable Mecca of privileged information.

And in a world where terrorists are more clean-shaved tech jargon-speaking geeks than gun-branding wild-looking cavemen, the possibilities take on an entirely new level of threat. Horrible, but inevitable.

Make people aware. It is a clichéd line, but the principle still works best. Technology may be your best friend, but it is also your worst enemy. Looking over your shoulders constantly is not paranoia anymore, it is actually commendable caution. Like Mad eye Moody says, be in « CONSTANT VIGILANCE!! ».

Of course, there are still people who tout the line « I don’t have anything to hide, so I’m not concerned about privacy protection ».

To them: know the laptop sitting in your 14 year old daughter’s bedroom? A hacker who thinks it is worth the effort can hack into her webcam and watch her while she is changing. Nothing to hide, you say?


Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Rejoignez 315 autres abonnés

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :