Hagiographie: On ne peut comprendre la gauche si on ne comprend pas qu’elle est une religion (God is great and Chavez is his new prophet)

31 mars, 2014
http://www.sfsustudentcenter.com/about/muralimages/Cesar%20Chavez%20Mural.png
https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc1/t1.0-9/p235x350/1978752_4105162284442_314659912_n.jpg
http://www.docspopuli.org/images/07_0821_120.jpg
http://blog.preservationnation.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/blog_photo_121009_POTUS-speech.jpg
http://www.defense.gov/news/Sep2002/200209262a_hr.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e7/Cesar_Chavez_2014_film.jpg
You cannot understand the Left if you do not understand that leftism is a religion. Dennis Prager
On Cesar Chavez Day, we celebrate one of America’s greatest champions for social justice. Raised into the life of a migrant farm worker, he toiled alongside men, women, and children who performed daily, backbreaking labor for meager pay and in deplorable conditions. They were exposed to dangerous pesticides and denied the most basic protections, including minimum wages, health care, and access to drinking water. Cesar Chavez devoted his life to correcting these injustices, to reminding us that every job has dignity, every life has value, and everyone — no matter who you are, what you look like, or where you come from — should have the chance to get ahead. After returning from naval service during World War II, Cesar Chavez fought for freedom in American agricultural fields. Alongside Dolores Huerta, he founded the United Farm Workers, and through decades of tireless organizing, even in the face of intractable opposition, he grew a movement to advance "La Causa" across the country. In 1966, he led a march that began in Delano, California, with a handful of activists and ended in Sacramento with a crowd 10,000 strong. A grape boycott eventually drew 17 million supporters nationwide, forcing growers to accept some of the first farm worker contracts in history. A generation of organizers rose to carry that legacy forward. The values Cesar Chavez lived by guide us still. As we push to fix a broken immigration system, protect the right to unionize, advance social justice for young men of color, and build ladders of opportunity for every American to climb, we recall his resilience through setbacks, his refusal to scale back his dreams. When we organize against income inequality and fight to raise the minimum wage — because no one who works full time should have to live in poverty — we draw strength from his vision and example. Throughout his lifelong struggle, Cesar Chavez never forgot who he was fighting for. "What [the growers] don’t know," he said, "is that it’s not bananas or grapes or lettuce. It’s people." Today, let us honor Cesar Chavez and those who marched with him by meeting our obligations to one another. I encourage Americans to make this a national day of service and education by speaking out, organizing, and participating in service projects to improve lives in their communities. Let us remember that when we lift each other up, when we speak with one voice, we have the power to build a better world. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 31, 2014, as Cesar Chavez Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with appropriate service, community, and education programs to honor Cesar Chavez’s enduring legacy. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-eighth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth. Barack Obama
His face is on a U.S. postage stamp. Countless statues, murals, libraries, schools, parks and streets are named after him — he even has his own national monument. He was on the cover of Time magazine in 1969. A naval ship was named after him. The man even has his own Google Doodle and Apple ad. Yet his footprint in American history is widely unknown and that’s exactly the reason why actor-turned-director Diego Luna decided to produce a movie about his life. CNN
Sorel, for whom religion was important, drew a comparison between the Christian and the socialist revolutionary. The Christian’s life is transformed because he accepts the myth that Christ will one day return and usher in the end of time; the revolutionary socialist’s life is transformed because he accepts the myth that one day socialism will triumph, and justice for all will prevail. What mattered for Sorel, in both cases, is not the scientific truth or falsity of the myth believed in, but what believing in the myth does to the lives of those who have accepted it, and who refuse to be daunted by the repeated failure of their apocalyptic expectations. How many times have Christians in the last two thousand years been convinced that the Second Coming was at hand, only to be bitterly disappointed — yet none of these disappointments was ever enough to keep them from holding on to their great myth. So, too, Sorel argued, the myth of socialism will continue to have power, despite the various failures of socialist experiments, so long as there are revolutionaries who are unwilling to relinquish their great myth. That is why he rejected scientific socialism — if it was merely science, it lacked the power of a religion to change individual’s lives. Thus for Sorel there was “an…analogy between religion and the revolutionary Socialism which aims at the apprenticeship, preparation, and even the reconstruction of the individual — a gigantic task. Lee Harris

En cette Journée César Chavez tout récemment proclamée par Notre Grand Timonier Obama …

Lancée, comme il se doit, par ses images saintes made in Hollywood

Bienvenue au dernier saint de nos amis de la gauche américaine !

The Left’s Misplaced Concern
The Left craves power not money, and that makes it much more frightening.
Dennis Prager
National review on line
May 22, 2012

You cannot understand the Left if you do not understand that leftism is a religion. It is not God-based (some left-wing Christians’ and Jews’ claims notwithstanding), but otherwise it has every characteristic of a religion. The most blatant of those characteristics is dogma. People who believe in leftism have as many dogmas as the most fundamentalist Christian.

One of them is material equality as the preeminent moral goal. Another is the villainy of corporations. The bigger the corporation, the greater the villainy. Thus, instead of the devil, the Left has Big Pharma, Big Tobacco, Big Oil, the “military-industrial complex,” and the like. Meanwhile, Big Labor, Big Trial Lawyers, and — of course — Big Government are left-wing angels.

And why is that? Why, to be specific, does the Left fear big corporations but not big government?

The answer is dogma — a belief system that transcends reason. No rational person can deny that big governments have caused almost all the great evils of the last century, arguably the bloodiest in history. Who killed the 20 to 30 million Soviet citizens in the Gulag Archipelago — big government or big business? Hint: There were no private businesses in the Soviet Union. Who deliberately caused 75 million Chinese to starve to death — big government or big business? Hint: See previous hint. Did Coca-Cola kill 5 million Ukrainians? Did Big Oil slaughter a quarter of the Cambodian population? Would there have been a Holocaust without the huge Nazi state?

Whatever bad things big corporations have done is dwarfed by the monstrous crimes — the mass enslavement of people, the deprivation of the most basic human rights, not to mention the mass murder and torture and genocide — committed by big governments.

How can anyone who thinks rationally believe that big corporations rather than big governments pose the greatest threat to humanity? The answer is that it takes a mind distorted by leftist dogma. If there is another explanation, I do not know what it is.

Religious Christians and Jews also have some irrational beliefs, but their irrationality is overwhelmingly confined to theological matters; and these theological irrationalities have no deleterious impact on religious Jews’ and Christians’ ability to see the world rationally and morally. Few religious Jews or Christians believe that big corporations are in any way analogous to big government in terms of evil done. And the few who do are leftists.

That the Left demonizes Big Pharma, for instance, is an example of this dogmatism. America’s pharmaceutical companies have saved millions of lives, including millions of leftists’ lives. And I do not doubt that in order to increase profits they have not always played by the rules. But to demonize big pharmaceutical companies while lionizing big government, big labor unions, and big tort-law firms is to stand morality on its head.

There is yet another reason to fear big government far more than big corporations. ExxonMobil has no police force, no IRS, no ability to arrest you, no ability to shut you up, and certainly no ability to kill you. ExxonMobil can’t knock on your door in the middle of the night and legally take you away. Apple Computer cannot take your money away without your consent, and it runs no prisons. The government does all of these things.

Of course, the Left will respond that government also does good and that corporations and capitalists are, by their very nature, “greedy.”

To which the rational response is that, of course, government also does good. But so do the vast majority of corporations, private citizens, church groups, and myriad voluntary associations. On the other hand, only big government can do anything approaching the monstrous evils of the last century.

As for greed: Between hunger for money and hunger for power, the latter is incomparably more frightening. It is noteworthy that none of the twentieth century’s monsters — Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao — were preoccupied with material gain. They loved power much more than money.

And that is why the Left is much more frightening than the Right. It craves power.

— Dennis Prager, a nationally syndicated columnist and radio talk-show host, is author of Still the Best Hope: Why the World Needs American Values to Triumph. He may be contacted through his website, dennisprager.com.

Voir aussi:

The iconic UFW

Another myth. I opened my Easter Sunday Google browser and did not find a Christian icon on the page, but instead a (badly done) romantic rendition of a youthful Cesar Chavez, apparently our age’s version of a politically correct divinity.

Yet I wondered whether the midlevel Googilites who post these politically hip images knew all that much about Chavez. I grant in this age that they saw no reason to emphasize Christianity on its most holy day. But there is, after all, Miriam Pawel’s 2010 biography of Chavez still readily accessible[10], and a new essay about him in The Atlantic[11] — both written by sympathetic authors who nonetheless are not quite the usual garden-variety hagiographers. To suggest something other than sainthood is heresy in these parts, as I have discovered since the publication of Mexifornia a decade ago.

I grew up in the cauldron of farm-labor disputes. Small farms like ours largely escaped the violence, because there were five of us kids to do the work in summer and after school, and our friends welcomed the chance to buck boxes or help out propping trees or thinning plums. Hired help was rare and a matter of a few days of hiring 20 or so locals for the fall raisin harvest. But the epic table grape fights were not far away in Parlier, Reedley, and down the 99 in Delano. I offer a few impressions, some of them politically incorrect.

First, give Chavez his due. Farmworkers today are more akin to supposedly non-skilled (actually there is a skill required to pruning and picking) labor elsewhere, with roughly the same protective regulations as the food worker or landscaper. That was not true in 1965. Conservatives will argue that the market corrected the abuse (e.g., competition for ever scarcer workers) and ensured overtime, accessible toilets, and the end to hand-held hoes; liberals will credit Chavez — or fear of Chavez.

But that said, Chavez was not quite the icon we see in the grainy videos walking the vineyards withRobert Kennedy[12]. Perhaps confrontation was inevitable, but the labor organizing around here was hardly non-violent. Secondary boycotts were illegal, but that did not stop picketers from yelling and cursing as you exited the local Safeway with a bag of Emperor grapes. There were the constant union fights with bigger family growers (the 500 acre and above sort), as often demonstrators rushed into fields to mix it up with so-called scabs. Teamsters fought the UAW. The latter often worked with the immigration service to hunt down and deport illegals. The former bused in toughs to crack heads. After-hours UFW vandalism, as in the slashed tire and chain-sawed tree mode, was common.

The politics were explicable by one common theme: Cesar Chavez disliked small farmers and labor contractors[13], and preferred agribusiness and the idea of a huge union. Otherwise, there were simply too many incongruities in an agrarian checkerboard landscape for him to handle — as if the UAW would have had to deal with an auto industry scattered among thousands of small family-owned factories.

For Chavez, the ideal was a vast, simple us/them, 24/7 fight, albeit beneath an angelic veneer of Catholic suffering. In contrast, small farmers were not rich and hardly cut-out caricatures of grasping exploitation. Too many were unapologetic Armenians, Japanese (cf. the Nisei Farmers League), Portuguese, and Mexican-Americans to guarantee the necessary white/brown binary. Many had their own histories of racism, from the Armenian genocide to the Japanese internment, and had no white guilt of the Kennedy sort. I cannot imagine a tougher adversary than a Japanese, Armenian, or Punjabi farmer, perched on his own tractor or irrigating his 60 acres — entirely self-created, entirely unapologetic about his achievement, entirely committed to the idea that no one is going to threaten his existence.

The local labor contractors were not villains, but mostly residents who employed their relatives and knew well the 40-acre and 100-acre farmers they served. When there were slow times on the farm, I picked peaches for two summers for a Selma labor contractor, whose kids I went to school with. He was hardly a sellout. The crusty, hard-bitten small farmers (“don’t bruise that fruit,” “you missed three peaches up there on that limb,” “you stopped before it was quite noon”) who monitored personally the orchards we picked looked no different from the men on ladders.

In contrast, Chavez preferred the south and west Central Valley of huge corporate agribusiness. Rich and powerful, these great captains had the ability by fiat to institute labor agreements across hundreds of thousands of acres of farmland. Chavez’s organizing forte was at home in a Tulare, Delano, Shafter, Mendota or Tranquility, not a Reedley, Kingsburg or Selma. In those days, the former were mostly pyramidal societies of a few corporate kingpins with an underclass of agricultural laborers, the latter were mixed societies in which Mexican-Americans were already ascendant and starting to join the broader middle class of Armenians, Japanese, and Punjabis.

Chavez was to be a Walter Reuther or George Meany, a make-or-breaker who sat across from a land baron, cut a deal for his vast following, and then assumed national stature as he doled out union patronage and quid-pro-quo political endorsements. In that vision, as a 1950s labor magnate Chavez largely failed — but not because agribusiness did not cave in to him. Indeed, it saw the UFW and Chavez as the simple cost of doing business, a tolerable write-off necessary to making all the bad press, vandalism, and violence go away.

Instead, the UFW imploded by its own insider and familial favoritism, corruption, and, to be frank, lunatic paranoia. The millions of dollars Chavez deducted for pension funds often vanished. Legions of relatives (for a vestigial experience of the inner sanctum, I suggest a visit to the national shrine southeast of Bakersfield) staffed the union administration. There were daily rumors of financial malfeasance, mostly in the sense of farmworkers belatedly discovering that their union deductions did not lead to promised healthcare or pensions.

Most hagiographies ignore Chavez’s eerie alliance with the unhinged Synanon bunch. In these parts, they had opened a foothill retreat of some sort above Woodlake, not far from here. (I visited the ramshackle Badger enclave once with my mother [I suppose as her informal "security,"], who was invited as a superior court judge to be introduced to their new anti-drug program in their hopes that county officials might save millions of dollars by sentencing supposedly non-violent heroin addicts to Synanon recovery treatments. Needless to say, she smiled, met the creepy “group,” looked around the place, and we left rather quickly, and that was that.)

I don’t think that the Google headliners remember that Charles Dederich[14] (of rattlesnake-in-the-mailbox and “Don’t mess with us. You can get killed, dead” fame) was a sort of model for Chavez, who tried to introduce the wacko-bird Synanon Game to his own UFW hierarchy. No matter, deification of Chavez is now de rigeur; the young generation who idolizes him has almost no knowledge of the man, his life, or his beliefs. It is enough that Bobby Kennedy used to fly into these parts, walk for a few well-filmed hours, and fly out.

When I went to UC Santa Cruz in September of 1971, I remember as a fool picking a box of Thompson seedless grapes from our farm to take along, and soon being met by a dorm delegation of rich kids from Pacific Palisades and Palos Verdes (a favorite magnet area for Santa Cruz in those days) who ordered me not to eat my own grapes on my own campus in my own room. Soon I had about four good friends who not only enjoyed them, but enjoyed eating them in front of those who did not (to the extent I remember these student moralists, and can collate old faces with names in the annual alumni news, most are now high-ups and executives in the entertainment industry). Victor Davis Hanson

Voir encore:

The study of history demands nuanced thinking

Miriam Pawel

Austin American-Statesman
7-17-09

[Pawel is the author of the forthcoming book 'The Union of Their Dreams — Power, Hope and Struggle in Cesar Chavez's Farm Worker Movement.']

Cesar Chavez was not a saint. He was, at times, a stubborn authoritarian bully, a fanatical control freak, a wily fighter who manufactured enemies and scapegoats, a mystical vegetarian who healed with his hands, and a union president who wanted his members to value sacrifice above higher wages.

He was also a brilliant, inspirational leader who changed thousands of lives as he built the first successful union for farmworkers, a consummate strategist singularly committed to his vision of helping the poor — a vision that even those close to him sometimes misunderstood.

That one man embodies such complexity and contradictions should be a key lesson underlying any history curriculum: Students should learn to think in shades of gray, to see heroes as real people, and to reject the dogma of black and white.

That sort of nuanced thinking appears largely absent from the debate over whether Cesar Chavez should be taught in Texas schools. Two of the six reviewers appointed to assess Texas’ social studies curriculum recently deemed Chavez an inappropriate role model whose contributions and stature have been overstated. Their critiques suggested he should be excised, not glorified. Their opponents pounced on the comments in an ongoing ideological and political dispute that clearly is far more sweeping than Chavez’s proper place in the classroom.

But the debate over Chavez and how his story is taught exemplifies the dangers of oversimplification and the absence of critical thinking.

His supporters are at fault as well as his detractors. For years, they have mythologized Chavez and fiercely fended off efforts to portray him in less than purely heroic terms. The hagiography only detracts from his very real, remarkable accomplishments. In an era when Mexican Americans were regarded as good for nothing more than the most back-breaking labor, Chavez mobilized public support and forced agribusiness to recognize the rights of farmworkers. His movement brought farmworkers dignity and self-respect, as well as better wages and working conditions. In California, he pushed through what remains today the most pro-labor law in the country, the only one granting farmworkers the right to organize and petition for union elections.

Chavez’s legacy can be seen in the work of a generation of activists and community organizers who joined the farmworker crusade during the 1960s and ’70s, a movement that transformed their lives. They, in turn, have gone on to effect change across the country, most recently playing key roles in the Obama presidential campaign.

The decline of the union Chavez founded and the ultimate failure of the United Farm Workers to achieve lasting change in the fields of California — much less expand into a national union — is part of the Chavez legacy, too. Chavez himself played a role in that precipitous decline, and students of history should not follow his example and blame the failures solely on outside forces and scapegoats.

Chavez, an avid reader of history, preserved an extraordinary record of his own movement: For years, he ordered that all documents, tapes and pictures be sent to the Walter P. Reuther Library at Wayne State University in Detroit, the nation’s preeminent labor archive. Chavez told people he wanted the history of his movement to be saved and studied — warts and all.

Those lessons should be taught in classrooms everywhere. – See more at: http://hnn.us/article/107517#sthash.NSesFPOF.dpuf

Voir encore:

Amid Chants of ‘¡Huelga!,’ an Embodiment of Hope
Hero Worship Abounds in ‘Cesar Chavez’

A. O. Scott

The NYT

MARCH 27, 2014

“Cesar Chavez,” directed by Diego Luna, is a well-cast, well-intentioned movie that falls into the trap that often awaits film biographies of brave and widely admired individuals. The movie is so intent on reminding viewers of its subject’s heroism that it struggles to make him an interesting, three-dimensional person, and it tells his story as a series of dramatic bullet points, punctuated by black-and-white footage, some real, some simulated, of historical events.

In spite of these shortcomings, Mr. Luna’s reconstruction of the emergence of the United Farm Workers organization in the 1960s unfolds with unusual urgency and timeliness. After a rushed beginning — in which we see Chavez (Michael Peña) arguing in a Los Angeles office and moving his family to Delano, a central California town, before we fully grasp his motives — we settle in for a long, sometimes violent struggle between the workers and the growers. Attempted strikes are met with intimidation and brutality, from the local sheriff and hired goons, and Chavez and his allies (notably Dolores Huerta, played by Rosario Dawson) come up with new tactics, including a public fast, a march from Delano to Sacramento and a consumer boycott of grapes.

As is customary in movies like this, we see the toll that the hero’s commitment takes on his family life. His wife, Helen (America Ferrera), is a steadfast ally, but there is tension between Chavez and his oldest son, Fernando (the only one of the couple’s eight children with more than an incidental presence on screen). Fernando (Eli Vargas) endures racist bullying at school and suffers from his father’s frequent absences. Their scenes together are more functional than heartfelt, fulfilling the requirement of allowing the audience a glimpse at the private life of a public figure.

We also venture into the household of one of Chavez’s main antagonists, a landowner named Bogdonovich, played with sly, dry understatement by John Malkovich. He is determined to break the incipient union, and the fight between the two men and their organizations becomes a national political issue. Senator Robert F. Kennedy (Jack Holmes) takes the side of the workers, while the interests of the growers are publicly defended by Ronald Reagan, shown in an archival video clip describing the grape boycott as immoral, and Richard Nixon. Parts of “Cesar Chavez” are as rousing as an old folk song, with chants of “¡Huelga!” and “¡Sí, se puede!” ringing through the theater. Although it ends, as such works usually do, on a note of triumph, the film, whose screenplay is by Keir Pearson and Timothy J. Sexton, does not present history as a closed book. Movies about men and women who fought for social change — “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” is a recent example — treat them less as the radicals they were than as embodiments of hope, reconciliation and consensus.

Though Cesar Chavez, who died in 1993, has been honored and celebrated, the problems he addressed have hardly faded away. The rights of immigrants and the wages and working conditions of those who pick, process and transport food are still live and contentious political issues.

And if you read between the lines of Mr. Luna’s earnest, clumsy film, you find not just a history lesson but an argument. The success of the farm workers depended on the strength of labor unions, both in the United States and overseas, and the existence of political parties able to draw on that power. What the film struggles to depict, committed as it is to the conventions of hagiography, is the long and complex work of organizing people to defend their own interests. You are invited to admire what Cesar Chavez did, but it may be more vital to understand how he did it.

“Cesar Chavez” is rated PG-13 (Parents strongly cautioned). Strong language and scenes of bloody class struggle.

Voir encore:

The Madness of Cesar Chavez
A new biography of the icon shows that saints should be judged guilty until proved innocent.
Caitlin Flanagan
The Atlantic
Jun 13 2011,

Once a year, in the San Joaquin Valley in Central California, something spectacular happens. It lasts only a couple of weeks, and it’s hard to catch, because the timing depends on so many variables. But if you’re patient, and if you check the weather reports from Fresno and Tulare counties obsessively during the late winter and early spring, and if you are also willing, on very little notice, to drop everything and make the unglamorous drive up (or down) to that part of the state, you will see something unforgettable. During a couple of otherworldly weeks, the tens of thousands of fruit trees planted there burst into blossom, and your eye can see nothing, on either side of those rutted farm roads, but clouds of pink and white and yellow. Harvest time is months away, the brutal summer heat is still unimaginable, and in those cool, deserted orchards, you find only the buzzing of bees, the perfumed air, and the endless canopy of color.

I have spent the past year thinking a lot about the San Joaquin Valley, because I have been trying to come to terms with the life and legacy of Cesar Chavez, whose United Farm Workers movement—born in a hard little valley town called Delano—played a large role in my California childhood. I spent the year trying, with increasing frustration, to square my vision of him, and of his movement, with one writer’s thorough and unflinching reassessment of them. Beginning five years ago, with a series of shocking articles in the Los Angeles Times, and culminating now in one of the most important recent books on California history, Miriam Pawel has undertaken a thankless task: telling a complicated and in many ways shattering truth. That her book has been so quietly received is not owing to a waning interest in the remarkable man at its center. Streets and schools and libraries are still being named for Chavez in California; his long-ago rallying cry of “Sí, se puede” remains so evocative of ideas about justice and the collective power of the downtrodden that Barack Obama adopted it for his presidential campaign. No, the silence greeting the first book to come to terms with Chavez’s legacy arises from the human tendency to be stubborn and romantic and (if the case requires it) willfully ignorant in defending the heroes we’ve chosen for ourselves. That silence also attests to the way Chavez touched those of us who had any involvement with him, because the full legacy has to include his singular and almost mystical way of eliciting not just fealty but a kind of awe. Something cultlike always clung to the Chavez operation, and so while I was pained to learn in Pawel’s book of Chavez’s enthrallment with an actual cult—with all the attendant paranoia and madness—that development makes sense.

In the face of Pawel’s book, I felt compelled to visit the places where Chavez lived and worked, although it’s hard to tempt anyone to join you on a road trip to somewhere as bereft of tourist attractions as the San Joaquin Valley. But one night in late February, I got a break: someone who’d just driven down from Fresno told me that the trees were almost in bloom, and that was all I needed. I took my 13-year-old son, Conor, out of school for a couple of days so we could drive up the 99 and have a look. I was thinking of some things I wanted to show him, and some I wanted to see for myself. It would be “experiential learning”; it would be a sentimental journey. At times it would be a covert operation.

One Saturday night, when I was 9 or 10 years old, my parents left the dishes in the sink and dashed out the driveway for their weekend treat: movie night. But not half an hour later—just enough time for the round trip from our house in the Berkeley Hills to the United Artists theater down on Shattuck—they were right back home again, my mother hanging up her coat with a sigh, and my father slamming himself angrily into a chair in front of The Bob Newhart Show.

What happened?

“Strike,” he said bitterly.

One of the absolute rules of our household, so essential to our identity that it was never even explained in words, was that a picket line didn’t mean “maybe.” A picket line meant “closed.” This rule wasn’t a point of honor or a means of forging solidarity with the common man, someone my father hoped to encounter only in literature. It came from a way of understanding the world, from the fierce belief that the world was divided between workers and owners. The latter group was always, always trying to exploit the former, which—however improbably, given my professor father’s position in life—was who we were.

In the history of human enterprise, there can have been no more benevolent employer than the University of California in the 1960s and ’70s, yet to hear my father and his English-department pals talk about the place, you would have thought they were working at the Triangle shirtwaist factory. Not buying a movie ticket if the ushers were striking meant that if the shit really came down, and the regents tried to make full professors teach Middlemarch seminars over summer vacation, the ushers would be there for you. As a child, I burned brightly with the justice of these concepts, and while other children were watching Speed Racer or learning Chinese jump rope, I spent a lot of my free time working for the United Farm Workers.

Everything about the UFW and its struggle was right-sized for a girl: it involved fruits and vegetables, it concerned the most elementary concepts of right and wrong, it was something you could do with your mom, and most of your organizing could be conducted just outside the grocery store, which meant you could always duck inside for a Tootsie Pop. The cement apron outside a grocery store, where one is often accosted—in a manner both winsome and bullying—by teams of Brownies pressing their cookies on you, was once my barricade and my bully pulpit.

Of course, it had all started with Mom. Somewhere along the way, she had met Cesar Chavez, or at least attended a rally where he had spoken, and that was it. Like almost everyone else who ever encountered him, she was spellbound. “This wonderful, wonderful man,” she would call him, and off we went to collect clothes for the farmworkers’ children, and to sell red-and-black UFW buttons and collect signatures. It was our thing: we loved each other, we loved doing little projects, we had oceans of free time (has anyone in the history of the world had more free time than mid-century housewives and their children?), and we were both constitutionally suited to causes that required grudge-holding and troublemaking and making things better for people in need. Most of all, though, we loved Cesar.

In those heady, early days of the United Farm Workers, in the time of the great five-year grape strike that started in 1965, no reporter, not even the most ironic among them, failed to remark upon, if not come under, Chavez’s sway. “The Messianic quality about him,” observed John Gregory Dunne in his brilliant 1967 book, Delano, “is suggested by his voice, which is mesmerizing—soft, perfectly modulated, pleasantly accented.” Peter Matthiessen’s book-length profile of Chavez, which consumed two issues of The New Yorker in the summer of 1969, reported: “He is the least boastful man I have ever met.” Yet within this self-conscious and mannered presentation of inarticulate deference was an ability to shape both a romantic vision and a strategic plan. Never since then has so great a gift been used for so small a cause. In six months, he took a distinctly regional movement and blasted it into national, and then international, fame.

The ranchers underestimated Chavez,” a stunned local observer of the historic Delano grape strike told Dunne; “they thought he was just another dumb Mex.” Such a sentiment fueled opinions of Chavez, not just among the valley’s grape growers—hardworking men, none of them rich by any means—but among many of his most powerful admirers, although they spoke in very different terms. Chavez’s followers—among them mainline Protestants, socially conscious Jews, Berkeley kids, white radicals who were increasingly rootless as the civil-rights movement transformed into the black-power movement—saw him as a profoundly good man. But they also understood him as a kind of idiot savant, a noble peasant who had risen from the agony of stoop labor and was mysteriously instilled with the principles and tactics of union organizing. In fact he’d been a passionate and tireless student of labor relations for a decade before founding the UFW, handpicked to organize Mexican Americans for the Community Service Organization, a local outfit under the auspices of no less a personage than Saul Alinsky, who knew Chavez well and would advise him during the grape strike. From Alinsky, and from Fred Ross, the CSO founder, Chavez learned the essential tactic of organizing: the person-by-person, block-by-block building of a coalition, no matter how long it took, sitting with one worker at a time, hour after hour, until the tide of solidarity is so high, no employer can defeat it.

Chavez, like all the great ’60s figures, was a man of immense personal style. For a hundred reasons—some cynical, some not—he and Robert Kennedy were drawn to each other. The Kennedy name had immense appeal to the workers Chavez was trying to cultivate; countless Mexican households displayed photographs of JFK, whose assassination they understood as a Catholic martyrdom rather than an act of political gun violence. In turn, Chavez’s cause offered Robert Kennedy a chance to stand with oppressed workers in a way that would not immediately inflame his family’s core constituency, among them working-class Irish Americans who felt no enchantment with the civil-rights causes that RFK increasingly embraced. The Hispanic situation was different. At the time of the grape strike, Mexican American immigration was not on anyone’s political radar. The overwhelming majority of California’s population was white, and the idea that Mexican workers would compete for anyone’s good job was unheard-of. The San Joaquin Valley farms—and the worker exploitation they had historically engendered—were associated more closely with the mistreatment of white Okies during the Great Depression than with the plight of any immigrant population.

Kennedy—his mind, like Chavez’s, always on the political promise of a great photograph—flew up to Delano in March 1968, when Chavez broke his 25-day fast, which he had undertaken not as a hunger strike, but as penance for some incidents of UFW violence. In a Mass held outside the union gas station where Chavez had fasted, the two were photographed, sitting next to Chavez’s wife and his mantilla-wearing mother, taking Communion together (“Senator, this is probably the most ridiculous request I ever made in my life,” said a desperate cameraman who’d missed the shot; “but would you mind giving him a piece of bread?”). Three months later, RFK was shot in Los Angeles, and a second hagiographic photograph was taken of the leader with a Mexican American. A young busboy named Juan Romero cradled the dying senator in his arms, his white kitchen jacket and dark, pleading eyes lending the picture an urgency at once tragic and political: The Third of May recast in a hotel kitchen. The United Farm Workers began to seem like Kennedy’s great unfinished business. The family firm might have preferred that grieving for Bobby take the form of reconsidering Teddy’s political possibilities, but in fact much of it was channeled, instead, into boycotting grapes.

That historic grape boycott eventually ended with a rousing success: three-year union contracts binding the Delano growers and the farmworkers. After that, the movement drifted out of my life and consciousness, as it did—I now realize—for millions of other people. I remember clearly the night my mother remarked (in a guarded way) to my father that the union had now switched its boycott from grapes to … lettuce. “Lettuce?” he squawked, and then burst out in mean laughter. I got the joke. What was Chavez going to do now, boycott each of California’s agricultural products, one at a time for five years each? We’d be way into the 21st century by the time they got around to zucchini. And besides, things were changing—in the world, in Berkeley, and (in particular, I thought) at the Flanagans’. Things that had appeared revolutionary and appealing in the ’60s were becoming weird or ugly in the ’70s. People began turning inward. My father, stalwart Vietnam War protester and tear-gasee, turned his concern to writing an endless historical novel about 18th-century Ireland. My mother stopped worrying so much about the liberation of other people and cut herself into the deal: she left her card table outside the Berkeley Co-op and went back to work. I too found other pursuits. Sitting in my room with the cat and listening over and over to Carly Simon’s No Secrets album—while staring with Talmudic concentration at its braless cover picture—was at least as absorbing as shaking the Huelga can and fretting about Mexican children’s vaccination schedules had once been. Everyone sort of moved on.

I didn’t really give any thought to the UFW again until the night of my mother’s death. At the end of that terrible day, when my sister and I returned from the hospital to our parents’ house, we looked through the papers on my mother’s kitchen desk, and there among the envelopes from the many, many charities she supported (she sent each an immediate albeit very small check) was one bearing a logo I hadn’t seen in years: the familiar black-and-red Huelga eagle. I smiled and took it home with me. I wrote a letter to the UFW, telling about my mom and enclosing a check, and suddenly I was back.

Re-upping with the 21st-century United Farm Workers was fantastic. The scope of my efforts was so much larger than before (they encouraged me to e-blast their regular updates to everyone in my address book, which of course I did) and the work so, so much less arduous—no sitting around in parking lots haranguing people about grapes. I never got off my keister. Plus, every time a new UFW e-mail arrived—the logo blinking, in a very new-millennium way, “Donate now!”—and I saw the pictures of farmworkers doing stoop labor in the fields, and the stirring photographs of Cesar Chavez, I felt close to my lost mother and connected to her: here I am, Mom, still doing our bit for the union.

And then one morning a few years later, I stepped out onto the front porch in my bathrobe, picked up the Los Angeles Times, and saw a headline: “Farmworkers Reap Little as Union Strays From Its Roots.” It was the first article in a four-part series by a Times reporter named Miriam Pawel, and from the opening paragraph, I was horrified.

I learned that while the UFW brand still carried a lot of weight in people’s minds—enough to have built a pension plan of $100 million in assets but with only a few thousand retirees who qualified—the union had very few contracts with California growers, the organization was rife with Chavez nepotism, and the many UFW-funded business ventures even included an apartment complex in California built with non-union labor. I took this news personally. I felt ashamed that I had forwarded so many e-mails to so many friends, all in the service, somehow, of keeping my mother’s memory and good works alive, and all to the ultimate benefit—as it turned out—not of the workers in the fields (whose lives were in some ways worse than they had been in the ’60s), but rather of a large, shadowy, and now morally questionable organization. But at least, I told myself, none of this has in any way impugned Cesar himself: he’d been dead more than a decade before the series was published. His own legacy was unblighted.

Or so it seemed, until my editor sent me a copy of The Union of Their Dreams, Pawel’s exhaustively researched, by turns sympathetic and deeply shocking, investigation of Chavez and his movement, and in particular of eight of the people who worked most closely with him. Through her in-depth interviews with these figures—among them a prominent attorney who led the UFW legal department, a minister who was one of Chavez’s closest advisers, and a young farmworker who had dedicated his life to the cause—Pawel describes the reality of the movement, not just during the well-studied and victorious period that made it famous, but during its long, painful transformation to what it is today. Her story of one man and his movement is a story of how the ’60s became the ’70s.

To understand Chavez, you have to understand that he was grafting together two life philosophies that were, at best, an idiosyncratic pairing. One was grounded in union-organizing techniques that go back to the Wobblies; the other emanated directly from the mystical Roman Catholicism that flourishes in Mexico and Central America and that Chavez ardently followed. He didn’t conduct “hunger strikes”; he fasted penitentially. He didn’t lead “protest marches”; he organized peregrinations in which his followers—some crawling on their knees—arrayed themselves behind the crucifix and effigies of the Virgin of Guadalupe. His desire was not to lift workers into the middle class, but to bind them to one another in the decency of sacrificial poverty. He envisioned the little patch of dirt in Delano—the “Forty Acres” that the UFW had acquired in 1966 and that is now a National Historic Landmark—as a place where workers could build shrines, pray, and rest in the shade of the saplings they had tended together while singing. Like most ’60s radicals—of whatever stripe—he vastly overestimated the appeal of hard times and simple living; he was not the only Californian of the time to promote the idea of a Poor People’s Union, but as everyone from the Symbionese Liberation Army to the Black Panthers would discover, nobody actually wants to be poor. With this Christ-like and infinitely suffering approach to some worldly matters, Chavez also practiced the take-no-prisoners, balls-out tactics of a Chicago organizer. One of his strategies during the lettuce strike was causing deportations: he would alert the immigration authorities to the presence of undocumented (and therefore scab) workers and get them sent back to Mexico. As the ’70s wore on, all of this—the fevered Catholicism and the brutal union tactics—coalesced into a gospel with fewer and fewer believers. He moved his central command from the Forty Acres, where he was in constant contact with workers and their families—and thus with the realities and needs of their lives—and took up residence in a weird new headquarters.

Located in the remote foothills of the Tehachapi Mountains, the compound Chavez would call La Paz centered on a moldering and abandoned tuberculosis hospital and its equally ravaged outbuildings. In the best tradition of charismatic leaders left alone with their handpicked top command, he became unhinged. This little-known turn of events provides the compelling final third of Pawel’s book. She describes how Chavez, the master spellbinder, himself fell under the spell of a sinister cult leader, Charles Dederich, the founder of Synanon, which began as a tough-love drug-treatment program and became—in Pawel’s gentle locution—“an alternative lifestyle community.” Chavez visited Dederich’s compound in the Sierras (where women routinely had their heads shaved as a sign of obedience) and was impressed. Pawel writes:

Chavez envied Synanon’s efficient operation. The cars all ran, the campus was immaculate, the organization never struggled for money.

He was also taken with a Synanon practice called “The Game,” in which people were put in the center of a small arena and accused of disloyalty and incompetence while a crowd watched their humiliation. Chavez brought the Game back to La Paz and began to use it on his followers, among them some of the UFW’s most dedicated volunteers. In a vast purge, he exiled or fired many of them, leaving wounds that remain tender to this day. He began to hold the actual farmworkers in contempt: “Every time we look at them,” he said during a tape-recorded meeting at La Paz, “they want more money. Like pigs, you know. Here we’re slaving, and we’re starving and the goddamn workers don’t give a shit about anything.”

Chavez seemed to have gone around the bend. He decided to start a new religious order. He flew to Manila during martial law in 1977 and was officially hosted by Ferdinand Marcos, whose regime he praised, to the horror and loud indignation of human-rights advocates around the world.

By the time of Chavez’s death, the powerful tide of union contracts for California farmworkers, which the grape strike had seemed to augur, had slowed to the merest trickle. As a young man, Chavez had set out to secure decent wages and working conditions for California’s migrant workers; anyone taking a car trip through the “Salad Bowl of the World” can see that for the most part, these workers have neither.

For decades, Chavez has been almost an abstraction, a collection of gestures and images (the halting speech, the plaid shirt, the eagerness to perform penance for the smallest transgressions) suggesting more an icon than a human being. Here in California, Chavez has reached civic sainthood. Indeed, you can trace a good many of the giants among the state’s shifting pantheon by looking at the history of one of my former elementary schools. When Berkeley became the first city in the United States to integrate its school system without a court order, my white friends and I were bused to an institution in the heart of the black ghetto called Columbus School. In the fullness of time, its name was changed to Rosa Parks School; the irony of busing white kids to a school named for Rosa Parks never seemed fully unintentional to me. Now this school has a strong YouTube presence for the videos of its Cesar Chavez Day play, an annual event in which bilingual first-graders dressed as Mexican farmworkers carry Sí, Se Puede signs and sing “De Colores.” The implication is that just as Columbus and Parks made their mark on America, so did Chavez make his lasting mark on California.

In fact, no one could be more irrelevant to the California of today, and particularly to its poor, Hispanic immigrant population, than Chavez. He linked improvement of workers’ lives to a limitation on the bottomless labor pool, but today, low-wage, marginalized, and exploited workers from Mexico and Central America number not in the tens of thousands, as in the ’60s, but in the millions. Globalization is the epitome of capitalism, and nowhere is it more alive than in California. When I was a child in the ’60s, professional-class families did not have a variety of Hispanic workers—maids, nannies, gardeners—toiling in and around their households. Most faculty wives in Berkeley had a once-a-week “cleaning lady,” but those women were blacks, not Latinas. A few of the posher families had gardeners, but those men were Japanese, and they were employed for their expertise in cultivating California plants, not for their willingness to “mow, blow, and go.”

Growing up here when I did meant believing your state was the most blessed place in the world. We were certain—both those who lived in the Republican, Beach Boys paradises of Southern California and those who lived in the liberal enclaves of Berkeley and Santa Monica—that our state would always be able to take care of its citizens. The working class would be transformed (by dint of the aerospace industry and the sunny climate) into the most comfortable middle class in the world, with backyard swimming pools and self-starting barbecue grills for everyone. The poor would be taken care of, too, whether that meant boycotting grapes, or opening libraries until every rough neighborhood had books (and Reading Lady volunteers) for everyone.

But all of that is gone now.

The state is broken, bankrupt, mean. The schools are a misery, and the once-famous parks are so crowded on weekends that you might as well not go, unless you arrive at first light to stake your claim. The vision of civic improvement has given way to self-service and consumer indulgence. Where the mighty Berkeley Co-op once stood on Shattuck and Cedar—where I once rattled the can for Chavez, as shoppers (each one a part owner) went in to buy no-frills, honestly purveyed, and often unappealing food—is now a specialty market of the Whole Foods variety, with an endless olive bar and a hundred cheeses.

When I took my boy up the state to visit Cesar’s old haunts, we drove into the Tehachapi Mountains to see the compound at La Paz, now home to the controversial National Farm Workers Service Center, which sits on a war chest of millions of dollars. The place was largely deserted and very spooky. In Delano, the famous Forty Acres, site of the cooperative gas station and of Chavez’s 25-day fast, was bleak and unvisited. We found a crust of old snow on Chavez’s grave in Keene, and a cold wind in Delano. We spent the night in Fresno, and my hopes even for the Blossom Trail were low. But we followed the 99 down to Fowler, tacked east toward Sanger, and then, without warning, there we were.

“Stop the car,” Conor said, and although I am usually loath to walk a farmer’s land without permission, we had to step out into that cloud of pale color. We found ourselves in an Arthur Rackham illustration: the boughs bending over our heads were heavy with white blossoms, the ground was covered in moss that was in places deep green and in others brown, like worn velvet. I kept turning back to make sure the car was still in sight, but then I gave up my last hesitation and we pushed deeper and deeper into the orchard, until all we could see were the trees. At 65 degrees, the air felt chilly enough for a couple of Californians to keep their sweaters on. In harvest season, the temperature will climb to over 100 degrees many days, and the rubbed velvet of the spring will have given way to a choking dust. Almost none of the workers breathing it will have a union contract, few will be here legally, and the deals they strike with growers will hinge on only one factor: how many other desperate people need work. California agriculture has always had a dark side. But—whether you’re eating a ripe piece of fruit in your kitchen or standing in a fairy-tale field of blossoms on a cool spring morning—forgetting about all of that is so blessedly easy. Chavez shunned nothing more fervently than the easy way; and nothing makes me feel further away from the passions and certainty of my youth than my eagerness, now, to take it.
Caitlin Flanagan’s book Girl Land will be published in January 2012.

Voir enfin:

Why the ‘Cesar Chavez’ biopic matters now
Cindy Y. Rodriguez
CNN
March 28, 2014

New York (CNN) — Cesar Chavez is something of a national icon.

His face is on a U.S. postage stamp. Countless statues, murals, libraries, schools, parks and streets are named after him — he even has his own national monument. He was on the cover of Time magazine in 1969. A naval ship was named after him. The man even has his own Google Doodle and Apple ad.

Yet his footprint in American history is widely unknown and that’s exactly the reason why actor-turned-director Diego Luna decided to produce a movie about his life.

"I was really surprised that there wasn’t already a film out about Chavez’s life, so that’s why I spent the past four years making this and hope the country will join me in celebrating his life and work," Diego Luna said during Tuesday’s screening of "Cesar Chavez: An American Hero" in New York. The movie opens nationwide on Friday.

After seeing farm workers harvesting the country’s food unable to afford feeding their own families — let alone the deplorable working conditions they faced — Chavez decided to act.

He and Dolores Huerta co-founded what’s now known as the United Farm Workers. They became the first to successfully organize farm workers while being completely committed to nonviolence.

Without Chavez, California’s farm workers wouldn’t have fair wages, lunch breaks and access to toilets or clean water in the fields. Not to mention public awareness about the dangers of pesticides to farm workers and helping outlaw the short-handled hoe. Despite widespread knowledge of its dangers, this tool damaged farm workers’ backs.

His civil rights activism has been compared to that of Martin Luther King Jr. and Mahatma Gandhi.

Difficult conditions in America’s fields

But as the film successfully highlights Chavez’s accomplishments, viewers will also be confronted with an uncomfortable truth about who picks their food and under what conditions.

Unfortunately, Chavez’s successes don’t cross state lines.

States such as New York, where farm workers face long hours without any overtime pay or a day of rest, are of concern for human rights activist Kerry Kennedy, president of the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights.

The Kennedys have been supporters of the UFW since Sen. Robert Kennedy broke bread with Chavez during the last day of his fast against violence in 1968.

"New York is 37 years behind California. Farm workers here can be fired if they tried collective bargaining," Kennedy said after the "Cesar Chavez" screening. "We need a Cesar Chavez."

California is still the only state where farm workers have the right to organize.

Kennedy is urging the passing of the Farmworkers Fair Labor Practices Act, which would give farm workers the right to one day of rest each week, time-and-a-half pay for work past an eight-hour day, as well as unemployment, workers’ compensation and disability insurance.

It’s not just New York. Farm workers across the country face hardship. In Michigan’s blueberry fields, there’s a great deal of child labor, Rodriguez said.

"Because they’re paid by piece-rate, it puts a lot of stress on all family members to chip in. Plus, families work under one Social Security number because about 80% of the farm worker population is undocumented," Rodriguez added.

That’s why the UFW and major grower associations worked closely with the Senate’s immigration reform bill to include special provisions that would give farm workers legal status if they continued to work in agriculture.

"Farm workers shouldn’t struggle so much to feed their own families, and we can be part of that change," Luna said.

A national holiday in honor Chavez?

To help facilitate that change, Luna and the film’s cast — Michael Peña as Chavez, America Ferrera as his wife, Helen, and Rosario Dawson as labor leader Dolores Huerta — have been trekking all over the country promoting the film and a petition to make Chavez’s birthday on March 31 a national holiday.

"We aren’t pushing Cesar Chavez Day just to give people a day off. It’s to give people a ‘day on’ because we have a responsibility to provide service to our communities," United Farm Workers president Arturo Rodriguez told CNN.

In 2008, President Barack Obama showed his support for the national holiday and even borrowed the United Farm Workers famous chant "Si Se Puede!’ — coined by Dolores Huerta — during his first presidential campaign.

Obama endorsed it again in 2012, when he created a national monument to honor Chavez, but the resolution still has to be passed by Congress to be recognized as a national holiday.

Right now, Cesar Chavez Day is recognized only in California, Texas and Colorado.
Political activist Dolores Huerta Political activist Dolores Huerta

Huerta, 83, is still going strong in her activism and has also helped promote the film. She said she wishes the film could have included more history, but she knows it’s impossible.

"There were so many important lessons in the film. All the sacrifices Cesar and his wife, Helen, had to make and the obstacles we had to face against the police and judges. We even had people that were killed in the movement but we were still able to organize," Huerta said.

Actor Tony Plana, who attending the New York screening, knew the late Chavez and credited him with the launch of his acting career. Plana, known for his role as the father on ABC’s "Ugly Betty" TV series, said his first acting gig was in the UFW’s theatrical troupe educating and helping raising farm workers’ awareness about their work conditions.

"I’ve waited more than 35 years for this film to be made, and I can’t tell you how honored I am to finally see it happen," Plana told CNN.

It’s not that there wasn’t interest in making the biopic before: Hollywood studios and directors have approached the Chavez family in the past, but the family kept turning them down, mainly for two reasons.

"Well, first Cesar didn’t want to spend the time making the film because there was so much work to do, and he was hesitant on being singled out because there were so many others that contributed to the UFW’s success," said Rodriguez.

It wasn’t until Luna came around and asked the Chavez family how they felt the movie should be made that the green light was given. But when it came time to getting the funding to produce the film, Hollywood was not willing.

"Hopefully this film will send a message to Hollywood that our [Latino] stories need to be portrayed in cinema," Luna added.

"Latinos go to the movies more than anyone else, but we’re the least represented on screen. It doesn’t make any sense," Dawson told CNN.

In 2012, Hispanics represented 18% of the movie-going population but accounted for 25% of all movies seen, according to Nielsen National Research Group.

"I hope young people use the power of social media to help spread the word about social change," Dawson said.

"There is power in being a consumer and boycotting. If we want more as a community, we need to speak up."


Roumanie: Attention, un refus de sourire peu en cacher un autre ! (Looking back at a time when child abuse was legal, even celebrated)

26 février, 2014
https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTeyEYIHHnQ71iZF7QCYolP8318m2w_jf_s0RmJJKMQSlQaw3UnJQhttps://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t1/p526x296/1505677_4011098172898_26535197_n.jpghttps://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-frc3/t1/p280x280/1662283_4011066892116_2146793531_n.jpg
http://img.timeinc.net/time/magazine/archive/covers/1984/1101840521_400.jpghttp://cdn.thedailybeast.com/content/dailybeast/articles/2013/12/09/ukraine-protesters-smash-lenin-s-statue-in-kiev/jcr:content/image.crop.800.500.jpg/1386585933380.cached.jpghttps://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/t1/s526x296/1959218_4008407105623_2113883908_n.jpgUn des grands problèmes de la Russie – et plus encore de la Chine – est que, contrairement aux camps de concentration hitlériens, les leurs n’ont jamais été libérés et qu’il n’y a eu aucun tribunal de Nuremberg pour juger les crimes commis. Thérèse Delpech
Ne donne-t-on pas des médailles aussi bien aux dieux du stade qu’aux soldats tombés au front? L’Express
Je crois que c’est deux nouvelles qu’on peut appeler bonnes et mauvaises. La bonne nouvelle, c’est que je serai à Times Square. La mauvaise, c’est que je n’ai aucun vêtement sur moi. Je pense qu’elle va mourir. Nadia Comaneci (sur la réaction probable de sa mère encore au pays à l’annonce de son contrat publicitaire avec un fabricant de sous-vêtements américain, 1992)
Je viens d’un pays où il est très difficile de trouver des sous-vêtements et maintenant je viens ici et vous choisissez quel genre de sous-vêtements vous voulez porter : c’est pas bon, c’est du coton, c’est du lycra. Et je pense que je vais faire venir ma mère pour Noël. Et la première fois qu’elle va venir ici à New York, je vais la mettre dans une limousine – elle n’a jamais vu une limousine de sa vie – et je vais arrêter la voiture ici à Times Square : je pense qu’elle va mourir complètement. Nadia Comaneci
Il y a une chose qui intriguait le public: Comaneci ne souriait jamais, ne flirtait jamais avec la foule comme Korbut le faisait toujours. Il y avait des applaudissements fervents pour son brio, mais aucune histoire d’amour. "C’est pas sa nature de sourire", avait dit un juge roumaine, et Karolyi avait ajouté, "C’est son caractère grave". Sports Illustrated
Comaneci’s large brown eyes, hidden under long bangs, are solemn, perhaps too solemn for a 14-year-old. She answered questions crisply, without elaboration. Has she ever been afraid? "Never." Has she ever cried? "Never." What was the happiest moment in her life? "When I won the European Championship." What is the secret of her success? "I am so good because I work very hard for it." What is her favorite event? "The uneven bars. I can put in more difficulties. It is more challenging." How did she rate her performance in the American Cup? "It was a preparatory step toward the Olympics." Does she enjoy being famous? "It is all right, but I don’t want to get too excited about it." After a crash course in English, she was interviewed for ABC’s Wide World of Sports. How are you, Nadia? "Yes, I’m fine." Are you looking forward to the Olympics? "I want for myself gold medal." How many? "Five." Does it bother you to be constantly compared to Olga Korbut? "I’m not Olga Korbut. I’m Nadia Comaneci." Some say that Comaneci is not human enough, that she is a machine, that she has no emotions. But when she is not the center of attention and feels unwatched, she looks human, all right. She can grin like a child. She can get excited. Her favorite place in the U.S. is Disneyland. And she collects dolls. She has 60 of them, all in national costumes, lined up neatly on a shelf in her room at home. Four years ago, when Korbut started the little girls on this path, the Secretary General of the International Gymnastics Federation, Max Bangerter, branded her style "dangerous acrobatics which could lead to pelvic fractures." The IGF at one point even considered having Korbut’s routine banned in an effort to halt the revolution she had so clearly begun. Obviously, it was less than successful. But how much danger does Karolyi feel Comaneci is in, really? "Ah," he says, "but Comaneci never falls." Sports Illustrated
What I found was a story about legal, even celebrated, child abuse. In the dark troughs along the road to the Olympics lay the bodies of the girls who stumbled on the way, broken by the work, pressure and humiliation. I found a girl who felt such shame at not making the Olympic team that she slit her wrists. A father who handed custody of his daughter over to her coach so she could keep skating. A coach who fed his gymnasts so little that federation officials had to smuggle food into their hotel rooms. A mother who hid her child’s chicken pox with makeup so she could compete. Coaches who motivated their athletes by calling them imbeciles, idiots, pigs and cows. (…) Whether we see any changes instituted to protect these young athletes hinges on our willingness to sacrifice a few medals for the sake of their health and well-being. (…) "I’m not suggesting that all elite gymnasts and figure skaters emerge from their sports unhealthy and poorly adjusted. Joan Ryan
The book’s strongest moments come from the sport of gymnastics, where judges reward the work of sleek, supple girls able to perform the hardest maneuvers and give poorer marks to those who have slipped toward womanhood and must rely on grace and form. Countless hours of intensive training, combined with dangerous eating patterns, lower the percentage of body fat to such extreme levels that natural maturation cannot take place. The risks include stunted growth, broken bones and premature osteoporosis, according to Ryan. The physiological effects are only one part of this problem. The psychological effects of growing up as a gymnast can lead to eating disorders, such as the anorexia that eventually killed former gymnast Christy Heinrich. Amy Jackson, pushed by a parent, was training heavily at 6. By the time she was a high school senior, she had tried to commit suicide. The sections on figure skating pale in comparison to the reporting on gymnastics, but Ryan makes it clear that the impact on girls is similarly grim: Once the skaters mature, gaining the hips and breasts that make them aerodynamically inferior to the younger skaters, their careers are effectively shot. Ryan has suggestions for cleaning up the mess in gymnastics and figure skating: The minimum-age requirements should be raised. There should be mandatory licensing of coaches and careful scrutiny by the usually feckless national governing bodies. And athletes should be required to remain in regular schools at least until they are 16. The Chicago Tribune
In January, Romanian gymnastics coach Florin Gheorghe was sentenced to eight years in prison by a Bucharest court for having beaten an 11-year-old athlete so severely during a 1993 practice session she died two days later of a broken neck. Gheorghe’s attorney admitted his client slapped the young woman but said such physical abuse was common practice in Romanian gymnastics. "This kind of punishment is a heritage from Bela Karolyi," the attorney said, referring to the martinet coach who drove Nadia Comaneci and Mary Lou Retton to Olympic gold medals. Karolyi has denied the charge. – Aurelia Okino, a native Romanian whose daughter, Betty, trained with Karolyi a decade after his defection to the U.S., said in a 1992 interview she had become scared to answer the phone in her Elmhurst home. Aurelia Okino worried it would be Betty, then 17, calling from Karolyi’s gym in Houston with news of another injury, There had been serious elbow, back and knee injuries before Okino made the 1992 Olympic team and helped the U.S. women win a bronze medal in the team event. "Gymnastics is a brutal sport," Betty Okino said matter-of-factly. Asked why she had let her daughter go that far, Okino said, "How do you deny a child her dream?"- In 1985, a few days before her enormously talented daughter, Tiffany, would win her only U.S. figure skating title, Marjorie Chin accepted the offer of a ride back to her Kansas City hotel from a reporter she had first met 20 minutes before. Tiffany, then 17, took a back seat to Marjorie in the reporter’s car. For 30 minutes, Mrs. Chin delivered relentless criticism of her daughter’s performance in practice that day. "If you keep it up, you’re not going to be the star of the ice show, you’re going to be just part of the supporting cast," Mrs. Chin said, over and over. – Several times in the last few years, officials of the U.S. Figure Skating Association have spoken to a prominent ice dancer about her eating habits. The ice dancer, 32 years old, still looks like a wraith. One of those stories came from a wire service. The other three are personal recollections–mine, not Ryan’s. Her book, subtitled "the making and breaking of elite gymnasts and figure skaters" (Doubleday, 243 pp., $22.95), has much more frightening tales to tell. Ryan recounts in compelling detail the stories of Julissa Gomez and Christy Henrich, gymnasts whose pursuit of glory proved fatal; of figure skater Amy Grossman, whose mother said, "Skating was God"; of coaches like Karolyi and one of his disciples, Rick Newman, whose ideas of motivating adolescent girls include demeaning them at a time when their egos are most fragile; and of parents who hide their irresponsibility behind the notion of "trying to get the best for my child." Such is the sordid underbelly of the Olympics’ two most glamorous sports. Only in the last three years has the nation begun to have a vague awareness of this life under the sequins and leotards. Ryan began to get a clear view of these problems while doing research for a newspaper story before the 1992 Olympics. That led her to write this book, in which the villains are both coaches and parents. She lets Karolyi skewer himself with his own words. She shows how parents lose sight of the fundamental notion of protecting their children from harm, so blinded are they by possible fame and fortune. The cause of such intemperate adult behavior is partly the peculiar competitive demands to jump higher and twirl faster, particularly in gymnastics, that favor girls with tiny bodies over young women developing hips and breasts. That puts them in a race against puberty, creating a window of opportunity so narrow it leads to foolhardiness. Neither figure skating nor gymnastics is without athletes whose experiences are positive, a point that needed more attention in Ryan’s book than the disclaimer, "I’m not suggesting that all elite gymnasts and figure skaters emerge from their sports unhealthy and poorly adjusted." A better balance might have been struck if the author had given voice to the likes of Olympic champions Retton and Kristi Yamaguchi. Ryan’s basic premise about child abuse still is thoroughly supported by interviews, anecdotes and factual evidence. "Little Girls in Pretty Boxes" should be a manifesto for change in the rules of these two sports, so that women with adult bodies still can compete. It should be a wakeup call to parents who have abdicated their responsibility for their childrens’ well-being. Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up hooked on sports that don’t let them grow up . Philip Hersch
La réalité de sa Russie … est à l’opposé des idéaux olympiques et des droits de l’Homme les plus élémentaires. Il n’est pas possible d’ignorer le côté obscur de son régime – la répression qui broie les âmes, les nouvelles lois cruelles contre le blasphème et l’homosexualité, ou encore le système juridique corrompu qui permet de condamner des dissidents politiques à de longues peines sur la foi de fausses accusations. The New York Times
Les Jeux Olympiques, créés dans le but de rapprocher les pays autour du sport, semble avoir eu l’effet inverse sur les relations américano-russes. L’animosité grandissante entre les deux anciens protagonistes de la Guerre froide était visible lors de l’ouverture des Jeux, lors de laquelle une ex-patineuse artistique qui avait tweeté une photo à connotation raciste du président Obama a été choisie pour l’allumage symbolique de la vasque olympique. Cela s’est produit au lendemain de la fuite via YouTube de l’enregistrement d’un appel téléphonique entre l’ambassadeur américain à Kiev et Victoria Nuland, une responsable du Département d’État, dans lequel on entend cette dernière prononcer les mots « Fuck the European Union ». L’administration Obama avait immédiatement accusé Moscou d’avoir intercepté et fuité l’appel, ce que les Russes n’ont qu’à peine démenti. [ ... ] Alors qu’il entame sa 15ème année au pouvoir, le président Vladimir Poutine avait espéré que ces Jeux, les premiers sur le sol russe depuis les Jeux olympiques de Moscou en 1980 que les Etats-Unis avaient boycotté, mettrait en valeur la « nouvelle Russie » émergeant des cendres de l’Union soviétique. Au lieu de cela, les États-Unis et leurs alliés occidentaux ont systématiquement dépeint la Russie sous les traits d’une autocratie corrompue. [ ... ] Membre Démocrate de la commission du renseignement de la Chambre des Représentants, Dutch Ruppersberger a déclaré à CNN jeudi qu’il craignait que « l’ego » de Poutine mettrait en danger les athlètes et les visiteurs. Pour sa part, le Département d’Etat a conseillé aux membres de l’équipe olympique des États-Unis de ne pas porter leurs tenues officielles aux couleurs de « Team USA » en dehors des sites olympiques officiels, pour leur propre sécurité. Les tensions entre les deux pays ont été les plus fortes sur la question des droits des homosexuels. [ ... ] Mais ce n’est pas tout ce qui les divise. Le donneur d’alerte de la NSA Edward Snowden se trouve encore en Russie, qui lui a accordé l’asile temporaire l’an dernier. Sa présence à Moscou est une source d’embarras persistant pour l’administration Obama, et les responsables du renseignement américain ont ouvertement exprimé leurs inquiétudes quant à la possibilité qu’il soit désormais sous l’influence de leurs homologues russes. [ ... ] Les deux pays s’affrontent également sur comment gérer le programme nucléaire de l’Iran et sur ​​ce qu’il faut faire par rapport à la Syrie, cette dernière étant un proche allié de la Russie. La crise en Ukraine, où les manifestants cherchent à évincer le président pro-russe Viktor Ianoukovitch, ne fait qu’ajouter aux tensions. The Hill
How does a nation become self-governing when so much of "self" is so rotten? Run-of-the-mill analyses that Ukraine is a "young democracy" with corrupt elites, an ethnic divide and a bullying neighbor don’t suffice. Ukraine is what it is because Ukrainians are what they are. The former doesn’t change until the latter does. (…) that’s what people said about Ukraine during the so-called Orange Revolution in 2004, or about Lebanon’s Cedar Revolution in 2005, or about the Arab Spring in 2011. The revolution will be televised—and then it will be squandered. (…) The homo Sovieticus Ukrainians should fear the most may not be Vladimir Putin after all. Bret Stephens
Avec la même vigueur que ses compatriotes, cependant, le cinéaste filme un pays où les passe-droits pèsent aussi lourd que la terreur politique, jadis. Nul, en effet, ne résiste aux prébendes de Cornelia, pas même le flic présenté comme un modèle incorruptible : il résiste, il résiste, mais il cède comme tous les autres… Télérama
Quand tu prends le train en Roumanie, personne n’achète son ticket au guichet. Tu montes, tu t’assois et tu donnes la moitié de ce que tu aurais dû payer au contrôleur. Rasvan (28 ans)
A la fin des années 1970, le corps enfantin fait fantasmer. Brooke Shields, 13 ans prostituée dans La Petite de Louis Malle et en une de magazine, nue et outrageusement maquillée; Jodie Foster elle aussi pute sous la caméra de Martin Scorsese dans Taxi Driver nous rappellent qu’une certaine forme de pédophilie artistique était alors acceptable. Le traitement médiatique de Nadia Comaneci à cette époque fait écho à cette «mode». Cette fascination pour les corps androgynes et pourtant dénudés est-elle un signe du passé ou cette marchandisation de l’enfance est-elle encore de mise? C’est très troublant le passage que j’ai écrit sur les petites filles de l’Ouest et celles de l’Est. Ces petites filles chargées de maquillage un peu comme des petites esclaves et elle, Nadia, qui arrive le visage pâle, un peu comme une guerrière. J’adore cette image, j’adore le fait qu’elle était entre fille et garçon, elle échappe à son genre pendant un moment. Le titre par exemple, c’est la première phrase que j’ai écrite. Les journalistes occidentaux à Montréal lui demandaient de sourire mais elle ne souriait pas parce que c’est difficile et qu’elle n’avait pas que cela à faire. Sa réponse était «je sais sourire mais une fois que j’ai accompli ma mission». Il y a eu beaucoup de commentaires sur son visage triste, sobre. Pour moi, elle leur a fait un pied de nez, du genre je ne suis pas une petite poupée. (…) Ça a longtemps fait partie de mon adolescence. Quand je suis arrivée en France, ayant été élevée dans un autre système, j’ai été très brutalisée par la consommation. Ce n’est pas une pose, ça m’a pris de front. J’avais 13 ans et je n’avais jamais vu quelqu’un dormir dehors. Ça m’a bouleversée. Pendant des années, quand je disais aux gens qu’il y avait des trucs bien en Roumanie, c’était un discours impossible à entendre. Soit je passais pour une débile, soit on me disait que je ne savais pas de quoi je parlais. Evidemment le système était dévoyé, et la Roumanie n’était pas un système communiste, le communisme n’y a jamais été réellement appliqué. C’est comme quand on parle de la surveillance. Ça me fait mourir de rire. Les gens me disent, il y avait la Securitate en Roumanie. Oui c’est vrai. Mais c’était des baltringues. Des gens qui en suivaient d’autres. Ici votre pass navigo vous localise partout. On a votre nom, votre date de naissance, c’est une atteinte à votre liberté. Pareil pour les caméras vidéo, mais c’est accepté. On pense que ça va être plus pratique! Le succès du capitalisme, c’est d’arriver à faire accepter des choses qui dans le communisme étaient considérées comme horribles. Le capitalisme est nettement mieux marketé. (…) J’étais en France à ce moment-là et comme tous les Roumains, bouche bée. Plus que ça: j’étais sidérée. Parce que pour moi ça ne pouvait pas changer, c’était éternel. J’ai été élevée sous le portrait de Ceausescu. Mais cette sensation de malaise incroyable parce qu’on ne voit pas ses juges. Ça ne commence pas bien un procès où on ne voit pas les juges. Le truc que les gens qui l’arrêtent ratent, c’est qu’ils ont l’air d’un couple de petits vieux. Ils sont pathétiques. Ils ne font pas peur. On a pitié. Lui tremblote, elle a l’air usé, avec son fichu. Ils sont fatigués. Force de l’image mais qui est ratée selon moi. A cette période, il y a eu beaucoup de morts en Roumanie, le contraire de la révolution de velours. Les gens ne savaient plus qui était qui et se tirait dessus. Il n’y a eu aucun procès des sécuristes. Inclure des passages sur la Roumanie dans le roman, ça ne s’est pas décidé tout de suite, ça a pris plusieurs mois. J’étais en Roumanie à ce moment-là. Quand je voyais mes amis là-bas, ce qu’ils me racontaient me semblait tellement contredire ma documentation que je l’ai mis en scène. Moi j’étais armée avec tous mes bouquins et je rencontre des gens de moins de 30 ans qui n’ont pas vraiment vécu cette époque et qui en ont une nostalgie incroyable. On a toujours la nostalgie de son enfance, mais surtout ils en bavent tellement aujourd’hui. Ils me disent «moi mes parents ils partaient en vacances, ils allaient au resto, nous on doit payer nos études et on n’a pas les moyens, on peut pas sortir de toutes façons parce qu’on n’a pas d’argent». Il y a un énorme H&M au centre de Bucarest, j’ai l’impression qu’il est tout le temps vide. Lola Lafon

Attention: un refus de sourire peu en cacher un autre  !

Au lendemain de la chute, payée au prix fort mais pas gagnée d’avance étant donné la corruption généralisée, de la maison Ianoukovitch et de la découverte populaire de son Neverland qui 25 ans après les époux Ceausescu avait un étrange air de déjà vu …

Et de Jeux olympiques dignes des plus beaux jours de la Guerre froide …

Comme avec le roman que vient de sortir Lola Lafon sur la gymnaste prodige roumaine Nadia Comaneci, passée d’un seul coup de Héros du Travail Socialiste à femme-sandwich d’une marque de sous-vêtements américaine  …

Et un excellent dossier du site Slate.fr sur l’ancienne terre des ogres Ceausescu …

Comment ne pas repenser à toute une époque aujourd’hui largement oubliée où, a l’instar des Brooke Shields et autres Jodie Foster dans le cinéma, le corps de nos enfants était non seulement légal mais célébré ?

Mais aussi ne pas voir au-delà de l’image d’épinal que nous pouvons en avoir de travailleurs bon marché et de voleurs de poules voire de châteaux de buveurs de sang  …

La frustration d’une population écartelée entre d’un côté les nécessaires perfusions du FMI et une corruption, comme le rappelle un film roumain sorti en France le mois dernier, effectivement aussi endémique que phénoménale d’où une perte démographique de 13% depuis la fin du communisme (soit quelque 3 millions pour une population à l’origine de 23 millions à destination principalement de l’Italie, de l’Allemagne et de l’Espagne) …

Et de l’autre les craintes de voir leur sol et sous-sol pollués et bradés à des intérêts étrangers par des dirigeants tous aussi véreux les uns que les autres suite à la découverte du plus grand gisement d’or et d’argent d’Europe (300 tonnes et 1.600 tonnes respectivement pour une dizaine de milliards d’euros en jeu) et du troisième gisement européen de gaz de schiste après la Pologne et la France (quelque 1.444 milliards de mètres cubes) ?

Autrement dit, le dépit tout particulier mais probablement pas si rare en ces contrées autrefois martyrisées par le communisme (dont d’ailleurs comme en Chine on attend toujours les procès de Nuremberg) et pas vraiment gâtées par leurs successeurs …

De se retrouver avec ce que les Roumains appellent eux-mêmes un "pauvre pays riche" ?

Lola Lafon sur Nadia Comaneci, la Roumanie, le capitalisme et les corps: l’entretien tablette

Dans «La Petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais», la romancière raconte l’histoire de la gymnaste Nadia Comaneci, mais surtout à travers elle aborde les questions du genre, du corps féminin, de l’Europe de la guerre froide .

Ursula Michel

Slate.fr

04/02/2014

A l’occasion de la sortie de son nouveau roman, Lola Lafon s’est prêtée à l’exercice de l’entretien tablette de Slate.fr, où les questions sont remplacées par des vidéos, des images, des photos ou encore des dessins. Une autre manière d’aborder l’univers de l’artiste.

A vec ce quatrième roman, La Petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais, Lola Lafon exhume de nos mémoires Nadia Comaneci, la jeune gymnaste roumaine qui a affolé les compteurs, les journalistes et le public aux Jeux olympiques de Montréal en 1976. Ce «perfect 10», note que personne n’avait jusque-là acquise, la gamine s’en empare et fait découvrir par la même à l’Occident ce petit pays inconnu derrière le rideau de fer. Produit d’un système totalitaire, Comaneci fascine mais l’histoire la rattrape et la chute du mur de Berlin scellera son destin de star déchue.

De Bucarest à Miami, des années 1970 à cet hiver 1989, Lola Lafon revisite le mythe, sonde les fantasmes que ce corps androgyne a provoqués et interroge le manichéisme est/ouest qui a façonné la conception du monde du siècle dernier.

Pendant une poignée de secondes, le monde a retenu son souffle en cet été 1976. La minuscule Roumaine a fait vaciller les championnes russes, elle a transfiguré les possibles de la gymnastique et a donné à la Roumanie une notoriété internationale. Mais comment décide-t-on d’en faire un personnage de roman?

Je ne sais pas quand est arrivée l’idée du personnage de Nadia mais ça faisait un moment que ça traînait dans ma tête. Au bout de quelques mois de documentation, j’ai réalisé que ce n’était pas un roman sur le sport mais que ça réunissait toutes mes thématique: le genre et le mouvement, le corps féminin dans l’espace au sens large, l’espace qu’on s’autorise et celui qui est autorisé, le bloc de l’est et de l’ouest.

Dans le roman précédent [Nous sommes les oiseaux de la tempête qui s’annonce], il y avait déjà beaucoup de choses sur la danse, le corps et le mouvement. Après, des difficultés et d’obstacles sont apparus: six mois de documentation en trois langues qui ont fini par m’ensevelir. Il a fallu arrêter d’ingurgiter.

J’ai alors commencé à écrire une première moitié, mais ça n’allait pas. Il fallait épouser le corps de Nadia, être avec elle, acérée. Pas développer des millions de phrases, avec des adjectifs. Je cherchais la langue, cette fluidité, le passage d’un geste à l’autre comme d’une phrase à l’autre. J’ai coupé dans le texte comme jamais avant.

Et puis j’ai vécu en Roumanie, donc il y avait ma subjectivité assumée. Je voulais faire revivre l’Europe. C’est une métaphore énorme, mais les dix centimètres de la poutre, je les ai ressentis tout du long en évoquant le thème politique. Je me suis dit qu’il fallait rendre compte de Ceausescu et de ses décrets (j’en ai d’ailleurs découverts beaucoup après, j’étais trop jeune à l’époque). Sur le corps des femmes et l’avortement, c’était terrible. On voit aujourd’hui que Ceausescu n’a pas l’apanage de ce genre de décisions… Je voulais rendre compte sans nostalgie ni apologie de cette époque, et ne pas oublier qu’on a idolâtré cette gamine et elle était le pur produit d’un système communiste.

J’ai écrit plusieurs mois sans la voix de la narratrice. C’est mon premier roman à la 3e personne. Et à un moment donné, cet échange épistolaire entre elle et Nadia s’est imposé. Je me suis demandé si c’était juste un retour vers une habitude d’écriture mais en fait non, c’était nécessaire pour lui redonner la parole, pour qu’elle ne reste pas qu’un corps, un corps extraordinaire soit, mais sinon j’étais du côté de ceux qui la regardaient et je voulais lui redonner le pouvoir sur le texte, même fictivement.

A aucun moment, je n’ai envisagé de contacter Nadia. Ce roman est une rêverie, pas une biographie. Je me suis arrêtée en 1990 dans le roman parce qu’après, c’est le réel, c’est sa vie qui lui appartient. J’essaie de rendre compte de la fin d’une époque, d’un parcours qui s’arrête avec le mur qui s’écroule.

A la fin des années 1970, le corps enfantin fait fantasmer. Brooke Shields, 13 ans prostituée dans La Petite de Louis Malle et en une de magazine, nue et outrageusement maquillée; Jodie Foster elle aussi pute sous la caméra de Martin Scorsese dans Taxi Driver nous rappellent qu’une certaine forme de pédophilie artistique était alors acceptable. Le traitement médiatique de Nadia Comaneci à cette époque fait écho à cette «mode». Cette fascination pour les corps androgynes et pourtant dénudés est-elle un signe du passé ou cette marchandisation de l’enfance est-elle encore de mise?

C’est très troublant le passage que j’ai écrit sur les petites filles de l’Ouest et celles de l’Est. Ces petites filles chargées de maquillage un peu comme des petites esclaves et elle, Nadia, qui arrive le visage pâle, un peu comme une guerrière. J’adore cette image, j’adore le fait qu’elle était entre fille et garçon, elle échappe à son genre pendant un moment.

Le titre par exemple, c’est la première phrase que j’ai écrite. Les journalistes occidentaux à Montréal lui demandaient de sourire mais elle ne souriait pas parce que c’est difficile et qu’elle n’avait pas que cela à faire. Sa réponse était «je sais sourire mais une fois que j’ai accompli ma mission». Il y a eu beaucoup de commentaires sur son visage triste, sobre. Pour moi, elle leur a fait un pied de nez, du genre je ne suis pas une petite poupée. Aujourd’hui, avec les mini-miss, les mannequins de 15 ans, la représentation est plus subtile, mais d’une telle agressivité envers les femmes. Les filles de 15 ans sont photoshopées et celles de 30 ans s’en veulent de ne pas leur ressembler. C’est presque un complot contre les femmes.

Si les questions de genre sont au cœur de l’écriture de Lola Lafon, la dimension féministe tient une place tout aussi importante. Comment celle qui attaque les représentations machistes et le commerce du corps dans son travail romanesque se situe-t-elle face au nouveau féminisme incarné par les Femen?

Je n’aime pas l’idée des féministes qui s’entre-déchirent. Mais je trouve bizarre d’adopter un langage qui plaise tant aux hommes pour dénoncer les injustices faites aux femmes. Et puis adopter un langage de pub… je me demande ce qu’il en reste. Finalement, ces interventions ne sont pas si dérangeantes. Les religieux sont choqués, mais on s’en fout. Je crois que la leader, Inna Shevchenko avait dit «les anciennes féministes ce sont des femmes qui lisaient des livres». Mais un livre, c’est parfois beaucoup plus dérangeant qu’une photo. Les Femen, c’est du pop féminisme. C’est digérable. Si grâce à elles d’autres femmes ailleurs se sont libérées, s’il y a eu des prises de conscience, tant mieux. Tous les moyens sont bons finalement.

Son premier roman Une fièvre impossible à négocier arborait le symbole anarchiste. Au-delà d’une pose, cette implication politique irrigue ses autres romans, comme c’est encore le cas dans La petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais où la narratrice, capitaliste de culture (comme on peut l’être pour une religion), dialogue avec Nadia Comaneci, symbole d’un certain communisme. Un discours comparatif entre Est et Ouest, capitalisme et communisme qui fait voler en éclat les idées reçues et la bien-pensance occidentale. Un roman anarchiste peut-être, iconoclaste sans aucun doute.

Ça a longtemps fait partie de mon adolescence. Quand je suis arrivée en France, ayant été élevée dans un autre système, j’ai été très brutalisée par la consommation. Ce n’est pas une pose, ça m’a pris de front. J’avais 13 ans et je n’avais jamais vu quelqu’un dormir dehors. Ça m’a bouleversée.

Pendant des années, quand je disais aux gens qu’il y avait des trucs bien en Roumanie, c’était un discours impossible à entendre. Soit je passais pour une débile, soit on me disait que je ne savais pas de quoi je parlais. Evidemment le système était dévoyé, et la Roumanie n’était pas un système communiste, le communisme n’y a jamais été réellement appliqué. C’est comme quand on parle de la surveillance. Ça me fait mourir de rire. Les gens me disent, il y avait la Securitate en Roumanie. Oui c’est vrai. Mais c’était des baltringues. Des gens qui en suivaient d’autres.

Ici votre pass navigo vous localise partout. On a votre nom, votre date de naissance, c’est une atteinte à votre liberté. Pareil pour les caméras vidéo, mais c’est accepté. On pense que ça va être plus pratique! Le succès du capitalisme, c’est d’arriver à faire accepter des choses qui dans le communisme étaient considérées comme horribles. Le capitalisme est nettement mieux marketé.

Ayant passé une grande partie de son enfance en Roumanie sous le régime Ceausescu, Lola Lafon est fortement critique à l’égard de ce système mort en 1989. Quelques jours avant Noël, une révolution balaie le pouvoir en place, un simulacre de procès est organisé et le couple dirigeant est exécuté. Ces images, d’une violence inouïe, ont tourné en boucle sur les écrans du monde entier à l’époque. L’occasion de les commenter avec la romancière était trop belle.

J’étais en France à ce moment-là et comme tous les Roumains, bouche bée. Plus que ça: j’étais sidérée. Parce que pour moi ça ne pouvait pas changer, c’était éternel. J’ai été élevée sous le portrait de Ceausescu. Mais cette sensation de malaise incroyable parce qu’on ne voit pas ses juges. Ça ne commence pas bien un procès où on ne voit pas les juges. Le truc que les gens qui l’arrêtent ratent, c’est qu’ils ont l’air d’un couple de petits vieux. Ils sont pathétiques. Ils ne font pas peur. On a pitié. Lui tremblote, elle a l’air usé, avec son fichu. Ils sont fatigués. Force de l’image mais qui est ratée selon moi. A cette période, il y a eu beaucoup de morts en Roumanie, le contraire de la révolution de velours. Les gens ne savaient plus qui était qui et se tirait dessus. Il n’y a eu aucun procès des sécuristes.

Inclure des passages sur la Roumanie dans le roman, ça ne s’est pas décidé tout de suite, ça a pris plusieurs mois. J’étais en Roumanie à ce moment-là. Quand je voyais mes amis là-bas, ce qu’ils me racontaient me semblait tellement contredire ma documentation que je l’ai mis en scène. Moi j’étais armée avec tous mes bouquins et je rencontre des gens de moins de 30 ans qui n’ont pas vraiment vécu cette époque et qui en ont une nostalgie incroyable. On a toujours la nostalgie de son enfance, mais surtout ils en bavent tellement aujourd’hui. Ils me disent «moi mes parents ils partaient en vacances, ils allaient au resto, nous on doit payer nos études et on n’a pas les moyens, on peut pas sortir de toutes façons parce qu’on n’a pas d’argent». Il y a un énorme H&M au centre de Bucarest, j’ai l’impression qu’il est tout le temps vide. Ces propos venaient contredire la narratrice, c’est vraiment la mise en scène du processus d’écriture. La confrontation entre la documentation et le réel. Et la voix de Nadia, c’est un peu la mienne. Je lui prends la main.

En plus de son activité romanesque, Lola Lafon s’adonne aussi à la chanson, avec deux albums à son actif. Loin de la culture rock qu’on pouvait imaginer, son admiration se porte sur une chanteuse à texte dont elle a eu l’occasion de reprendre un titre marquant: Göttingen de Barbara.

Je reviens toujours à elle. C’est une rebelle, une iconoclaste. J’ai découvert son œuvre très tard. Ma grande sœur l’écoutait, mais c’est un journaliste qui a titillé ma curiosité bien après. Je m’y suis alors plongée. Elle incarne le genre de femme qui me subjugue. Elle est intemporelle et d’une indépendance incroyable. Jean Corti m’a invité sur scène à interpréter ce titre, Göttingen. Je le chantais à un moment où des enfants sans papiers étaient arrêtés dans des écoles. J’étais totalement bouleversée.

A l’heure où les romans finissent souvent sur grand écran, Lola Lafon ne fait pas exception à la règle. La réalisatrice de Sur la planche, Leïla Kilani, travaillerait à l’adaptation de son précédent ouvrage Nous sommes les oiseaux de la tempête qui s’annonce. Info ou intox?

J’adore ce film, extraordinaire de poésie de brutalité et de rigueur. On s’est rencontrées avec Leïla Kilani et on a travaillé sur un découpage de Nous sommes les oiseaux de la tempête qui s’annonce. Puis, je me suis lancée dans l’écriture de La Petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais, elle dans son nouveau film donc le projet en suspens pour l’instant. Mais je pense que ça se fera. Mais c’est mieux que je reste à distance. Le roman ne m’appartient plus. Quand on vit deux ans avec un livre, il faut savoir s’en détacher à un moment. Et je suis tellement une control freak que sur un tournage, les gens craqueraient.

Propos recueillis par Ursula Michel

• La Petite communiste qui ne souriait jamais de Lola Lafon, Actes Sud.

Voir aussi:

Savez-vous pourquoi la Roumanie n’entrera pas dans Schengen? A cause de la corruption

Malgré des condamnations médiatisées et des progrès indéniables en matière d’indépendance de la justice, la corruption reste solidement ancrée en Roumanie. Et les rapports de Bruxelles n’y changent rien.

Marianne Rigaux

25/02/2014

D’après le rapport publié le 3 février par la Commission européenne, un Roumain sur 4 a été confronté à un pot-de-vin dans l’année écoulée. Une économie parallèle qui représenterait 31% du PIB national. Alarmant, mais pas nouveau.

En Roumanie, il y a la haute corruption, celle qui implique des représentants politiques et des magistrats, parfois condamnés. Et puis, celle, tenace, quotidienne, qui relève presque du mode de vie.

Pour Valentin, 30 ans, pas besoin de lui suggérer deux fois.

«Un policier qui te trouve saoul au volant commence par annoncer le prix de l’amende, 700 lei par exemple (155 euros). Tu protestes pour la forme. Tu es sûr qu’il va proposer de ”payer la moitié maintenant”. C’est le signe qu’il faut lui glisser un billet de 100 lei (22 euros).»

Un billet contre des draps propres

Idem pour obtenir une autorisation ou pour éviter un contrôle des normes. «Le pot-de-vin est la règle partout, on a laissé les Roumains aller top loin», déplore Valentin. Lui qui a travaillé pendant deux ans dans les marchés publics l’affirme:

«Ils sont tous biaisés.»

Quel que soit le sujet abordé avec un interlocuteur roumain, la conclusion sera toujours la même:

«Le problème de ce pays, c’est la corruption.»

Elle touche tous les secteurs: justice, politique, économie, médias, santé.

Un expatrié relativise.

«Les pots-de-vin pour accélérer un dossier administratif reculent à Bucarest, mais c’est vrai qu’ils restent de rigueur en milieu hospitalier.»

Lui-même n’a pas hésité lors d’une hospitalisation. Pour être bien traité, passer avant les autres ou avoir des draps propres, glissez votre bakchich dans la blouse.

L’habitude est si tenace que les personnes donnent parfois avant même qu’on ne leur demande. Rasvan, 28 ans, explique.

«Quand tu prends le train en Roumanie, personne n’achète son ticket au guichet. Tu montes, tu t’assois et tu donnes la moitié de ce que tu aurais dû payer au contrôleur.»

Le contrôle annuel de Bruxelles

Toute l’économie marche ainsi. C’est là l’héritage d’un demi-siècle de communisme bouleversé depuis les années 1990 par un capitalisme débridé, dans un Etat permissif, dont la tête est elle-même touchée. En Roumanie, la corruption part d’en haut et infuse toute la société.

«En 2007, les Roumains pensaient que la haute corruption allait baisser, mais le gouvernement n’écoute pas Bruxelles», constate Valentin. Lorsque la Roumanie a rejoint l’UE il y a 7 ans, Bruxelles a imposé un Mécanisme de coopération et de vérification (MCV) pour contrôler les efforts du pays en matière de réformes judiciaires et de lutte contre la corruption. Une première dans l’histoire de l’Union.

A chaque contrôle annuel, la Roumanie reçoit généralement un «peut mieux faire». Le dernier rapport MCV rendu en janvier attribuait à Bucarest un bon point pour les récentes condamnations de dirigeants hauts placés, mais pointait aussi une tentative inquiétante.

Tranquille, le Parlement se vote une «super-immunité»

Ainsi, en décembre le Parlement roumain a voté une «super-immunité» afin que les députés, les sénateurs, le président de la République, mais aussi des professions libérales ne puissent plus être poursuivis pour des crimes comme la corruption ou les abus de pouvoir commis dans l’exercice de leurs fonctions.

Autrement dit, une amnistie, sans que Bruxelles ne puisse intervenir. Pratique, mais aussi ironique, quand 28 membres du Parlement –dont certains qui ont voté cette immunité– sont actuellement jugés ou en train de purger des peines de prison pour corruption. Cristina Guseth, présidente de l’ONG de défense de l’Etat de droit Freedom House Roumanie parle de «mardi noir de la démocratie roumaine».

Un mois plus tard, l’amendement a été retoqué par la Cour constitutionnelle roumaine, mais la tentative a été consignée dans l’évaluation de la Commission européenne. L’avertissement n’a pourtant pas empêché début février l’entrée en vigueur d’un nouveau code pénal très controversé, plutôt conciliant avec les auteurs de corruption. Là encore, la Commission européenne ne peut contraindre Bucarest à revoir ses ajustements.

La seule vraie punition, c’est Schengen. Faute de véritables progrès dans la lutte contre la corruption, l’adhésion de la Roumanie à l’espace de libre circulation est sans cesse reportée depuis plusieurs années. Avec la tendance des douaniers à se faire graisser la patte, impossible de confier la gestion des frontières extérieures à la Roumanie.

Un «M. anti-corruption» détesté

Présentée ainsi, la Roumanie ne semble guère avoir évolué depuis 1989. Malgré tout, Horia Georgescu reste optimiste. Ce juriste de 36 ans dirige l’Agence nationale pour l’intégrité (ANI) qui a la lourde tâche de faire respecter l’intégrité des élus et des hauts fonctionnaires publics roumains.

«Les hommes politiques me détestent, me menacent parfois, mais je ne me laisse pas intimider. La société civile fait confiance à l’agence.»

Son équipe de 35 «inspecteurs de l’intégrité» vérifie actuellement la situation de plus de 2.700 élus et fonctionnaires publics.

Créée en 2008 à la demande de Bruxelles, l’ANI est régulièrement citée en exemple d’efficacité. Ses investigations ont permis de faire tomber 10 ministres, 65 parlementaires et 700 élus locaux pour conflits d’intérêts, incompatibilités ou avoirs non justifiés. Ce qui est à la fois rassurant et inquiétant. La justice roumaine fonctionne, mais la tâche semble immense.

«On fait ce qu’on peut. On espère que la Roumanie va devenir un modèle pour d’autres pays qui s’inspireraient de nos méthodes. Parce que c’est facile de dire ”chez nous, il n’y a pas de corruption” si on n’a pas les outils pour enquêter sur cette corruption.»

Alors, quand la Commission européenne a révélé que la corruption touchait l’ensemble des pays européens, Horia Georgescu s’est senti tout de même un peu rassuré.

«Maintenant, on attend que Bruxelles mette en place des outils pour les membres de l’UE, mais la lutte contre la corruption est d’abord une question de confiance dans les institutions nationales.»

4 ans ferme pour l’ancien Premier ministre

Une autre institution affiche de beaux tableaux de chasse en la matière: la Direction nationale anticorruption (DNA). Depuis 2002, ce parquet financier a fait traduire en justice plus de 5.000 personnes pour corruption moyenne et haute, dont 2.000 condamnées définitivement. Ses experts sont régulièrement invités dans les pays voisins pour présenter l’efficacité du «modèle roumain».

Parmi les personnalités condamnées à de la prison ferme figurent un ancien Premier ministre (4 ans), un patron du club de foot (3 ans), deux anciens ministres de l’Agriculture (3 ans), une ancienne ministre des Sports (5 ans) et de nombreux parlementaires.

La condamnation à quatre ans ferme d’Adrian Nastase est celle qui a le plus intéressé les médias. Premier ministre de 2000 à 2004, négociateur de l’adhésion de la Roumanie à l’Otan et à l’UE, il a plongé pour avoir détourné plus de 1,5 million d’euros pour sa campagne électorale.

D’après Livia Sapaclan, porte parole de la DNA, «le nombre de condamnés définitifs pour corruption de haut niveau (soit plus de 10.000 euros reçus en pots-de-vin) est passé de 155 en 2006 à plus de 1.000 en 2013». Des chiffres encore une fois aussi satisfaisants qu’alarmants sur l’état de corruption du pays.

Réveiller le citoyen

Les jeunes Roumains rencontrés restent mitigés devant ces chiffres. «Les résultats de la DNA, c’est juste des exemples sur-médiatisés. Pour un ancien ministre attrapé, combien font des trucs plus graves sans être condamnés?», s’interroge Valentin.

Andrei et Romana, deux jeunes journalistes d’investigation pour Rise Project, préfèrent en rire.

«Au moins, on ne manque pas de travail! La plupart des médias roumains enquêtent, mais aucun ne le fait avec notre sérieux.»

Rise project a vu le jour en 2011. Il compte aujourd’hui 10 journalistes bénévoles et quelques jolies révélations à son actif, mais Romana veut rester modeste.

«Tu ne sais jamais si untel est condamné parce que tu as écrit un article sur ses conflits d’intérêt ou s’il l’aurait été quoi qu’il en soit.»

Le rapport de la Commission européenne sur la corruption? «Du blabla lointain», juge Andrei. Pour eux, la lutte contre la corruption ne part pas de Bruxelles, mais du citoyen, celui qu’il faut réveiller. Dommage que peu de médias roumains aient cette même envie. Peut-être sont-ils corrompus eux aussi…

Voir également:

Les Roumains en ont assez de se faire voler

Contrairement aux idées reçues, la Roumanie est riche. Mais elle se fait piller. Et si les Roumains ont remporté une victoire contre un projet de mine d’or potentiellement nocif pour l’environnement, la mobilisation continue contre l’exploration des gaz de schiste.

Marianne Rigaux

Slate

01/10/2013

Dimanche 6 octobre, des milliers de Roumains sont descendus dans les rues de Bucarest pour protester contre le gouvernement de centre gauche accusé de favoriser un projet canadien de mine d’or contesté par les scientifiques.

Contrairement aux idées reçues, la Roumanie n’est pas dépourvue de richesses. Mais ce n’est pas elle qui en profite le plus. A l’ouest, il y a l’or convoité par des Canadiens. A l’est, les gaz de schiste promis aux Américains. Et au milieu, les manifestations des Roumains.

En autorisant des compagnies étrangères à exploiter son sous-sol dans l’espoir d’en tirer des bénéfices, le gouvernement a fait exploser la colère des citoyens. Il doit aujourd’hui faire machine à arrière.

Prenons les habitants de Rosia Montana par exemple. S’ils creusaient sous leurs maisons, ils seraient les plus riches de Roumanie. Sous ce village de Transylvanie se trouve le plus grand gisement d’or (300 tonnes) et d’argent (1.600 tonnes) d’Europe. Que tente d’extraire et d’exploiter depuis 1995 une société canadienne, Gabriel Resources.

Le projet prévoit désormais une exploitation intensive à ciel ouvert pendant seize ans, le recours à de grandes quantités de cyanure pour séparer l’or de la boue. Une pratique controversée, interdite dans certains pays d’Europe. Pendant des années, le dossier a connu peu d’avancées concrètes. Sollicité en 2011 pour donner son feu vert, le ministère roumain de l’Environnement n’a même jamais donné de réponse, tandis que la mobilisation contre le projet restait assez locale.

Qui n’en profiterait pas?

Mais voilà: Bucarest a besoin d’argent pour remplir ses caisses vidées par la crise. Car la Roumanie vit depuis trois ans sous perfusion du FMI. Les retombées économiques attendues pour ce pays en crise ont poussé le Premier ministre Victor Ponta –contre ce projet il y a encore quelques mois lorsqu’il était dans l’opposition– à mettre cet été le dossier sur le haut de la pile. Le gouvernement a déposé un projet de loi déclarant la mine «d’utilité publique et d’intérêt exceptionnel». Ce statut autoriserait la compagnie minière à exproprier les villageois qui refusent de quitter le site, au nom de l’Etat roumain.

Des mesures exceptionnelles à la hauteur de l’enjeu? La valeur de Rosia Montana a augmenté au même rythme que le cours de l’or: 10.000 euros le kilo en 2005, plus de 31.000 euros aujourd’hui. Le gisement est aujourd’hui estimé à 10 milliards d’euros.

«Quel pays disposant d’une telle richesse ne chercherait pas de solutions pour en profiter?», avait lancé le président roumain Traian Basescu en 2011, alors que le cours de l’or atteignait un pic historique. Victor Ponta devenu Premier ministre tient à peu près le même discours:

«En tant que député, je ne peux être que contre, mais en tant que Premier ministre, je ne peux être que pour, car je me dois d’attirer de nouveaux investissements en Roumanie.»

Problème: l’Etat roumain est minoritaire au sein de Rosia Montana Gold Corporation (RMGC), la compagnie chargée de l’exploitation du filon. Les profits iront surtout à la société canadienne Gabriel Resources, actionnaire à hauteur de 75%.

Le site d’investigation roumain Rise Project a publié le 31 août le contrat liant l’Etat roumain à RMGC. Il était resté secret pendant toutes ces années, malgré la promesse récurrente du Premier ministre de le publier. Selon ce document, RMGC, qui possède les droits d’exploitation, versera une redevance de 6% sur la production à l’Etat roumain. Pour les manifestants, le gouvernement a tout simplement vendu le pays.

Dans le village de Rosia Montana, les réactions sont mitigées. Il y a ceux qui résistent encore, comme Ani et Andrei, jeune couple d’altermondialistes, qui refusent toujours de vendre leur auberge aux Canadiens.

Et ceux qui se sont résignés: avec 75% de chômage dans la région, «toutes les personnes sensées sont pour la mine», confie Catalin, accoudé au bar. Il faut dire que le lobbying de RMGC ne leur laisse guère le choix.

Dans la cantine du village, financée par RMGC, le porte-parole des Canadiens Catalin Hosu promet que «la mine créera 3.600 emplois directs et indirects durant les 16 années d’exploitation». La compagnie emploie déjà 500 habitants, dont 22 qui se sont enfermés dans une galerie minière à l’annonce du coup de frein au projet.

En décembre, la population locale avait approuvé par référendum la réouverture de la mine à 78%. La consultation, boycottée par les opposants, avait été annulée, faute de participation suffisante. Au fil des années, la majorité des 2.000 habitants a vendu sa maison et fuit.

12.000 tonnes de cyanure par an

«Le prix à payer pour créer quelques emplois est trop élevé», juge Sorin Jurca, l’un des irréductibles opposants. Employé par la mine d’Etat jusqu’à sa fermeture en 2006, il a créé la fondation culturelle Rosia Montana pour défendre le patrimoine menacé.

«Le prix à payer», c’est 900 familles expropriées, 4 montagnes décapitées, 7 églises rasées, 7 cimetières déplacés, des galeries romaines classées au patrimoine national endommagées et surtout 250 millions de tonnes de déchets cyanurés stockés dans un bassin retenu par un barrage, en amont de Rosia Montana.

C’est ce danger environnemental qui a lancé la mobilisation à Bucarest. «Nous ne voulons pas de cyanure, nous ne voulons pas de dictature», ont scandé quotidiennement, pendant les 10 premiers jours de septembre, les manifestants, à Bucarest et dans les grandes villes du pays, mais aussi à Paris, Londres et Bruxelles. Les anti ne sont pas inquiets sans raison: en 2000, à Baia Mare (nord-ouest de la Roumanie), la rupture d’un barrage similaire a déversé 100.000 tonnes de cyanure dans le Danube, tuant 100 tonnes de poissons et empoisonnant l’eau de 2,5 millions de Hongrois.

Depuis, l’Union européenne a durci sa législation sur le cyanure. Environ 1.000 tonnes de cyanure sont utilisées chaque année dans les mines d’or d’Europe, notamment en Suède. En Roumanie, Gold corporation prévoit d’en utiliser 12 fois plus.

Devant la pression populaire, le Premier ministre fait machine arrière à la mi-septembre, retire son soutien au projet de loi et assure qu’il sera rejeté par le Parlement. Bien que le projet ne soit pas définitivement enterré, c’est une victoire pour les opposants.

Et une double défaite pour Victor Ponta qui, à force de changer d’avis, a perdu la confiance de la population. Et sa crédibilité auprès de Gabriel Resources. L’investisseur canadien menace de poursuivre l’Etat roumain «pour violations multiples des traités internationaux d’investissement» si le projet est définitivement abandonné. La presse parle de 4 milliards de dollars (3 milliards d’euros) de dommages et intérêts.

Le soir du 9 septembre, jour du recul du gouvernement roumain, l’action de Gabriel Resources a perdu la moitié de sa valeur à la Bourse de Toronto. Une dépréciation peu du goût des actionnaires, parmi lesquels des fonds spéculatifs, comme celui de John Paulson, qui s’est enrichi en spéculant sur la faillite de la Grèce.

Si les opposants au projet ont accueilli favorablement le recul du gouvernement roumain, ils ont bien l’intention de poursuivre leur mobilisation jusqu’au rejet du projet de loi par le Parlement et promis de revenir touts les jours, jusqu’à ce que le cyanure soit interdit dans l’industrie minière en Roumanie et le site de Rosia Montana classé au patrimoine de l’Unesco.

Les manifestants anti-mine d’or font aussi le lien avec les anti-gaz de schiste. A Bârlad, nord-est du pays, les protestations se multiplient depuis que le Premier ministre a autorisé cet été la compagnie américaine Chevron à explorer les gaz de schiste de la région.

D’après l’Agence américaine d’information sur l’énergie (EIA), le sous-sol roumain renfermerait quelque 1.444 milliards de mètres cubes de gaz de schiste, le troisième gisement européen après la Pologne et la France.

Si le gisement se confirme, Chevron prévoit une extraction par fracturation hydraulique à l’horizon 2017-2018. Une technique controversée, placée par la France sous moratoire, car elle polluerait les nappes phréatiques, fragiliserait les sols, voire favoriserait les tremblements de terre.

Mais en contrepartie de la fracturation de son sol, la région de Bârlad se voit promettre des dizaines de millions de dollars d’investissement dans les infrastructures locales, ainsi que dans le développement de la zone.

Rosia Montana, Bârlad: même combat

Pendant sa campagne électorale, le Premier ministre disait pourtant refuser qu’une entreprise étrangère explore le gaz de schiste roumain. C’était là encore avant d’être nommé et de faire volte-face en ouvrant la porte aux investissements étrangers en ces termes:

«Je veux que nous soyons un pays qui comprenne où sont ses intérêts.»

Comme à Rosia Montana, le profit que pourraient tirer les habitants de Bârlad, une ville désindustrialisée et appauvrie de 60.000 habitants, reste inconnu, car le contrat entre l’Etat et Chevron demeure secret. Et comme à Rosia Montana, le mécontentement dépasse largement les milieux écologistes.

Les Roumains se dressent aussi contre la manière de gouverner, la corruption, les entorses à la démocratie. Ils veulent défendre l’environnement, mais surtout empêcher leur pays de brader son sous-sol. Un réveil démocratique inédit en Roumanie depuis 1989.

Voir également:

L’invasion de Roms n’aura pas lieu

Pas plus de Roumains et de Bulgares, d’ailleurs, au 1er janvier 2014 comme le font craindre certains. Pourquoi? Ceux qui auraient pu venir sont déjà là et ils ne sont pas très nombreux.

Marianne Rigaux

Slate

26/09/2013

Deux échéances font revenir en force les Roms dans les médias: l’accès libre au marché du travail à partir du 1er janvier 2014 et les élections municipales de mars, avec leur lot de surenchère verbale. Au 1er janvier prochain, Roumains et Bulgares pourront librement travailler en France. Depuis leur entrée dans l’UE en 2007, ils sont libres de circuler et de s’installer où ils le veulent, mais ne peuvent pas exercer n’importe quel métier.

Pour l’instant, ils doivent obtenir une autorisation de travail délivrée par une préfecture française, ce qui peut prendre plusieurs mois, même avec une solide promesse d’embauche. L’employeur doit aussi prouver qu’il n’a pas trouvé de candidat français pour le poste, sauf pour une liste de 291 métiers pour lesquels le pays manque de main d’œuvre. Jusqu’en octobre 2012, cette liste ne contenait encore que 150 métiers dits «sous tension».

Avant même la fin de ces mesures transitoires, certains pays comme les Pays-Bas, l’Allemagne, la France et le Royaume-Uni pointent le risque d’une «invasion» de ressortissants roumains et bulgares. Et parmi eux, de nombreux Roms.

Spéculations et fantasmes

Au Royaume-Uni, le leader de l’United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) Nigel Farage l’affirme: «Nous allons ouvrir nos portes à 29 millions de Bulgares et Roumains pauvres. Il est temps de reprendre le contrôle de nos frontières». «Ils ont peur que les travailleurs roumains dérèglent leur marché du travail avec nos salaires plus faibles», constate Ilie Serbanescu, économiste et ancien ministre roumain.

Une étude de l’Observatoire des migrations de l’université d’Oxford relativise pourtant ces fantasmes. Après avoir analysé le «raz-de-marée» migratoire suscité par l’élargissement de l’UE en 2004, les auteurs concluent que les ressortissants des nouveaux pays membres ne représentent qu’un tiers de l’immigration totale au Royaume-Uni.

En France, c’est le Front National qui agite le chiffon rouge. «Je vous annonce que dans le courant de l’année 2014, il viendra à Nice 50.000 Roms au moins puisqu’à partir du 1er janvier, les 12 millions de Roms qui sont situés en Roumanie, en Bulgarie et en Hongrie auront la possibilité de s’établir dans tous les pays d’Europe», a lancé Jean-Marie Le Pen cet été.

Il y a entre 15.000 et 20.000 Roms en France, originaires de Roumanie et de Bulgarie pour la plupart, mais aussi de Macédoine, du Kosovo, de Slovaquie… Un chiffre stable depuis des années. De tous ses voisins, la France est le pays qui compte le moins de Roms: ils sont 750.000 en Espagne et 150.000 en Italie.

L’immigration a déjà eu lieu

Pour la politologue roumaine Irène Costelian, il n’y aura pas de raz-de-marée à l’horizon. «Les Roumains [Roms ou non] sont déjà partis depuis longtemps», affirme-t-elle. Il n’y aura pas de nouveau rush comme il y en a eu en 2004 à la suppression des visas ou en 2007 à l’entrée dans l’Union européenne». Ni comme en 1990, après la chute du dictateur Ceausescu.

D’après le recensement réalisé en 2011, la Roumanie a perdu 13% de sa population depuis la fin du communisme, passant de 23,21 millions en 1990 à 20,12 millions d’habitants en 2011. En cause, une forte émigration, principalement vers l’Italie, l’Allemagne et l’Espagne, et dans une moindre mesure vers la France, où le nombre de ressortissants roumains est estimé à 200.000 personnes.

Et puis partir n’a plus la cote, selon Edith Lhomel, analyste à la documentation française. «En 2011 et 2012, les revenus envoyés au pays par les Roumains expatriés ont baissé. On commence à se rendre compte qu’immigrer dans un pays d’Europe occidentale en crise n’est pas si rentable».

«Le pauvre fait peur»

Reste que les spéculations font douter, à quelques mois des élections municipales en France. Le trio Rom/immigration/insécurité refait surface dans les discours politiques et les médias. «Il ne faut vraiment pas craindre la Roumanie», écrivait le Premier ministre roumain Victor Ponta dans une tribune publiée dans le Times en février.

Oui mais voilà, «le pauvre fait peur», reconnaît Irène Costelian, elle-même née en Roumanie. «Le Roumain traîne l’image du travailleur pauvre qui va casser les prix». Un thème de campagne idéal pour le Front National, mais aussi pour la droite.

Depuis quelques semaines, les Roms et les amalgames sont partout: articles, petites phrases, carte pour localiser les camps, Une racoleuse. Ils ne sont que 20.000, soit la population du Puy-en-Velay, mais ils arrivent à éclipser les 3,2 millions de chômeurs.

Voir de même:

 Mère et Fils

Pierre Murat

Télérama

15/01/2014

Drame réalisé en 2013 par Calin Peter Netzer

Avec Luminita Gheorghiu , Bogdan Dumitrache , Natasa Raab …

Mère et Fils – Bande Annonce – VOST

SYNOPSIS

A 60 ans, Cornelia fait partie de la haute bourgeoisie de Bucarest. Son argent lui permet de connaître tous les puissants et la bonne société de la capitale roumaine. Tout irait pour le mieux si seulement ses relations avec son fils étaient moins tendues. Alors que médecins, musiciens, avocats se pressent à son anniversaire, il a refusé de venir. Lorsque celui-ci tue un enfant dans un accident de voiture, elle utilise son carnet d’adresse et consacre sa fortune pour lui éviter la prison. Un bon moyen, pense-t-elle, pour regagner l’amour de son fils. Or, elle a beau se démener, son fils refuse de se laisser amadouer…

LA CRITIQUE LORS DE LA SORTIE EN SALLE DU 15/01/2014

Plus il la repousse, plus Cornelia intervient dans la vie de son fils quadragénaire. Lorsqu’il tue un gamin au volant de sa voiture, elle fait jouer toutes ses relations pour lui éviter le pire… Depuis quelque temps, le cinéma roumain est au top : sujets brûlants, mises en scène jouant avec brio sur la durée. On se souvient de La Mort de Dante Lazarescu (Cristi Puiu), il y a quelques années, d’Un mois en Thaïlande (Paul Negoescu), l’an dernier, et, bien sûr, de 4 Mois, 3 semaines, 2 jours (Cristian Mungiu), Palme d’or à Cannes en 2007. Couronné à Berlin l’année dernière, Mère et fils n’a pas la même intensité. Durant la première heure, le réalisateur semble se gargariser de la virtuosité de sa caméra. Et le personnage du fils est beaucoup trop faible : brutal, borné, sans envergure ni démesure. On ne comprend pas sa rancoeur. Sa (fausse ?) rédemption indiffère.

Avec la même vigueur que ses compatriotes, cependant, le cinéaste filme un pays où les passe-droits pèsent aussi lourd que la terreur politique, jadis. Nul, en effet, ne résiste aux prébendes de Cornelia, pas même le flic présenté comme un modèle incorruptible : il résiste, il résiste, mais il cède comme tous les autres… Et Luminita Gheorghiu (déjà remarquable dans La Mort de Dante Lazarescu) fait de son personnage une sorte de monstre shakespearien, ne pouvant s’empêcher de distiller le poison dont son fils se sert pour la détruire.

Voir par ailleurs:

Book review.

Spotlight Casts Cruel Shadows For Girls

Reviewed by Bob Ford, Knight-Ridder Newspapers.

The Chicago tribune

August 28, 1995

Little Girls in Pretty Boxes:

The Making and Breaking of Elite Gymnasts and Figure Skaters

By Joan Ryan

Doubleday, 243 pages, $22.95

The lights come on, the audience is hushed and the athletes spin, flip and pirouette before us, china dolls performing their routines with grace and joy.

The little girls who form the core of our national gymnastics and figure-skating teams are the stuff of gossamer dreams as they compete against the world for Olympic medals and patriotic glory.

But for every girl who makes it into the brightest spotlight, there are hundreds left in the shadows of the sport, used and discarded. It is the other side of the American dream and one that has long needed a closer look.

As part of a series of newspaper articles on female athletes, Joan Ryan, a San Francisco journalist, began this investigation of the price exacted in the quest for youthful success. The series grew into "Little Girls in Pretty Boxes," which is as vital and troubling a work as the sports world has seen in a long time.

"What I found," writes Ryan, "was a story about legal, even celebrated, child abuse. In the dark troughs along the road to the Olympics lay the bodies of the girls who stumbled on the way, broken by the work, pressure and humiliation.

"I found a girl who felt such shame at not making the Olympic team that she slit her wrists. A skater who underwent plastic surgery when a judge said her nose was distracting. A father who handed custody of his daughter over to her coach so she could keep skating. A coach who fed his gymnasts so little that federation officials had to smuggle food into their hotel rooms. A mother who hid her child’s chicken pox with makeup so she could compete. Coaches who motivated their athletes by calling them imbeciles, idiots, pigs and cows."

Ryan lets the facts clearly indicate the damage that can be done to young girls by overbearing parents, obsessive coaches and the elusive dream of stardom.

The book’s strongest moments come from the sport of gymnastics, where judges reward the work of sleek, supple girls able to perform the hardest maneuvers and give poorer marks to those who have slipped toward womanhood and must rely on grace and form. Countless hours of intensive training, combined with dangerous eating patterns, lowers the percentage of body fat to such extreme levels that natural maturation cannot take place.

The psychological effects of growing up as a gymnast can lead to eating disorders, such as the anorexia that eventually killed former gymnast Christy Heinrich, and mental illness.

Ryan goes hard after Bela Karolyi, the former Romanian national team coach whose star rose in 1976 with the success of his student, Nadia Comaneci. The methods of Karolyi, now a coach in this country, include verbal abuse, Ryan asserts, and she also alleges that the gymnasts starve themselves to stay in his good graces. Karolyi does his job of producing winners well, however, and Ryan points out that until society changes its priorities for athletes, the situation will not change.

The sections on figure skating are cobbled in artfully by Ryan, but the material pales in comparison to the reporting on gymnastics. She carefully documents the pressure and the politics involved in skating and observes, once again, that judges are usually unwilling to grade a graceful woman as highly as a triple-jumper. Once the skaters mature, gaining the hips and breasts that make them aerodynamically inferior to the younger skaters, their careers are effectively shot. Getting to the top of the pack is a race against time, and the corners cut to get there can scar the athletes forever.

Ryan suggests changes involving gymnastics and figure skating: The minimum-age requirements should be raised. There should be mandatory licensing of coaches and careful scrutiny by the national governing bodies. And athletes should be required to remain in regular schools at least until they are 16.

Few sports books can truly be called important. This book, beautifully written and painstakingly researched, is one of those few.

Voir enfin:

Abuse Amid Glamor In Name Of Sports

 Philip Hersh, Tribune Olympic Sports Writer

The Chicago tribune

June 01, 1995

120

Joan Ryan comes right to the point in the introductory chapter of her book, "Little Girls in Pretty Boxes," which hits this stores this month.

Ryan, a San Francisco Chronicle columnist, undertook the book to learn about the effects of subjecting young girls to the training demands of figure skating and gymnastics, especially the latter.

"What I found," Ryan writes, "was a story about legal, even celebrated, child abuse."

The following anecdotes should illustrate why Ryan came to such a conclusion:

- In January, Romanian gymnastics coach Florin Gheorghe was sentenced to eight years in prison by a Bucharest court for having beaten an 11-year-old athlete so severely during a 1993 practice session she died two days later of a broken neck.

Gheorghe’s attorney admitted his client slapped the young woman but said such physical abuse was common practice in Romanian gymnastics.

"This kind of punishment is a heritage from Bela Karolyi," the attorney said, referring to the martinet coach who drove Nadia Comaneci and Mary Lou Retton to Olympic gold medals. Karolyi has denied the charge.

- Aurelia Okino, a native Romanian whose daughter, Betty, trained with Karolyi a decade after his defection to the U.S., said in a 1992 interview she had become scared to answer the phone in her Elmhurst home.

Aurelia Okino worried it would be Betty, then 17, calling from Karolyi’s gym in Houston with news of another injury, There had been serious elbow, back and knee injuries before Okino made the 1992 Olympic team and helped the U.S. women win a bronze medal in the team event.

"Gymnastics is a brutal sport," Betty Okino said matter-of-factly.

Asked why she had let her daughter go that far, Okino said, "How do you deny a child her dream?"

- In 1985, a few days before her enormously talented daughter, Tiffany, would win her only U.S. figure skating title, Marjorie Chin accepted the offer of a ride back to her Kansas City hotel from a reporter she had first met 20 minutes before. Tiffany, then 17, took a back seat to Marjorie in the reporter’s car.

For 30 minutes, Mrs. Chin delivered relentless criticism of her daughter’s performance in practice that day. "If you keep it up, you’re not going to be the star of the ice show, you’re going to be just part of the supporting cast," Mrs. Chin said, over and over.

- Several times in the last few years, officials of the U.S. Figure Skating Association have spoken to a prominent ice dancer about her eating habits. The ice dancer, 32 years old, still looks like a wraith. One of those stories came from a wire service. The other three are personal recollections–mine, not Ryan’s.

Her book, subtitled "the making and breaking of elite gymnasts and figure skaters" (Doubleday, 243 pp., $22.95), has much more frightening tales to tell.

Ryan recounts in compelling detail the stories of Julissa Gomez and Christy Henrich, gymnasts whose pursuit of glory proved fatal; of figure skater Amy Grossman, whose mother said, "Skating was God"; of coaches like Karolyi and one of his disciples, Rick Newman, whose ideas of motivating adolescent girls include demeaning them at a time when their egos are most fragile; and of parents who hide their irresponsibility behind the notion of "trying to get the best for my child."

Such is the sordid underbelly of the Olympics’ two most glamorous sports.

Only in the last three years has the nation begun to have a vague awareness of this life under the sequins and leotards. Ryan began to get a clear view of these problems while doing research for a newspaper story before the 1992 Olympics.

That led her to write this book, in which the villains are both coaches and parents. She lets Karolyi skewer himself with his own words. She shows how parents lose sight of the fundamental notion of protecting their children from harm, so blinded are they by possible fame and fortune.

The cause of such intemperate adult behavior is partly the peculiar competitive demands to jump higher and twirl faster, particularly in gymnastics, that favor girls with tiny bodies over young women developing hips and breasts. That puts them in a race against puberty, creating a window of opportunity so narrow it leads to foolhardiness.

Neither figure skating nor gymnastics is without athletes whose experiences are positive, a point that needed more attention in Ryan’s book than the disclaimer, "I’m not suggesting that all elite gymnasts and figure skaters emerge from their sports unhealthy and poorly adjusted." A better balance might have been struck if the author had given voice to the likes of Olympic champions Retton and Kristi Yamaguchi.

Ryan’s basic premise about child abuse still is thoroughly supported by interviews, anecdotes and factual evidence.

"Little Girls in Pretty Boxes" should be a manifesto for change in the rules of these two sports, so that women with adult bodies still can compete. It should be a wakeup call to parents who have abdicated their responsibility for their childrens’ well-being. Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up hooked on sports that don’t let them grow up.


Polémique Dieudonné: Après le mariage, la victimisation pour tous ! (Streisand effect: How demonization keeps France’s defrocked multiculturalist poster child alive)

5 janvier, 2014
Manifestation de soutien à Dieudonné le 28 décembre 2013.http://commentisfreewatch.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/next.jpeg?w=450&h=337http://img.over-blog-kiwi.com/0/20/39/77/201312/ob_4cb4fd5b214abe66efb2a1bde6351932_pi30-jpg.jpeghttp://img.over-blog-kiwi.com/0/20/39/77/201312/ob_e75f461b6fd55538c3e699cc1f6c5738_soralberlin-jpg.jpeghttp://img.over-blog-kiwi.com/0/20/39/77/201312/ob_5f121e_1475866-446627335441323-1693066782-n-jpg.jpeghttp://www.gabrielglewis.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/strangelove.jpgPresque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Il ne faut pas dissimuler que les institutions démocratiques développent à un très haut niveau le sentiment de l’envie dans le coeur humain. Ce n’est point tant parce qu’elle offrent à chacun les moyens de s’égaler aux autres, mais parce que ces moyens défaillent sans cesse à ceux qui les emploient. Les institutions démocratiques réveillent et flattent la passion de l’égalité sans pouvoir jamais la satisfaire entièrement. Cette égalité complète s’échappe tous les jours des mains du peuples au moment où il croit la saisir, et fuit, comme dit Pascal, d’une fuite éternelle; le peuple s’échauffe à la recherche de ce bien d’autant plus précieux qu’il est assez proche pour être connu et assez loin pour ne pas être goûté. Tout ce qui le dépasse par quelque endroit lui paraît un obstacle à ses désirs, et il n’y a pas de supériorité si légitime dont la vue ne fatigue sas yeux. Tocqueville
Il y a en effet une passion mâle et légitime pour l’égalité qui excite les hommes à vouloir être tous forts et estimés. Cette passion tend à élever les petits au rang des grands ; mais il se rencontre aussi dans le cœur humain un goût dépravé pour l’égalité, qui porte les faibles à vouloir attirer les forts à leur niveau, et qui réduit les hommes à préférer l’égalité dans la servitude à l’inégalité dans la liberté. Tocqueville
Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude. Chesterton
L’antisémitisme est le socialisme des imbéciles. Ferdinand Kronawetter ? (attribué à August Bebel)
Imaginons deux enfants dans une pièce pleine de jouets identiques. Le premier prend un jouet, mais il ne semble pas fort intéressé par l’objet. Le second l’observe et essaie d’arracher le jouet à son petit camarade. Celui-là n’était pas fort captivé par la babiole, mais – soudain – parce que l’autre est intéressé cela change et il ne veut plus le lâcher. Des larmes, des frustrations et de la violence s’ensuivent. Dans un laps de temps très court un objet pour lequel aucun des deux n’avait un intérêt particulier est devenu l’enjeu d’une rivalité obstinée. René Girard
C’était une cité fortement convoitée par les ennemis de la foi et c’est pourquoi, par une sorte de syndrome mimétique, elle devint chère également au cœur des Musulmans. Emmanuel Sivan
Il faut se souvenir que le nazisme s’est lui-même présenté comme une lutte contre la violence: c’est en se posant en victime du traité de Versailles que Hitler a gagné son pouvoir. Et le communisme lui aussi s’est présenté comme une défense des victimes. Désormais, c’est donc seulement au nom de la lutte contre la violence qu’on peut commettre la violence. René Girard
L’effet Streisand est un phénomène médiatique au cours duquel la volonté d’empêcher la divulgation d’informations que l’on aimerait garder secrètes – qu’il s’agisse de simples rumeurs ou de faits vérifiés – déclenche le résultat inverse. Par ses efforts, la victime encourage malgré elle l’exposition d’une publication qu’elle souhaitait voir ignorée. Il s’agit donc à proprement parler d’un "effet pervers". Wikipedia
Que veut, en fait, Dieudonné ? Il veut un ‘Holocauste’ pour les Arabes et pour les noirs aussi. (…) La noble idée de "la guerre contre le racisme" se transforme graduellement en une idéologie hideusement mensongère. Et cet antiracisme sera, pour le XXIe siècle, ce qu’a été le communisme pour le XXe. Alain Finkielkraut
Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège : la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor
La lisibilité de la filiation, qui est dans l’intérêt de l’enfant, est sacrifiée au profit du bon vouloir des adultes et la loi finit par mentir sur l’origine de la vieConférence des évêques
C’est un moment génial de l’histoire de France. Toute la communauté issue de l’immigration adhère complètement à la position de la France. Tout d’un coup, il y a une espèce de ferment. Profitons de cet espace de francitude nouvelle. Jean-Louis Borloo (ministre délégué à la Ville, suite à des manifestations anti-guerre d’Irak marquées par nombre de cris d’"A mort les juifs!", avril 2003)
Je n’ai pas le droit à la prison, c’est évidemment une très très grande déception, parce que je m’y étais préparé, ça faisait partie de ma campagne promotionnelle. Dieudonné
While this gesture has been part of French culture for many years, it was not until recently that I learned of the very negative concerns associated with it. When l was photographed making that gesture three years ago, I thought it was part of a comedy act and did not know that it could be in any way offensive or harmful. Since I have been made aware of the seriousness of this gesture, I will certainly never repeat the gesture and sincerely apologize for any misunderstanding or harm relating to my actions. Hopefully this incident will serve to educate others that we need to be more aware that things that may seem innocuous can actually have a history of hate and hurt. Tony Parker
La quenelle est avant tout un code identitaire, qui a acquis une vraie popularité chez les jeunes. Difficile de dire que tous aient conscience de la portée de ce geste». .. une mouvance transversale, antisystème et complotiste, dont l’antisémitisme reste la colonne vertébrale. Leur vision du monde est celle d’un ordre mondial dominé par l’axe Washington-Tel-Aviv. Derrière les discours fustigeant l’Otan et la finance internationale, tout en soutenant Bachar al-Assad et Hugo Chávez, il y a la conviction qu’au fond, ce sont les Juifs qui tirent les ficelles. Jean-Yves Camus (spécialiste de l’extrême droite)
A présent que ce geste s’est répandu dans toutes les cours de récréation, des milliers de personnes qui faisaient ce geste par amusement et qui ne pensaient pas du tout aux juifs (et oui, Mesdames, Messieurs du Crif, les juifs et la shoah n’occupent pas les pensées de tout le monde, tout le temps….), il est certain que toutes ces personnes pourront se dire « c’est à cause des juifs et d’Israël (bref des sionistes) que l’on ne peut plus rigoler, ils nous cassent les pieds » (et je reste poli…). On sait déjà que la source originelle de l’antisémitisme vient du fait que le judaïsme a instauré pour l’humanité des principes de vie et de morale avec les dix commandements, et que ne plus obéir totalement à son désir, mais avoir des contraintes morales est nécessairement une atteinte à sa liberté (on n’est plus libre de tuer qui on veut, de voler ce qui nous plait, et l’on ne se sent plus aussi bien lorsque l’on pratique l’adultère….). Le désastre, c’est qu’aujourd’hui, pour les centaines de milliers de fans de Dieudonné, il y a un onzième commandement : on ne va plus pouvoir rigoler et faire de bonnes blagues à cause des juifs, des sionistes et d’Israël. Raison de plus pour résister à ce nouveau « diktat moral des juifs » en continuant à faire ce geste…. Cette mise en exergue d’un geste qui n’était qu’un trait de vulgarité, a réveillé un immense caractère antisémite dans des milliers de cerveaux français, et bientôt européens…. Stéphane Haddad
Il se marre. Il se bidonne, il s’éclate, Dieudonné ! La polémique sur la possible interdiction de son show a refait le plein de carburant pour sa petite machine à haine, et à cash. Le ministre de l’Intérieur va demander aux préfets d’invoquer un risque de «trouble à l’ordre public ».« Trouble à l’ordre public » ? C’est presque la Légion d’honneur qui lui est ainsi décernée. Dieudonné se nourrit du «trouble» et conchie l’ «ordre public », qui n’est, pour lui, que l’ordre sioniste, l’ordre des Juifs, l’ordre du « système ». Ses fans s’enflamment : si Dieudonné est ainsi menacé, c’est bien qu’il dérange ! Et qu’il vise juste ! Car le public qui se presse pour assister à son spectacle a évolué, au fil des années, suivant docilement la trajectoire de l’« artiste». Ce n’est plus l’humoriste que l’on va voir pour rigoler un bon coup. C’est le provocateur. C’est l’«antisystème ». A chaque dérapage antisémite, l’assistance est parcourue par le délicieux frisson de l’interdit.  (…) Il faut une solide dose d’aveuglement, ou plutôt de mauvaise foi, pour ne pas traduire correctement le mot « système ». Si le monde va comme il va, c’est parce que les Juifs le font tourner. Il ne s’agit pas seulement d ‘ une vulgaire déclaration raciste. C’est une lecture de l’Histoire : la lecture des nazis. D’ailleurs, la filiation est assumée, avec cette fameuse «quenelle». Ce geste est celui du Docteur Folamour, dans le film du même nom. Incapable de réfréner le salut nazi que fait compulsivement son bras droit, le héros est obligé de le bloquer avec la main gauche. Le gag de Kubrick a fait florès. Mille fois répété, bien avant que Dieudonné s’en saisisse, sa signification est parfaitement claire : je suis nazi, mais je ne dois pas l’exprimer. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre de recenser les lieux choisis par les fans qui se font photographier en pleine quenelle et adressent le cliché au site Internet de Dieudonné : le mémorial de la Shoah à Berlin, la voie ferrée menant à Auschwitz, l’école de Toulouse où Merah a tué des enfants juifs… Rien d’antisémite dans ces choix! Ceux qui font mine de s’interroger sur la portée du geste se foutent du monde. (…) Tiens ? Où est-elle passée, Christiane Taubira, en pleine tourmente Dieudonné ? Quelles instructions a-t-elle données aux parquets généraux ? Il y a de quoi rire, en effet, quand on sait qu’aucune des condamnations déjà prononcées n’a été exécutée . Le Canard enchainé
Cela ne concerne pas toute la France, sinon Jean-Jacques Goldman et Patrick Bruel y seraient des marginaux, tout comme Gad Elmaleh ou Patrick Timsit, mais cela concerne néanmoins une part inquiétante de la population française : il existe en ce pays une nébuleuse fétide où se mêle une extrême droite porteuse de relents pétainistes, catholiques intégristes, nationalistes myopes, anti-israéliens et anti-américains, une extrême-gauche qui ne se distingue de l’extrême droite que parce qu’elle est favorable à l’islamisation du monde et à l’immigration sans contrôles, et, précisément, des courants islamiques eux-mêmes anti-israéliens et anti-américains. L’extrême droite camoufle son antisémitisme sous le manteau de l’ « antisionisme », qui est celui sous lequel s’abritent aussi extrême gauche et courants islamiques. Dieudonné trouve un public dans les divers composants de cette nébuleuse. Il suscite aussi chez des spectateurs de passage une accoutumance à certains parfums. Ces parfums sont ceux de la décomposition. On n’arrêtera pas la décomposition en interdisant des spectacles. Mais si des vagues de révolte contre ce que signifient ces spectacles se lèvent, ce seront des vagues salubres. Et elles ont mon soutien. On n’arrêtera pas le recours à certains gestes en interdisant ceux-ci. Mais faire un geste qui se trouve fait et photographié à Auschwitz, devant des synagogues, devant l’école juive de Toulouse où Merah a assassiné des enfants juifs, devant des photos d’Anne Frank, et j’en passe, c’est faire un geste lourd de sens et lourd de son poids de cadavres, et se voir traité comme un être infâme pour avoir fait ce geste est pleinement légitime. C’est se faire complice, par l’esprit, d’un crime contre l’humanité passé et de crimes contre l’humanité présents : ceux qui frappent des Israéliens et peuvent les frapper. Et que face à ce geste se lèvent aussi des vagues de révolte est sain et légitime. Je crains, hélas, que Dieudonné soit l’un des signes annonciateurs de ce qui vient. Guy Millière
Dans une vidéo postée sur YouTube le 20 août et vue 385 000 fois, Dieudonné, écharpe du Hamas au cou, se délecte de la popularité exponentielle du geste, feignant d’être dépassé par son succès. «Je ne pensais pas que le mouvement de la quenelle irait aussi loin. Aujourd’hui, cet acte subversif ne m’appartient plus, il appartient à la révolution.» S’ensuit un montage photo de «quenelles glissées» par des jeunes, des vieux, des pompiers, des syndicalistes. On retrouve le geste sur des photos de classe et de mariage. D’autres, prises devant des synagogues en France ou à l’étranger et jusqu’au mémorial de la Shoah à Berlin, ne cachent pas leur sous-texte antisémite. Climax de la vidéo, des policiers et militaires en tenue. Hilare, Dieudonné se met à «rêver d’un coup d’Etat au secours du peuple, comme en Egypte». Avec la condamnation du ministère de la Défense, la polémique dépasse désormais le cercle des initiés. Et ce débat amène certains, à l’instar du journaliste Jean-Laurent Cassely, à s’inquiéter d’une éventuelle «dieudonisation des esprits». Libération
La quenelle est, si on ose dire, le bras armé de l’idéologie de Dieudonné. Tout à la fois running gag, symbole politique et bras d’honneur dirigé contre ceux «d’en haut», «glisser une quenelle» consiste à placer sa main ouverte sur son bras opposé, à allonger se dernier pour faire un signe dont la signification est explicite. La référence au salut hitlérien est évidemment volontaire. On a vu d’ailleurs apparaître ces «quenelles» dans le cadre de la campagne du Parti antisioniste, dont il fut l’éphémère tête de liste en Ile de France aux européennes de 2009, sur une affiche électorale dont l’ambiguïté n’était pas vraiment de mise… La quenelle se décline en plusieurs tailles, à jauger en fonction du succès de l’action: petite quenelle, quenelle de 12, quenelle de 40, de 175, quenelle épaulée, etc. Plus la quenelle est longue, plus, bien entendu, le bras d’honneur est profond et procure satisfaction à son auteur. Un registre paillard qui rappelle un peu le slogan de Coluche lors de la présidentielle de 1981, pour laquelle il décidera finalement de se retirer: «Tous ensemble, pour leur foutre au cul». La cible n’est évidemment plus la même. Quant à l’ananas, décliné tout au long de la soirée sous de multiples formes (ananas frais au buffet, fresque géante devant la salle, tee-shirts souvenir, déguisements, etc.), il est omniprésent pour rappeler la cause de la condamnation de l’intéressé pour provocation à la haine: la chanson Shoananas, qu’il reprend en cœur avec son public lors de chaque spectacle, sur l’air de la chanson Chaud Cacao d’Annie Cordy. Le troisième signe de ralliement important qui, avec la quenelle et l’ananas, forme la trinité de la terminologie officielle, c’est l’expression «Au-dessus, c’est le soleil». Traduction: on s’attaque à la chose la plus haute, la plus sacrée possible (la Shoah, mais cela peut aussi s’appliquer à Bernard-Henri Levy ou à Mahmoud Ahmadinejad). Cette phrase peut-être prononcée, imprimée sur tee-shirt, ou encore simplement mimée (il suffit pour cela de tenir son doigt en l’air comme pointé vers le soleil, en mimant avec la bouche une sorte de bisou pour en faire une caricature de rabin). Quant à la quenelle à proprement parler, elle se décline en signes, en tee-shirts, en logos détournés. Elle est devenue une unité de langage. La voici parodiant le logo de Facebook, "réseau social sioniste". Jean-Laurent Cassely
Malheureusement, toutes ces manœuvres sont non seulement inutiles, mais également contre-productives. Et cela, qu’elles soient légales ou illégales, menées par des individus ou des institutions : la répression ne fonctionne pas lorsqu’elle lutte contre des idées. La répression d’idées "dissidentes" par les pouvoirs publics ou les médias nationaux a un effet pervers : elle leur offre un véritable "diplôme de non-respectabilité". Cela tient de la logique circulaire : si ces idées sont combattues avec autant d’acharnement par des "représentants du système" (journalistes, commentateurs, intellectuels médiatiques) ou par les pouvoirs publics, c’est qu’elles dérangent. Encore récemment, le Front national utilisait cet effet, s’appuyant sur sa "diabolisation" afin de prouver qu’il constituait un parti d’opposition de premier ordre. Dieudonné l’expliqua lui-même à la suite de sa dernière condamnation : "Je n’ai pas le droit à la prison, c’est évidemment une très très grande déception, parce que je m’y étais préparé, ça faisait partie de ma campagne promotionnelle". Aujourd’hui, la censure produit l’effet totalement inverse de son objectif premier ; il s’agit de l’une des applications de l’Effet Streisand. Cet effet s’ajoute à celui de la "validation" des idées comme anti-systèmes par les "représentants du système" eux-mêmes. Cette censure confine à l’absurde lorsqu’elle concerne la publication d’œuvres tombées dans le domaine public, comme c’est le cas de celles de Léon Bloy ou d’Edouard Drumont, éditées par Kontre Kulture. À ce premier anachronisme qui consiste à vouloir empêcher la diffusion de textes politiques en France au XXIe siècle, s’ajoute un problème technique et moral : pourquoi empêcher une maison d’édition de publier des textes que n’importe quel internaute peut dénicher gratuitement ? À l’heure de la diffusion numérique massive, même des textes hors-domaine public, donc piratés, s’obtiennent sans difficulté sur internet. Par chance, nous vivons dans une démocratie. Les seules violences exercées contre des porte-paroles d’idéologies jugées inacceptables le sont par des individus n’ayant aucun lien avec les pouvoirs publics. Malgré tout, cette approche fait partie du prisme répressif, du front luttant contre les idées d’Alain Soral et Dieudonné M’bala M’bala. Et comme les approches légales de la répression, il est important de souligner qu’elles sont parfaitement inutiles. La violence, qu’elle soit légalement ou illégalement exercée, affaiblit difficilement les idées. Au contraire : celles-ci se nourrissent des réactions qu’elles engendrent, et se renforcent grâce aux actes engagés contre leurs porte-paroles. Ainsi, les agressions d’Alain Soral et Dieudonné M’bala M’bala, les menaces qu’ils reçoivent et la pression exercée sur les "quenelleurs" sont prises comme des raisons supplémentaires de poursuivre leur combat. La radicalisation d’Alain Soral, par exemple, est postérieure à son agression en 2004, lors d’une dédicace, durant laquelle l’essayiste fut blessé au même titre que ses lecteurs. Que l’on juge nauséabonde ou honorable une idéologie, celle-ci obéit à la même loi : ses défenseurs trouvent dans la répression une raison supplémentaire de tenir tête à leurs adversaires. Les démocrates et les défenseurs de l’ordre républicain devraient se rappeler qu’il y a bien plus d’utilité et de noblesse à défendre l’expression libre d’idées avec lesquelles nous ne sommes pas d’accord. L’Histoire devrait également leur rappeler que le marteau du juge, la matraque du policier ou la barre de fer du militant violent n’ont jamais réussi à arrêter des idées, nauséabondes ou non. Face aux idées, il ne peut y avoir que des idées. La condamnation systématique et aveugle, la haine comme moteur de l’action politique et la mystification de l’adversaire ne sont que des pratiques inefficaces et désuètes. Au mieux, elles troublent le jeu démocratique ; au pire, elles renforcent ceux qu’elles comptaient combattre. Arnaud Lavalade
Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala was born in a Paris suburb nearly 48 years ago. His mother was white, from Brittany, his father was African, from Cameroun.  This should make him a poster child for the “multiculturalism” the ideologically dominant left claims to promote.  And during the first part of his career, teaming up with his Jewish friend, Elie Simoun, he was just that: campaigning against racism, focusing his criticism on the National Front and even running for office against an NF candidate in the dormitory town of Dreux, some sixty miles West of Paris, where he lives. Like the best humorists, Dieudonné always targeted current events, with a warmth and dignity unusual in the profession. His career flourished, he played in movies, was a guest on television, branched out on his own.  A great observer, he excels at relatively subtle imitations of various personality types and ethnic groups from Africans to Chinese. Ten years ago, on December 1, 2003, as guest on a TV show appropriately called “You Can’t Please Everybody”, dedicated to current events, Dieudonné came on stage roughly disguised as “a convert to Zionist extremism” advising others to get ahead by “joining the American-Israeli Axis of Good”. This was in the first year of the US assault on Iraq, which France’s refusal to join had led Washington to rechristen what it calls “French fries” (Belgian, actually) as “Freedom fries”.  A relatively mild attack on George W. Bush’s “Axis of Evil” seemed totally in the mood of the times. The sketch ended with a brief salute, “Isra-heil”.  This was far from being vintage Dieudonné, but nevertheless, the popular humorist was at the time enthusiastically embraced by other performers while the studio audience gave him a standing ovation. Then the protests started coming in, especially concerning the final gesture seen as likening Israel to Nazi Germany. (…) Thus began a decade of escalation.  LICRA began a long series of lawsuits against him (“incitement to racial hatred”), at first losing, but keeping up the pressure.  Instead of backing down, Dieudonné went farther in his criticism of “Zionism” after each attack.  Meanwhile, Dieudonné was gradually excluded from television appearances and treated as a pariah by mainstream media.  It is only the recent internet profusion of images showing young people making the quenelle sign that has moved the establishment to conclude that a direct attack would be more effective than trying to ignore him. To begin to understand the meaning of the Dieudonné affair, it is necessary to grasp the ideological context.  For reasons too complex to review here, the French left – the left that once was primarily concerned with the welfare of the working class, with social equality, opposition to aggressive war, freedom of speech – has virtually collapsed.  The right has won the decisive economic battle, with the triumph of policies favoring monetary stability and the interests of international investment capital (“neo-liberalism”).  As a consolation prize, the left enjoys a certain ideological dominance, based on anti-racism, anti-nationalism and devotion to the European Union – even to the hypothetical “social Europe” that daily recedes into the cemetery of lost dreams. In fact, this ideology fits perfectly with a globalization geared to the requirements of international finance capital. In the absence of any serious socio-economic left, France has sunk into a sort of “Identity Politics”, which both praises multiculturalism and reacts vehemently against “communitarianism”, that is, the assertion of any unwelcome ethnic particularisms. (…) France has adopted laws to “punish anti-Semitism”.  The result is the opposite.  Such measures simply tend to confirm the old notion that “the Jews run the country” and contribute to growing anti-Semitism.  When French youth see a Franco-Israeli attempt to outlaw a simple gesture, when the Jewish community moves to ban their favorite humorist, anti-Semitism can only grow even more rapidly. Diana Johnstone

Après le mariage,… la victimisation pour tous !

Alors qu’attirés par le goût du sang de la polémique qui enfle et contre toutes les hyprocrites dénégations ("anti-système", on vous dit !) de leurs initiateurs, nos nouveaux tenants du socialisme des imbéciles bouffeurs de rabbins disent chaque jour un peu plus la pathétique vérité de leur geste

Et que d’autres qui avec leurs confrères bouffeurs de curé se sont faits un véritable de fonds de commerce de la caricature la plus débile en sont à dénoncer le jusqu’alors silence assourdissant d’une ministre de la Justice à qui l’on doit déjà deux lois vériticides (historique et biologique) …

Pendant qu ‘outre-manche ou atlantique et sans la moindre loi mémorielle, on ne semble pas trop plaisanter avec ces choses …

Comment ne pas voir après les lois liberticides sur les génocides juif et arménien ou l’actuelle mode des génocides et autres mariages pour tous

Et les tentatives, jusqu’ici heureusement infructueuses, du totalitarisme islamique de faire condamner les caricatures de leur propre prêcheur de haine

L’énième épisode d’un syndrome mimétique et de la concurrence des victimes qui est ici en train de se rejouer dans ce cimetière rempli d’idées chrétiennes devenues folles qu’est devenu notre monde moderne ?

Mais aussi, au-delà des indéniables risques de banalisation (Enderlin-Dieudonné, même combat!) l’immense cadeau que l’on est en train de faire en prétendant le priver de son imprescriptible droit à la bêtise la plus crasse …

A l’humoriste de seconde zone qui, réduit à jouer les victimes (jusqu’à sa propre insolvabilité pendant que Madame dépose la marque de l’objet du délit!) et à multiplier les provocations à l’instar de son pathétique mentor front-nationaliste, avait largement lui aussi dépassé sa date de péremption ?

La "quenelle" de Dieudonné : face aux idées, la répression et la violence sont inutiles

Arnaud Lavalade

Chargé d’études

Le Nouvel Observateur

29-12-2013

Manuel Valls n’a pas de mots assez durs pour définir l’essayiste Alain Soral et l’humoriste Dieudonné M’bala M’bala. Les considérant comme des ennemis de la République, dégoûté par leur "idéologie nauséabonde", il prône désormais l’interdiction des spectacles de Dieudonné.

Du débat public à la répression de la parole

Cette politique répressive est censée faire face à la "dieudonnisation des esprits", et s’inscrit plus globalement dans le cadre de la lutte contre des idées jugées inacceptables. Cette lutte a pu prendre différentes formes, allant de l’agression physique aux interdictions de spectacles par des élus locaux, en passant par de multiples condamnations publiques ou judiciaires.

Entre autres condamnations récentes, la maison d’édition Kontre Kulture, diffusant les œuvres des deux militants, s’est vue forcée de censurer plusieurs de ses ouvrages. En parallèle, Dieudonné M’bala M’bala a été condamné en appel pour sa chanson "Shoah Nanas" à 28.000 euros d’amende.

La répression systématique étendue aux "quenelleurs"

Cette répression s’étend également à tous ceux affichant, de près ou de loin, des affinités pour le duo polémique. Entre autres : les "quenelleurs", pratiquant le geste de la quenelle, considéré par certains comme une sorte de bras d’honneur, par d’autres comme un salut nazi ou un signe simplement antisémite.

Les actions "anti-quenelles" reprennent un schéma comparable : ennuis professionnels, condamnations publiques, procès, voire des actes illégaux accomplis par des activistes, tels que des piratages informatiques ou violences physiques. En sus, on attend de toute célébrité ayant déjà réalisé une quenelle qu’elle s’explique publiquement sur son geste.

Malheureusement, toutes ces manœuvres sont non seulement inutiles, mais également contre-productives. Et cela, qu’elles soient légales ou illégales, menées par des individus ou des institutions : la répression ne fonctionne pas lorsqu’elle lutte contre des idées.

La répression décerne le titre "d’ennemi du système"

La répression d’idées "dissidentes" par les pouvoirs publics ou les médias nationaux a un effet pervers : elle leur offre un véritable "diplôme de non-respectabilité".

Cela tient de la logique circulaire : si ces idées sont combattues avec autant d’acharnement par des "représentants du système" (journalistes, commentateurs, intellectuels médiatiques) ou par les pouvoirs publics, c’est qu’elles dérangent. Encore récemment, le Front national utilisait cet effet, s’appuyant sur sa "diabolisation" afin de prouver qu’il constituait un parti d’opposition de premier ordre.

Dieudonné l’expliqua lui-même à la suite de sa dernière condamnation : "Je n’ai pas le droit à la prison, c’est évidemment une très très grande déception, parce que je m’y étais préparé, ça faisait partie de ma campagne promotionnelle".

La censure, un outil désuet

Aujourd’hui, la censure produit l’effet totalement inverse de son objectif premier ; il s’agit de l’une des applications de l’Effet Streisand. Cet effet s’ajoute à celui de la "validation" des idées comme anti-systèmes par les "représentants du système" eux-mêmes.

Cette censure confine à l’absurde lorsqu’elle concerne la publication d’œuvres tombées dans le domaine public, comme c’est le cas de celles de Léon Bloy ou d’Edouard Drumont, éditées par Kontre Kulture.

À ce premier anachronisme qui consiste à vouloir empêcher la diffusion de textes politiques en France au XXIe siècle, s’ajoute un problème technique et moral : pourquoi empêcher une maison d’édition de publier des textes que n’importe quel internaute peut dénicher gratuitement ?

À l’heure de la diffusion numérique massive, même des textes hors-domaine public, donc piratés, s’obtiennent sans difficulté sur internet.

Une violence inutile

Par chance, nous vivons dans une démocratie. Les seules violences exercées contre des porte-paroles d’idéologies jugées inacceptables le sont par des individus n’ayant aucun lien avec les pouvoirs publics. Malgré tout, cette approche fait partie du prisme répressif, du front luttant contre les idées d’Alain Soral et Dieudonné M’bala M’bala. Et comme les approches légales de la répression, il est important de souligner qu’elles sont parfaitement inutiles.

La violence, qu’elle soit légalement ou illégalement exercée, affaiblit difficilement les idées. Au contraire : celles-ci se nourrissent des réactions qu’elles engendrent, et se renforcent grâce aux actes engagés contre leurs porte-paroles.

Ainsi, les agressions d’Alain Soral et Dieudonné M’bala M’bala, les menaces qu’ils reçoivent et la pression exercée sur les "quenelleurs" sont prises comme des raisons supplémentaires de poursuivre leur combat. La radicalisation d’Alain Soral, par exemple, est postérieure à son agression en 2004, lors d’une dédicace, durant laquelle l’essayiste fut blessé au même titre que ses lecteurs.

Une répression contre-productive

Que l’on juge nauséabonde ou honorable une idéologie, celle-ci obéit à la même loi : ses défenseurs trouvent dans la répression une raison supplémentaire de tenir tête à leurs adversaires.

Les démocrates et les défenseurs de l’ordre républicain devraient se rappeler qu’il y a bien plus d’utilité et de noblesse à défendre l’expression libre d’idées avec lesquelles nous ne sommes pas d’accord. L’Histoire devrait également leur rappeler que le marteau du juge, la matraque du policier ou la barre de fer du militant violent n’ont jamais réussi à arrêter des idées, nauséabondes ou non.

Face aux idées, il ne peut y avoir que des idées. La condamnation systématique et aveugle, la haine comme moteur de l’action politique et la mystification de l’adversaire ne sont que des pratiques inefficaces et désuètes. Au mieux, elles troublent le jeu démocratique ; au pire, elles renforcent ceux qu’elles comptaient combattre.

Voir aussi:

Ca part en quenelle

Louis-Marie Horeau

Le Canard enchainé

31 décembre 2013

Il se marre. Il se bidonne, il s’éclate, Dieudonné ! La polémique sur la possible interdiction de son show a refait le plein de carburant pour sa petite machine à haine, et à cash. Le ministre de l’Intérieur va demander aux préfets d’invoquer un risque de «trouble à l’ordre public ».

« Trouble à l’ordre public » ?

C’est presque la Légion d’honneur qui lui est ainsi décernée. Dieudonné se nourrit du «trouble» et conchie l’ «ordre public », qui n’est, pour lui, que l’ordre sioniste, l’ordre des Juifs, l’ordre du « système ».

Ses fans s’enflamment : si Dieudonné est ainsi menacé, c’est bien qu’il dérange ! Et qu’il vise juste ! Car le public qui se presse pour assister à son spectacle a évolué, au fil des années, suivant docilement la trajectoire de l’« artiste». Ce n’est plus l’humoriste que l’on va voir pour rigoler un bon coup. C’est le provocateur. C’est l’«antisystème ».

A chaque dérapage antisémite, l’assistance est parcourue par le délicieux frisson de l’interdit. Le sommet est atteint quand Dieudonné se lâche et reprend dans un sketche les termes d’une plainte déposée par son avocat. « La sodomie ne pouvant être réalisée sur des restes calcinés de corps humains sortis des fours crématoires nazis, et pire encore après qu’ils aient été transformés en savon…» Applaudissements.

Il faut une solide dose d’aveuglement, ou plutôt de mauvaise foi, pour ne pas traduire correctement le mot « système ». Si le monde va comme il va, c’est parce que les Juifs le font tourner. Il ne s’agit pas seulement d ‘ une vulgaire déclaration raciste. C’est une lecture de l’Histoire : la lecture des nazis.

D’ailleurs, la filiation est assumée, avec cette fameuse «quenelle». Ce geste est celui du Docteur Folamour, dans le film du même nom. Incapable de réfréner le salut nazi que fait compulsivement son bras droit, le héros est obligé de le bloquer avec la main gauche. Le gag de Kubrick a fait florès. Mille fois répété, bien avant que Dieudonné s’en saisisse, sa signification est parfaitement claire : je suis nazi, mais je ne dois pas l’exprimer. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre de recenser les lieux choisis par les fans qui se font photographier en pleine quenelle et adressent le cliché au site Internet de Dieudonné : le mémorial de la Shoah à Berlin, la voie ferrée menant à Auschwitz, l’école de Toulouse où Merah a tué des enfants juifs… Rien d’antisémite dans ces choix! Ceux qui font mine de s’interroger sur la portée du geste se foutent du monde. Et ils font rigoler Dieudonné.

Ce ne sont pas quelques arrêtés d’interdiction qui vont l’empêcher de se marrer. Toutes les tentatives dans ce sens se sont heurtées au droit et ont été annulées par les tribunaux administratifs . Le régime de la censure préalable n’a plus le droit de cité en France, et c’est heureux . En revanche, la justice a son mot à dire. Et elle le dit : plusieurs condamnations ont déjà été prononcées, d’autres sont à venir. Et Dieudonné rigole toujours. Il rigole parce que les poursuites sont engagées par des particuliers ou des associations. Les procureurs de la République roupillent. La Chancellerie regarde ailleurs, la ministre de la Justice se tait.

Tiens ? Où est-elle passée, Christiane Taubira, en pleine tourmente Dieudonné ? Quelles instructions a-t-elle données aux parquets généraux ? Il y a de quoi rire, en effet, quand on sait qu’aucune des condamnations déjà prononcées n’a été exécutée . Dieudonné se marre, et il y a de quoi. Le ministre de l’Intérieur se fâche, et il a raison, mais il est impuissant. La ministre qui pourrait agir est aux abonnés absents . Une idée de sketch pour le prochain spectacle ?

Voir également:

Dieudonné et sa "quenelle" : lettre à mes amis (encore) fans de l’humoriste

Thomas Carre-Pierrat

Le Nouvel observateur

28-12-2013

Vous êtes encore quelques-uns, dans mon entourage, à vouloir rigoler des blagues de Dieudonné. Pendant longtemps, il fut l’un de nos comiques préférés, pour ne pas dire le premier. Il était assurément l’humoriste le plus doué de sa génération ; un comédien génial et un auteur d’exception.

Comme vous, je suis encore capable de réciter certains de ses sketchs par cœur. Mais voilà, cela fait un moment que "Dieudo", comme vous l’appelez encore, ne me fait plus marrer. En fait, j’ai décroché le jour où j’ai compris qu’il se moquait ouvertement de nous.

Dieudonné a basculé dans la mouvance d’extrême droite

Malheureusement, Dieudonné n’est plus un provocateur, un type subversif qui utilisent l’humour pour taper où cela fait mal. Il est devenu un homme politique qui se sert de ses spectacles pour diffuser des idées qui nous ulcèrent par ailleurs.

Dans un souci de cohérence, j’ai dû arrêter de le soutenir car je ne pouvais plus cautionner un mec qui traîne dans la nébuleuse de l’extrême droite et fréquente des hauts responsables du Front national, ce parti contre lequel nous avons si souvent usé nos souliers.

Essayez de répondre franchement et de manière convaincante aux questions suivantes : comment peut-on apprécier un type qui était venu consoler Jean-Marie Le Pen après sa défaite à la présidentielle en 2007 ? A-t-on envie de s’asseoir sur les bancs de son théâtre qui a servi de salle de formation pour des militants du Front National ? Est-il vraiment drôle et subversif de choisir Jean-Marie Le Pen pour être le parrain de sa fille ? Auriez-vous envie comme Dieudonné, d’aller boire des coups avec Serge Ayoub, l’un des leaders des skinheads français, après la mort du militant antifasciste Clément Méric ?

La vérité est tristement factuelle. Dieudonné est aujourd’hui un militant d’extrême droite. Cela ne signifie pas que vous l’êtes également. Mais, lorsque vous regardez ses spectacles, un certain nombre de vos voisins viennent précisément pour cette raison.

Car eux, ont bien compris que Dieudonné ne blaguait pas sur les juifs comme il est capable de le faire avec les musulmans, les catholiques ou les bouddhistes. Ils savent que Dieudonné est passé, au fil du temps, d’antisioniste à antisémite. Il fait partie de ces gens qui croient réellement en l’existence d’un lobby juif dont nous serions les frêles marionnettes.

Un humoriste qui vous coupe l’appétit

Le seul trait de génie dont on peut encore créditer Dieudonné, est précisément de s’appuyer sur cette ambiguïté entre l’humoriste et le politique pour faire passer un message purement et banalement antisémite. En cela, et pour le paraphraser, Dieudonné est la branche comique de l’extrême droite.

Je préfère le répéter une nouvelle fois ; cela ne signifie pas, chers amis, que vous seriez également d’extrême droite, de la même manière que bien des "quenelles" n’ont aucun soubassement antisémite.

Mais, en participant à cela, vous cautionnez son combat nauséabond et vous faites prospérer la boutique de Dieudonné et de ses nouveaux camarades.

Comment peut-on critiquer, à juste titre, les hommes politiques qui stigmatisent les étrangers, les musulmans ou les Roms pour chasser sur les terres du FN et continuer d’applaudir un mec qui mange déjà à la table des Le Pen ? Personnellement, cela me coupe définitivement l’appétit.

Le "système" n’est pas l’ennemi de Dieudonné mais son gagne-pain

En réalité, Dieudonné vous a fait cocu avec l’extrême-droite et vous continuez à fermer les yeux parce que vous aimez son image de rebelle, pourfendeur du "système". Désolé de vous décevoir là-aussi, mais Dieudonné n’est qu’un rebelle de supermarché, un provocateur de bac à sable.

Franchement, peut-on se présenter comme un adversaire du "système" et se faire prendre en photo avec des Yannick Noah, Tony Parker ou Mamadou Sakho, c’est-à-dire des millionnaires, purs produits du système et dont la conscience politique est comparable à l’érudition de Nabilla.

Si vous souhaitez éveiller vos consciences, ou lutter contre l’ordre établi, je vous recommande plutôt de lire des livres de Noam Chomsky ou Naomi Klein. Leurs œuvres sont moins drôles, mais légèrement plus pertinentes et argumentés que les saillies inutiles de Dieudonné.

Le "système" n’est pas l’ennemi de Dieudonné mais son gagne-pain. Dans la plus pure tradition de l’extrême droite, il joue sur les peurs et les indignations de son public en lui livrant un bouc-émissaire éternel, le prétendu lobby juif. En plus d’avoir perdu son sens de l’humour, Dieudonné est un piètre penseur sans idée et dont l’idéologie ne procède que d’un délire paranoïaque.

Il faut tourner définitivement la page

L’humoriste Dieudonné est malheureusement mort et il faut être capable d’en faire son deuil. Comme tous les grands, il est irremplaçable. Sa pathétique réincarnation qui s’agite au Théâtre de la Main d’or est épouvantable. Malgré les légères ressemblances, il est vain de vouloir le défendre. Il n’y a plus rien à faire si ce n’est tourner définitivement la page.

Plus que d’éventuelles interdictions des pouvoirs publics ou de sanctions judiciaires qui le maintiendraient confortablement dans sa position de victime, Dieudonné doit être condamné par son public.

Chers amis, en cette fin d’année, prenez une bonne résolution : cessez de rire aux sketches de ce personnage car, à chacun de vos applaudissements, derrière la scène, c’est l’extrême droite qui se frotte les mains.

Voir également:

Les «quenelles» de Dieudonné laissent un sale goût

Guillaume Gendron

Libération

12 septembre 2013

RÉCIT

Le salut inventé par l’humoriste condamné pour antisémitisme a essaimé sur le Web. Des sanctions contre deux soldats qui ont reproduit le geste vont être prises.

Main ouverte près de l’épaule, bras opposé tendu vers le bas, paume ouverte et doigts joints, les deux militaires posent devant une synagogue, rue de Montevidéo, dans le XVIe arrondissement de Paris. Tout sourire, les deux chasseurs alpins en mission Vigipirate dans la capitale reproduisent le geste dit de la «quenelle», dont la paternité est revendiquée par l’humoriste controversé Dieudonné, poursuivi et condamné à plusieurs reprises pour des propos antisémites. La photo, qui circule depuis quelques semaines sur les réseaux sociaux après sa publication sur un site «antisioniste», a provoqué l’ire de Jean-Yves Le Drian, le ministre de la Défense, qui a réclamé mardi des sanctions à l’encontre des deux militaires. «Ils ont porté atteinte à l’uniforme et aux valeurs de l’armée de terre», a fait savoir, hier, Pierre Bayle, porte-parole du ministère de la Défense, qui a envoyé un «rappel au règlement à l’ensemble des personnels».

Totem. Depuis la diffusion du cliché par le magazine le Point en début de semaine, plusieurs autres photos de soldats «glissant des quenelles», selon l’expression consacrée par Dieudonné, avaient fait surface. Une source militaire parle même «d’un phénomène de mode», invisible aux yeux du grand public mais loin de se limiter aux rangs de l’armée. Bras d’honneur «bien profond dans le cul du système» pour ses ouailles ou ersatz de salut nazi à peine déguisé pour ses détracteurs, la «quenelle» de Dieudonné est à la fois un signe de ralliement et un message subliminal. Comme les ananas, autre totem des dieudonâtres faisant référence à la chanson Shoahnanas (un détournement antisémite de la chanson Cho Ka Ka O d’Annie Cordy pour laquelle il a été condamné fin 2012), la quenelle est d’autant plus réussie quand elle passe inaperçue aux yeux des profanes et des principales cibles de la vindicte dieudonesque. Soit les «sionistes», les médias et «le système».

Code. D’année en année, parallèlement à l’ostracisation plus ou moins orchestrée de l’humoriste enchaînant les dérapages, la quenelle s’est répandue sur la fachosphère. Quitte à être reprise par des milliers d’anonymes et des personnalités qui n’en mesurent pas totalement la symbolique, à l’image d’un Tony Parker immortalisé en compagnie de Dieudonné dans les coulisses du théâtre de la Main d’or ou du footballeur montpellierain Mathieu Deplagne après avoir marqué un but. «La quenelle est avant tout un code identitaire, qui a acquis une vraie popularité chez les jeunes. Difficile de dire que tous aient conscience de la portée de ce geste», estime Jean-Yves Camus, spécialiste de l’extrême droite. Le politologue définit cependant le groupe hétéroclite de fans de Dieudonné comme «une mouvance transversale, antisystème et complotiste, dont l’antisémitisme reste la colonne vertébrale. Leur vision du monde est celle d’un ordre mondial dominé par l’axe Washington-Tel-Aviv. Derrière les discours fustigeant l’Otan et la finance internationale, tout en soutenant Bachar al-Assad et Hugo Chávez, il y a la conviction qu’au fond, ce sont les Juifs qui tirent les ficelles.»

Les origines du geste sont floues, sans cesse réinventées par son géniteur. En revanche, son usage systématique lors des apparitions publiques de Dieudonné date de la «liste antisioniste», qu’il a présentée en Ile-de-France lors des européennes de 2009, au côté d’Alain Soral, ex-plume de Jean-Marie Le Pen, devenu gourou idéologique de l’humoriste. A l’époque, Dieudonné se réjouissait à «l’idée de glisser [sa] petite quenelle dans le fond du fion du sionisme», comme il l’avait déclaré à Libération. Aujourd’hui, la quenelle se veut «révolutionnaire».

Dans une vidéo postée sur YouTube le 20 août et vue 385 000 fois, Dieudonné, écharpe du Hamas au cou, se délecte de la popularité exponentielle du geste, feignant d’être dépassé par son succès. «Je ne pensais pas que le mouvement de la quenelle irait aussi loin. Aujourd’hui, cet acte subversif ne m’appartient plus, il appartient à la révolution.» S’ensuit un montage photo de «quenelles glissées» par des jeunes, des vieux, des pompiers, des syndicalistes. On retrouve le geste sur des photos de classe et de mariage. D’autres, prises devant des synagogues en France ou à l’étranger et jusqu’au mémorial de la Shoah à Berlin, ne cachent pas leur sous-texte antisémite. Climax de la vidéo, des policiers et militaires en tenue. Hilare, Dieudonné se met à «rêver d’un coup d’Etat au secours du peuple, comme en Egypte». Avec la condamnation du ministère de la Défense, la polémique dépasse désormais le cercle des initiés. Et ce débat amène certains, à l’instar du journaliste Jean-Laurent Cassely, à s’inquiéter d’une éventuelle «dieudonisation des esprits».

Voir encore:

La dieudonnisation des esprits, une (grosse) quenelle qui vient d’en bas

Jean-Laurent Cassely

Slate

27/06/2013

Un reportage de juin 2013. Le soir de la fête de la musique, Dieudonné tenait son grand meeting annuel, «Le Bal des Quenelles», entre festival d’humour et université d’été politique. Grâce à un ensemble de signes cryptés, il a formé en dix ans une petite contre-culture autour de lui: vous l’avez vu récemment dans Top Chef, Secret Story ou encore Pékin Express… Sans même le savoir.

Manuel Valls, le ministre de l’Intérieur, souhaite faire interdire les spectacles de Dieudonné. Dans une interview au Parisien, Manuel Valls rappelle que «Dieudonné a été condamné à plusieurs reprises pour diffamation, injures et provocation à la haine raciale». «C’est donc un récidiviste et j’entends agir avec la plus grande fermeté, dans le cadre de la loi» déclare-t-il. Nous republions à cette occasion le reportage de Jean-Laurent Cassely à l’un des spectacles de Dieudonné.

***

Un automobiliste roulant le 21 juin dans les environs de Saint-Lubin-de-la-Haye, à la limite de l’Ile-de-France et de la région Centre, serait tombé ce soir-là sur de petits panneaux indiquant la simple mention «quenelles» en bord de route, près d’un élevage bovin.

Il aurait peut-être cru qu’il s’agissait d’une vente directe de cette spécialité, mais aurait tiqué en se souvenant que c’est plutôt vers Lyon qu’on apprécie ce plat. Quelques virages plus loin, l’automobiliste aurait alors croisé, entassés dans une petite voiture, des jeunes brandissant des ananas depuis les fenêtres, ce qui leur procurait manifestement une très grande excitation.

Songeur, notre automobiliste imaginaire aurait alors continué sa route, s’interrogeant sur les mœurs curieuses de cette partie calme et isolée du pays. Sans se douter une seconde qu’à quelques kilomètres de là, la «Dieudosphère» tenait son grand rassemblement annuel.

C’est à cela qu’on reconnaît que Dieudonné a construit, patiemment et avec obstination, une petite contre-société, qui dispose désormais de signes de reconnaissance et de communication très sûrs, car totalement ésotériques pour le profane, mais très visibles même dans les médias les plus grand public.

Ananas, soleil, quenelle: une grammaire de la dieudosphère

La quenelle est, si on ose dire, le bras armé de l’idéologie de Dieudonné. Tout à la fois running gag, symbole politique et bras d’honneur dirigé contre ceux «d’en haut», «glisser une quenelle» consiste à placer sa main ouverte sur son bras opposé, à allonger se dernier pour faire un signe dont la signification est explicite. La référence au salut hitlérien est évidemment volontaire.

On a vu d’ailleurs apparaître ces «quenelles» dans le cadre de la campagne du Parti antisioniste, dont il fut l’éphémère tête de liste en Ile de France aux européennes de 2009, sur une affiche électorale dont l’ambiguïté n’était pas vraiment de mise…

La quenelle se décline en plusieurs tailles, à jauger en fonction du succès de l’action: petite quenelle, quenelle de 12, quenelle de 40, de 175, quenelle épaulée, etc. Plus la quenelle est longue, plus, bien entendu, le bras d’honneur est profond et procure satisfaction à son auteur. Un registre paillard qui rappelle un peu le slogan de Coluche lors de la présidentielle de 1981, pour laquelle il décidera finalement de se retirer: «Tous ensemble, pour leur foutre au cul». La cible n’est évidemment plus la même.

Quant à l’ananas, décliné tout au long de la soirée sous de multiples formes (ananas frais au buffet, fresque géante devant la salle, tee-shirts souvenir, déguisements, etc.), il est omniprésent pour rappeler la cause de la condamnation de l’intéressé pour provocation à la haine: la chanson Shoananas, qu’il reprend en cœur avec son public lors de chaque spectacle, sur l’air de la chanson Chaud Cacao d’Annie Cordy (Dieudonné a fait appel du jugement).

Depuis cette condamnation, la chanson Shoananas est le clou du spectacle Foxtrot, qui a tourné dans toute la France ces derniers mois. A chaque fois, Dieudonné fait mine de ne plus pouvoir la faire chanter à son public, sous peine de poursuites judiciaires… Et, bien sûr, finit par l’interpréter, pour le plus grand plaisir de la salle qui chante en choeur avec lui.

A l’entrée du Bal des quenelles, une fresque géante d’ananas donne le ton…

Le troisième signe de ralliement important qui, avec la quenelle et l’ananas, forme la trinité de la terminologie officielle, c’est l’expression «Au-dessus, c’est le soleil». Traduction: on s’attaque à la chose la plus haute, la plus sacrée possible (la Shoah, mais cela peut aussi s’appliquer à Bernard-Henri Levy ou à Mahmoud Ahmadinejad).

Cette phrase peut-être prononcée, imprimée sur tee-shirt, ou encore simplement mimée (il suffit pour cela de tenir son doigt en l’air comme pointé vers le soleil, en mimant avec la bouche une sorte de bisou pour en faire une caricature de rabin).

Un gif animé qui capture la gestuelle caractéristique du «Soleil». Mémorisez-là, c’est utile pour la suite de l’article

Quant à la quenelle à proprement parler, elle se décline en signes, en tee-shirts, en logos détournés. Elle est devenue une unité de langage. La voici parodiant le logo de Facebook, «réseau social sioniste».

Source: Dieudosphère

A l’entrée du Bal des quenelles, qui se déroule chaque année dans le vaste hangar où l’artiste tourne ses films, les fans venus de loin immortalisent ce moment en se faisant prendre en photo entre deux humains déguisés en ananas, mimant la fameuse quenelle. Un peu comme à Disneyland, quand Mickey ou Pluto viennent prendre la pose avec vos enfants…

Deux des trois signes codés de la dieudosphère: l’ananas et la quenelle, ici au Bal des quenelles 2013

Prendre la pose en mimant une quenelle est devenu un rituel chez les admirateurs de Dieudonné. Pour ce dernier, les quenelles sont un instrument politique: en demandant à ses fans de lui envoyer les photos et en les postant sur le mur de son compte Facebook officiel, il veut montrer à quel point il est soutenu par la base.

Ici à Strasbourg, la quenelle géante à laquelle le public est invité à participer en fin de spectacle se présente comme la défense de la liberté d’expression, et un bras d’honneur aux maires qui tentent de faire interdire le spectacle pour trouble à l’ordre public

Un public jeune et mélangé

Les gens sont venus nombreux: en couple, entre amis, la plupart se sont retrouvés à la gare voisine d’Houdan, d’où l’équipe de Dieudonné indiquait la route pour se rendre sur place, l’information n’étant pas disponible sur les billets sans doute pour éviter de voir la fête troublée par des opposants. De sympathiques jeunes gens m’ont amené en voiture jusqu’à la salle. D’ailleurs presque tous les participants sont jeunes.

Derrière moi, dans la queue pour accéder au buffet, deux très jeunes musulmans discutent du «Prophète», de ce qu’il autorise et ce qu’il interdit en matière d’alimentation, de culture, etc. Certains jeunes issus de l’immigration qui vivent leur revival religieux peuvent être naturellement séduits par les combats politiques de Dieudonné autour de la question palestinienne (ne me demandez pas de quantifier cette affirmation, évidemment nous n’en savons rien).

La recherche d’une vérité alternative basée sur un relativisme généralisé —le monde selon Dieudonné— a fini par séduire des populations hétéroclites. Tout un petit peuple de rastas blancs, qu’on imaginerait plutôt dans un festival reggae ou une free party. Une frange de l’extrême gauche altermondialiste, qu’on reconnaîtra facilement au port du tee-shirt à l’effigie d’Hugo Chavez ou au total look joueur de diabolo à Rennes. On supposera que cette jeunesse est plutôt arrivée là par le biais de la critique radicale des médias, de l’oligarchie et du «nouvel ordre mondial» que par le prisme du conflit israélo-palestinien, encore que les deux logiques aient tendance à s’entrecroiser.

Des partisans de Bachar el-Assad brandissant des drapeaux syriens et des portraits à l’effigie du dictateur sont d’ailleurs venus recevoir leur «Quenelle d’or» (catégorie «pour l’ensemble de son œuvre»), la petite statuette inspirée des César que Dieudonné distribue lors de ce bal annuel à ses soutiens ou à ceux qui partagent ses combats. Selon le site révisionniste Entre la plume et l’enclume, la quenelle sera d’ailleurs remise en mains propres au président syrien.

Quelques authentiques militants d’extrême droite, qui regrettent l’absence du négationniste Faurisson, sont aussi présents mais ne semblent pas représenter la majorité du public… En revanche on retrouve dans ces soirées les animateurs du réseau qui sont désormais des relais artistiques sur internet de la pensée «antisioniste», selon l’expression consacrée: le Jamel Comedy Club de Dieudonné. Car en un peu plus d’une décennie, Dieudonné a fait école.

Très présents sur Internet, ils publient des BD, des pamphlets ou des vidéos, comme les dessinateurs Zéon et Joe Lecorbeau —un «glisseur de quenelles» qui réalise des détournements dieudonniens de BD célèbres comme Astérix ou Tintin— ou sont actifs dans l’écriture et l’idéologie, comme Salim Laïbi (alias «Le libre penseur») et Alain Soral bien sûr —dit «Maître quenellier», distinction qu’il est le seul à partager avec Dieudonné.

La première partie était assurée par le comique Jo Damas, et par le régisseur des spectacles de Dieudonné, l’acteur Jacky Sigaux, célèbre pour son rôle du juif déporté dans les précédents spectacles du comédien, et qui est monté sur scène dans le personnage de «Samuel» pour se lancer dans une lamentation musicale intitulée «Je suis juif». Personnage copieusement hué par la salle.

Dieudonnisation médiatique ou l’entrisme de la quenelle

Mais ce «Dieudonnisme», que vous croyiez ne plus avoir aperçu dans les médias depuis un sketch chez Marc-Olivier Fogiel devant Jamel Debbouze en 2003, a su faire grimper son influence à la télévision, par des moyens souvent détournés et grâce à ses petites quenelles:

Le 23 janvier 2013, le footballeur de Montpellier Mathieu Deplagne marque son premier but en pro face au FC Sochaux. Pour son petit geste de parade, le footballeur mime alors une «quenelle». Le lendemain, il fait la une de Midi Libre.

Il est venu, le 21 juin, récupérer sa Quenelle d’Or, «catégorie sportive», des mains de Dieudonné.

Les sportifs sont, à l’image de Tony Parker, nombreux à effectuer ces clins d’oeil à l’humoriste.

Ci-dessous, Didier Dinart et Nikola Karabatic de l’équipe de France de hand.

Source: Facebook Dieudonné officiel

… Et oui, Yannick Noah aussi

Dans les émissions de téléréalité aussi, Dieudonné fait des apparitions fréquentes grâce à l’astuce de ses fans.

Sur TF1, dans l’émission Bienvenue chez nous du 20 juin, un jeune homme est apparu portant un tee-shirt «Au-dessus c’est le soleil».

Réaction de joie immédiate sur la page Facebook de Dieudonné:

«En direct sur TF1 ça glisse de la quenelle !!»

Et réactions enchantées du public:

Un peu plus tôt dans le mois, c’est cette fois l’équipe de la saison 2013 de Pékin Express (M6) qui pose en faisant une quenelle. Et il n’est pas inintéressant de reprendre la description que fait un blog pro-Dieudonné des participants, en tout point conforme au type de population que l’on trouvait au Bal des quenelles, c’est-à-dire des profils de classes moyennes et populaires.

«Denis (28 ans, comptable) & Julie (30 ans, chargée de communication), deux corses/ Linda & Salim (Un couple. Ils ont tout deux 33 ans et sont techniciens)/ Fabien (26 ans, barman et mannequin) & Tarik (51 ans, chanteur) : Père et fils.»

Le 5 mars 2013, c’était un candidat de Top Chef, l’émission culinaire star de M6, qui faisait une référence à Dieudonné en citant la phrase «Au-dessus, c’est le soleil». Mais est-ce vraiment une référence volontaire? Difficile à dire (à 2’56 dans la vidéo).

En 2010, c’est une équipe de candidats de l’émission Secret Story qui, interrogée lors d’un des appartés face caméra pour commenter les derniers épisodes, affirme avoir glissé une grosse quenelle à ses concurrents. Benjamin Castaldi lui-même reprend la formulation sur le plateau.

Sur Internet, les forums proches de l’humoriste exultent devant l’ironie de la situation. La principale chaîne du système vient de rendre un hommage appuyé bien qu’involontaire à l’humoriste le plus boycotté de France. Qui plus est, Secret Story est produit par Endemol, la société d’Arthur, ennemi juré de Dieudonné. L’archive a été rapidement supprimée, mais elle est encore visionnable sur le site russe Rutube.

Le niveau de conscience politique des multiples candidats de téléréalité qui citent du Dieudonné est difficile à évaluer, bien entendu (leur niveau de conscience tout court, peut-être, aussi). Mais le phénomène est bien réel.

Est-ce vraiment surprenant? Le dernier spectacle de Dieudonné, Foxtrot, a fait le plein des Zenith de France, réunissant 2 à 4.000 spectateurs par ville. Posté le 18 juin sur YouTube, ce dernier avait, le 23, été visionné près de 300.000 fois (vidéo aujourd’hui retirée). Quant au grand raout annuel des troupes, le Bal des quenelles, l’édition 2013 a écoulé toutes ses places, et il est raisonnable d’estimer l’affluence à un petit millier de personnes.

L’activité protéiforme de Dieudonné et sa capacité à se placer simultanément sur plusieurs tableaux constitue un phénomène assez nouveau. Il se passe bien quelque chose, mais on ne sait pas encore vraiment quoi.

Voir de plus:

Quenelle de Dieudonné : la stupidité des élites juives

Stephane Haddad

Riposte laïque

31 décembre 2013

La Quenelle de Dieudonné a pris des proportions considérables et comme son inventeur antisémite, le proclame fièrement, « ça ne lui appartient plus, ça appartient à l’Histoire ».

Il convient de rappeler que ce geste est apparu il y a au moins 5 ans. Dieudonné a mis ce geste à toutes les sauces, en visant les politiques, les administrations, le gouvernement, les américains, les juifs, etc. Personne ne l’avait remarqué pour autre chose que sa façon de faire rire son public, de la même manière que chaque humoriste a ses marottes et ses postures pour être identifié et se démarquer.

Pour l’immense majorité des personnes, dont je suis, il pouvait être considéré comme un geste provocateur, vulgaire ou drôle selon l’humeur et l’humour de chacun, mais pas comme le salut nazi inversé. La meilleure preuve en est que, pendant des années, ce geste ne soulevait pas l’indignation qu’il provoque aujourd’hui, et n’avait pas gagné une popularité d’une telle ampleur.

Il a fallu qu’un esprit peu éclairé de la communauté, décide que c’était là le symbole du salut Nazi inversé pour lui donner à présent cette unique signification et que le phénomène prenne des proportions considérables et irrattrapables….

Il fallait qu’un esprit en mal de reconnaissance, qui se croyait plus intelligent que les autres, « shoatise » le geste, pour se faire remarquer ( ?), ou pour déclarer vouloir lutter contre Dieudonné alors qu’il y a bien d’autres moyens et raison de le combattre et de le critiquer (une des meilleures étant probablement d’aller sur son terrain, et de le moquer, en le caricaturant en grouillot lèche babouche de l’Iran et des islamistes ce que personne ne fait…).

Même si il est possible que Dieudonné ait eu cette idée dès la création de cette posture, elle ne faisait pas les ravages actuelles qu’elle provoque avant qu’elle soit requalifiée de la sorte. De surcroit, Dieudonné « surfant sur la vague du succès » a, à présent, légèrement modifié le geste en baissant un peu le niveau de la main, pour effectivement le rapprocher du salut nazi inversé.

En décrétant ce geste comme le symbole du mal absolu, cette personne a de façon évidente offert sa plus belle victoire à Dieudonné, un peu comme lorsque l’on ouvre un programme indésirable dans un ordinateur, et qu’un virus contamine tout le réseau. C’est un désastre.

Il y a de surcroit un effet pervers beaucoup plus redoutable qui a été réveillé.

A présent que ce geste s’est répandu dans toutes les cours de récréation, des milliers de personnes qui faisaient ce geste par amusement et qui ne pensaient pas du tout aux juifs (et oui, Mesdames, Messieurs du Crif, les juifs et la shoah n’occupent pas les pensées de tout le monde, tout le temps….), il est certain que toutes ces personnes pourront se dire « c’est à cause des juifs et d’Israël (bref des sionistes) que l’on ne peut plus rigoler, ils nous cassent les pieds » (et je reste poli…).

On sait déjà que la source originelle de l’antisémitisme vient du fait que le judaïsme a instauré pour l’humanité des principes de vie et de morale avec les dix commandements, et que ne plus obéir totalement à son désir, mais avoir des contraintes morales est nécessairement une atteinte à sa liberté (on n’est plus libre de tuer qui on veut, de voler ce qui nous plait, et l’on ne se sent plus aussi bien lorsque l’on pratique l’adultère….).

Le désastre, c’est qu’aujourd’hui, pour les centaines de milliers de fans de Dieudonné, il y a un onzième commandement : on ne va plus pouvoir rigoler et faire de bonnes blagues à cause des juifs, des sionistes et d’Israël. Raison de plus pour résister à ce nouveau « diktat moral des juifs » en continuant à faire ce geste…. Cette mise en exergue d’un geste qui n’était qu’un trait de vulgarité, a réveillé un immense caractère antisémite dans des milliers de cerveaux français, et bientôt européens….

La Quenelle de Dieudonné, ou quand ceux qui se considèrent comme « l’élite » de la communauté juive devraient apprendre à tourner sept fois leur langue dans la bouche avant de parler.

Voir par ailleurs:

Dieudonné est un signe annonciateur de ce qui vient

Guy Millière

Dreuz

02 jan 201

Dois-je l’écrire ? Je ne suis pas socialiste. J’ai eu l’occasion de critiquer de nombreuses fois ce gouvernement, et Manuel Valls. Mais quand Manuel Valls prend une position digne, je dis que Manuel Valls prend une position digne, je le dis. Et, en l’occurrence, je dis que Manuel Valls prend une position digne dans l’affaire Dieudonné.

J’ajoute que ceux qui invoquent la liberté de parole ou les principes inhérents au Premier amendement à la Constitution des Etats-Unis se trompent : il ne s’agit plus, en l’occurrence, de liberté de parole, mais d’incitations à la haine, et, sans doute, d’incitations au meurtre, voire d’incitation au génocide. C’est en tout cas dans cette catégorie que tombent les propos tenus par le principal intéressé concernant Patrick Cohen et les chambres à gaz. La liberté de parole ne couvre pas les incitations au meurtre, voire les incitations au génocide, qui peuvent faire l’objet de procédures judiciaires aux Etats-Unis, à juste titre à mes yeux. Dire « je suis raciste » est une chose (qui rentre dans la même catégorie que dire : je suis un salaud) : dire « ce serait bien de tuer les Noirs » est tout à fait une autre chose.

Je précise que ceux qui parlent de « spectacle » se trompent aussi : il ne s’agit plus de spectacle lorsque les propos qu’on tient sont emplis de connivences permettant aux racistes, aux antisémites, aux négationnistes, à ceux qui souhaitent la destruction génocidaire d’Israël de s’exciter ensemble et d’entendre de surcroît les incitations susdites.

Je souligne que les propos des dirigeants du Front National sur le sujet suffisent à montrer que décidément, le Front National continue à entretenir un rapport aux Juifs, au judaïsme et à Israël couvert de moisissures.

Je souligne aussi que les propos tenus de façon récurrente dur un site tel que Boulevard Voltaire montrent la dérive de ce site vers des positions qui sont celles d’une extrême droite qui ne me semble pas très fréquentable.

Publier des propos anti-israéliens comme il en traîne dans des publications déjà nombreuses n’a rien d’original. Faire de la publicité pour des livres radicalement anti-israéliens (tels « Le livre noir de l’occupation israélienne ») dans un contexte où des textes excusent ou édulcorent l’antisémitisme n’a rien de courageux.

Dans une société comme la société américaine, Dieudonné serait considéré comme si abject qu’il aurait déjà disparu de l’horizon, et se produirait devant des salles quasiment vides. Malgré Obama, les Etats-Unis restent un pays très imperméable à l’antisémitisme, et c’est ce qui en fait un pays qui reste plus sain que la France. On trouve aux Etats-Unis de la propagande « pro-palestinienne », sur les campus universitaires surtout, mais ceux qui disséminent cette propagande veillent soigneusement à éviter ce qui pourrait permettre de les accoler à des propagateurs de haine antisémite.

En France, l’abjection qu’incarne désormais Dieudonné remplit les salles, crée des réseaux, use de signes de ralliement prolongeant les connivences inhérentes aux spectacles. Les commentaires publiés après divers articles de presse montrent que l’antisémitisme remonte des égouts et traine désormais dans de nombreux caniveaux.

Parce qu’il prend position, avec courage, Meyer Habib, qui mène remarquablement un travail de vigilance contre l’antisémitisme et l’ « antisionisme », se voit incité à aller vivre en Israël.

Cela ne concerne pas toute la France, sinon Jean-Jacques Goldman et Patrick Bruel y seraient des marginaux, tout comme Gad Elmaleh ou Patrick Timsit, mais cela concerne néanmoins une part inquiétante de la population française : il existe en ce pays une nébuleuse fétide où se mêle une extrême droite porteuse de relents pétainistes, catholiques intégristes, nationalistes myopes, anti-israéliens et anti-américains, une extrême-gauche qui ne se distingue de l’extrême droite que parce qu’elle est favorable à l’islamisation du monde et à l’immigration sans contrôles, et, précisément, des courants islamiques eux-mêmes anti-israéliens et anti-américains. L’extrême droite camoufle son antisémitisme sous le manteau de l’ « antisionisme », qui est celui sous lequel s’abritent aussi extrême gauche et courants islamiques. Dieudonné trouve un public dans les divers composants de cette nébuleuse. Il suscite aussi chez des spectateurs de passage une accoutumance à certains parfums. Ces parfums sont ceux de la décomposition.

On n’arrêtera pas la décomposition en interdisant des spectacles. Mais si des vagues de révolte contre ce que signifient ces spectacles se lèvent, ce seront des vagues salubres. Et elles ont mon soutien.

On n’arrêtera pas le recours à certains gestes en interdisant ceux-ci. Mais faire un geste qui se trouve fait et photographié à Auschwitz, devant des synagogues, devant l’école juive de Toulouse où Merah a assassiné des enfants juifs, devant des photos d’Anne Frank, et j’en passe, c’est faire un geste lourd de sens et lourd de son poids de cadavres, et se voir traité comme un être infâme pour avoir fait ce geste est pleinement légitime. C’est se faire complice, par l’esprit, d’un crime contre l’humanité passé et de crimes contre l’humanité présents : ceux qui frappent des Israéliens et peuvent les frapper. Et que face à ce geste se lèvent aussi des vagues de révolte est sain et légitime.

Je crains, hélas, que Dieudonné soit l’un des signes annonciateurs de ce qui vient.

Je crains que des tendances plus denses et plus profondes soient à l’oeuvre en France.

Je crains que les amis de Manuel Valls, qui oeuvrent au sein du parti socialiste ne servent ces tendances, sans toujours savoir ce qu’ils font.

Je crains que les amis de Patrick Cohen qui oeuvrent au sein de la nomenklatura médiatique ne servent eux aussi ces tendances, sans eux-mêmes toujours savoir ce qu’ils font.

Je crains que nous ne soyons dans une époque très malsaine, et que cela ne s’arrange pas.

Des Français quittent la France chaque année, comme on quitte un navire qui glisse vers le naufrage : c’est un fait.

Des Juifs quittent la France chaque année parce qu’ils sentent ce qui passe dans l’air du temps : c’est un fait encore.

Je comprends ces départs.

Voir enfin:

The Move to Muzzle Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala

The Bête Noire of the French Establishment

Diana Johnstone

Counterpunch

Paris

French mainstream media and politicians are starting off the New Year with a shared resolution for 2014: permanently muzzle a Franco-African comedian who is getting to be too popular among young people.

In between Christmas and New Year’s Eve, no less than the President of the Republic, François Hollande, while visiting Saudi Arabia on (very big) business, said his government must find a way to ban performances by the comedian Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala, as called for by French Interior Minister, Manuel Valls.

The leader of the conservative opposition party, UMP, Jean-François Copé, immediately chimed in with his “total support” for silencing the unmanageable entertainer.

In the unanimous media chorus, the weekly Nouvel Observateur editorialized that Dieudonné is “already dead”, washed up, finished. Editors publicly disputed whether it was a better tactic to try to jail him for “incitement to racial hatred”, close his shows on grounds of a potential “threat to public order”, or put pressure on municipalities by threatening cultural subsidies with cuts if they allow him to perform.

The goal of national police boss Manuel Valls is clear, but the powers that be are groping for the method.

The dismissive cliché heard repeatedly is that “nobody laughs at Dieudonné any more”.

In reality, the opposite is true. And that is the problem. On his recent tour of French cities, videos show large, packed theaters roaring with laughter at their favorite humorist. He has popularized a simple gesture, which he calls the “quenelle”. It is being imitated by young people all over France. It simply and obviously means, we are fed up.

To invent a pretext for destroying Dieudonné, the leading Jewish organizations CRIF (Conseil Représentatif des Institutions Juives de France, the French AIPAC) and LICRA (Ligue internationale contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme, which enjoys special privileges under French law) have come up with a fantasy to brand Dieudonné and his followers as “Nazis”. The quenelle is all too obviously a vulgar gesture roughly meaning “up yours”, with one hand placed at the top of the other arm pointing down to signify “how far up” this is to be.

But for the CRIF and LICRA, the quenelle is “a Nazi salute in reverse”. (You can never be too “vigilant” when looking for the hidden Hitler.)

As someone has remarked, a “Nazi salute in reverse” might as well be considered anti-Nazi. If indeed it had anything to do with Heil Hitler. Which it clearly does not.

But world media are taking up this claim, at least pointing out that “some consider the quenelle to be a Nazi salute in reverse”. Never mind that those who use it have no doubt about what it means: F— the system!

But to what extent are the CRIF and LICRA “the system”?

France needs all the laughter it can get

French industry is vanishing, with factory shutdowns week after week. Taxes on low income citizens are going up, to save the banks and the euro. Disillusion with the European Union is growing. EU rules exclude any serious effort to improve the French economy. Meanwhile, politicians on the left and the right continue their empty speeches, full of clichés about “human rights” – largely as an excuse to go to war in the Middle East or rant against China and Russia. The approval rating of President Hollande has sunk to 15%. However people vote, they get the same policies, made in EU.

Why then are the ruling politicians focusing their wrath on “the most talented humorist of his generation” (as his colleagues acknowledge, even when denouncing him)?

The short answer is probably that Dieudonné’s surging popularity among young people illustrates a growing generation gap. Dieudonné has turned laughter against the entire political establishment. This has led to a torrent of abuse and vows to shut down his shows, ruin him financially and even put him in jail. The abuse also provides a setting for physical attacks against him. A few days ago, his assistant Jacky Sigaux was physically attacked in broad daylight by several masked men in front of the city hall of the 19th arrondissement – just opposite the Buttes Chaumont Park. He has lodged a complaint.

But how much protection is to be expected from a government whose Interior Minister, Manuel Valls – in charge of police – has vowed to seek ways to silence Dieudonné?

The story is significant but is almost certain to be badly reported outside France – just as it is badly reported inside France, the source of almost all foreign reports. In translation, a bit of garbling and falsehoods add to the confusion.

Why Do They Hate Him?

Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala was born in a Paris suburb nearly 48 years ago. His mother was white, from Brittany, his father was African, from Cameroun. This should make him a poster child for the “multiculturalism” the ideologically dominant left claims to promote. And during the first part of his career, teaming up with his Jewish friend, Elie Simoun, he was just that: campaigning against racism, focusing his criticism on the National Front and even running for office against an NF candidate in the dormitory town of Dreux, some sixty miles West of Paris, where he lives. Like the best humorists, Dieudonné always targeted current events, with a warmth and dignity unusual in the profession. His career flourished, he played in movies, was a guest on television, branched out on his own. A great observer, he excels at relatively subtle imitations of various personality types and ethnic groups from Africans to Chinese.

Ten years ago, on December 1, 2003, as guest on a TV show appropriately called “You Can’t Please Everybody”, dedicated to current events, Dieudonné came on stage roughly disguised as “a convert to Zionist extremism” advising others to get ahead by “joining the American-Israeli Axis of Good”. This was in the first year of the US assault on Iraq, which France’s refusal to join had led Washington to rechristen what it calls “French fries” (Belgian, actually) as “Freedom fries”. A relatively mild attack on George W. Bush’s “Axis of Evil” seemed totally in the mood of the times. The sketch ended with a brief salute, “Isra-heil”. This was far from being vintage Dieudonné, but nevertheless, the popular humorist was at the time enthusiastically embraced by other performers while the studio audience gave him a standing ovation.

Then the protests started coming in, especially concerning the final gesture seen as likening Israel to Nazi Germany.

“Anti-Semitism!” was the cry, although the target was Israel (and the United States as allies in the Middle East). Calls multiplied to ban his shows, to sue him, to destroy his career. Dieudonné attempted to justify his sketch as not targeting Jews as such, but, unlike others before him, would not apologize for an offense he did not believe he had committed. Why no protests from Africans he had made fun of? Or Muslims? Or Chinese? Why should a single community react with such fury?

Thus began a decade of escalation. LICRA began a long series of lawsuits against him (“incitement to racial hatred”), at first losing, but keeping up the pressure. Instead of backing down, Dieudonné went farther in his criticism of “Zionism” after each attack. Meanwhile, Dieudonné was gradually excluded from television appearances and treated as a pariah by mainstream media. It is only the recent internet profusion of images showing young people making the quenelle sign that has moved the establishment to conclude that a direct attack would be more effective than trying to ignore him.

The Ideological Background

To begin to understand the meaning of the Dieudonné affair, it is necessary to grasp the ideological context. For reasons too complex to review here, the French left – the left that once was primarily concerned with the welfare of the working class, with social equality, opposition to aggressive war, freedom of speech – has virtually collapsed. The right has won the decisive economic battle, with the triumph of policies favoring monetary stability and the interests of international investment capital (“neo-liberalism”). As a consolation prize, the left enjoys a certain ideological dominance, based on anti-racism, anti-nationalism and devotion to the European Union – even to the hypothetical “social Europe” that daily recedes into the cemetery of lost dreams. In fact, this ideology fits perfectly with a globalization geared to the requirements of international finance capital.

In the absence of any serious socio-economic left, France has sunk into a sort of “Identity Politics”, which both praises multiculturalism and reacts vehemently against “communitarianism”, that is, the assertion of any unwelcome ethnic particularisms. But some ethnic particularisms are less welcome than others. The Muslim veil was first banned in schools, and demands to ban it in adult society grow. The naqib and burka, while rare, have been legally banned. Disputes erupt over Halal foods in cafeterias, prayers in the street, while cartoons regularly lampoon Islam. Whatever one may think of this, the fight against communitarianism can be seen by some as directed against one particular community. Meanwhile, French leaders have been leading the cry for wars in Muslim countries from Libya to Syria, while insisting on devotion to Israel.

Meanwhile, another community is the object of constant solicitude. In the last twenty years, while religious faith and political commitment have declined drastically, the Holocaust, called the Shoah in France, has gradually become a sort of State Religion. Schools commemorate the Shoah annually, it increasingly dominates historical consciousness, which in other areas is declining along with many humanistic studies. In particular, of all the events in France’s long history, the only one protected by law is the Shoah. The so-called Gayssot Law bans any questioning of the history of the Shoah, an altogether unprecedented interference with freedom of speech. Moreover, certain organizations, such as LICRA, have been granted the privilege of suing individuals on the basis of “incitement to racial hatred” (very broadly and unevenly interpreted) with the possibility of collecting damages on behalf of the “injured community”. In practice, these laws are used primarily to prosecute alleged “anti-Semitism” or “negationism” concerning the Shoah. Even though they frequently are thrown out of court, such lawsuits constitute harassment and intimidation. France is the rare country where the BDS (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions) movement against Israeli settlement practices can also be attacked as “incitement to racial hatred”.

The violence-prone Jewish Defense League, outlawed in the United States and even in Israel, is known for smashing books shops or beating up isolated, even elderly, individuals. When identified, flight to Israel is a good way out. The victims of the JDL fail to inspire anything close to the massive public indignation aroused when a Jewish person falls victim to wanton violence. Meanwhile, politicians flock to the annual dinner of the CRIF with the same zeal that in the United States they flock to the dinner of AIPAC – not so much for campaign funds as to demonstrate their correct sentiments.

France has the largest Jewish population in Western Europe, which actually largely escaped the deportation during German occupation that expelled Jewish immigrants to concentration camps. In addition to an old, established Jewish population, there are many newcomers from North Africa. All this adds up to a very dynamic, successful population, numerous in the more visible and popular professions (journalism, show business, as well as science and medicine, among others).

Of all French parties, the Socialist Party (especially via the Israeli Labor Party of Shimon Peres in the Socialist International) has the closest historic ties with Israel. In the 1950s, when France was fighting against the Algerian national liberation movement, the French government (via Peres) contributed to the Israeli project of building nuclear weapons. Today it is not the Labor Party that rules Israel, but the far right. Hollande’s recent cozy trip to Benjamin Netanyahu showed that the rightward drift of policy in Israel has done nothing to strain relations – which seem closer than ever.

Yet this Jewish community is very small compared to the large number of Arab immigrants from North Africa or black immigrants from France’s former colonies in Africa. Several years ago, a leading Socialist Party intellectual, Pascal Boniface, cautiously warned party leaders that their heavy bias in favor of the Jewish community could eventually cause electoral problems. This statement in a political assessment document caused an uproar which nearly cost him his career.

But the fact remains: it is not hard for French people of Arab or African background to feel that the “communitarianism” that really has clout is the Jewish community.

The Political Uses of the Holocaust

Norman Finkelstein showed some time ago that the Holocaust can be exploited for less than noble purposes: such as extorting funds from Swiss banks. However, in France the situation is very different. No doubt, constant reminders of the Shoah serve as a sort of protection for Israel from the hostility aroused by its treatment of the Palestinians. But the religion of the Holocaust has another, deeper political impact with no direct relation to the fate of the Jews.

More than anything else, Auschwitz has been interpreted as the symbol of what nationalism leads to. Reference to Auschwitz has served to give a bad conscience to Europe, and notably to the French, considering that their relatively small role in the matter was the result of military defeat and occupation by Nazi Germany. Bernard-Henri Lévy, the writer whose influence has grown to grotesque proportions in recent years (he led President Sarkozy into war against Libya), began his career as ideologue by claiming that “fascism” is the genuine “French ideology”. Guilt, guilt, guilt. By placing Auschwitz as the most significant event of recent history, various writers and speakers justify by default the growing power of the European Union as necessary replacement for Europe’s inherently “bad” nations. Never again Auschwitz! Dissolve the nation-states into a technical bureaucracy, free of the emotional influence of citizens who might vote incorrectly. Do you feel French? Or German? You should feel guilty about it – because of Auschwitz.

Europeans are less and less enthusiastic about the EU as it ruins their economies and robs them of all democratic power over the economy. They can vote for gay marriage, but not for the slightest Keynesian measure, much less socialism. Nevertheless, guilt about the past is supposed to keep them loyal to the European dream.

Dieudonné’s fans, judging from photographs, appear to be predominantly young men, fewer women, mostly between the ages of twenty and thirty. They were born two full generations after the end of World War II. They have spent their lives hearing about the Shoah. Over 300 Paris schools bear a plaque commemorating the tragic fate of Jewish children deported to Nazi concentration camps. What can be the effect of all this? For many who were born long after these terrible events, it seems that everyone is supposed to feel guilty – if not for what they didn’t do, for what they supposedly might do if they had a chance.

When Dieudonné transformed an old semi-racist “tropical” song, Chaud Cacao, into Shoah Ananas, the tune is taken up en masse by Dieudonné fans. I venture to think that they are not making fun of the real Shoah, but rather of the constant reminders of events that are supposed to make them feel guilty, insignificant and powerless. Much of this generation is sick of hearing about the period 1933-1945, while their own future is dim.

Nobody Knows When to Stop

Last Sunday, a famous football player of Afro-Belgian origin, Nicolas Anelka, who plays in the UK, made a quenelle sign after scoring a goal – in solidarity with this friend Dieudonné M’Bala M’Bala. With this simple and basically insignificant gesture, the uproar soared to new heights.

In the French parliament, Meyer Habib represents “overseas French” – some 4,000 Israelis of French origin. On Monday he twittered: “Anelka’s quenelle is intolerable! I will introduce a bill to punish this new Nazi salute practiced by anti-Semites.”

France has adopted laws to “punish anti-Semitism”. The result is the opposite. Such measures simply tend to confirm the old notion that “the Jews run the country” and contribute to growing anti-Semitism. When French youth see a Franco-Israeli attempt to outlaw a simple gesture, when the Jewish community moves to ban their favorite humorist, anti-Semitism can only grow even more rapidly.

Yet in this escalation, the relationship of forces is very uneven. A humorist has words as his weapons, and fans who may disperse when the going gets rough. On the other side is the dominant ideology, and the power of the State.

In this sort of clash, civic peace depends on the wisdom of those with most power to show restraint. If they fail to do so, this can be a game with no winners.


Diversité: L’enfer, c’est les autres, mais j’ai besoin des oeufs ! (Hell is other people, but I need the eggs ! – How diversity is eating away at trust)

1 décembre, 2013
http://consumertraveler.com/wp-content/uploads/In-God-.jpghttp://edge.liveleak.com/80281E/ll_a_s/2013/Oct/23/LiveLeak-dot-com-f83_1382554898-USHasSpent37TrillionOnWelfareOverPast5Yearsprev.jpg?d5e8cc8eccfb6039332f41f6249e92b06c91b4db65f5e99818badf93454dddd05891&ec_rate=230Mais, quand le Fils de l’homme viendra, trouvera-t-il la foi sur la terre? Jésus (Luc 18: 8)
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10: 34-36)
Je pensais à cette vieille blague, vous savez, ce-ce-ce type va chez un psychiatre et dit : « Doc, euh, mon frère est fou. Il se prend pour un poulet. » Et, euh, le docteur dit : « Et bien, pourquoi ne le faites-vous pas enfermer ? » Et le type dit : « J’aimerais bien, mais j’ai besoin des œufs. » Et bien, je crois que c’est ce que je ressens au sujet des relations. Vous savez, elles sont totalement irrationnelles et folles et absurdes et… mais, euh, je crois qu’on continue parce que, euh, la plupart d’entre nous ont besoin des œufs…  Woody Allen
Nous venons de terminer le cinquième exercice depuis que le président Obama a pris ses fonctions. Durant ces cinq années, le gouvernement fédéral a dépensé un total de 3,7  mille milliard de dollars pour environ 80 programmes sous condition de ressources différents contre la pauvreté et de protection sociale. La caractéristique commune des programmes d’aide sous condition de ressources est qu’ils sont gradués par apport au revenu d’une personne et que, contrairement aux programmes tels que la sécurité sociale ou l’assurance-maladie, ils sont un avantage gratuit sans aucune contribution du bénéficiaire. La somme énorme dépensée pourl’assistance sous condition de ressources est près de cinq fois supérieure au montant combiné consacré à la NASA et à l’éducation et à tous les projets de transport de compétence fédérale au cours de cette époque. (3,7 mille milliards de dollars n’est pas encore la totalité du montant dépensé pour le soutien fédéral de la pauvreté, les États membres contribuant pour plus de 200 milliards de dollars chaque année à ce lien fédéral, principalement sous forme de soins de santé gratuits à faible revenu.) Parce que le budget de l’aide sociale est tellement fragmenté — les coupons alimentaires ne sont qu’un des 15 programmes fédéraux qui fournissent une aide alimentaire, cela rend le contrôle efficace presque impossible, tout en masquant l’étendue tant aux contribuables qu’aux législateurs. Par exemple, il est plus facile pour les législateurs opposés aux réformes de s’opposer à des économies de coupons alimentaires en occultant le fait qu’un ménage qui reçoit des coupons alimentaires a souvent simultanément  droit à une myriade de programmes d’aide fédéraux y compris l’assistance de trésorerie, les logements subventionnés, les soins médicaux gratuits, la garde d’enfants gratuite et l’assistance énergétique à la maison. Commission sénatoriale du Budget
"Il est temps que l’Amérique comprenne que beaucoup des plus grandes disparités de la nation, de l’éducation à la pauvreté et à l’espérance de vie sont de plus en plus liées à la position de classe économique, » a déclaré William Julius Wilson, professeur de Harvard spécialiste des questions raciales et de la pauvreté. Il note par ailleurs que, malgré la persistance des difficultés économiques, les minorités sont plus optimistes quant à l’avenir après l’élection d’Obama, ce qui n’est pas les blancs qui se débattait. « Il y a la possibilité réelle que l’aliénation blanche va augmenter si des mesures ne sont pas prises pour mettre en évidence et lutter contre l’inégalité sur un large front, » a dit Ted Wilson. Parfois appelé "les pauvres invisibles" par les démographes, les blancs à faible revenu sont généralement dispersés dans les banlieues, mais aussi les petites villes rurales, où plus de 60% des pauvres sont blancs. Concentrés dans les Appalaches à l’est, ils sont également nombreux dans le Midwest industriel et  à travers le cœur de l’Amérique, du Missouri, de l’Arkansas et de l’Oklahoma jusqu’aux grandes plaines. Plus de 19 millions de blancs sont tombésen dessous du seuil de pauvreté de 23 021 $ pour une famille de quatre, représentant plus de 41 % de la nation démunis, près du double le nombre de pauvres noirs. CS monitor
"L’enfer c’est les autres" a été toujours mal compris. On a cru que je voulais dire par là que nos rapports avec les autres étaient toujours empoisonnés, que c’était toujours des rapports infernaux. Or, c’est tout autre chose que je veux dire. Je veux dire que si les rapports avec autrui sont tordus, viciés, alors l’autre ne peut être que l’enfer. Pourquoi ? Parce que les autres sont, au fond, ce qu’il y a de plus important en nous-mêmes, pour notre propre connaissance de nous-mêmes. Quand nous pensons sur nous, quand nous essayons de nous connaître, au fond nous usons des connaissances que les autres ont déjà sur nous, nous nous jugeons avec les moyens que les autres ont, nous ont donné, de nous juger. Quoi que je dise sur moi, toujours le jugement d’autrui entre dedans. Quoi que je sente de moi, le jugement d’autrui entre dedans. Ce qui veut dire que, si mes rapports sont mauvais, je me mets dans la totale dépendance d’autrui et alors, en effet, je suis en enfer. Et il existe une quantité de gens dans le monde qui sont en enfer parce qu’ils dépendent trop du jugement d’autrui. Mais cela ne veut nullement dire qu’on ne puisse avoir d’autres rapports avec les autres, ça marque simplement l’importance capitale de tous les autres pour chacun de nous. Sartre
Chacun se croit seul en enfer et c’est cela l’enfer. René Girard
De toutes les menaces qui pèsent sur nous, la plus redoutable, nous le savons, la seule réelle, c’est nous-mêmes. René Girard
Ce ne sont pas les différences qui provoquent les conflits mais leur effacement. René Girard
Aucun nombre de bombes atomiques ne pourra endiguer le raz de marée constitué par les millions d’êtres humains qui partiront un jour de la partie méridionale et pauvre du monde, pour faire irruption dans les espaces relativement ouverts du riche hémisphère septentrional, en quête de survie. Boumediene (mars 1974)
Un jour, des millions d’hommes quitteront le sud pour aller dans le nord. Et ils n’iront pas là-bas en tant qu’amis. Parce qu’ils iront là-bas pour le conquérir. Et ils le conquerront avec leurs fils. Le ventre de nos femmes nous donnera la victoire. Houari Boumediene (ONU, 10.04.74)
Nous avons 50 millions de musulmans en Europe. Il y a des signes qui attestent qu’Allah nous accordera une grande victoire en Europe, sans épée, sans conquête. Les 50 millions de musulmans d’Europe feront de cette dernière un continent musulman. Allah mobilise la Turquie, nation musulmane, et va permettre son entrée dans l’Union Européenne. Il y aura alors 100 millions de musulmans en Europe. L’Albanie est dans l’Union européenne, c’est un pays musulman. La Bosnie est dans l’Union européenne, c’est un pays musulman. 50% de ses citoyens sont musulmans. L’Europe est dans une fâcheuse posture. Et il en est de même de l’Amérique. Elles [les nations occidentales] devraient accepter de devenir musulmanes avec le temps ou bien de déclarer la guerre aux musulmans. Kadhafi (10.04.06) 
Et si Raspail, avec "Le Camp des Saints", n’était ni un prophète ni un romancier visionnaire, mais simplement un implacable historien de notre futur? Jean Cau
Le 17 février 2001, un cargo vétuste s’échouait volontairement sur les rochers côtiers, non loin de Saint-Raphaël. À son bord, un millier d’immigrants kurdes, dont près de la moitié étaient des enfants. « Cette pointe rocheuse faisait partie de mon paysage. Certes, ils n’étaient pas un million, ainsi que je les avais imaginés, à bord d’une armada hors d’âge, mais ils n’en avaient pas moins débarqué chez moi, en plein décor du Camp des saints, pour y jouer l’acte I. Le rapport radio de l’hélicoptère de la gendarmerie diffusé par l’AFP semble extrait, mot pour mot, des trois premiers paragraphes du livre. La presse souligna la coïncidence, laquelle apparut, à certains, et à moi, comme ne relevant pas du seul hasard. Jean Raspail
Qu’est-ce que Big Other ? C’est le produit de la mauvaise conscience occidentale soigneusement entretenue, avec piqûres de rappel à la repentance pour nos fautes et nos crimes supposés –  et de l’humanisme de l’altérité, cette sacralisation de l’Autre, particulièrement quand il s’oppose à notre culture et à nos traditions. Perversion de la charité chrétienne, Big Other a le monopole du Vrai et du Bien et ne tolère pas de voix discordante. Jean Raspail
Ce qui m’a frappé, c’est le contraste entre les opinions exprimées à titre privé et celles tenues publiquement. Double langage et double conscience… À mes yeux, il n’y a pire lâcheté que celle devant la faiblesse, que la peur d’opposer la légitimité de la force à l’illégitimité de la violence. Jean Raspail
La véritable cible du roman, ce ne sont pas les hordes d’immigrants sauvages du tiers-monde, mais les élites, politiques, religieuses, médiatiques, intellectuelles, du pays qui, par lâcheté devant la faiblesse, trahissent leurs racines, leurs traditions et les valeurs de leur civilisation. En fourriers d’une apocalypse dont ils seront les premières victimes. Chantre des causes dé sespérées et des peuples en voie de disparition, comme son œuvre ultérieure en témoigne, Jean Raspail a, dans ce grand livre d’anticipation, incité non pas à la haine et à la discrimination, mais à la lucidité et au courage. Dans deux générations, on saura si la réalité avait imité la fiction. Bruno de Cessole
Délinquants itinérants issus des gens du voyage ou «petites mains» pilotées à distance par des mafias des pays de l’Est, ces bandes de cambrioleurs ignorant les frontières n’hésitent plus à couvrir des centaines de kilomètres lors de raids nocturnes pour repérer puis investir des demeures isolées. En quelques années, les «voleurs dans la loi» géorgiens sont devenus les «aristocrates» de la discipline. Organisés de façon quasi militaire et placés sous la férule de lieutenants, ces «Rappetout» venus du froid écument avec méthode les territoires les plus «giboyeux» du pays, notamment dans le Grand Ouest, les régions Rhône-Alpes, Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur ou encore Languedoc-Roussillon. Selon une estimation récente, la valeur marchande de leur colossal butin frise les 200.000 euros par semaine. Continuant à se propager dans les grandes villes, le fléau gangrène à une vitesse étourdissante les campagnes et les petites agglomérations: entre 2007 et 2012, le nombre de villas et résidences «visitées» en zone gendarmerie a bondi de 65 %. Soit 35.361 faits constatés de plus en cinq ans. En plein cœur du département de la Marne, où les cambriolages ont flambé de 47 % en un an, des clans albanais retranchés près de Tirana ont dépêché des «soldats» pour piller des maisons de campagne situées dans des villages jusque-là préservés tels que Livry-Louvercy, aux Petites-Loges ou encore à Gueux. Le Figaro
Le tout virtuel ne marche pas. Si les solutions pour travailler à distance existent, rien ne remplace le contact humain nécessaire au bon fonctionnement d’une entreprise. A la longue, communiquer uniquement par mail ou par téléphone devient pénible. Gauthier Toulemonde
En présence de la diversité, nous nous replions sur nous-mêmes. Nous agissons comme des tortues. L’effet de la diversité est pire que ce qui avait été imaginé. Et ce n’est pas seulement que nous ne faisons plus confiance à ceux qui ne sont pas comme nous. Dans les communautés diverses, nous ne faisons plus confiance à ceux qui nous ressemblent. Robert Putnam
Page appelle ça le "paradoxe de diversité." Il pense que les effets à la fois positifs et négatifs de la diversité peuvent coexister dans les communautés, mais qu’il doit y avoir une limite." Si l’investissement civique tombe trop bas, il est facile d’imaginer que les effets positifs de la diversité puissent tout aussi bien commencer à s’affaiblir. Michael Jonas
Americans don’t trust each other anymore. We’re not talking about the loss of faith in big institutions such as the government, the church or Wall Street, which fluctuates with events. For four decades, a gut-level ingredient of democracy — trust in the other fellow — has been quietly draining away. These days, only one-third of Americans say most people can be trusted. Half felt that way in 1972, when the General Social Survey first asked the question. Forty years later, a record high of nearly two-thirds say “you can’t be too careful” in dealing with people. (…) Does it matter that Americans are suspicious of one another? Yes, say worried political and social scientists. What’s known as “social trust” brings good things. A society where it’s easier to compromise or make a deal. Where people are willing to work with those who are different from them for the common good. Where trust appears to promote economic growth. Distrust, on the other hand, seems to encourage corruption. At the least, it diverts energy to counting change, drawing up 100-page legal contracts and building gated communities. Even the rancor and gridlock in politics might stem from the effects of an increasingly distrustful citizenry, said April K. Clark, a Purdue University political scientist and public opinion researcher. “It’s like the rules of the game,” Clark said. “When trust is low, the way we react and behave with each other becomes less civil.” (…) There’s no single explanation for Americans’ loss of trust. The best-known analysis comes from “Bowling Alone” author Robert Putnam’s nearly two decades of studying the United States’ declining “social capital,” including trust. Putnam says Americans have abandoned their bowling leagues and Elks lodges to stay home and watch TV. Less socializing and fewer community meetings make people less trustful than the “long civic generation” that came of age during the Depression and World War II. Connie Cass

A l’heure où même les plus démagogiques de nos dirigeants atteignent des sommets d’impopularité …

Et où, attirés par le grand festin de l’Etat-tout-Providence, les réfugiés économiques du Tiers-Monde comme les nouveaux barbares de l’est déferlent par vagues entières sur nos côtes et nos villes …

Pendant que, par manque de contact humain, un chef d’entreprise français, pourtant armé des dernières technologies numériques et d’un sacré sens de l’auto-promotion, se voit contraint après 40 jours à peine de mettre un terme à son expérience de Robinson virtuel …

Comment ne pas voir avec les résultats d’une grande enquête américaine sur les modes de vie …

Que contre les prédictions les plus naïves ou les plus roublardes de nos hérauts de la diversité …

Mais conformément aux prévisions des plus lucides de nos sociologues ou, accessoirement, de nos propres Evangiles …

Ce n’est pas nécessairement, derrière les spectaculaires et indéniables prodiges de nos nouvelles technologies, à plus de paix et d’harmonie que va aboutir le formidable rassemblement de population – proprement inouï dans l’Histoire de l’humanité – que nous connaissons actuellement …

Mais bien, très probablement, à des niveaux de conflit dont nous n’avons pas encore idée ?

In God we trust, maybe, but not each other

Connie Cass

WASHINGTON (AP) — You can take our word for it. Americans don’t trust each other anymore.

We’re not talking about the loss of faith in big institutions such as the government, the church or Wall Street, which fluctuates with events. For four decades, a gut-level ingredient of democracy — trust in the other fellow — has been quietly draining away.

These days, only one-third of Americans say most people can be trusted. Half felt that way in 1972, when the General Social Survey first asked the question.

Forty years later, a record high of nearly two-thirds say “you can’t be too careful” in dealing with people.

An AP-GfK poll conducted last month found that Americans are suspicious of each other in everyday encounters. Less than one-third expressed a lot of trust in clerks who swipe their credit cards, drivers on the road, or people they meet when traveling.

“I’m leery of everybody,” said Bart Murawski, 27, of Albany, N.Y. “Caution is always a factor.”

Does it matter that Americans are suspicious of one another? Yes, say worried political and social scientists.

What’s known as “social trust” brings good things.

A society where it’s easier to compromise or make a deal. Where people are willing to work with those who are different from them for the common good. Where trust appears to promote economic growth.

Distrust, on the other hand, seems to encourage corruption. At the least, it diverts energy to counting change, drawing up 100-page legal contracts and building gated communities.

Even the rancor and gridlock in politics might stem from the effects of an increasingly distrustful citizenry, said April K. Clark, a Purdue University political scientist and public opinion researcher.

“It’s like the rules of the game,” Clark said. “When trust is low, the way we react and behave with each other becomes less civil.”

There’s no easy fix.

In fact, some studies suggest it’s too late for most Americans alive today to become more trusting. That research says the basis for a person’s lifetime trust levels is set by his or her mid-twenties and unlikely to change, other than in some unifying crucible such as a world war.

People do get a little more trusting as they age. But beginning with the baby boomers, each generation has started off adulthood less trusting than those who came before them.

The best hope for creating a more trusting nation may be figuring out how to inspire today’s youth, perhaps united by their high-tech gadgets, to trust the way previous generations did in simpler times.

There are still trusters around to set an example.

Pennsylvania farmer Dennis Hess is one. He runs an unattended farm stand on the honor system.

Customers pick out their produce, tally their bills and drop the money into a slot, making change from an unlocked cashbox. Both regulars and tourists en route to nearby Lititz, Pa., stop for asparagus in spring, corn in summer and, as the weather turns cold, long-neck pumpkins for Thanksgiving pies.

“When people from New York or New Jersey come up,” said Hess, 60, “they are amazed that this kind of thing is done anymore.”

Hess has updated the old ways with technology. He added a video camera a few years back, to help catch people who drive off without paying or raid the cashbox. But he says there isn’t enough theft to undermine his trust in human nature.

“I’ll say 99 and a half percent of the people are honest,” said Hess, who’s operated the produce stand for two decades.

There’s no single explanation for Americans’ loss of trust.

The best-known analysis comes from “Bowling Alone” author Robert Putnam’s nearly two decades of studying the United States’ declining “social capital,” including trust.

Putnam says Americans have abandoned their bowling leagues and Elks lodges to stay home and watch TV. Less socializing and fewer community meetings make people less trustful than the “long civic generation” that came of age during the Depression and World War II.

University of Maryland Professor Eric Uslaner, who studies politics and trust, puts the blame elsewhere: economic inequality.

Trust has declined as the gap between the nation’s rich and poor gapes ever wider, Uslaner says, and more and more Americans feel shut out. They’ve lost their sense of a shared fate. Tellingly, trust rises with wealth.

“People who believe the world is a good place and it’s going to get better and you can help make it better, they will be trusting,” Uslaner said. “If you believe it’s dark and driven by outside forces you can’t control, you will be a mistruster.”

African-Americans consistently have expressed far less faith in “most people” than the white majority does. Racism, discrimination and a high rate of poverty destroy trust.

Nearly 8 in 10 African-Americans, in the 2012 survey conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago with principal funding from the National Science Foundation, felt that “you can’t be too careful.” That figure has held remarkably steady across the 25 GSS surveys since 1972.

The decline in the nation’s overall trust quotient was driven by changing attitudes among whites.

It’s possible that people today are indeed less deserving of trust than Americans in the past, perhaps because of a decline in moral values.

“I think people are acting more on their greed,” said Murawski, a computer specialist who says he has witnessed scams and rip-offs. “Everybody wants a comfortable lifestyle, but what are you going to do for it? Where do you draw the line?”

Ethical behavior such as lying and cheating are difficult to document over the decades. It’s worth noting that the early, most trusting years of the GSS poll coincided with Watergate and the Vietnam War. Trust dropped off in the more stable 1980s.

Crime rates fell in the 1990s and 2000s, and still Americans grew less trusting. Many social scientists blame 24-hour news coverage of distant violence for skewing people’s perceptions of crime.

Can anything bring trust back?

Uslaner and Clark don’t see much hope anytime soon.

Thomas Sander, executive director of the Saguaro Seminar launched by Putnam, believes the trust deficit is “eminently fixable” if Americans strive to rebuild community and civic life, perhaps by harnessing technology.

After all, the Internet can widen the circle of acquaintances who might help you find a job. Email makes it easier for clubs to plan face-to-face meetings. Googling someone turns up information that used to come via the community grapevine.

But hackers and viruses and hateful posts eat away at trust. And sitting home watching YouTube means less time out meeting others.

“A lot of it depends on whether we can find ways to get people using technology to connect and be more civically involved,” Sander said.

“The fate of Americans’ trust,” he said, “is in our own hands.”

___

Associated Press Director of Polling Jennifer Agiesta and AP News Survey Specialist Dennis Junius contributed to this report.

___

Online:

AP-GfK Poll: http://www.ap-gfkpoll.com

General Social Survey: http://www3.norc.org/GSS+Website

Voir aussi:

L’exil du patron Robinson sur une île déserte touche à sa fin

Isabelle de Foucaud

le Figaro

18/11/2013

Gauthier Toulemonde est parti 40 jours sur une île de l’archipel indonésien pour démontrer que le télétravail n’est plus une utopie avec les technologies de communication.

Gauthier Toulemonde, qui a décidé de passer 40 jours sur une île au large de l’Indonésie pour tester des conditions «extrêmes» de télétravail, a pu gérer son entreprise sans encombre. Il sera de retour en France d’ici à la fin de la semaine.

Gauthier Toulemonde prépare ses valises avec le sentiment du devoir accompli. Il doit quitter mardi son île déserte de l’archipel indonésien, longue de 700 mètres, large de 500 et située à cinq heures de bateau du village le plus proche, sur laquelle il vient de passer 40 jours dans des conditions extrêmes. «J’appréhende le retour à la vie moderne après cette longue période de solitude. Je ne sais plus ce que c’est de prendre le métro ou d’être coincé dans les embouteillages», confie-t-il au figaro.fr par téléphone satellitaire ce lundi, à la veille de son départ.

A 54 ans, l’entrepreneur de Saint-André-lez-Lille (Nord), qui a partagé son expérience sur un blog, ne voulait pas seulement réaliser un «rêve d’enfant» en montant cette expédition à la Robinson Crusoé. Certes, il a passé ce séjour dans l’isolement total, mais ultra connecté. Un ordinateur, une tablette numérique et deux téléphones satellitaires alimentés par des panneaux solaires étaient du voyage. «Mon but était de démontrer que je pouvais continuer à gérer mon entreprise à distance, grâce aux nouvelles technologies», explique Gauthier Toulemonde , propriétaire de la société Timbropresse qui publie le mensuel Timbres magazine, et par ailleurs rédacteur en chef de L’Activité immobilière.

Un pari réussi. «Nous avons bouclé, avec mon équipe à distance, chaque magazine dans les délais et avec les mêmes contenus et paginations que d’habitude», se réjouit-il, en assurant avoir assumé sans encombre l’ensemble de ses responsabilités. Choix des sujets, attribution aux journalistes et pigistes, réalisation d’interviews et lancement des pages en production … «Les communications étaient réduites a minima et je privilégiais les échanges par mail plutôt que par téléphone satellitaire, ces appels étant beaucoup plus coûteux.» Le patron Robinson est parti avec un budget de «moins de 10.000 euros», sans sponsor, et s’est fixé comme limite stricte 20 euros de frais Internet par jour.

Les limites du «tout virtuel»

Autre complication: le décalage horaire de six heures (en plus) qui a considérablement rallongé les journées de Gauthier Toulemonde afin qu’il puisse «croiser» un minimum sa dizaine de salariés en France. «Lorsque je prenais du retard sur la rédaction d’un article, en revanche, ce décalage devenait un sérieux avantage pour moi en me donnant un peu plus de temps.»

Si les solutions pour travailler à distance existent et fonctionnent, rien ne remplace le contact humain nécessaire au bon fonctionnement d’une entreprise

Des délais souvent bienvenus alors que ce chef d’entreprise – parti quand même avec des rations de survie de pâtes et de riz – devait en plus assurer sa subsistance en pêchant, chassant ou cueillant des végétaux dès 5 heures du matin. Le tout dans un environnement dominé par des rats, serpents et varans. «Ma plus grande crainte était de perdre ma connexion», confie cependant l’aventurier. Parti en pleine saison des pluies, il a subi des intempéries qui l’ont parfois fait vivre pendant quelques jours sur ses réserves d’énergie.

Ces frayeurs ont-elles refroidi l’enthousiasme de l’entrepreneur pour le télétravail? «Le tout virtuel ne marche pas. Si les solutions pour travailler à distance existent, rien ne remplace le contact humain nécessaire au bon fonctionnement d’une entreprise», conclut Gauthier Toulemonde, en confiant au passage qu’«à la longue, communiquer uniquement par mail ou par téléphone devient pénible».

Voir encore:

Real-life Robinson Crusoe who decided to run his Paris business from a remote Indonesian island goes home after being put off by the snakes, spiders and sky-high phone bills

Gauthier Toulemonde, 54, moved to a 700×500-metre island for 40 days

He scavenged for vegetables and fish, and ‘detoxed from modern life’

Only companion was a ‘rented’ dog that scared off wildlife for him

Says lack of human contact and fear of losing web signal was unbearable

Mia De Graaf

The Daily Mail

 30 November 2013

A French businessman who realised his childhood dream to relocate to a desert island has been driven home by wild Indonesian creatures and unaffordable phone bills.

Gauthier Toulemonde, 54, had been getting increasingly frustrated with his stagnant life commuting from Lille to Paris every day to his office job as a publicist.

Last Christmas, the sorry sight of distinctly un-merry Parisians lugging presents through the station compelled him to finally take a leap.

Deserted: Gauthier Toulemonde, 54, relocated his work as a publicist to one of Indonesia’s 17,000 islands

Deserted: Gauthier Toulemonde, 54, relocated his work as a publicist to one of Indonesia’s 17,000 islands

Moving to one of Indonesia’s 17,000 islands like Robinson Crusoe moved to Trinidad, Mr Toulemonde ‘detoxed from modern life’ by scavenging for food, being in touch with nature, and having little to no contact with other human beings.

His only companion was Gecko, a dog borrowed from a Chinese woman, to scare off the wildlife.

He told The Guardian he wanted to be the first ‘Web Robinson’ to persuade French people to abandon the tiring, demoralising commute and work remotely.

He added: ‘I found myself in Gare Saint Lazare in Paris just before Christmas watching the continuous stream of people passing by.

Idyllic: He was bound by Indonesian law to keep the exact location of the 700×500-metre island a secret

Idyllic: He was bound by Indonesian law to keep the exact location of the 700×500-metre island a secret

‘Web Robinson’: Toulemonde filmed his experiment testing if it was possible to work this far from the office

‘Web Robinson’: Toulemonde filmed his experiment testing if it was possible to work this far from the office

‘They had this sad look on their faces, even though they were carrying Christmas presents. It had long seemed to me absurd this travelling back and forth to offices.

‘My idea of going away had been growing for a while, but it was on that day, I decided to leave.’

It took him six months – and numerous run-ins with the Indonesian government – to find the perfect uninhabited island for a six-week trial run. Although he managed to persuade officials to let him go, he was ordered by law not to reveal the exact location of the hideaway, that is just 700-by-500 metres.

Finally, in October he set off – with just a tent, four solar panels, a phone, a laptop, rice and pasta for supplies.

Guard dog: Gecko, a dog he borrowed from a Chinese woman, helped scare off the wildlife

Guard dog: Gecko, a dog he borrowed from a Chinese woman, helped scare off the wildlife

Isolated: Toulemonde was banned from revealing the exact location of the uninhabited island

Isolated: Toulemonde was banned from stating the exact location of the uninhabited island in the Indian Ocean

Every day he woke at 5am and went to bed at midnight.

He would scavenge for vegetables on the island and fish in the sea before simply reclining to ‘detox from modern life’.

‘Those days, for me it was like being in quarantine,’ he told Le Figaro.

‘I used the time as a detox from modern life.’

He told Paris Match: ‘What gave me most joy was living – stripped bare – in the closest possible contact with nature. Every day was magical.’

However, it was not stress-free: his company had to publish two editions of Stamps Magazine.

Snakes: Toulemonde was surrounded by Indonesia’s wildlife ranging from small snakes to giant pythons

Snakes: Toulemonde was surrounded by Indonesia’s wildlife ranging from small snakes to giant pythons

Rats: He said living on the island with pests such as rats for any more than 40 days would be too much to handle

Rats: He said living on the island with pests such as rats for any more than 40 days would be too much to handle

Diary: He wrote a blog and made videos tracking his progress. He admitted he won’t go out again

Diary: He wrote a blog and made videos tracking his progress. He admitted he won’t go out again

He allowed himself 20 euros a day for internet to email his employees – and abandoned extortionate phone calls early on.

But after completing his trial, Mr Toulemonde has conceded that he cannot do it forever.

Although he claims the ‘telecommuting’ experiment was a success, he told French broadcasters My TF1 News that the snakes and rats were intolerable – and fear of losing Internet connection was even worse.

The biggest challenge was lack of human contact.

He said: ‘Telecommuting really works but doing everything virtually has its limits. Working from distance might be doable, but nothing can replace human contact.’

Voir par ailleurs:

Exclusive: Signs of declining economic security

Hope Yen

Jul. 28, 2013

ECONOMIC INSECURITY

Chart shows cumulative economic insecurity by age; 2c x 4 inches; 96.3 mm x 101 mm;

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four out of 5 U.S. adults struggle with joblessness, near poverty or reliance on welfare for at least parts of their lives, a sign of deteriorating economic security and an elusive American dream.

Survey data exclusive to The Associated Press points to an increasingly globalized U.S. economy, the widening gap between rich and poor and loss of good-paying manufacturing jobs as reasons for the trend.

The findings come as President Barack Obama tries to renew his administration’s emphasis on the economy, saying in recent speeches that his highest priority is to "rebuild ladders of opportunity" and reverse income inequality.

Hardship is particularly on the rise among whites, based on several measures. Pessimism among that racial group about their families’ economic futures has climbed to the highest point since at least 1987. In the most recent AP-GfK poll, 63 percent of whites called the economy "poor."

"I think it’s going to get worse," said Irene Salyers, 52, of Buchanan County, Va., a declining coal region in Appalachia. Married and divorced three times, Salyers now helps run a fruit and vegetable stand with her boyfriend, but it doesn’t generate much income. They live mostly off government disability checks.

"If you do try to go apply for a job, they’re not hiring people, and they’re not paying that much to even go to work," she said. Children, she said, have "nothing better to do than to get on drugs."

While racial and ethnic minorities are more likely to live in poverty, race disparities in the poverty rate have narrowed substantially since the 1970s, census data show. Economic insecurity among whites also is more pervasive than is shown in government data, engulfing more than 76 percent of white adults by the time they turn 60, according to a new economic gauge being published next year by the Oxford University Press.

The gauge defines "economic insecurity" as experiencing unemployment at some point in their working lives, or a year or more of reliance on government aid such as food stamps or income below 150 percent of the poverty line. Measured across all races, the risk of economic insecurity rises to 79 percent.

"It’s time that America comes to understand that many of the nation’s biggest disparities, from education and life expectancy to poverty, are increasingly due to economic class position," said William Julius Wilson, a Harvard professor who specializes in race and poverty.

He noted that despite continuing economic difficulties, minorities have more optimism about the future after Obama’s election, while struggling whites do not.

"There is the real possibility that white alienation will increase if steps are not taken to highlight and address inequality on a broad front," Wilson said.

___

Sometimes termed "the invisible poor" by demographers, lower-income whites are generally dispersed in suburbs as well as small rural towns, where more than 60 percent of the poor are white. Concentrated in Appalachia in the East, they are also numerous in the industrial Midwest and spread across America’s heartland, from Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma up through the Great Plains.

More than 19 million whites fall below the poverty line of $23,021 for a family of four, accounting for more than 41 percent of the nation’s destitute, nearly double the number of poor blacks.

Still, while census figures provide an official measure of poverty, they’re only a temporary snapshot. The numbers don’t capture the makeup of those who cycle in and out of poverty at different points in their lives. They may be suburbanites, for example, or the working poor or the laid off.

In 2011 that snapshot showed 12.6 percent of adults in their prime working-age years of 25-60 lived in poverty. But measured in terms of a person’s lifetime risk, a much higher number — 4 in 10 adults — falls into poverty for at least a year of their lives.

The risks of poverty also have been increasing in recent decades, particularly among people ages 35-55, coinciding with widening income inequality. For instance, people ages 35-45 had a 17 percent risk of encountering poverty during the 1969-1989 time period; that risk increased to 23 percent during the 1989-2009 period. For those ages 45-55, the risk of poverty jumped from 11.8 percent to 17.7 percent.

By race, nonwhites still have a higher risk of being economically insecure, at 90 percent. But compared with the official poverty rate, some of the biggest jumps under the newer measure are among whites, with more than 76 percent enduring periods of joblessness, life on welfare or near-poverty.

By 2030, based on the current trend of widening income inequality, close to 85 percent of all working-age adults in the U.S. will experience bouts of economic insecurity.

"Poverty is no longer an issue of ‘them’, it’s an issue of ‘us’," says Mark Rank, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis who calculated the numbers. "Only when poverty is thought of as a mainstream event, rather than a fringe experience that just affects blacks and Hispanics, can we really begin to build broader support for programs that lift people in need."

Rank’s analysis is supplemented with figures provided by Tom Hirschl, a professor at Cornell University; John Iceland, a sociology professor at Penn State University; the University of New Hampshire’s Carsey Institute; the Census Bureau; and the Population Reference Bureau.

Among the findings:

—For the first time since 1975, the number of white single-mother households who were living in poverty with children surpassed or equaled black ones in the past decade, spurred by job losses and faster rates of out-of-wedlock births among whites. White single-mother families in poverty stood at nearly 1.5 million in 2011, comparable to the number for blacks. Hispanic single-mother families in poverty trailed at 1.2 million.

—The share of children living in high-poverty neighborhoods — those with poverty rates of 30 percent or more — has increased to 1 in 10, putting them at higher risk of teen pregnancy or dropping out of school. Non-Hispanic whites accounted for 17 percent of the child population in such neighborhoods, up from 13 percent in 2000, even though the overall proportion of white children in the U.S. has been declining.

The share of black children in high-poverty neighborhoods dropped sharply, from 43 percent to 37 percent, while the share of Latino children ticked higher, from 38 to 39 percent.

___

Going back to the 1980s, never have whites been so pessimistic about their futures, according to the General Social Survey, which is conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago. Just 45 percent say their family will have a good chance of improving their economic position based on the way things are in America.

The divide is especially evident among those whites who self-identify as working class: 49 percent say they think their children will do better than them, compared with 67 percent of non-whites who consider themselves working class.

In November, Obama won the votes of just 36 percent of those noncollege whites, the worst performance of any Democratic nominee among that group since 1984.

Some Democratic analysts have urged renewed efforts to bring working-class whites into the political fold, calling them a potential "decisive swing voter group" if minority and youth turnout level off in future elections.

"They don’t trust big government, but it doesn’t mean they want no government," says Republican pollster Ed Goeas, who agrees that working-class whites will remain an important electoral group. "They feel that politicians are giving attention to other people and not them."

___

AP Director of Polling Jennifer Agiesta, News Survey Specialist Dennis Junius and AP writer Debra McCown in Buchanan County, Va., contributed to this report.

Voir aussi:

Report: U.S. Spent $3.7 Trillion on Welfare Over Last 5 Years

Dutch King: Say Goodbye to Welfare State

AMSTERDAM September 17, 2013 (AP)

Toby Sterling Associated Press

King Willem-Alexander delivered a message to the Dutch people from the government Tuesday in a nationally televised address: the welfare state of the 20th century is gone.

In its place a "participation society" is emerging, in which people must take responsibility for their own future and create their own social and financial safety nets, with less help from the national government.

The king traveled past waving fans in an ornate horse-drawn carriage to the 13th-century Hall of Knights in The Hague for the monarch’s traditional annual address on the day the government presents its budget for the coming year. It was Willem-Alexander’s first appearance on the national stage since former Queen Beatrix abdicated in April and he ascended to the throne.

"The shift to a ‘participation society’ is especially visible in social security and long-term care," the king said, reading out to lawmakers a speech written for him by Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s government.

"The classic welfare state of the second half of the 20th century in these areas in particular brought forth arrangements that are unsustainable in their current form."

Rutte may be hoping that the pomp and ceremony surrounding the king and his popular wife, Queen Maxima, will provide a diversion from the gloomy reality of a budget full of unpopular new spending cuts he revealed later in the day.

A series of recent polls have shown that confidence in Rutte’s government is at record low levels, and that most Dutch people — along with labor unions, employers’ associations and many economists — believe the Cabinet’s austerity policies are at least partially to blame as the Dutch economy has worsened even as recoveries are underway in neighboring Germany, France and Britain.

After several consecutive years of government spending cuts, the Dutch economy is expected to have shrunk by more than 1 percent in 2013, and the agency is forecasting growth of just 0.5 percent next year.

"The necessary reforms take time and demand perseverance," the king said. But they will "lay the basis for creating jobs and restoring confidence."

Willem-Alexander said that nowadays, people expect and "want to make their own choices, to arrange their own lives, and take care of each other."

The ‘participation society’ has been on its way for some time: benefits such as unemployment compensation and subsidies on health care have been regularly pruned for the past decade. The retirement age has been raised to 67.

The king said Tuesday some costs for the care of the elderly, for youth services, and for job retraining after layoffs will now be pushed back to the local level, in order to make them better tailored to local circumstances.

The monarchy was not immune to cost-cutting and Willem-Alexander’s salary will be cut from around 825,000 euros ($1.1 million) this year to 817,000 euros in 2014. Maintaining the Royal House — castles, parades and all — costs the government around 40 million euros annually.

A review of the government’s budget by the country’s independent analysis agency showed that the deficit will widen in 2014 to 3.3 percent of GDP despite the new spending cuts intended to reduce it.

Eurozone rules specify that countries must keep their deficit below 3 percent, and Rutte has been among the most prominent of European leaders, along with Germany’s Angela Merkel, in insisting that Southern European countries attempt to meet that target.

Among other measures, the government announced 2,300 new military job cuts. That follows a 2011 decision to cut 12,000 jobs — one out of every six defense employees — between 2012 and 2015.

However, the government said Tuesday it has decided once and for all not to abandon the U.S.-led "Joint Strike Fighter" program to develop new military aircraft. The program has suffered cost overruns and created divisions within Rutte’s governing coalition.

A debate over the budget later this week will be crucial for the future of the coalition, as it does not command a majority in the upper house, and it must seek help from opposition parties to have the budget approved.

Challenged as to whether his Cabinet may be facing a crisis, Rutte insisted in an interview with national broadcaster NOS on Tuesday that he ultimately will find support for the budget.

"At crucial moments, the opposition is willing to do its share," he said.

Geert Wilders, whose far right Freedom Party currently tops popularity polls, called Rutte’s budget the equivalent of "kicking the country while it’s down."

——–

History suggests that era of entitlements is nearly over

Michael Barone

The Examiner

January 11, 2013

It’s often good fun and sometimes revealing to divide American history into distinct periods of uniform length. In working on my forthcoming book on American migrations, internal and immigrant, it occurred to me that you could do this using the American-sounding interval of 76 years, just a few years more than the biblical lifespan of three score and ten.

It was 76 years from Washington’s First Inaugural in 1789 to Lincoln’s Second Inaugural in 1865. It was 76 years from the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse in 1865 to the attack at Pearl Harbor in 1941.

Going backward, it was 76 years from the First Inaugural in 1789 to the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713, which settled one of the British-French colonial wars. And going 76 years back from Utrecht takes you to 1637, when the Virginia and Massachusetts Bay colonies were just getting organized.

As for our times, we are now 71 years away from Pearl Harbor. The current 76-year interval ends in December 2017.

Each of these 76-year periods can be depicted as a distinct unit. In the Colonial years up to 1713, very small numbers of colonists established separate cultures that have persisted to our times.

The story is brilliantly told in David Hackett Fischer’s "Albion’s Seed." For a more downbeat version, read the recent "The Barbarous Years" by the nonagenarian Bernard Bailyn.

From 1713 to 1789, the Colonies were peopled by much larger numbers of motley and often involuntary settlers — slaves, indentured servants, the unruly Scots-Irish on the Appalachian frontier.

For how this society became dissatisfied with the Colonial status quo, read Bailyn’s "The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution."

From 1789 to 1865, Americans sought their manifest destiny by expanding across the continent. They made great technological advances but were faced with the irreconcilable issue of slavery in the territories.

For dueling accounts of the period, read the pro-Andrew Jackson Democrat Sean Wilentz’s "The Rise of American Democracy" and the pro-Henry Clay Whig Daniel Walker Howe’s "What Hath God Wrought." Both are sparklingly written and full of offbeat insights and brilliant apercus.

The 1865-to-1941 period saw a vast efflorescence of market capitalism, European immigration and rising standards of living. For descriptions of how economic change reshaped the nation and its government, read Morton Keller’s "Affairs of State" and "Regulating a New Society."

The 70-plus years since 1941 have seen a vast increase in the welfare safety net and governance by cooperation among big units — big government, big business, big labor — that began in the New Deal and gained steam in and after World War II. I immodestly offer my own "Our Country: The Shaping of America from Roosevelt to Reagan."

The original arrangements in each 76-year period became unworkable and unraveled toward its end. Eighteenth-century Americans rejected the Colonial status quo and launched a revolution, then established a constitutional republic.

Nineteenth-century Americans went to war over expansion of slavery. Early-20th-century Americans grappled with the collapse of the private-sector economy in the Depression of the 1930s.

We are seeing something like this again today. The welfare state arrangements that once seemed solid are on the path to unsustainability.

Entitlement programs — Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid — are threatening to gobble up the whole government and much of the private sector, as well.

Lifetime employment by one big company represented by one big union is a thing of the past. People who counted on corporate or public-sector pensions are seeing them default.

Looking back, we are as far away in time today from victory in World War II in 1945 as Americans were at the time of the Dred Scott decision from the First Inaugural.

We are as far away in time today from passage of the Social Security in 1935 as Americans then were from the launching of post-Civil War Reconstruction.

Nevertheless our current president and most politicians of his party seem determined to continue the current welfare state arrangements — historian Walter Russell Mead calls this the blue-state model — into the indefinite future.

Some leaders of the other party are advancing ideas for adapting a system that worked reasonably well in an industrial age dominated by seemingly eternal big units into something that can prove workable in an information age experiencing continual change and upheaval wrought by innovations in the market economy.

The current 76-year period is nearing its end. What will come next?

Michael Barone,The Examiner’s senior political analyst, can be contacted at mbarone@washingtonexaminer.com

———-

America’s Fourth Revolution: The Coming Collapse of the Entitlement Society-and How We Will Survive It

James Piereson

The United States has been shaped by three far-reaching political revolutions: Jefferson’s “revolution of 1800,” the Civil War, and the New Deal. Each of these upheavals concluded with lasting institutional and cultural adjustments that set the stage for new phases of political and economic development. Are we on the verge of a new upheaval, a “fourth revolution” that will reshape U.S. politics for decades to come? There are signs to suggest that we are.

America’s Fourth Revolution describes the political upheaval that will overtake the United States over the next decade as a consequence of economic stagnation, the growth of government, and the exhaustion of post-war arrangements that formerly underpinned American prosperity and power. The inter-connected challenges of public debt, the retirement of the "baby boom" generation, and slow economic growth have reached a point where they can no longer be addressed by incremental adjustments in taxes and spending, but will require profound changes in the role of government in American life. At the same time, the widening gulf between the two political parties and the entrenched power of interest groups will make it difficult to negotiate the changes needed to renew the system.

America’s Fourth Revolution places this impending upheaval in historical context by reminding readers that Americans have faced and overcome similar challenges in the past and that they seem to resolve their deepest problems in relatively brief but intense periods of political conflict. In contrast to other books which claim that the United States is in decline, America’s Fourth Revolution argues that Americans will struggle over the next decade to form a governing coalition that will guide the nation on a path of renewed dynamism and prosperity.

Voir enfin:

L’enfer c’est les autres

1964 et 1970

L’existentialisme athée

par Jean-Paul Sartre

Extrait du CD « Huis clos » et de « L’Existentialisme est un humanisme »

* * *

L’enfer, c’est les autres [1]

Quand on écrit une pièce, il y a toujours des causes occasionnelles et des soucis profonds. La cause occasionnelle c’est que, au moment où j’ai écrit Huis clos, vers 1943 et début 44, j’avais trois amis et je voulais qu’ils jouent une pièce, une pièce de moi, sans avantager aucun d’eux. C’est-à-dire, je voulais qu’ils restent ensemble tout le temps sur la scène. Parce que je me disais que s’il y en a un qui s’en va, il pensera que les autres ont un meilleur rôle au moment où il s’en va. Je voulais donc les garder ensemble. Et je me suis dit, comment peut-on mettre ensemble trois personnes sans jamais en faire sortir l’une d’elles et les garder sur la scène jusqu’au bout, comme pour l’éternité. C’est là que m’est venue l’idée de les mettre en enfer et de les faire chacun le bourreau des deux autres. Telle est la cause occasionnelle. Par la suite, d’ailleurs, je dois dire, ces trois amis n’ont pas joué la pièce, et comme vous le savez, c’est Michel Vitold, Tania Balachova et Gaby Sylvia qui l’ont jouée.

Mais il y avait à ce moment-là des soucis plus généraux et j’ai voulu exprimer autre chose dans la pièce que, simplement, ce que l’occasion me donnait. J’ai voulu dire « l’enfer c’est les autres ». Mais « l’enfer c’est les autres » a été toujours mal compris. On a cru que je voulais dire par là que nos rapports avec les autres étaient toujours empoisonnés, que c’était toujours des rapports infernaux. Or, c’est tout autre chose que je veux dire. Je veux dire que si les rapports avec autrui sont tordus, viciés, alors l’autre ne peut être que l’enfer. Pourquoi ? Parce que les autres sont, au fond, ce qu’il y a de plus important en nous-mêmes, pour notre propre connaissance de nous-mêmes. Quand nous pensons sur nous, quand nous essayons de nous connaître, au fond nous usons des connaissances que les autres ont déjà sur nous, nous nous jugeons avec les moyens que les autres ont, nous ont donné, de nous juger. Quoi que je dise sur moi, toujours le jugement d’autrui entre dedans. Quoi que je sente de moi, le jugement d’autrui entre dedans. Ce qui veut dire que, si mes rapports sont mauvais, je me mets dans la totale dépendance d’autrui et alors, en effet, je suis en enfer. Et il existe une quantité de gens dans le monde qui sont en enfer parce qu’ils dépendent trop du jugement d’autrui. Mais cela ne veut nullement dire qu’on ne puisse avoir d’autres rapports avec les autres, ça marque simplement l’importance capitale de tous les autres pour chacun de nous.

Deuxième chose que je voudrais dire, c’est que ces gens ne sont pas semblables à nous. Les trois personnes que vous entendrez dans Huis clos ne nous ressemblent pas en ceci que nous sommes tous vivants et qu’ils sont morts. Bien entendu, ici, « morts » symbolise quelque chose. Ce que j’ai voulu indiquer, c’est précisément que beaucoup de gens sont encroûtés dans une série d’habitudes, de coutumes, qu’ils ont sur eux des jugements dont ils souffrent mais qu’ils ne cherchent même pas à changer. Et que ces gens-là sont comme morts, en ce sens qu’ils ne peuvent pas briser le cadre de leurs soucis, de leurs préoccupations et de leurs coutumes et qu’ils restent ainsi victimes souvent des jugements que l’on a portés sur eux.

À partir de là, il est bien évident qu’ils sont lâches ou méchants. Par exemple, s’ils ont commencé à être lâches, rien ne vient changer le fait qu’ils étaient lâches. C’est pour cela qu’ils sont morts, c’est pour cela, c’est une manière de dire que c’est une « mort vivante » que d’être entouré par le souci perpétuel de jugements et d’actions que l’on ne veut pas changer.

De sorte que, en vérité, comme nous sommes vivants, j’ai voulu montrer, par l’absurde, l’importance, chez nous, de la liberté, c’est-à-dire l’importance de changer les actes par d’autres actes. Quel que soit le cercle d’enfer dans lequel nous vivons, je pense que nous sommes libres de le briser. Et si les gens ne le brisent pas, c’est encore librement qu’ils y restent. De sorte qu’ils se mettent librement en enfer.

Vous voyez donc que « rapport avec les autres », « encroûtement » et « liberté », liberté comme l’autre face à peine suggérée, ce sont les trois thèmes de la pièce.

Je voudrais qu’on se le rappelle quand vous entendrez dire… « L’enfer c’est les autres ».

Je tiens à ajouter, en terminant, qu’il m’est arrivé en 1944, à la première représentation, un très rare bonheur, très rare pour les auteurs dramatiques : c’est que les personnages ont été incarnés de telle manière par les trois acteurs, et aussi par Chauffard, le valet d’enfer, qui l’a toujours jouée depuis, que je ne puis plus me représenter mes propres imaginations autrement que sous les traits de Michel Vitold, Gaby Sylvia, de Tania Balachova et de Chauffard. Depuis, la pièce a été rejouée par d’autres acteurs, et je tiens en particulier à dire que j’ai vu Christiane Lenier, quand elle l’a jouée, et que j’ai admiré quelle excellente Inès elle a été.

L’existence précède l’essence [2]

Est-ce qu’au fond, ce qui fait peur, dans la doctrine que je vais essayer de vous exposer, ce n’est pas le fait qu’elle laisse une possibilité de choix à l’homme ? Pour le savoir, il faut que nous revoyions la question sur un plan strictement philosophique.

Qu’est-ce qu’on appelle existentialisme ? La plupart des gens qui utilisent ce mot seraient bien embarrassés pour le justifier, puisque aujourd’hui [1945], que c’est devenu une mode, on déclare volontiers qu’un musicien ou qu’un peintre est existentialiste. Un échotier de Clartés signe l’Existentialiste ; et au fond le mot a pris aujourd’hui une telle largeur et une telle extension qu’il ne signifie plus rien du tout. Il semble que, faute de doctrine d’avant-garde analogue au surréalisme, les gens avides de scandale et de mouvement s’adressent à cette philosophie, qui ne peut d’ailleurs rien leur apporter dans ce domaine ; en réalité c’est la doctrine la moins scandaleuse, la plus austère ; elle est strictement destinée aux techniciens et aux philosophes. Pourtant, elle peut se définir facilement. Ce qui rend les choses compliquées, c’est qu’il y a deux espèces d’existentialistes : les premiers, qui sont chrétiens, et parmi lesquels je rangerai Jaspers et Gabriel Marcel, de confession catholique ; et, d’autre part, les existentialistes athées parmi lesquels il faut ranger Heidegger, et aussi les existentialistes français et moi-même. Ce qu’ils ont en commun, c’est simplement le fait qu’ils estiment que l’existence précède l’essence, ou, si vous voulez, qu’il faut partir de la subjectivité. Que faut-il au juste entendre par là ? Lorsqu’on considère un objet fabriqué, comme par exemple un livre ou un coupe-papier, cet objet a été fabriqué par un artisan qui s’est inspiré d’un concept ; il s’est référé au concept de coupe-papier, et également à une technique de production préalable qui fait partie du concept, et qui est au fond une recette. Ainsi, le coupe-papier est à la fois un objet qui se produit d’une certaine manière et qui, d’autre part, a une utilité définie, et on ne peut pas supposer un homme qui produirait un coupe-papier sans savoir à quoi l’objet va servir. Nous dirons donc que, pour le coupe-papier, l’essence — c’est-à-dire l’ensemble des recettes et des qualités qui permettent de le produire et de le définir — précède l’existence ; et ainsi la présence, en face de moi, de tel coupe-papier ou de tel livre est déterminée. Nous avons donc là une vision technique du monde, dans laquelle on peut dire que la production précède l’existence.

Lorsque nous concevons un Dieu créateur, ce Dieu est assimilé la plupart du temps à un artisan supérieur ; et quelle que soit la doctrine que nous considérions, qu’il s’agisse d’une doctrine comme celle de Descartes ou de la doctrine de Leibniz, nous admettons toujours que la volonté suit plus ou moins l’entendement, ou tout au moins l’accompagne, et que Dieu, lorsqu’il crée, sait précisément ce qu’il crée. Ainsi, le concept d’homme, dans l’esprit de Dieu, est assimilable au concept de coupe-papier dans l’esprit de l’industriel ; et Dieu produit l’homme suivant des techniques et une conception, exactement comme l’artisan fabrique un coupe-papier suivant une définition et une technique. Ainsi l’homme individuel réalise un certain concept qui est dans l’entendement divin. Au XVIIIe siècle, dans l’athéisme des philosophes, la notion de Dieu est supprimée, mais non pas pour autant l’idée que l’essence précède l’existence. Cette idée, nous la retrouvons un peu partout : nous la retrouvons chez Diderot, chez Voltaire, et même chez Kant. L’homme est possesseur d’une nature humaine ; cette nature humaine, qui est le concept humain, se retrouve chez tous les hommes, ce qui signifie que chaque homme est un exemple particulier d’un concept universel, l’homme ; chez Kant, il résulte de cette universalité que l’homme des bois, l’homme de la nature, comme le bourgeois sont astreints à la même définition et possèdent les mêmes qualités de base. Ainsi, là encore, l’essence d’homme précède cette existence historique que nous rencontrons dans la nature.

L’existentialisme athée, que je représente, est plus cohérent. Il déclare que si Dieu n’existe pas, il y a au moins un être chez qui l’existence précède l’essence, un être qui existe avant de pouvoir être défini par aucun concept et que cet être c’est l’homme ou, comme dit Heidegger, la réalité humaine. Qu’est-ce que signifie ici que l’existence précède l’essence ? Cela signifie que l’homme existe d’abord, se rencontre, surgit dans le monde, et qu’il se définit après.

L’homme, tel que le conçoit l’existentialiste, s’il n’est pas définissable, c’est qu’il n’est d’abord rien. Il ne sera qu’ensuite, et il sera tel qu’il se sera fait. Ainsi, il n’y a pas de nature humaine, puisqu’il n’y a pas de Dieu pour la concevoir. L’homme est seulement, non seulement tel qu’il se conçoit, mais tel qu’il se veut, et comme il se conçoit après l’existence, comme il se veut après cet élan vers l’existence ; l’homme n’est rien d’autre que ce qu’il se fait. Tel est le premier principe de l’existentialisme.

C’est aussi ce qu’on appelle la subjectivité, et que l’on nous reproche sous ce nom même. Mais que voulons-nous dire par là, sinon que l’homme a une plus grande dignité que la pierre ou que la table ? Car nous voulons dire que l’homme existe d’abord, c’est-à-dire que l’homme est d’abord ce qui se jette vers un avenir, et ce qui est conscient de se projeter dans l’avenir. L’homme est d’abord un projet qui se vit subjectivement, au lieu d’être une mousse, une pourriture ou un chou-fleur ; rien n’existe préalablement à ce projet ; rien n’est au ciel intelligible, et l’homme sera d’abord ce qu’il aura projeté d’être. Non pas ce qu’il voudra être. Car ce que nous entendons ordinairement par vouloir, c’est une décision consciente, et qui est pour la plupart d’entre nous postérieure à ce qu’il s’est fait lui-même. Je peux vouloir adhérer à un parti, écrire un livre, me marier, tout cela n’est qu’une manifestation d’un choix plus originel, plus spontané que ce qu’on appelle volonté. Mais si vraiment l’existence précède l’essence, l’homme est responsable de ce qu’il est. Ainsi, la première démarche de l’existentialisme est de mettre tout homme en possession de ce qu’il est et de faire reposer sur lui la responsabilité totale de son existence.

Ma volonté engage l’humanité entière [3]

Ainsi, notre responsabilité est beaucoup plus grande que nous ne pourrions le supposer, car elle engage l’humanité entière. Si je suis ouvrier, et si je choisis d’adhérer à un syndicat chrétien plutôt que d’être communiste, si, par cette adhésion, je veux indiquer que la résignation est au fond la solution qui convient à l’homme, que le royaume de l’homme n’est pas sur la terre, je n’engage pas seulement mon cas : je veux être résigné pour tous, par conséquent ma démarche a engagé l’humanité tout entière. Et si je veux, fait plus individuel, me marier, avoir des enfants, même si ce mariage dépend uniquement de ma situation, ou de ma passion, ou de mon désir, par là j’engage non seulement moi-même, mais l’humanité tout entière sur la voie de la monogamie. Ainsi je suis responsable pour moi-même et pour tous, et je crée une certaine image de l’homme que je choisis ; en me choisissant, je choisis l’homme.

L’angoisse et la mauvaise foi [4]

Ceci nous permet de comprendre ce que recouvrent des mots un peu grandiloquents comme angoisse, délaissement, désespoir. Comme vous allez voir, c’est extrêmement simple. D’abord, qu’entend-on par angoisse ? L’existentialiste déclare volontiers que l’homme est angoisse. Cela signifie ceci : l’homme qui s’engage et qui se rend compte qu’il est non seulement celui qu’il choisit d’être, mais encore un législateur choisissant en même temps que soi l’humanité entière, ne saurait échapper au sentiment de sa totale et profonde responsabilité. Certes, beaucoup de gens ne sont pas anxieux ; mais nous prétendons qu’ils se masquent leur angoisse, qu’ils la fuient ; certainement, beaucoup de gens croient en agissant n’engager qu’eux-mêmes, et lorsqu’on leur dit : « mais si tout le monde faisait comme ça ? » ils haussent les épaules et répondent : « tout le monde ne fait pas comme ça. » Mais en vérité, on doit toujours se demander : qu’arriverait-il si tout le monde en faisait autant ? Et on n’échappe à cette pensée inquiétante que par une sorte de mauvaise foi. Celui qui ment et qui s’excuse en déclarant : tout le monde ne fait pas comme ça, est quelqu’un qui est mal à l’aise avec sa conscience, car le fait de mentir implique une valeur universelle attribuée au mensonge. Même lorsqu’elle se masque l’angoisse apparaît. C’est cette angoisse que Kierkegaard appelait l’angoisse d’Abraham.

Vous connaissez l’histoire : Un ange a ordonné à Abraham de sacrifier son fils : tout va bien si c’est vraiment un ange qui est venu et qui a dit : tu es Abraham, tu sacrifieras ton fils. Mais chacun peut se demander, d’abord, est-ce que c’est bien un ange, et est-ce que je suis bien Abraham ? Qu’est-ce qui me le prouve ? Il y avait une folle qui avait des hallucinations : on lui parlait par téléphone et on lui donnait des ordres. Le médecin lui demanda : « Mais qui est-ce qui vous parle ? » Elle répondit : « Il dit que c’est Dieu. » Et qu’est-ce qui lui prouvait, en effet, que c’était Dieu ? Si un ange vient à moi, qu’est-ce qui prouve que c’est un ange ? Et si j’entends des voix, qu’est-ce qui prouve qu’elles viennent du ciel et non de l’enfer, ou d’un subconscient, ou d’un état pathologique ? Qui prouve qu’elles s’adressent à moi ? Qui prouve que je suis bien désigné pour imposer ma conception de l’homme et mon choix à l’humanité ? Je ne trouverai jamais aucune preuve, aucun signe pour m’en convaincre. Si une voix s’adresse à moi, c’est toujours moi qui déciderai que cette voix est la voix de l’ange ; si je considère que tel acte est bon, c’est moi qui choisirai de dire que cet acte est bon plutôt que mauvais. Rien ne me désigne pour être Abraham, et pourtant je suis obligé à chaque instant de faire des actes exemplaires. Tout se passe comme si, pour tout homme, toute l’humanité avait les yeux fixés sur ce qu’il fait et se réglait sur ce qu’il fait. Et chaque homme doit se dire : suis-je bien celui qui a le droit d’agir de telle sorte que l’humanité se règle sur mes actes ? Et s’il ne se dit pas cela, c’est qu’il se masque l’angoisse. Il ne s’agit pas là d’une angoisse qui conduirait au quiétisme, à l’inaction. Il s’agit d’une angoisse simple, que tous ceux qui ont eu des responsabilités connaissent. Lorsque, par exemple, un chef militaire prend la responsabilité d’une attaque et envoie un certain nombre d’hommes à la mort, il choisit de le faire, et au fond il choisit seul. Sans doute il y a des ordres qui viennent d’en haut, mais ils sont trop larges et une interprétation s’impose, qui vient de lui, et de cette interprétation dépend la vie de dix ou quatorze ou vingt hommes. Il ne peut pas ne pas avoir, dans la décision qu’il prend, une certaine angoisse.

Tous les chefs connaissent cette angoisse. Cela ne les empêche pas d’agir, au contraire, c’est la condition même de leur action ; car cela suppose qu’ils envisagent une pluralité de possibilités, et lorsqu’ils en choisissent une, ils se rendent compte qu’elle n’a de valeur que parce qu’elle est choisie. Et cette sorte d’angoisse, qui est celle que décrit l’existentialisme, nous verrons qu’elle s’explique en outre par une responsabilité directe vis-à-vis des autres hommes qu’elle engage. Elle n’est pas un rideau qui nous séparerait de l’action, mais elle fait partie de l’action même.

L’homme est condamné à être libre [5]

Et lorsqu’on parle de délaissement, expression chère à Heidegger, nous voulons dire seulement que Dieu n’existe pas, et qu’il faut en tirer jusqu’au bout les conséquences. L’existentialiste est très opposé à un certain type de morale laïque qui voudrait supprimer Dieu avec le moins de frais possible.

Lorsque, vers 1880, des professeurs français essayèrent de constituer une morale laïque, ils dirent à peu près ceci : Dieu est une hypothèse inutile et coûteuse, nous la supprimons, mais il est nécessaire cependant, pour qu’il y ait une morale, une société, un monde policé, que certaines valeurs soient prises au sérieux et considérées comme existant a priori ; il faut qu’il soit obligatoire a priori d’être honnête, de ne pas mentir, de ne pas battre sa femme, de faire des enfants, etc., etc.. Nous allons donc faire un petit travail qui permettra de montrer que ces valeurs existent tout de même, inscrites dans un ciel intelligible, bien que, par ailleurs, Dieu n’existe pas. Autrement dit, et c’est, je crois, la tendance de tout ce qu’on appelle en France le radicalisme, rien ne sera changé si Dieu n’existe pas ; nous retrouverons les mêmes normes d’honnêteté, de progrès, d’humanisme, et nous aurons fait de Dieu une hypothèse périmée qui mourra tranquillement et d’elle-même.

L’existentialiste, au contraire, pense qu’il est très gênant que Dieu n’existe pas, car avec lui disparaît toute possibilité de trouver des valeurs dans un ciel intelligible ; il ne peut plus y avoir de bien a priori, puisqu’il n’y a pas de conscience infinie et parfaite pour le penser ; il n’est écrit nulle part que le bien existe, qu’il faut être honnête, qu’il ne faut pas mentir, puisque précisément nous sommes sur un plan où il y a seulement des hommes. Dostoïevsky avait écrit : « Si Dieu n’existait pas, tout serait permis. » C’est là le point de départ de l’existentialisme. En effet, tout est permis si Dieu n’existe pas, et par conséquent l’homme est délaissé, parce qu’il ne trouve ni en lui, ni hors de lui une possibilité de s’accrocher. Il ne trouve d’abord pas d’excuses. Si, en effet, l’existence précède l’essence, on ne pourra jamais expliquer par référence à une nature humaine donnée et figée ; autrement dit, il n’y a pas de déterminisme, l’homme est libre, l’homme est liberté. Si, d’autre part, Dieu n’existe pas, nous ne trouvons pas en face de nous des valeurs ou des ordres qui légitimeront notre conduite. Ainsi, nous n’avons ni derrière nous, ni devant nous, dans le domaine lumineux des valeurs, des justifications ou des excuses. Nous sommes seuls, sans excuses. C’est ce que j’exprimerai en disant que l’homme est condamné à être libre. Condamné, parce qu’il ne s’est pas créé lui-même, et par ailleurs cependant libre, parce qu’une fois jeté dans le monde, il est responsable de tout ce qu’il fait.

L’existentialiste ne croit pas à la puissance de la passion. Il ne pensera jamais qu’une belle passion est un torrent dévastateur qui conduit fatalement l’homme à certains actes, et qui, par conséquent, est une excuse. Il pense que l’homme est responsable de sa passion. L’existentialiste ne pensera pas non plus que l’homme peut trouver un secours dans un signe donné, sur terre, qui l’orientera ; car il pense que l’homme déchiffre lui-même le signe comme il lui plaît. Il pense donc que l’homme, sans aucun appui et sans aucun secours, est condamné à chaque instant à inventer l’homme.

Le désespoir [6]

Quant au désespoir, cette expression a un sens extrêmement simple. Elle veut dire que nous nous bornerons à compter sur ce qui dépend de notre volonté, ou sur l’ensemble des probabilités qui rendent notre action possible.

Quand on veut quelque chose, il y a toujours des éléments probables. Je puis compter sur la venue d’un ami. Cet ami vient en chemin de fer ou en tramway ; cela suppose que le chemin de fer arrivera à l’heure dite, ou que le tramway ne déraillera pas. Je reste dans le domaine des possibilités ; mais il ne s’agit de compter sur les possibles que dans la mesure stricte où notre action comporte l’ensemble de ces possibles. À partir du moment où les possibilités que je considère ne sont pas rigoureusement engagées par mon action, je dois m’en désintéresser, parce qu’aucun Dieu, aucun dessein ne peut adapter le monde et ses possibles à ma volonté. Au fond, quand Descartes disait : « Se vaincre plutôt soi-même que le monde », il voulait dire la même chose : agir sans espoir.

[1] Extrait audio et texte de Jean-Paul Sartre, Huis clos, Groupe Frémeaux Colombini SAS © 2010 (La Librairie Sonore en accord avec Moshé Naïm Emen © 1964 et Gallimard © 2004, ancien exploitant).

[2] Jean-Paul Sartre, L’Existentialisme est un humanisme, Éditions Nagel © 1970, pages 15 à 24.

Extrait audio de Luc Ferry, Mythologie, Frémeaux & Associés © 2010, CD2-[8], L’invention de la liberté, 0:07 à 3:34.

[3] Ibid. pages 26 et 27.

[4] Ibid. pages 27 à 33.

[5] Ibid. pages 33 à 38.

[6] Ibid. pages 49 à 51.

Philo5…

… à quelle source choisissez-vous d’alimenter votre esprit?


Miss America/92e: Attention: un racisme peut en cacher un autre ! (No Kansas guns and religion, please, we’re New Yorkers: Has Miss America betrayed the American dream ?)

2 octobre, 2013
http://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large/1-margaret-gorman-1921-granger.jpghttp://www.historybyzim.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Miss-America-1921-Margaret-Gorman.jpghttp://images.fineartamerica.com/images-medium-large/my-favorite-brunette-dorothy-lamour-everett.jpghttp://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/a69ce-bessmyersoncollage.gif?w=450&h=409http://31.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m9acqcRGQF1qjkeqso1_400.jpghttp://www.vfa.us/MISS%20AMERICA%2009%2007%20196803.jpghttp://img.timeinc.net/time/photoessays/2009/10_beauty/beauty_williams.jpghttp://www.alleewillis.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/Vanessa-Williams-cornflakes-box_2350.jpgVanessaWilliamshttp://covers.openlibrary.org/w/id/169318-M.jpghttp://www.orangejuiceblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Miss-America-2014-dancing.jpg
 
http://media.philly.com/images/526*395/theresa_vail_Miss_Kansas_600.jpghttp://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/About/General/2013/9/19/1379575928829/Obabiyi-Aishah-Ajibola-010.jpghttp://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/06/2012-sdt-asian-americans-0232.pnghttp://familyinequality.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/pew-asian-income.jpg?w=450&h=691http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2012/06/2012-sdt-asian-americans-0261.pngCar on donnera à celui qui a; mais à celui qui n’a pas on ôtera même ce qu’il a. Jésus (Marc 4: 25)
Je rêve que mes quatre petits enfants vivront un jour dans un pays où on ne les jugera pas à la couleur de leur peau mais à la nature de leur caractère. Martin Luther King
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme dans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Obama
Nous qui vivons dans les régions côtières des villes bleues, nous lisons plus de livres et nous allons plus souvent au théâtre que ceux qui vivent au fin fond du pays. Nous sommes à la fois plus sophistiqués et plus cosmopolites – parlez-nous de nos voyages scolaires en Chine et en Provence ou, par exemple, de notre intérêt pour le bouddhisme. Mais par pitié, ne nous demandez pas à quoi ressemble la vie dans l’Amérique rouge. Nous n’en savons rien. Nous ne savons pas qui sont Tim LaHaye et Jerry B. Jenkins. […] Nous ne savons pas ce que peut bien dire James Dobson dans son émission de radio écoutée par des millions d’auditeurs. Nous ne savons rien de Reba et Travis. […] Nous sommes très peu nombreux à savoir ce qu’il se passe à Branson dans le Missouri, même si cette ville reçoit quelque sept millions de touristes par an; pas plus que nous ne pouvons nommer ne serait-ce que cinq pilotes de stock-car. […] Nous ne savons pas tirer au fusil ni même en nettoyer un, ni reconnaître le grade d’un officier rien qu’à son insigne. Quant à savoir à quoi ressemble une graine de soja poussée dans un champ… David Brooks
Mon Dieu,donnez-moi la sérénité d’accepter les choses que je ne puis changer, le courage de changer les choses que je peux, dt la sagesse d’en connaître la différence. Prière de la sérénité (tatouage de Miss Kansas)
Il y a autant de racismes qu’il y a de groupes qui ont besoin de se justifier d’exister comme ils existent, ce qui constitue la fonction invariante des racismes. Il me semble très important de porter l’analyse sur les formes du racisme qui sont sans doute les plus subtiles, les plus méconnaissables, donc les plus rarement dénoncées, peut-être parce que les dénonciateurs ordinaires du racisme possèdent certaines des propriétés qui inclinent à cette forme de racisme. Je pense au racisme de l’intelligence. (…) Ce racisme est propre à une classe dominante dont la reproduction dépend, pour une part, de la transmission du capital culturel, capital hérité qui a pour propriété d’être un capital incorporé, donc apparemment naturel, inné. Le racisme de l’intelligence est ce par quoi les dominants visent à produire une "théodicée de leur propre privilège", comme dit Weber, c’est-à-dire une justification de l’ordre social qu’ils dominent. (…) Tout racisme est un essentialisme et le racisme de l’intelligence est la forme de sociodicée caractéristique d’une classe dominante dont le pouvoir repose en partie sur la possession de titres qui, comme les titres scolaires, sont censés être des garanties d’intelligence et qui ont pris la place, dans beaucoup de sociétés, et pour l’accès même aux positions de pouvoir économique, des titres anciens comme les titres de propriété et les titres de noblesse. Pierre Bourdieu
Dieu merci, le temps de la domination des barbies blondes peroxydées est révolu … Time
Quand on est miss America, on doit être américaine. Tweet
C’est l’élection de Miss Etats-Unis, pas Miss Inde. Tweet
Super, ils ont choisi une musulmane comme Miss America. Obama doit être heureux. Peut-être qu’il a voté. Tweet
Les juges de Miss America ne le diront jamais, mais Miss Kansas a perdu parce qu’elle représente réellement les valeurs américaines. Todd Starnes (Fox news)
Une fille au teint foncé comme Nina ne serait jamais devenue Miss Inde. Au moins, elle est devenue Miss America. Varun Agarwal
À cette miss New York aux allures pas assez "américaines" (encore faudrait-il définir ce qu’est un vrai américain parmi ce peuple originaire d’Afrique, d’Europe, ou encore d’Asie), ils préféraient miss Kansas : une femme blanche, sergent de l’armée américaine, arborant un insigne militaire de toute beauté tatoué sur l’épaule. Céline Husson-Alaya
Nous avons délibérément choisi de tenir cet événement juste avant la finale des Miss Monde afin de montrer qu’une alternative existe pour les musulmanes. Créatrice du concours Miss Muslimah
Margaret Gorman represents the type of womanhood America needs, strong, red-blooded, able to shoulder the responsibilities of homemaking and motherhood. It is in her type that the hope of the country rests. The NYT (1921)
There she is, Miss America There she is, your ideal The dreams of a million girls Who are more than pretty May come true in Atlantic City Oh she may turn out to be The queen of femininity There she is, Miss America There she is, your ideal With so many beauties She’ll take the town by storm With her all-American face and form And there she is Walking on air she is Fairest of the fair she is Miss America. Jingle de Miss America
Thank God I have lived long enough that this nation has been able to select the beautiful young woman of color to be Miss America. Shirley Chisholm (Congresswoman)
Beauty contests are ways that if you live in a poor neighborhood, you can imagine getting ahead because it is a way up. It is a way to scholarships, to attention, and it’s one of the few things that you see out there as a popular symbol. When I was living in a kind of factory working neighborhood of Toledo, the K-Part television Miss TV contest, something like that, was advertised. And I decided I would try to enter the contest even though I was underage. I think I was 16 and the limit was, was 18. So I lied about my age. It wasn’t a terrible experience. It was a surrealistic experience. You had to put on your bathing suit and walk and stand on a beer keg. I did three or four different kinds of dances. Spanish and Russian and heaven knows what. I thought I would get money for college. And it seemed glamorous. It seemed to me in high school like a way out of a not too great life in a pretty poor neighborhood. Gloria Steinem
In spite of cringe-worth flaws of the pageant [like the bikini-in-heels (aka "swimsuit") competition], Nina Davuluri, the new Miss America, probably represents some of the best qualities and aspirations of "modern" America. Here’s why: America was built on a dream of hard work by people from all over the world. She and her family certainly fit that ideal. Her father is a physician and she aspires to be one as well. (…) Thanks to the life her parents built (from scratch), and her own hard work-ethic, she graduated from the University of Michigan debt-free. She’s a great example of working through failure and difficulty, and getting back up again. This shows in her struggle against bulimia. For fifteen years she studied classical Indian dance, refining a nuanced art form. She was gutsy enough to showcase a fusion of classical and Bollywood dance in her talent act (…) Her platform: "Celebrating Diversity through Cultural Competency" couldn’t be more timely. (…) When headlines all over the world proclaim Nina Davuluri as Miss America, this stops anti-Americans in their tracks. They see that the USA can live up to its values, as the land of the free, home of the brave. It’s where dreams for a better life come true. It’s where diverse people are welcomed. It’s full of beauty and sparkles and anything is possible. Homa Sabet Tavangar
Half of employed Asian Americans (50%) are in management, professional and related occupations, a higher share than the roughly 40% for employed Americans overall. Many of these occupations require advanced degrees. (…) These high levels of educational attainment are a factor in the occupational profile of Asian Americans, especially their concentration in the fields of science and engineering. Among adults, 14% of Asian Americans hold these types of jobs, compared with 5% of the U.S. population overall. The share among Indians is 28%. Another facet of the Asian-American occupational profile is the high share of immigrants from Asian countries who are in the U.S. under the H1-B visa program. These visas were authorized under the Immigration and Nationality Act in 1990 to increase the inflow of highly skilled “guest workers” from abroad. Asian countries are now the source of about three-quarters of such temporary visas. In 2011, India alone accounted for 72,438 of the 129,134 H1-B visas granted, or 56% (…) Among Indian Americans ages 25 and older, seven-in-ten (70%) have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree; this is higher than the Asian-American share (49%) and much higher than the national share (28%). Median annual personal earnings for Indian-American full-time, year-round workers are $65,000, significantly higher than for all Asian Americans ($48,000) as well as for all U.S. adults ($40,000). Among households, the median annual income for Indians is $88,000, much higher than for all Asians ($66,000) and all U.S. households ($49,800). (…) The share of adult Indian Americans who live in poverty is 9%, lower than the shares of all Asian Americans (12%) and of the U.S. population overall (13%). (…) Compared with other U.S. Asian groups, Indian Americans are the most likely to identify with the Democratic Party; 65% are Democrats or lean to the Democrats, 18% are Republican or lean to the Republicans. Pew (2012)
Les Indiens-américains sont en effet une nouvelle "minorité modèle". Ce terme remonte aux années 1960 quand les Americains d’origine asiatique – les Chinois, Japonais et Coréens – étaient connus pour leurs hautes qualifications et hauts revenus. Les ressortissants d’Asie du nord-est continuent d’exceller aux États-Unis, mais parmi les groupes minoritaires, les Indiens sont clairement le dernier et meilleur "modèle". En 2007, le revenu médian des ménages dirigés par un Indien-américain était d’environ 83 000 $, comparativement à 61 000 $ pour les ressortissants d’Asie du nord-est et 55 000 $ pour les Blancs. Environ 69 % des Indiens-américains de 25 ans et plus sont au moins détenteurs d’une licence, ce qui éclipse les taux de 51 % et 30 % atteints respectivement par les Asiatiques en général et les Blancs. Les Indiens-américains sont également moins susceptibles d’être pauvres ou en prison par rapport aux Blancs. Alors pourquoi les Indiens-Américains s’en sortent-ils si bien ? Une réponse naturelle est l’autosélection. Quelqu’un qui est prêt à s’arracher à ses racines et à traverser la moitié du monde aura tendance à être plus ambitieux et travailleur que la moyenne. Mais les gens veulent venir aux États-Unis pour de nombreuses raisons dont certaines – comme par exemple le rapprochement familial – ont peu à voir avec l’ardeur au travail. En fin de compte, la politique d’immigration décide quels types de qualités nos immigrants possèdent. En vertu de notre politique d’immigration actuelle, une majorité d’immigrants légaux aux États-Unis obtiennent la carte verte (résidence permanente) car ils ont des liens familiaux avec des citoyens américains, mais un petit nombre (15 % en 2007) sont choisis spécifiquement pour leur valeur sur le marché du travail. La proportion d’immigrants indiens qui ont reçu une carte verte liée à l’emploi est l’une des plus élevées de toutes les nationalités. Par conséquent, c’est principalement l’élite instruite indienne et ses proches qui vient aux États-Unis. Forbes

Miss America a-elle trahi le Rêve américain ?

Alors qu’en cette saison finissante de l’été et de ses habituels concours de beauté

Où tous voiles dehors la troisième Miss Muslimah nous bassine de ses versets d’un livre prétendument "incréé" à qui l’on doit sur son seul continent d’origine une énième boucherie au Kénya et les destructions à présent quasi-hebdomadaires d’églises chrétiennes …

La première Miss Monde philippine, dont le concours sous la pression des islamistes avait dû être déplacé à Bali, est non seulement née aux Etats-Unis de père américain mais déjà actrice confirmée …

Comment ne pas voir, avec l’élection récente de la première Miss America d’origine indienne qui triomphe avec un numéro digne de Bollywood mais dont le teint foncé n’aurait probablement jamais permis l’élection en Inde même, la trahison précisément du Rêve américain qu’elle était censée servir ?

Et ne pas comprendre du coup les réactions dites "racistes" qui ont accompagné, derrière cette lutte entre l’urbanité d’une Miss New York,  fille de gynécologue et future médecin elle-même, et la ruralité d’une Miss Kansas, blonde diane chasseresse aux rangers et tatouages religieux et militaire, l’apparent couronnement du produit de la plus grande concentration de privilèges ?

Où la géniale mais bassement commerciale trouvaille (probable reprise des fêtes médiévales du premier mai) du fameux Barnum des femmes à barbe et des cirques du même nom pour allonger la saison touristique des plages américaines et servir accessoirement de marche-pied pour Hollywood (Dorothy Lamour, Miss Louisiana 1931), la mode ou la publicité (jusqu’à 100 000 dollars annuels pour Miss 1926, soit plus que le champion de baseball Babe Ruth ou le président des Etats-Unis !) à la première jeune Américaine venue …

Qui sous la pression des ligues de vertu religieuses puis féministes et entre la première lauréate juive (et future candidate au Sénat au lendemain du génocide de 1945), la première Noire (1984) ou la première handicapée (2005), avait progressivement abandonné les manteaux de fourrure et bijoux des débuts pour devenir le premier fournisseur de bourses d’étude pour filles au monde (quelque 45 millions annuels pour 12 000 jeunes filles dont un total de 340 000 dollars pour l’élection finale et 50 000 pour la gagnante) …

Finit en fait entre le désormais sacrosaint impératif de diversité, la multiplication des épreuves toujours plus "intelligentes" (comme par ailleurs, sans compter les dérives de la chirurgie esthétique et des concours pour enfants, d’autres concours tels Miss Monde, Miss Univers, Miss International ou Miss Terre !) et cet adoubemment d’une nouvelle "minorité modèle" qui ajoute à présent l’ultime luxe de la beauté aux plus hauts taux de diplômés et revenus des Etats-Unis …

Par remplacer (ne nous avait-on pas déjà fait le coup en 2008 avec l’élection qui avait viré au concours de beauté politiquement correct du premier président américain de couleur ?) un racisme (ethnique) par un autre (social) ?

Has Miss America betrayed the American dream?

JC Durbant

October 2, 2013

What is more American than Miss America and its idea that any well-deserving American girl will make it to the top ? But with the recent controversial election of Miss America 2014, has America’s oldest beauty pageant really kept its promise of unlimited personal progress ?

To be sure, over its 92 years of existence, America’s favorite beauty contest has had its share of criticism: immorality, commercialism, dehumanization, over-sexualization, even racism. Yet over the years it has always seemed to adapt with the times, introducing ever more advances such as a talent competition, scholarships, evening gowns or allowing non-white participants. Thus, 1945 saw the election of the first Jewish American girl and 1983 the crowning of the first of many non-white contestants, including this year’s first Indian-American. And even if it did start as a marketing device to make Labor Day tourists prolong their stay at the Atlantic beaches, it did provide an opportunity for ordinary young women such as Hollywood superstar Dorothy Lamour to realize their American dream in the form of advertising or movie contracts. In fact, it even helped its first Jewish winner to enter politics and run for the Senate in 1980. Or provided initial exposure to one of today’s most powerful and influential women in America and in the world, namely talk show host Oprah Winfrey. And over the years it has distributed millions and millions of dollars in scholarship money to the point where it is now the world’s largest provider of scholarships to women.

So how to explain the controversy which this year’s election has just generated ? After all, Miss America’s first Indian-American winner has got all the talent, brains and beauty that one can expect from the woman that is supposed to represent the best of America’s womanhood for a year ? Shall it be assigned to the usual cause of racism that America’s slowly-dwindling white majority has been known for in the past ? Or could it be that Miss America is just the victim of its own success? After raising, one after another, its standards over the years as a response to the criticisms of which it was the object, America’s oldest beauty pageant now finds itself electing the best America can offer. An India-American gynecologist’s daughter with the brightest education record and plans to be a physician herself, Nina Davuluri is the perfect example of a new model minority that is already the best educated and best-off of all the ethnic groups in the country -whites included. Hence perhaps the not-to-unexpected resentment of some in a white majority that in these days of recession is fast losing ground.

But is this not in fact one of the inherent contradictions of the American dream itself – and the source of America’s persistent and even increasing inequalities – in which only the best are supposed to win and where therefore you end up rewarding the least needy in the end ?

Voir aussi:

La nouvelle Miss America est d’origine indienne (donc arabe, musulmane et fanatique d’Al-Qaïda)

Céline Husson-Alaya

Femmes, féminins, féminismes

La plus belle femme des États-Unis est d’origine indienne. Rien de bien étonnant en soi en Amérique, terre d’immigration et de métissage par excellence. Nina Davuluri, grande brune à la peau mate née dans l’État de New York il y a 24 ans, a été élue Miss America 2014 le 15 septembre au soir.

Mais cette élection a visiblement courroucé certains conservateurs. Non pas pour le côté suranné d’un concours de beauté féminine tout à fait discutable au XXIème siècle, mais parce que certains estiment que la belle Nina n’est pas assez américaine. Pire, elle serait arabe (passons sur le fait que toutes les personnes mates de peau ne sont pas nécessairement arabes, et que les Indiens le sont encore moins). Double tare, elle serait musulmane (comme Barack Obama en fait, c’est une conspiration). Provocation ultime : lors de "l’épreuve des talents", elle a interprété un mélange de danse traditionnelle indienne et de mouvements de films de Bollywood. N’en jetez plus.

La nouvelle miss a été lynchée de tweets racistes sur le site de micro-blogging. "Quand on est miss America, on doit être Américaine", "Quand est-ce qu’une femme blanche sera élue Miss America ? Jamais ?", "Ils ont choisi une musulmane pour devenir Miss America. Obama a dû être content. Peut-être qu’il faisait partie du jury". "Comment une étrangère peut gagner ? C’est une Arabe !". Sans compter une réflexion de toute beauté : "#MissAmerica hmmm quoi ? Avons-nous oublié le 11 septembre ? " et le splendide : "C’est plutôt miss Terroriste #MissAmerica".

Comme on dit, la bave de crapaud n’atteint pas la blanche colombe, qui déclarait après son couronnement : "Je suis si heureuse que cette institution prenne en compte la diversité". "Nous sommes en train d’écrire l’histoire ici, en tant qu’Asiatiques américaines", alors que la communauté asio-américaine compte 18,2 millions de personnes aux États-Unis (5,7% de la population). Balayant la polémique, la reine de beauté affirmait lors de sa première conférence de presse : "Je dois m’élever au-dessus de ça". "Je me suis toujours considérée en premier lieu et avant tout comme une Américaine", elle qui racontait avoir dû combattre les préjugés sur sa culture durant cette année d’élection (certains étaient convaincus que ses parents allaient organiser un mariage arrangée pour elle).

À cette miss New York aux allures pas assez "américaines" (encore faudrait-il définir ce qu’est un vrai américain parmi ce peuple originaire d’Afrique, d’Europe, ou encore d’Asie), ils préféraient miss Kansas : une femme blanche, sergent de l’armée américaine, arborant un insigne militaire de toute beauté tatoué sur l’épaule.

Ni musulmane, ni Indienne, et encore moins arabe, (et quand bien même) Nina Davuluri est une étudiante diplômée de l’Université du Michigan qui souhaite devenir médecin, comme son père, gynécologue obstétricien, et souhaite utiliser l’argent de sa victoire, non pas pour financer Al-Qaïda, mais pour payer l’université. Et réaliser son rêve américain.

Ce n’est pas la première fois qu’une miss America est la cible d’attaques racistes. En 2010, Rima Fakih, une jeune femme d’origine libanaise, était la cible des mêmes relents haineux. Car d’origine libanaise, donc arabe, donc musulmane et donc sans doute terroriste, elle était accusée de militer pour le Hezbollah.

Voir également:

Non, Miss America n’est pas une terroriste !

L’attribution de la couronne de Miss America à Nina Davuluri, une Américaine originaire de l’Etat de l’Andhra Pradesh, a déchaîné une véritable hystérie raciste en ligne. Des nombreux utilisateurs de Twitter ont vu en elle une terroriste arabe. Une histoire à vite oublier, estime le quotidien.

Neeti Sarkar

The Hindu

19 Septembre 2013

Quand Nina Davuluri est devenue la première Américaine d’origine indienne à remporter le titre de Miss America [le 16 septembre], tweets malveillants et autres commentaires racistes se sont multipliés sur les réseaux sociaux.

Aujourd’hui, avec la révolution des télécommunications, n’importe qui peut dire n’importe quoi sur le web. La démocratie Internet est une hydre. Les commentaires [racistes] sur Nina y voisinent avec ceux, peut-être plus nombreux encore, qui prennent sa défense. Bina Hanchinamani Ellefsen, une avocate de Seattle, se dit "mal à l’aise face aux commentaires racistes au sujet d’une Miss America d’origine indienne. Nous ne sommes pas moins américains parce que nos ancêtres étaient indiens et non pas européens."

Quant à Nimisha Gandhi, gestionnaire dans le monde de la mode, elle "déplore qu’un pays par ailleurs si avancé soit si arriéré dans sa mentalité. Et sur les réseaux, dès qu’il s’agit de dénigrer quelqu’un à cause de sa couleur de peau ou de sa religion, les commentaires pleuvent. Je suis désolé pour cette belle fille intelligente et forte qui a été traitée de tous les noms. D’un autre côté, je suis contente qu’un jury américain ne se soit pas laissé influencer par les différences raciales."

"On est choqué de lire tant de commentaires racistes sur Twitter, s’indigne la journaliste et blogueuse Divya Sehgal. Et c’est effrayant de s’apercevoir que les Américains d’origine asiatique ne sont toujours pas reconnus comme des Américains. Cela dit, je pense que c’est le fait d’une petite minorité. Si vous faites défiler l’article de Buzzfeed [site qui a mis en ligne les commentaires postés sur Twitter], vous verrez combien d’Américains sont choqués par ces propos racistes. Donc, si le racisme est déplorable, j’ose espérer qu’il n’est qu’une goutte d’eau dans un immense océan non raciste."

"Nina ne serait jamais devenue Miss Inde"

Tandis que la plupart des Indiens sont attristés par ce qui s’est passé aux Etats-Unis, l’entrepreneur et auteur Varun Agarwal a reçu 600 commentaires favorables sous son message [posté sur Facebook]. "Une fille au teint foncé comme Nina ne serait jamais devenue Miss Inde, écrivait-il. Au moins, elle est devenue Miss America."

Selon la psychologue Jamuna Tripathi, "nous vivons malheureusement dans un monde qui perpétue les stéréotypes. La société rend complexés les gens à la peau foncée. L’aspect positif, c’est que Nina est restée très digne face à l’adversité. Sa confiance en elle et sa maturité sont vraiment la marque d’une gagnante."

Tout en rappelant qu’il serait temps de prendre de la hauteur, l’ancienne Miss Inde et Miss Terre 2010, Nicole Faria, affirme : "Chacun a le droit d’avoir ses opinions et, dans les concours de beauté, tout le monde peut avoir un point de vue différent ; la beauté est dans l’œil de celui qui regarde. Ce qui est bien, c’est que le résultat est définitif, et, même si certains peuvent voir les choses autrement, le verdict est tombé. Nina a remporté la couronne. En tant qu’Indienne, ça fait chaud au cœur. Rappelons-nous que la beauté et la bonté ont triomphé, et ne laissons rien ternir de cette victoire si méritée."

Voir aussi:

Attaques racistes

"Miss America est une terroriste"

Clémentine Rebillat

Paris Match

16 septembre 2013

Nina Davuluri, la nouvelle Miss America, a été élue dimanche soir. A peine a-t-elle eu le temps de savourer sa victoire que la jeune femme d’origine indienne a été la cible d’insultes racistes.

Quelques minutes après son sacre, Nina Davuluri déclarait: «Je suis tellement contente que cette organisation laisse une large place à la diversité». La nouvelle Miss America 2014 n’avait pas encore conscience du flot d’insultes dont elle allait être la victime. La jeune femme de 24 ans d’origine indienne qui a remporté dimanche soir à Atlantic City le prestigieux concours de Miss est au coeur d’une polémique. Malgré sa grâce, ses talents de danseuse et ses brillantes études -elle souhaite devenir médecin et compte utiliser l’argent de son couronnement pour payer l’université- Nina ne fait pas l’unanimité. Loin de là.

Miss America

Au moment où son nom a été annoncé par le présentateur, la sublime brune à la beauté exotique a déclenché un flot d’insultes racistes sur les réseaux sociaux. «Si tu es Miss America, tu dois être Américaine», a lancé un internaute. «Super, ils ont choisi une musulmane comme Miss America. Obama doit être heureux. Peut-être qu’il a voté», a écrit un autre. «Miss New York est une Indienne… Avec tout votre respect, c’est l’Amérique», «Et une Arabe devient Miss Amérique. Classique», «#Miss Amérique. Avons-nous oublié le 11-Septembre?», «Miss America est une terroriste», «C’est Miss America ou Miss Al Qaïda?» ont posté d’autres téléspectateurs…

"La domination des Barbie blondes peroxydées est révolue"

Pour beaucoup d’internautes, ce n’est pas Nina qui aurait dû gagner mais Miss Kansas, une sculpturale blonde tatouée, militaire, parachutiste, boxeuse et championne de tir à l’arc. Theresa Vail n’hésite jamais à poser en treillis ou arme à la main. Une image de l’Amérique conservatrice que les détracteurs de Nina auraient voulu gagnante. «Les juges de Miss America ne le diront jamais, mais Miss Kansas a perdu parce qu’elle représente réellement les valeurs américaines», a réagi sur Twitter l’animateur de la Fox, Todd Starnes.

Pourtant, Nina Davuluri, qui, plus jeune, s’est battue contre des troubles alimentaires, a elle aussi une histoire forte. Farouchement opposée à la chirurgie esthétique -un fait rare dans les élections de miss aux Etats-Unis- son père est un éminent médecin, un métier qu’elle veut exercer, d’après CNN. Le «Time» de son côté se félicite que le «temps de la domination des Barbie blondes peroxydées est révolu». Si beaucoup d’internautes se sont déchainés contre la gagnante, d’autres n’ont pas hésité à prendre sa défense, critiquant «l’ignorance» des auteurs.

Malgré la polémique, Nina Davuluri est bien décidée à profiter de son sacre et ne compte pas se laisser abattre par les insultes. En conférence de presse, elle a déclaré qu’elle «devait passer au-dessus de tout ça». «Je me suis toujours vue avant tout comme une Américaine», a-t-elle ajouté. Pour son premier déplacement en tant que Miss America, cette passionnée de Bollywood devrait se rendre dans le New Jersey, sur les lieux de l’ouragan Sandy.

Voir encore:

Les «Miss musulmanes» répliquent à «Miss Monde»

Chloé Woitier, AFP, AP, Reuters Agences

Le Figaro

18/09/2013

Ce concours de beauté où la piété et l’engagement comptent autant que la beauté aura lieu en Indonésie quelques jours avant la grande finale de Miss Monde, qui se déroule cette année dans le même pays.

Alors que, sur l’île de Bali, les Miss de tous les continents sont en pleine préparation de l’élection de Miss Monde, un concours de beauté d’un autre genre s’apprête à avoir lieu à près de 1000 kilomètres de là. La capitale de l’Indonésie, Jakarta, accueille en effet ce mercredi la finale de World Muslimah 2013, ou Miss musulmane du Monde.

Si World Muslimah reste avant tout un concours de beauté – la taille et le poids des 20 finalistes sont listés sur le site officiel du concours -, la sélection des jeunes femmes s’est faite sur des critères religieux. Pour participer, il est en effet obligatoire de porter le voile islamique, et de savoir lire parfaitement les versets du Coran. Les photos jointes au dossier de candidature doivent se faire «dans une tenue conforme aux standards musulmans», qui ne «laisse pas voir les courbes du corps», «empêche de deviner la peau et les cheveux», et dont le voile «est suffisamment long pour couvrir les oreilles, le cou et la poitrine». «Vos poses doivent être élégantes, nous recherchons avant tout la modestie», souligne le site officiel.

Dans les coulisses du concours

«Porter le voile n’empêche pas de réussir sa carrière»

Les candidates, âgées de 18 à 27 ans, doivent également expliquer dans leur dossier de candidature pourquoi elles ont choisi de mettre le voile. Mais la dévotion ne fait pas tout. Les jeunes femmes doivent également justifier d’une activité professionnelle, associative, artistique ou sportive qui met en avant leurs talents et leurs qualités morales. «Ce que je recherche, c’est une personnalité forte, quelqu’un qui aide sa communauté et prouve que la beauté n’est pas que corporelle», explique l’une des juges du concours.

Les candidates de World Muslimah, sélectionnées sur Internet, ont également dû préparer une vidéo pour se présenter. La jeune femme actuellement la plus populaire – 889 votes sur le site officiel – est originaire de Bali. Âgée de 21 ans, Febrian Nur Vianti explique dans sa vidéo être passionnée de mode et s’exercer à créer ses chaussures pour lancer à terme sa propre entreprise. On la voit également réciter longuement des versets du Coran, et «espérer que sa candidature prouvera aux jeunes musulmanes que porter le voile n’empêche pas de réussir sa carrière».

Miss Monde, «un concours de prostituées»

Les 20 finalistes, originaires d’Indonésie, d’Iran, de Malaisie, du Nigeria, de Bangladesh et du Brunei, se sont fait offrir un voyage à Jakarta pour préparer la finale et ont effectué un stage spirituel de trois jours. La grande gagnante pourra partir tous frais payés à La Mecque pour réaliser son pélerinage, tandis que ses dauphines participeront à des «voyages éducatifs» en Inde, Turquie, et au Brunei.

La grande finale de World Muslimah aura lieu quelques jours avant celle de Miss Monde, qui est sous le feu des critiques des islamistes d’Indonésie. Ces derniers ont dénoncé un «concours de prostituées» et obtenu que la finale soit déplacée de Jakarta à Bali, île à majorité hindouiste. Les organisateurs de World Muslimah ne sont pas associés à ces critiques. «Nous avons délibérément choisi de tenir cet événement juste avant la finale des Miss Monde afin de montrer qu’une alternative existe pour les musulmanes», affirme la créatrice du concours, qui avait été licenciée de la télévision indonésienne en 2006 pour avoir refusé de retirer son voile à l’antenne. «Nous préférons montrer à nos filles qu’elles ont le choix entre Miss Monde et Miss musulmanes».

Voir également:

5 Reasons the First Indian-American Crowned Miss America Represents Best Aspirations for Modern America

Homa Sabet Tavangar

Huffington Post

09/16/2013

I didn’t watch Miss America, but now I wish I had. Monday morning I woke up to a fascinating news feed about backlash on the winner, Miss New York, an Indian-American, and a first. But just as her mascara-punctuated tears began to flow as the tiara graced her perfect coif, the haters on Twitter reared their narrow-minded heads. Here’s an example of the media coverage, from CNN.com, with the headline:

Miss America Crowns 1st Winner of Indian Descent; racist tweets flow

The Tweets included this racist one from Todd Starnes, host of Fox News and Commentary: "The liberal Miss America judges won’t say this – but Miss Kansas lost because she actually represented American values. #missamerica"

Many, many Tweets protested her being "Arab" (really?!), Muslim (she’s Hindu) and not American (she was born in Syracuse, NY and has lived in Oklahoma and Michigan as well).

In spite of cringe-worth flaws of the pageant [like the bikini-in-heels (aka "swimsuit") competition], Nina Davuluri, the new Miss America, probably represents some of the best qualities and aspirations of "modern" America. Here’s why:

America was built on a dream of hard work by people from all over the world. She and her family certainly fit that ideal. Her father is a physician and she aspires to be one as well.

The Founding Fathers were slave owners and came from Europe. Obviously, to be true to the ideals they enshrined, we don’t need to continue to live and look like them.

Thanks to the life her parents built (from scratch), and her own hard work-ethic, she graduated from the University of Michigan debt-free.

She’s a great example of working through failure and difficulty, and getting back up again. This shows in her struggle against bulimia. For fifteen years she studied classical Indian dance, refining a nuanced art form. She was gutsy enough to showcase a fusion of classical and Bollywood dance in her talent act (this made me want to try it!). Here’s a clip:

Her platform: "Celebrating Diversity through Cultural Competency" couldn’t be more timely. She chose this in part since she had to dispel so many misconceptions about her culture through the year, such as whether her parents will arrange a marriage for her. With the national spotlight, these prejudices are obviously rampant and growing, but it also offers an opening for a meaningful conversation: What is "cultural competency" and why does it matter? What are the values you hold dear as an American? Does she represent them? Does her brown skin and non-European heritage stand in the way of appreciating her accomplishment?

When headlines all over the world proclaim Nina Davuluri as Miss America, this stops anti-Americans in their tracks. They see that the USA can live up to its values, as the land of the free, home of the brave. It’s where dreams for a better life come true. It’s where diverse people are welcomed. It’s full of beauty and sparkles and anything is possible. Millions of dollars in weapons couldn’t convince youth in Iraq or Afghanistan or Egypt of this fact, but Nina’s smile just might.

Voir encore:

Will the Next Miss America Wear Combat Boots?

Susan Kraus

Huffington Post

09/03/2013

There is a Miss America contestant this year whose platform is "Empowering Women: Overcoming Stereotypes and Breaking Barriers."

2013-09-02-_51K65811.jpg

Her name is Theresa Marie Vail, Miss Kansas, and she’ll be breaking a few barriers herself.

Theresa is in the military. She enlisted in the Army National Guard, raised her right hand and took the oath to "support and defend" just three weeks after her 17th birthday. She completed basic training the summer between her junior and senior years of high school, and AIT (Advanced Individual Training) as a mechanic between high school and college. She was the only woman in her class, and graduated #1. After three years she transferred to a medical detachment and went to dental tech school where she also graduated at the top of her class.

She’s not the first contestant to be in the military. There’s been one: Miss Utah 2007, Jill Stephens, a medic in the Utah National Guard. They have similarities: commitment to service, dedication to country, and almost no experience as a contestant.

Theresa entered her first pageant just nine months ago.

"I never thought about it until a mentor, in my unit, explained how the recognition could help with what I want to do as a role model," Theresa explained in a recent interview.

As a child she was teased and bullied, and was shy and insecure as a result. But she overcame obstacles, relied on her religious faith, and worked very hard to become the leader she is today.

Theresa is a young woman who excels. Now 22, she’s a Kansas State University senior with a double major in Chemistry and Chinese (with a 3.8 GPA in Chinese) – the first because she wants to be a dentist and the second because it’s a challenge. Theresa loves a challenge. Tell her she can’t do something and then stand back and watch her go.

She’s an expert marksman on the M 16. She’s an expert bow hunter. She skydives. She boxes. She’s working on a private pilot license. She started motorcycle racing but stopped after a crash in which she broke all the fingers her right hand (hard to be a good dentist without flexible fingers.)

With pageant festivities back this year in Atlantic City (where Miss America began in 1921), the "Show Us Your Shoes Parade" will return to the famed boardwalk. The September 14th parade will be televised live for the first time ever (and will be lead-in to the pageant itself on the 15th). This is where contestants flash extravagantly decorated, often state-themed, girly-girly high heels to laughing crowds yelling "Show us your shoes."

Only Theresa will be in uniform, wearing combat boots instead of four-inch heels.

When it comes to the bathing suit competition, Theresa will be breaking another barrier: she’ll be the first contestant ever with visible tattoos. No itty-bitty rose hidden under a bikini top for this girl. She has the insignia for the U.S. Army Dental Corps on her left shoulder. The Serenity Prayer ("God, grant me the Serenity to accept the things I cannot change, Courage to change the things I can, and Wisdom to know the difference") flows down her right side.

"It’s my personal mission statement," Theresa said.

Of course, Theresa is also – if one can use this description for someone trained to shoot to kill – drop-dead gorgeous.

When asked about what she is most proud of, she grinned.

"I just got promoted. I made sergeant," she said. "And I re-enlisted for six years."

So, if things get wild in Atlantic City in a few weeks, this would be another Miss America first: Here she comes, Miss America … Miss Kansas… Sgt. Theresa Marie Vail.

Voir de même:

Combat boots, tattoos, and a Miss Kansas pageant sash

Miss Kansas, Theresa Vail, at a Miss America event in Atlantic City. Vail, an Army National Guard sergeant, is an expert marksman, used to race motorcycles, and likes to skydive and bow-hunt for deer.

Jacqueline L. Urgo

Inquirer

September 13, 2013

ATLANTIC CITY – Hey, Kansas, your beauty queen wears combat boots!

And has big tattoos, too.

As an active member of the military, Miss Kansas, Theresa Vail – ahem, Army National Guard Sgt. Vail – may just have a slightly different take on world peace than the typical Miss America pageant contestant.

She’s also drop-dead gorgeous – literally. The slender blonde is an expert marksman who apparently knows her way around an M-16. She raced motorcycles as a teen until she broke her fingers. She is fluent in Chinese (she has a 3.8 GPA at Kansas State University) and likes to skydive and bow-hunt for deer. She’s working on a hunting series in production for the Outdoor Channel. (She will be the host.)

While her Miss America profile head shot has her looking like a supermodel, decked out in a hot-pink outfit, fluffed hair, and dangle earrings, other promo websites feature photos of her in full camouflage garb sporting a hunting rifle, bow and arrow, even posing with her prey (a deer, a fox).

But Vail is among only a handful of Miss America Pageant contestants to have military credentials. She is a dental technician with a National Guard medical unit based out of Kansas. Five pageant women since 1992 have been active-duty military, and Miss Utah 2007, Jill Stevens, was the first to work in a combat zone.

Also, Vail, 22, competing this week in the 2014 Miss America Pageant, is the first contestant ever to sport visible tattoos. Sure, other contestants have had tattoos – tiny, hidden ones, according to pageant officials.

But Vail’s big bold tat, of the Serenity Prayer, flanks her entire right midriff. She also sports the insignia of the Army Dental Corps on her left shoulder. The university senior aspires to be an Army dentist.

"No one expects a soldier to be a beauty queen. . . . Right now, everyone thinks of Miss America as this girl on a pedestal, and I want her to come down from that. She is just a normal girl," Vail said in a recent interview with a newspaper in Kansas.

So there it was, the big tattoo, when she competed Tuesday night in the swimsuit portion of the three-night preliminary competition. She didn’t win, wearing a bright-red bikini and the tattoo, done in scrolly vintage lettering.

But she apparently scored one for the atypical beauty queen crowd.

With no beauty contest experience, Vail entered her first pageant just nine months ago and became Miss Leavenworth County before winning Miss Kansas in June. Her pageant platform is "Empowering Women: Overcoming Stereotypes and Breaking Barriers."

It’s a subject Vail – who says she was bullied and teased through school – holds dear, hoping to inspire other young women to be whatever they choose.

Even for Saturday’s much-anticipated "Show Us Your Shoes" Parade – an all-out glittery spectacle where the contestants get to show off their flashy side – Vail is opting to wear her camouflage Army uniform and combat boots instead of the de rigueur five-inch heels and evening gowns being worn by most of the other women.

The next night, the Miss America Pageant will be televised live beginning at 9 on ABC.

"I think Miss Kansas’ participation in the pageant," said Sharon Pearce, president of the Miss America Organization, "shows us the diverse women that are involved in the competition."

Miss Kansas

Name: Theresa Vail.

Hometown: Manhattan, Kan.

Age: 22.

Education: Leavenworth High, Kansas State University.

Platform issue: Empowering women, overcoming stereotypes, and breaking barriers.

Scholastic ambition: To obtain a doctor of dental surgery degree.

Talent: Vocal.

Scholastic honors: Georganne Howler Chemistry Scholarship recipient; distinguished honor graduate of Army School of Ordnance; distinguished honor graduate of Army School of Health Science.

Career ambition: To become a prosthodontist for the Army.

About Face: Military Service and Miss America

Anu Bhagwati

Makers

September 19, 2013

I fully admit it—I’m steeped in judgment about beauty pageants as an industry, and I still wrestle with assumptions about the women and girls who participate in them. Almost all I can stomach on the topic is Miss Congeniality, in which Sandra Bullock plays a gung-ho FBI agent who goes undercover as Miss New Jersey at a national pageant and is forced to endure all of the industry’s sexist humiliations to pass as “gorgeous”—mandatory starvation, bikini waxing, high heels and all. Her resistance to the industry and her tough-guy attitude make the subject matter not only palatable but also even therapeutic.

Before you judge, let me share the negative impact the so-called “beauty industry” has had on me and almost every girl and woman I know—hours upon hours, spent week after week, for years on end, obsession with self-hatred, guilt or shame for how we look, what we do or do not eat, and how we must dress, speak and act in order to earn our family’s and society’s acceptance, and power and influence in the world. Miss America plays a role in shaping these powerfully defeating narratives in the lives of women and girls across the nation.

However, by the look of it, the face of national pageantry, if not the substance, is changing in apparently new and exciting ways. Plenty of attention has been a paid to the winner, Nina Davuluri, but I’m just as interested in Sergeant Theresa Vail, otherwise known as Miss Kansas, who made media waves as the first contestant ever to bare her tattoos. It’s not the first time a military woman has entered the pageant –Sergeant Jill Stevens, a combat medic, competed in 2008—and it certainly won’t be the last. But the media obsession with the “Serenity Prayer” tattooed around Vail’s midriff is less about women expressing themselves in authentic and edgy ways than it is about varying the same old theme on objectifying women’s bodies.

I don’t blame or resent Sgt. Vail for participating—I actually admire her talent and drive. And I don’t hold her even remotely responsible for either reforming the beauty pageant industry or for representing all military women everywhere. But I disagree with her that being Miss America and being a soldier are “one and the same”—you are not likely to get shot wearing the Miss America crown, and the average service member sacrifices a hell of a lot of comfort and privilege, unlike a crowned beauty queen.

Most of all, I am disappointed and indignant that the most national attention service women got this month (during a time of war, no less) was when the National Guardsman bared her skin in a red bikini and platform heels on prime time television. And that is entirely the fault of a sexist industry and the narrow-minded society that gives rise to it. Because to feature the sacrifices of women, women who have literally fought and died for this country, women who have accomplished great feats of leadership while in uniform might too provocatively subvert the gender status quo as we know it.

I’m reminded of a high profile event I reluctantly attended at New York City’s Fashion Week a couple years ago called, “Fatigues to Fabulous.” It was organized by several groups to, presumably, help women veterans and supported by several high profile fashion designers. The implication (and an actual suggestion) that what women veterans needed most when returning from war was to look “beautiful” still makes my stomach turn. If lipstick, stiletto heels and a $5000 dress could heal posttraumatic stress, they would definitely be onto something.

I discussed Sgt. Vail’s participation in the pageant with my fellow staff members at SWAN, women who have worn the uniform, deployed overseas and commanded troops. There was a palpable sense among us that we know what it’s like to be judged by our looks, to have our bodies scrutinized, to have to command mostly male troops within a climate of harassment and discrimination. At the end of the day, baring tattoos as a form of self-expression doesn’t erase the fact that Vail had to wear a bikini to express herself or that in the eyes of national media, a woman warrior is defined more by her looks when she’s undressed than by what she can do in uniform.

Voir par ailleurs:

Miss America

PBS

Film Description

On September 17, 1983, a long-legged 20-year-old sashayed across the stage at Convention Hall in Atlantic City. As the orchestra started to play, her powerful voice launched into "Happy Days are Here Again." Millions of Americans sat transfixed in front of their televisions. It was no surprise when the slender, hazel-eyed brunette was back on stage later in the evening among the pageant finalists. But what happened next made history. As the emcee announced: "And our new Miss America is… Vanessa Williams," the young woman’s mother leaned forward on her couch at home and in hushed tones, whispered "finally, finally."

Williams was the first African American woman to be crowned Miss America. Black leaders claimed her victory as a milestone in American racial history. Some compared the achievement to Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier in baseball. A black Miss America meant so much in 1983 because over the decades of its existence the Miss America Pageant had come to mean so much.

Miss America tracks the contest from its inception in 1921 as an exuberant local seaside pageant to its heyday as one of the most popular and anticipated events in the country’s cultural calendar. Among the many stories it uncovers are those of Williams and her predecessor, Bess Meyerson, who was crowned the first Jewish Miss America in 1945, the same year the Allies won World War II. It paints a vivid picture of the changing ambitions of the contestants and it describes how the pageant became the target of the first national protest by the women’s rights movement.

As the film unfolds, it becomes clear Miss America isn’t just the country’s oldest beauty contest. It is a powerful cultural institution that over the course of the century has come to reveal much about a changing nation — the increasing power of the image, the rise in commercialism, the complexity of sexual politics, the important role of big business and the emotional resonance of small towns. It is, we learn, about winners and losers, getting ahead, being included and being left out.

Beyond the symbolism lies a human story — at once moving, inspiring, infuriating, funny and poignant. Using intimate interviews with former contestants, archival footage and photographs, the film reveals why some women took part in the fledgling event and why others briefly shut it down. It describes how the pageant became a battleground for the country’s most conservative and progressive elements and a barometer for the changing position of women in society. It reveals how for women in the 1920s the pageant was an avenue to movie stardom and for women in the 1950s it paved the way to academic success.

Miss America intercuts period film with contemporary footage of the 1999 and 2000 pageants that captures the glamour and excitement of the event, both on stage and in the wings. The documentary reinforces the pageant’s continuing hold on the imagination of the American public.

Origins of the Beauty Pageant

PBS

Contests to determine "who is the fairest of them all" have been around at least since ancient Greece and the Judgment of Paris. According to legend, a poor mortal goatherd, Alexandros (Paris), was called upon to settle a dispute among the goddesses. Who was the most beautiful: Hera (Juno), Aprhodite (Venus), or Athena (Minerva)? All three goddesses offered bribes: according to the writer Apollodorus, "Hera said that if she were preferred to all women, she would give him the kingdom over all men; and Athena promised victory in war, and Aphrodite the hand of Helen." When Paris selected Aphrodite in exchange for getting Helen of Troy, the most beautiful mortal of the time, he inadvertently started the Trojan War.

While ancient Greeks memorialized in myth the complicated relationship between beauty and competition, there is no historical evidence that they actually held contests for women. A "contest of physique" called the euandria was held yearly at an Athenian festival — but the contest was for men. European festivals dating to the medieval era provide the most direct lineage for beauty pageants. For example, English May Day celebrations always involved the selection of queens.

In the United States, the May Day tradition of selecting women to serve as symbols of bounty and community ideals continued, as young beautiful women participated in public celebrations. When George Washington rode from Mount Vernon to New York City in 1789 to assume the presidency, groups of young women dressed in white lined his route, placing palm branches before his carriage. General Lafayette’s triumphant tour of the United States in 1826 also was greeted by similar delegations of young women.

The first truly modern beauty contest, involving the display of women’s faces and figures before judges, can be traced to one of America’s greatest showmen, Phineas T. Barnum (of circus fame). In the 1850s, the ever-resourceful Barnum owned a "dime museum" in New York City that catered to the growing audience for commercial entertainment. Some of Barnum’s most popular attractions were "national contests" where dogs, chickens, flowers, and even children were displayed and judged for paying audiences. While 61,000 people swarmed to his baby show in 1855, a similar event the year before to select and exhibit "the handsomest ladies" in America proved a disappointment. The prize — a dowry (if the winner was single) or a diamond tiara (if the winner was married) — was not enough to lure respectable girls and women of the Victorian era to publicly display themselves.

Barnum developed a brilliant alternate plan for a beauty contest that would accept entries in the form of photographic likenesses. These photographs would be displayed in his museum and the public would vote for them. The final ten entrants would receive specially commissioned oil portraits of themselves. These portraits would be reproduced in a "fine arts" book to be published in France, entitled the World’s Book of Female Beauty. Barnum sold off his museum before the photographs arrived, but in employing modern technology and in combining lowbrow entertainment with the appeal of highbrow culture, Barnum pioneered a new model of commercial entertainment.

In the decades to come, the picture photo contest was widely imitated and became a respectable way for girls and women to have their beauty judged. Civic leaders across the country, seeking to boost citizen morale, incorporate newcomers, and attract new settlers and businesses to their communities, held newspaper contests to choose women that represented the "spirit" of their locales. One of the most popular of these contests occurred in 1905, when promoters of the St. Louis Exposition contacted city newspapers across the country to select a representative young woman from their city to compete for a beauty title at the Exposition. There was intense competition and, according to one report, forty thousand photo entries.

By the early decades of the twentieth century, attitudes had begun to change about beauty pageants. Prohibitions against the display of women in public began to fade, though not to disappear altogether. One of the earliest known resort beauty pageants had been held in 1880, at Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. However, it was not until the twentieth century that beach resorts began to hold regular beauty pageants as entertainments for the growing middle class. In 1921, in an effort to lure tourists to stay past Labor Day, Atlantic City organizers staged the first Miss America Pageant in September. Stressing that the contestants were both youthful and wholesome, the Miss America Pageant brought together issues of democracy and class, art and commerce, gender and sex — and started a tradition that would grow throughout the century to come.

Transcript

ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: You can have wars and atom bombs, but so it seems there must always be a Miss America.

ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: Just one talented young girl receives top honors as Miss America. So democracy works here too for the Atlantic City Miss America contest is predicated on the conviction that the typical American girl has talent and brains as well as beauty.

KATHY PEISS, Historian: I think the Miss America Pageant has been about the American dream for some women. It has been about a dream of being beautiful. It’s also been about a dream of being successful. And that combination is I think the kind of complicated stew that is very much American women’s experience of the last eighty years.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: I am tingling with excitement wondering who will be the next Miss America.

BILL GOLDMAN: When my kids were little, one of the big nights of the year was just the four of us sitting there watching the Miss America and saying oh she’s got to win. And you root and you got involved in it. And we all loved it. It was a part of our lives.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Bert Parks: You know in this twentieth century, we have witnessed the birth of a legend, the legend of the American girl.

MARGARET CHO, Comedian: I think it’s a really important story to tell, because it’s about how we feel about ourselves as women, and how we’ve changed as women and who we are as women and what it means to be judged by men.

ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: There are beauty contests and beauty contests, and then there’s the Miss America competition and this year’s crop seems to be the most beauteous bevy of breathtaking beauties in decades.

TRICIA ROSE, Cultural Critic: The Pageant is this example where you can be sort of nationalistic and patriotic and pro American and get to see some "T and A" all in the same event.

KATE SHINDLE, Miss America 1998: The thing about the pageant is that you have to have a sense of humor about it. I mean you’ve got girls who have invested their entire lives in wanting to become Miss America. On the one hand, it’s this investment of thousands of dollars in this huge goal, and on the other hand a girl is spray gluing her swimsuit to her butt so it doesn’t ride up.

JULIA ALVAREZ, Writer: You know this is like Miss America. I mean it’s not Miss Coffee Beans. It’s not Miss Peach Blossoms. This is the woman that sort of represents the country like the President does. And so it’s seeing what is the way to be the woman of the most powerful country on earth.

MISS AMERICA

ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: These were the fabulous furious roaring 20s and this is why they roared.

NARRATOR: The Miss America Pageant started out as a promotional gimmick — dreamed up by Atlantic City businessmen in 1921, as a way to keep tourists in town after Labor Day. Over the next eight decades, it would become a national tradition dedicated to defining the ideal American woman.

Year after year, the Miss America Pageant would struggle to pull off a delicate balancing act — objectifying women while providing them with real opportunities; promoting traditional roles while encouraging women’s independence; glorifying feminine modesty while trading on female sexuality. Along the way, it would come to be a barometer of the nation’s shifting ideas about American womanhood.

But in 1921, Atlantic City’s businessmen were simply trying to turn a profit — by capitalizing on the country’s fascination with beauty.

KATHY PEISS: Well, there are many beauty pageants in the 1920′s, and they range from pageants oriented towards African-American women, Miss Bronze America. Even the Ku Klux Klan has a beauty pageant for Miss 100 Percent America. So there’s something about beauty as a symbol that is extremely important and many different groups are getting together and saying, we have the most beautiful woman who represents us. And Miss America is the national symbol of what is going on all over the country.

NARRATOR: The first Miss America Pageant was a spectacular two-day festival, culminating with a beachfront parade called the Bather’s Revue. The only rule for the competition was that all participants "must positively be attired in bathing costumes." A board of censors had been appointed to review questionable entries.

VICKI GOLD LEVI, Atlantic City Historian: Atlantic City was a place where everybody was kind of given to letting your hair down and having a delicious, romantic time. Bathing suits had changed a great deal and stockings were now being rolled beneath your knees, which was very daring. And women had to have their bathing suits at a certain length. And so there were beach censors who would actually come down and measure the length of your bathing suit.

NARRATOR: On the morning of the Revue, more than 100,000 people swarmed onto the Boardwalk, hoping to catch a glimpse of the scantily-clad young women down on the sand. The spectators’ stand out favorite was a slight, freckled sixteen-year-old from the nation’s capitol. Named Margaret Gorman.

RIC FERENTZ, Pageant Historian: Margaret Gorman was a sensation. She was tiny, petite, five one, with blonde, long ringlets who looked very much like Mary Pickford who was the biggest star of the day. So, the combination made this young, sixteen-year-old girl a star.

NARRATOR: Gorman swept the competition — and later that evening, she was crowned the very first Miss America. "Margaret Gorman represents the type of womanhood America needs," the New York Times declared, "strong, red-blooded, able to shoulder the responsibilities of homemaking and motherhood. It is in her type that the hope of the country rests."

NARRATOR: The first Miss America Pageant was a staggering success. Before the receipts were even tallied, city officials announced plans to continue the contest through the decade — confident that as long as there were girls in bathing suits, the crowds would come.

LEONARD HORN, Former CEO Miss America Organization: It was one of the first, if not the first instances of the marriage between advertising and the beauty of the female form which was ingenious because from then on many, many advertisers thought they could get more attention by putting a good looking woman into the picture. Some say it got started in 1921 in Atlantic City.

RIC FERENTZ: The very first years, there was a literal breakdown. Five points for the construction of the head, five points for the limbs, three points for the torso, two points for the leg…I mean it…you know and it added up to a hundred percent. Whether they really went by that, it’s hard to say.

NARRATOR: Throughout the 1920′s, scores of young women flocked to Atlantic City each year, most hoping the Pageant would land them a career in show business. While the average working woman labored in a factory or a typing pool, Miss America had offers from Hollywood and vaudeville — and the opportunity to cash in on her looks.

ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: "5 feet 4 inches tall, 118 pounds of beauty. Norma Smallwood is crowned Miss America of 1926."

NARRATOR: During the year of her reign, Miss America 1926 — a small-town girl from Tulsa, Oklahoma — reportedly made over $100,000, more than either Babe Ruth or the President of the United States.

RIC FERENTZ: Norma Smallwood had an acute business sense. In 1927, when she was due to return to crown her successor, she demanded a fee for her appearance in Atlantic City. And although she arrived and took part in the early part of the pageant, during the middle when that money was not forthcoming, Norma picked up and left for another job in North Carolina. And the press was not very kind to that. They thought that she should have been the gracious one that didn’t take the money and stayed around to crown her successor, and Norma thought, I’m sorry, this is a business.

KATHY PEISS: There was a general sense that the Old World had died and a new one was being born. And I think that was especially important for women. There’d been a women’s movement that had been successful in certain ways, women had gotten the right to vote for example, and women are increasingly in the labor force in the 1920′s. A number are getting college educated. And so in some ways the pageant seems to be a contradiction. Here, feminists had wanted women to move into the public sphere to sort of gain the positions that men had gained, and yet the pageant represents women very much as female and as in some ways, sexualized, as beauty objects.

NARRATOR: The Pageant’s attention to the female form had troubled conservative Americans since the very beginning. But in the late-1920′s, critics finally went on the offensive.

All over the country, women’s clubs and religious organizations publicly attacked the Miss America Pageant, and accused organizers of corrupting the nation’s morals. "Before the competition, the contestants were splendid examples of innocence and pure womanhood," one protestor argued. "Afterward their heads were filled with vicious ideas."

In 1928, fearing the controversy would ruin Atlantic City’s reputation, the Chamber of Commerce voted twenty-seven to three to cancel the Miss America Pageant.

For now, morality had shut the Pageant down. But America’s infatuation with beauty would endure.

CONTEMPORARY FOOTAGE: Brandi: "It’s very me, it’s very Brandi…"

MARGARET CHO: I think the fascination with beauty pageants is that there can be a winner. That there are certain rules, guidelines that constitute beauty, that it is not necessarily in the eye of the beholder. That we as the collective beholder have agreed on certain qualities that create beauty and uh that there can be a contest to judge it. It’s this fascinating thing.

TRICIA ROSE: What gets defined as beauty? I mean, it’s not unlike high fashion supermodels in that the bodies that work are the bodies that are least like what women look like. So what are we saying? What are we actually saying about what women look like when we say, well you know what, to be most beautiful you have to not look like what women look like?

ISAAC MIZRAHI, Designer: I think that fashion and beauty is everything in the way a woman marks her identity today, unfortunately. But I can’t think of a period of time when it wasn’t about that, and there are all sorts of obvious manifestations of that you know, the length of your skirt, the size of your waist. But there are other even more subtle things. Like when you shave your legs, even if you’re wearing pants that day you feel three times prettier, I think.

JULIA ALVAREZ: You know, there’s a yearning in the human spirit, an aspiring for beauty. And, the successful man still has a beautiful woman on his arm. That’s the prize. It’s been our power structure and it’s…it’s still operative. Beauty is still the currency out there.

GLORIA STEINEM, Writer: The traditional way to get ahead is to compete with other women for the favors of men, you know and this is not different from any other marginalized or less powerful group. You’re supposed to compete with each other for the favors of the powerful. So what could be a greater example of that than a beauty contest?

NARRATOR: Not long after the Miss America Pageant was cancelled, a devastating economic depression brought Atlantic City’s tourist trade to a halt. Desperate, local businessmen opted to ignore the critics and revived their lucrative beauty pageant. In 1933, thirty young women were brought to Atlantic City, aboard a chartered train called the Beauty Special, to compete for Miss America’s crown.

ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: Yeah it’s sort of relaxin’ what with strikes and food shortages and international disputes and so on to have the lassies back with us once again. Oh well, one good turn deserves another.

NARRATOR: "So striking was the change between the ideal figure of the twenties and that of 1933," one observer said of the contestants, "that one might almost have thought that a new anatomical species had come into being."

Among the entries was Marion Bergeron, a high school sophomore and the daughter of a Connecticut policeman.

MARION BERGERON SETZER, Miss America 1933: 1933, it was a depression and at 15 years old I hadn’t been out of Westhaven, Connecticut, let alone wind up in Atlantic City.

NARRATOR: A curvaceous blonde with a striking resemblance to screen-siren Jean Harlow, Bergeron had competed in her first local pageant just weeks before.

To her surprise, she had won the title of Miss New Haven, and then Miss Connecticut — and before she knew it, she was being crowned Miss America.

MARION BERGERON SETZER: To the judge’s eyes, I was the typical American girl. Totally unsophisticated, very naïve, had a lot of enthusiasm, had a lot of talent that they didn’t ask for, but I did have that. And I was just, I was just a 1933 typical American girl. My figure then as they described it was a typical Mae West figure which was hourglass, thirty-four bust, a twenty-six waist, eighty-two buns.

NARRATOR: The new Miss America was just the kind of girl vaudeville producers were looking for — and they soon came waving contracts, promising to make her a star.

But all the attention was short-lived. As soon as the newspapers reported that she was only fifteen, the show business contracts were quickly withdrawn — and Bergeron went back to high school.

MARION BERGERON SETZER: On our way home, I had to go back only to be met by the nuns that said I had had entirely too much undue publicity. And they felt that it would be better if I chose another school. Yeah, and that’s practically being kicked out of school. Here I feel like I’m really somebody. You know, I’m just the most glamorous thing that ever happened at 15 years old, but the but the nuns didn’t think so.

KATHY PEISS: Beauty pageants by the early thirties had a reputation for being somewhat disreputable, like …a carnival atmosphere. And especially the association with Atlantic City and the seaside resorts made that venue somewhat of a question mark I think for women in terms of their respectability. To be a public woman had a longstanding connotation of having loose morals, of being either a prostitute or sexually loose. And that doesn’t disappear, certainly through the 1930′s.

NARRATOR: In October 1935, a Pageant scandal rocked Atlantic City. Less than a month after seventeen-year-old Henrietta Leaver was crowned Miss America, a nude statue of her was unveiled in her hometown of Pittsburgh.

Leaver — a high school dropout and dime store salesgirl — swore she had worn a bathing suit when she posed, and that her grandmother had been present at all times. But the press coverage was merciless, and the businessmen behind the Pageant finally decided to make some changes.

For help, they turned to a single, 29-year-old Southern Baptist with years of experience in public relations. As the Pageant’s Executive Secretary, she would spend the next three decades inventing a new image for Miss America. Her name was Lenora Slaughter.

RIC FERENTZ: She was the iron fist in a velvet glove. I think that she was a woman that was well ahead of her time. She was tough when she had to be. But knew how to get by on a Southern drawl.

NARRATOR: Slaughter’s mission now was to eliminate scandal and to attract what she called "a better class of contestants."

She immediately established a minimum age requirement of eighteen, then added a talent competition to the traditional line-up of bathing suits and evening gowns. Once the contestants were in Atlantic City, Slaughter insisted they be chaperoned at all times, and that they observe a strict curfew of one a.m. They were barred from drinking establishments, forbidden to smoke, and there were to be no private visits with men — not even their fathers.

A Pageant judge once asked Slaughter what to look for in a winner. "Honey," she answered, "just pick me a lady."

VICKI GOLD LEVI: She brought a respectability to the pageant. She presented her girls with class, with style. She transformed the pageant by setting the standards high, by making it something that women would want to participate in.

NARRATOR: Sometime later, Slaughter slipped one final entry requirement into the Pageant by-laws. Known as Rule Seven, the new regulation strictly limited Pageant participation to women "in good health and of the white race."

SARAH BANET WEISER, Communication Scholar: Race has always factored into anyone’s notion of ideal womanhood in the United States. It’s just that the way in which whiteness functions is through invisibility. It’s not seen as a race. It’s just the normal way to be. It’s just regular. And it’s really no different in the Miss America Pageant.

TRICIA ROSE: That’s what’s most interesting about it to me that we are supposed to believe that this is what American womanhood looks like. And it really is an enormously narrow conception from facial features, you know, height, weight. And then of course there are the most obvious more political categories: race, ethnicity and all of these things are very important in the historical understanding of the Pageant.

NARRATOR: By the early 1940′s, Slaughter had constructed an ideal woman to represent the Miss America Pageant. Now, the mass media would make her a star.

Each September, millions of Americans watched the annual newsreel of Miss America’s crowning. She was featured in newspapers and advertisements, and honored with her own day at the World’s Fair. And when the United States entered World War II, and the Federal Government shut down most large public events, Slaughter convinced officials that the Pageant should be allowed to go on. "Miss America is emblematic of the nation’s spirit," she told them, "and that spirit [continues] through war and peace, good times and bad." Permission was granted — on the condition that the winner sell war bonds.

KATHY PEISS: The early period of the 1940′s is one where we see women being mobilized for the war effort. They’re being encouraged to take jobs, to work more than full time to support the war effort. At the same time, those women are encouraged to maintain their femininity and their beauty. And there’s a huge effort to sell women lipstick, to see cosmetics as morale boosters. And they are one product that is not rationed during the war. There’s an attempt to ration cosmetics but it’s overturned within six months. Women are given the pitch that one of the reasons we’re fighting the war is for women to be beautiful.

NARRATOR: Lenora Slaughter believed there was more to a woman than her looks — and she wanted Miss America to prove it. So in 1944, she convinced the Pageant’s new board of directors to award Miss America a scholarship to college.

Raising money proved a bigger challenge. Of the 236 companies Slaughter approached for contributions, only five signed on as sponsors. But between them, Slaughter had enough cash for a five thousand-dollar prize — and in 1945, the Miss America Pageant became one of the first organizations in the country to offer college scholarships to women.

VICKI GOLD LEVI: That’s immediately what redefined Miss America because no other pageant, competition, beauty contest was giving scholarship money. And by doing this it really, really set the pageant in a different category. You didn’t have to go in there just to prove you had a pretty figure, you could go in there to prove you had brains.

NARRATOR: Among those vying for the first scholarship in 1945 was a twenty-one year-old New Yorker named Bess Myerson. The American-born daughter of Russian-Jewish immigrants, Myerson had paid her own way through New York’s Hunter College by giving piano lessons in the Bronx neighborhood where she grew up. Now she hoped to go on to graduate school, where she planned to study conducting.

BESS MYERSON, Miss America 1945: Talent was very important because that was the way we were going to make our living. That’s what we were going to support ourselves doing when we grew up. The most important thing was that you do well at school…oh no. The most important thing was that you listened to your parents. That you do well in school. And that you play a musical instrument. We never imagined anything else would be open to us.

NARRATOR: To Lenora Slaughter, Myerson seemed the ideal candidate for the new scholarship prize. She was beautiful, talented, smart. There was only one problem: she would have to change her name.

BESS MYERSON: Lenora Slaughter said my name was not a good name for show business. And I said well, you know I have no intention of going into show business. I said, what do you want me to change it to? Well you know there are a lot of good stage names like Beth…Beth Merrick. I said…the problem is that I’m Jewish, yes? And with that kind of name it’ll be quite obvious to everyone else that I’m Jewish. And you don’t want to have to deal with a Jewish Miss America. And that really was the bottom line. I said I can’t change my name. You have to understand. I cannot change my name. I live in a building with two hundred and fifty Jewish families. The Sholom Aleichem apartment houses. If I should win, I want everybody to know that I’m the daughter of Louie and Bella Myerson.

NARRATOR: On September 3rd, Myerson and the other contestants appeared on Atlantic City’s Boardwalk for the Miss America Pageant’s opening ceremony: a victory parade to celebrate the end of the war. In the crowd was Myerson’s older sister Sylvia. Her mother, who spoke no English, had been left at home in the Bronx.

BESS MYERSON: The first night I compete with a group of girls on talent, I won. Headline says, "Jewish Girl in Atlantic City Wins Talent in Miss America Pageant." Now we’ve just learned all the details of six million Jews being killed, slaughtered, burned, tortured. And naturally it attracts attention, and the juxtaposition of the two things was so improbable. There were people that would come to the hotel where I was staying with my sister, and they would introduce themselves to me and say I’m Jewish, and it’s just wonderful that you’re in this contest. But how about when people came up to you with numbers on their arms, which they did as well, and said, you see this? You have to win. You have to show the world that we are not ugly. That we shouldn’t be disposed of and so on however they worded it. I have to tell you that I felt this tremendous responsibility. I owed it to those women to give them a present, a gift, that to them was the gift.

NARRATOR: On the second night of preliminaries, Myerson scored another win, in the swimsuit competition, and she now seemed a strong favorite for the finals. "The new Miss America will either be Miss New York City, Bess Myerson," one newspaper predicted, "or somebody else."

ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: They’re about to pick Miss America of 1945. Well, they’ve made their choice and the crown goes to Miss New York City, a 21-year-old, 5’10" brunette, Bess Myerson, Hunter College graduate.

NARRATOR: By the time Myerson’s name was announced, her sister Sylvia was already in tears. From the audience came shouts of "Mazel tov!" "Don’t let anybody kid you," Myerson said years later. "It was one hell of a terrific moment."

VICKI GOLD LEVI: Bess was the answer to every Jewish woman’s dream. Her win was such a multilevel symbol. It was a symbol of a certain statement against anti-Semitism. It was a symbol of a victory against Hitler. It was a symbol for women, and when she won there was great celebration in our house. It was like when Roosevelt won or something.

NARRATOR: Myerson expected to spend her reign making appearances and promoting the Pageant’s new sponsors. But after an obligatory four-week performance tour, where drunks in the audience demanded she play the piano in her bathing suit, there were few requests for her time. None of the sponsors wanted a Jewish girl — even a Jewish Miss America — posing with their products.

BESS MYERSON: Half way through that year, I said to the pageant, I’m not available to you anymore because I want to do something else. I’ve met people from an organization called the Anti-defamation League. And they’ve asked me to go out on a tour speaking at the high schools and colleges, speaking to students where there are problems having to do with anti-Semitism, with hatred, with racism. And I did a speech called "You Can’t Hate and be Beautiful."

SARAH BANET WEISER: Bess Myerson took on the mantle of Miss America in a different way. It’s the historical moment, it’s her ethnic identity, it’s her own aspirations, and all those put together you know provided a very different kind of Miss America and a very different kind of reign.

NARRATOR: Myerson had made Miss America a scholar and a lady. But the following year, pageant judges made it clear that looks still counted. "It was the year they brought out the rubberized bathing suit," one of them said later, "and we voted for the girl with the best of everything showing."

GLORIA STEINEM: The swimsuit competition is probably the most honest part of the competition because it really is about bodies. It is about looking at women as objects. That’s what it’s about. The fact is that the most disqualifying part of the competition is how you look.

MARGARET CHO: When you see their bodies, it’s so interesting because they seem so not real. You don’t see anything off. They are so perfect and not sexual really but you just kind of these perfectly shaped women that their bodies are very smooth. There’s no creases or lines, there’s no stretch marks or nipples or hair. It’s kind of jarring. You think god whose body is like that? And then you think, oh, maybe I’m not the woman. Maybe they’re the women, and I’m not the woman. And then you kind of feel like an imposter too.

ISAAC MIZRAHI: It’s always so sort of…heartbreaking to watch the swimsuit competition because these…these good girls they’re sort of like ooh, I’m such a piece of meat or something you know. Of all the parts of the pageant that I feel victimize women the most, it’s that part of the pageant. These poor girls in those painful looking high heels my heart goes out to them. But you know honestly if you have to wear a swimsuit and you have to parade, good, you should wear the high heels, because there’s nothing better on your leg than a high heel.

KATE SHINDLE: I worked so hard to be ready to compete in swimsuit that I didn’t dread it. You know, I actually found it kind of empowering because I figured that once I could get over enough issues to walk around on the stage in a bathing suit in front of twenty million people, I could pretty much do anything I wanted to.

ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: "Go ahead and drool, it’s Miss America time…"

NARRATOR: For more than a quarter century, the bathing suit competition had been the Miss America Pageant’s feature attraction. But with the scholarship program now in place, Lenora Slaughter wanted to project a more dignified image.

The challenge was to downplay the bathing suits without offending Catalina Swimwear, one the Pageant’s major sponsors. In 1947, Slaughter struck the term "bathing suit" from the official Pageant vocabulary, and replaced it with the more athletic-sounding "swimsuit." Then, she banned two-piece suits from the competition, and announced that Miss America would now be crowned in an evening gown.

Still, when most Americans thought of the Pageant, a girl in bathing suit was the first thing that came to mind.

Then along came Yolande Betbeze. A twenty-one-year-old opera singer from Mobile, Alabama, Betbeze had been recently sprung from convent school when she captured her first local crown, Miss Torch 1949. Miss Alabama wasn’t far behind.

YOLANDE BETBEZE, Miss America 1951: I didn’t plan on the Miss America Pageant. I didn’t know anything about it. I was in a convent for fourteen years. The last four years in a cloistered convent, behind high walls, and no escape, and I was very naïve when I arrived in Atlantic City. I mean coming from a small town in Alabama borrowing shoes of high heels and taking the braces off my teeth. I had a ball.

NARRATOR: The minute Betbeze stepped off the train in Atlantic City, Slaughter knew she was looking at the next Miss America. "Yolande was the sexiest, most glamorous thing I had ever laid eyes on," she later said. Slaughter’s new husband, a business manager for the Pageant, agreed. "She can’t lose," he predicted, "unless the women judges run away from her."

YOLANDE BETBEZE: I thought I was a little bit plain to be Miss America, but I knew that I would do well in talent as an operatic coloratura, and indeed I did… I did win the talent. The swimsuit was difficult. Fortunately, it was a suit in good taste, one piece, white, nothing very revealing. But even so, I mean to stand up for the first time in your life in front of fifty thousand people in a bathing suit is…is awkward. ARCHIVAL NEWSREEL: The field is squared off at 16 curvaceous finalists. The winner is brown haired brown-eyed Yolande Betbeze, 21, of Mobile, Alabama.

NARRATOR: The morning after she was crowned, the new Miss America was summoned to a breakfast meeting, where she was to be briefed on her duties for the coming year.

YOLANDE BETBEZE: I did not know what to expect with this. So I arrived and they…all these…these suits were sitting about. Older men, board of directors, congratulated me and said now Miss Betbeze, this is what I represent, this is what you’re going to do for us. Then it came to the bathing suit, the most important sponsor. And this man said to me, November we’ll be in Wyoming, and you’ll wear this and that bathing suit. I said wait a minute please. No. No way. To…go into Milwaukee in the middle of the winter and walk around a department store in a bathing suit is not my idea of Miss America, scholarship foundation, the reason I’m here. And he really, really thought I had lost my mind. He couldn’t believe it.

RIC FERENTZ: I love the fact that she made the statement that she had to play their game to become Miss America and once she became Miss America they had to play by her game. I thought it was very bold of her to say to one of its major sponsors which was Catalina that she just wasn’t going to pose in a swimsuit, that she was an opera singer, she was not a pinup.

NARRATOR: Catalina withdrew its sponsorship of Miss America, and soon launched not one, but two pageants of its own — Miss USA and Miss Universe. Both judged contestants entirely on looks and absolutely required them to wear Catalina swimsuits.

VICKI GOLD LEVI: For the Pageant there was always this pull between the pulchritude and the pulpit. There was always this sort of dichotomy about how are you an upstanding, religious, well-educated girl and you could show your thighs and cleavage — which is always kind of a theme of America anyhow, sexuality and godliness. The Elvis Presley phenomenon. Shake your hips while singing "Nearer My God to Thee."

NARRATOR: In the fall of 1952, the Pageant’s directors invited an up-and-coming Hollywood actress named Marilyn Monroe to serve as the Grand Marshall of the Boardwalk Parade. "She wore the first dress anybody had ever worn," that year’s Miss America said later, "that was cut down to her navel." Monroe was not asked back to Atlantic City.

NARRATOR: It had taken nearly three decades to transform Miss America from a local celebrity to a national phenomenon. But making her a household name would take just one night — September 11th, 1954, when Miss America would be crowned live on national television.

The Pageant’s board of directors had asked former Miss America Bess Myerson to provide backstage commentary for the viewers at home, and had even invited Academy award-winning actress Grace Kelly to judge the competition.

Now, as the cameras wheeled into position on Atlantic City’s Convention Hall stage, ABC sent out the broadcast signal — and television audiences coast-to-coast joined the Miss America finals already in progress.

ARCHIVAL: "Live from Atlantic City . . . "

LEE MERIWETHER, Miss America 1955: The only time I really noticed a camera was we were waiting to have the crowning. I saw a television camera, and it was coming toward us, so I thought, ooh it’s…it’s time. And then I saw Lenora Slaughter, the head of the pageant bringing a banner over, and she put it on my lap. She said, Lee, you’re our Miss America.

ARCHIVAL: 19 year old, Lee Ann Meriwether of San Francisco, California. She triumphed over 49 other…

LEE MERIWETHER: My head flipped back and that is all I remember. And I was crying hysterically. Crying, crying, I couldn’t stop, but I do remember my mother being pulled backstage. And my mother said, stop your sniveling. And that did it.

NARRATOR: More than 27 million people, nearly half of the television audience, watched the Miss America Pageant that night — in a broadcast that broke all records for TV viewership. "To think that folks out in Idaho could see this was just amazing," one Pageant volunteer recalled. "It just knocked everything off the airwaves."

WILLIAM GOLDMAN, Screenwriter: The Miss America contest was something that seemed very glamorous to all of us in the thirties and forties and fifties. But all we ever saw of it were snippets on newsreels in movie theaters. And then suddenly when television happened, here was this fabulous event and in that period it was incredibly popular. When you look at old black and white television now it looks so prehistoric, but my god, it was free, it was in your house, you could watch it. And it changed everything.

NARRATOR: By the second broadcast, the Pageant had been redesigned for TV, and a celebrity singer and announcer had been hired to serve as the regular master of ceremonies. The forty-year-old star of a popular TV program called Stop the Music; he was known to audiences across the country as the guy with "the smile you can read by." His name was Bert Parks.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Bert Parks: Thank you very much. Thank you. Good Evening. What a wonderful audience …

LEONARD HORN: Bert Parks came along at just the right time. And his ability to be funny, to be extemporaneous, to be silly, and yet at the same time allow the women to be the stars of the show was a perfect, series of ingredients that the Miss America program needed at that time.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Bert Parks: "Hi. And this of course ladies and gentlemen is Miss Oklahoma. From what city please?" Miss Oklahoma: "I’m from Alva, Oklahoma." Parks: "Alva?" Miss Oklahoma: "Alva." Parks "What is the population of Alva?" Miss Oklahoma: "7000." Parks: "7000. What’s Alva most famous for?" Miss Oklahoma: "Wheat and cattle and my daddy’s bakery." Parks: "Golden Krust bakery, call him up tonight."

VICKI GOLD LEVI: I don’t know if he would fly today, but he was really into the girls, the women, and that’s what made Bert Parks so different. He wasn’t a celebrity flown in on a Saturday night. He was there all week getting to know them. They trusted him. He loved what he was doing, and he really was one of the defining factors that made households and television households love Miss America. And when he sang "There She Is" that was it. There she was.

NARRATOR: Making its debut right alongside Parks was the official Miss America theme song. Composed in just under an hour by a New York songwriter named Bernie Wayne, the song was an instant hit. It would soon be as recognizable as the national anthem.

KATHY PEISS: It evokes a wedding with Bert Parks kind of giving away the… bride, or…in his youth he was more of the groom. It evokes the debutante ball. There is this real sense of suddenly being the most beautiful woman at the ball. And so there is this sense that this could happen to anyone, or at least that’s the fantasy, that this could happen to any girl.

JULIA ALVAREZ: We didn’t see a whole lot of what it was like to be an American woman. This was our little window into what it was like, what this world was like. It was a way to, I don’t know, climb the ladder of success. And so you know it was like watching a female version of a Horatio Alger story.

LEE MERIWETHER: I had no knowledge of the pageant really at all. I knew there was a Miss America Pageant, but I thought it was a quote unquote bathing beauty contest, and as such I would never have entered. And then my father passed away and just my life sort of stopped right there. And my mother said the money is no longer here, daddy’s gone and if you want to continue on with school, that’s the thing, go to Atlantic City.

GLORIA STEINEM: Beauty contests are ways that if you live in a poor neighborhood, you can imagine getting ahead because it is a way up. It is a way to scholarships, to attention, and it’s one of the few things that you see out there as a popular symbol. When I was living in a kind of factory working neighborhood of Toledo, the K-Part television Miss TV contest, something like that, was advertised. And I decided I would try to enter the contest even though I was underage. I think I was 16 and the limit was, was 18. So I lied about my age. It wasn’t a terrible experience. It was a surrealistic experience. You had to put on your bathing suit and walk and stand on a beer keg. I did three or four different kinds of dances. Spanish and Russian and heaven knows what. I thought I would get money for college. And it seemed glamorous. It seemed to me in high school like a way out of a not too great life in a pretty poor neighborhood.

NARRATOR: By 1958, Atlantic City’s local tourist attraction had become one of the most popular television events in the country. With networks competing over the broadcasting contract, and companies clamoring to provide the high-profile program with sponsorship, the Miss America Pageant could now afford to award over 200,000 dollars worth of scholarships. But winning money for college was only part of the Pageant’s appeal. As every contestant knew, being crowned Miss America on national television could turn a small-town girl into an instant celebrity.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: I’m sure you all realize, ladies and gentleman, what a frightening experience it is for these young ladies, most of whom have never appeared in public before much less here in the convention hall in Atlantic City before some 25,000 people and over a full television network.

NARRATOR: One of the contestants that year was Mary Ann Mobley, a nineteen-year-old drama major with her eye on the Broadway stage. A native of Brandon, Mississippi — population twenty-five hundred — Mobley had competed in her first pageant only two weeks before, at the personal request of Brandon’s mayor, and had walked off with the state title.

MARY ANN MOBLEY, Miss America 1959: Everyone was in shock. I said to my Sunday school teacher, I said, Miss Long I can’t believe I’m on the way to Atlantic City. I mean, I had seen the previous Miss America. She was tall, I mean her legs started at my armpits. And she had these wonderful features and long blonde hair, and I thought that’s what Miss America should look like and I’m nowhere near that.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Bert Parks: and now ladies and gentlemen, we come to the talent competition…

MARY ANN MOBLEY: Now I have to tell you that I had never sung with an orchestra. And there I was in front of two football fields put together. Well, I was panicked. And my horror was I was going to get out there and no sound was going to come out. And one of the stagehands tapped me on the shoulder and he said you go get ‘em Mississippi.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Bert Parks: Mississippi, let’s bring her on…

MARY ANN MOBLEY: And they swagged the curtain and I thought I’ve got two options, I can run or I can walk out there. And I said I can’t embarrass my home state and myself by running away, I have to walk out there.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Mary Ann Mobley: Tonight as my talent, may I sing a portion of the lovely, "Un bel di" from Puccini’s opera, Madame Butterfly.

MARY ANN MOBLEY: And I started "Un bel di," and it came out and it sounded okay. And then I said stop, but I’m tired of being proper and cultured and of appreciating Beethoven, Puccini and Bach …

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Mary Ann Mobley: I want to sing and dance to something that’s solid and hot. So, there’ll be some changes made.

MARY ANN MOBLEY: (SINGS) There’ll be a change in the weather and…

PAGEANT BROADCAST: (SINGING)…a change in the sea. And from now on, there’ll be a change in me. My…."

MARY ANN MOBLEY: They started to applaud.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: (SINGING)…nothing about me’s going to be the same.

MARY ANN MOBLEY: And I said they like me, or else they’re just applauding that I’m not going to finish the aria.

RIC FERENTZ, Pageant Historian: I think Mary Ann was very popular because she was different. She was tiny and spunky and had a little bit of guts.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Bert Parks: Here is your question, Miss Mississippi. What is your favorite topic when with a young man for opening the conversation? Mary Ann Mobley: Well, I’ve read different articles that tell you how to get along with the opposite sex, and the first thing that they say is get him to talk about himself. So the first thing I ask is, Do you play football or what sport are you interested in? And then if he doesn’t say anything, then you say, Well, what are your hobbies? And you go down the line from there and if you can’t get him to answer you on any of those then you’re just quiet for the rest of the evening.

RIC FERENTZ: I think that she showed a different side to Miss America. A more girl next door type. I think that more young women could relate to Mary Ann than they perhaps could to the Miss Americas that had preceded her.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Bert Parks: First runner up, Joan Lucille McDonald, Miss Iowa. Miss America … Miss Mississippi.

MARY ANN MOBLEY: Once I won, I came unglued. I mean, I’m not talking about glistening tears. They were running down my chin onto my chest and my dress. CBS ran that for a long time because you really saw someone terribly, terribly affected by what was happening in her life. But I remember thinking, what am I … what am I doing here, no one’s going to believe this. And I’m not pretty enough to be Miss America, but here I am with a crown on my head. It’s real, and how could it happen to the little girl from Brandon, Mississippi. I think even now it evokes memories. I guess what I was really feeling was I was Cinderella.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: "Everybody’s got talent."

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Over the years the talent competition has become the most significant and the most popular part of this decisive final night. The ability to be poised and personable in the living room is a far cry from the ability to be self possessed on the stage of this great convention hall before a live audience of 25,000 people and a television audience of many millions.

VICKI GOLD LEVI, Atlantic City Historian: I do remember a girl having a talent where she told us how she packed her suitcase. I definitely remember that. And illustrators were big. They had big pieces of paper clipped on and they would quickly do cartoon sketches and things.

WILLIAM GOLDMAN, Screenwriter: I have this great memory of this beautiful blonde girl from Wisconsin whose talent was telling a fishing story with an accent. And she was just beautiful. And it was…you were laughing at the screen even then, you couldn’t believe that that was her talent, telling a story with a Norwegian accent.

ISAAC MIZRAHI, Designer: I don’t really remember any of the talent except that it was always terrible you know and completely not interesting. And that you know what I used to think was a giant flop would get the biggest applause. Like I’d sit there thinking, wow that stank. And then the audience would just go mad, loving every second of it you know.

LEONARD HORN, Former CEO Miss America Organization: A lot of people sat back and laughed at it. I always thought it was kind of cruel to laugh at it because here was a young woman that was competing her little heart out for a coveted prize that was important to her. That’s what the program was all about. It was another reason why it became so popular because it was every woman and every woman was competing. And every woman is not an accomplished singer or an accomplished monologist.

MARGARET CHO, Comedian: If I had a talent I don’t know what I would do. I think that I would probably collate a script. Collate some new pages in a script. That’s…I’m really good at that, that’s probably my talent, or operating a three hole punch, I can do that pretty swiftly and, I’m probably the best at that.

ISAAC MIZRAHI, Designer: What would I do as my talent? I would probably sing a song.

GLORIA STEINEM, Writer: I wouldn’t enter but now I would I suppose read something I’d written.

JULIA ALVAREZ, Writer: As my talent? You know I worried about that. I mean there was a way in which I thought I could never be that, but it wasn’t just because of the beauty, I just didn’t have any displayable talents. I couldn’t sing. I couldn’t dance. I had an accent, so I couldn’t do a dramatic part. And I sort of wondered what I would do.

NARRATOR: By 1960, the Miss America Pageant had become a national ritual. Each year, on the second Saturday in September, Americans gathered in their living rooms, switched on their sets, and settled in to see if their favorite contestant would capture the crown. Five times over the next decade, the Miss America Pageant was the highest-rated show of the year.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: With her beauty, brains, poise and talent, the American girl has become the most envied and admired girl in the world.

NARRATOR: Richard Nixon claimed it was the only program his daughters were allowed to stay up late to watch.

And all across the country now, little girls dreamed of becoming Miss America.

VICKI GOLD LEVI: It was this time when I sort of call the debutante era of the pageant, sort of the late ’50s, early ’60s, when everyone looked like they were at a cotillion with the high white gloves and the crinolines and the big hoop skirts and they were for god, motherhood and apple pie. They wanted to be good mothers, good wives. They wanted to be supporters of what their husbands chose to do, they wanted world peace.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Parks "This is a presidential election year. If a qualified woman were running for president, how would you feel about voting for her and why?" Contestant: If the men candidates running were qualified, I feet I would vote against her. My reasons being that women are very high strung and emotional people. They aren’t reliable enough when it comes to making a decision, a snap decision. I believe that a man in such a predicament would be able to make a more justifiable and better decision.

PAGEANT BROADCAST Parks "What in your opinion constitutes the ideal wife?" Contestant: "I imagine that the ideal wife depends entirely upon the viewpoint of the husband."

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Parks "Some sociologists say that American women are usurping the place of the male in American life and have become too dominant. Do you agree or disagree and why?" Contestant: "I do agree w/that. I believe that there are far too many women in the working world. I can see many cases where this is a necessary arrangement, but I do feel that a woman’s place is in the home with her husband and with her children."

LEONARD HORN: The concept of Miss America as an ideal American woman was consistent with society’s ideas of what an ideal young woman was. She was your everyday young girl who any man would be happy to call daughter, any man would be happy to call wife. Miss America was the American girl next door. She was an ideal that many women aspired to.

NARRATOR: Until now, the Pageant had managed to present a vision of ideal womanhood that most of the country shared. But by the mid-1960′s, the all-American girl-next-door was changing fast.

At a time when bikinis and miniskirts were all the rage, Pageant contestants continued to wear the regulation one-piece suits and dresses that fell within two inches of their knees. While anti-war protestors marched through the nation’s streets, Miss America was in Vietnam, touring with the USO. And in a moment of sexual revolution, the Pageant’s ideal remained wholesome and pure.

KATHY PEISS, Historian: Well, the pageant bore no relationship to the reality of life in the United States at that moment. The height of the Vietnam War, a period of great civil unrest, the civil rights movement and black power movements at their height, and the beginnings of a feminist movement. The birth control pill, the counterculture, the origins of the gay and lesbian liberation movement. All of these suggested that the pageant was terribly out of date and that it really was no longer relevant to the lives of women.

GLORIA STEINEM: It was a very exhilarating, affirming, funny explosion of rebellion and consciousness. It was partly about taking off the symbols, the gloves, the little white gloves, the dyed to match shoes, and in the middle of all of that, the artificiality of the Miss America Contest was an obvious kind of cartoon.

NARRATOR: In the spring of 1968, a 27-year-old writer and editor named Robin Morgan decided to take a stand — and with help from a group called New York Radical Women, she began laying plans for a protest at the annual Miss America Pageant.

"Where else could one find such a perfect combination of American values?" Morgan argued. "Racism, militarism, and capitalism — all packaged in one ideal symbol: a woman."

ROBIN MORGAN, Writer: It seemed to me you know a sort of epiphany moment because it was the nexus of so many issues, beauty standards, money, women’s freedom, objectification of women, patriotism, and all of this somehow wrapped up in motherhood and apple pie or virgin hood and apple pie, in terms of Miss America. So it seemed like my god, what is not to dislike about this?

NARRATOR: Word of the protest soon reached Atlantic City, and pageant organizers braced themselves for the picket line.

It would be the first major demonstration of the women’s liberation movement in the United States.

ROBIN MORGAN: We had you know prepared for about maybe fifty people, and to do some guerilla theater, some songs, some chants, to picket on the boardwalk all day. What we had not counted on was that close to four hundred women showed up on the boardwalk. They came from all over. I mean they were carrying signs from Florida and from Wisconsin and some people drove from California, and that was just amazing. I mean it had clearly this protest tapped into something that was enormous and very, very moving.

GLORIA STEINEM: They put on the boardwalk a big trashcan and dumped in it all kinds of symbols of the stereotypical female role, a steno pad, a dust mop, an apron, a bra, all of these things. I think they never did burn those items because they couldn’t get a fire permit. Just shows you we’ve been too law abiding.

ARCHIVAL FOOTAGE: singing "Ain’t she sweet. Makin’ profit off her meat. Beauty sells she’s told, so she’s out pluggin’ it. Ain’t she sweet. Ain’t she quaint with her face all full of paint. After all how can she face reality? Ain’t she quaint."

NARRATOR: The demonstration soon drew a crowd of more than 600 spectators — most of them men, and nearly all unsympathetic. One suggested that the protestors throw themselves into the Freedom Trash Can.

ROBIN MORGAN: The threats, the epithets, the screams were mostly from guys who would, you know lean over the barricades and do the usual. I mean say sort of you know go back to Russia, you’re commie pinko lesbian crazy broom riding witches. You name it. You’re all too ugly to be in the Miss America Pageant.

NARRATOR: Inside Convention Hall, the Miss America contestants were running through one last rehearsal before show time. Outside, on the Boardwalk, the protestors were burning Bert Parks in effigy.

Parks was unfazed. When he got wind that one of the demonstrators was planning to infiltrate the Pageant finals that evening, he didn’t miss a beat. "I’ll grab her by the throat," he said, "and keep right on singing."

PAGEANT BROADCAST: 1968 Bert Parks sings, and Judy Ford crowned…

NARRATOR: Judy Ann Ford, an eighteen-year-old gymnast from Illinois, was the first blonde in eleven years to be crowned Miss America. "I’m so glad," she gushed to the press that evening. "I feel like it’s a breakthrough."

Meanwhile, just four blocks from Convention Hall, at the Ritz Carlton Hotel, another ideal was about to be chosen.

Calling itself a "positive protest," the Miss Black America Pageant had been scheduled to begin at midnight, in the hopes that newsmen would drop by when they left Convention Hall. It was nearly three in the morning before nineteen-year-old Philadelphian Saundra Williams was crowned. "Miss America does not represent us," Williams told the audience. "With my title, I can show black women they, too, are beautiful."

TRICIA ROSE, Cultural Critic: Miss Black America is of course an effort to say well, look, trying to be like a white person is not what’s at stake. But appreciating what is black is quite important. So Essence Magazine emerges. Black is beautiful, afros, you know, black women emphasizing that which is black as beautiful and so this was a way of saying, we exist as both a market and as a kind of esthetic really begins to take place in the late 1960s and gets even stronger in the late 70s and 80s.

NARRATOR: All the controversy of 1968 took its toll on Miss America. And before the year was out, Pepsi Cola, a sponsor of the Pageant for over eleven years, withdrew its support. "Miss America as run today," the company declared, "does not represent the changing values of our society."

LEONARD HORN: Society was swirling around it but the Miss America pageant stayed the same, continuing to worship an outmoded ideal. In fact, the powers that be at the pageant never did learn. They never did learn. They didn’t because they regard the Miss America pageant as sacrosanct. The Miss America pageant had developed a formula. The formula worked and nobody wanted to change it.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Bert Parks: "You know often I’ve heard it said, "Is Miss America relevant today? Well, is personal achievement relevant, is scholarship, is good citizenship relevant? We think it is. And we think it will be for a long time to come."

NARRATOR: The Miss America Pageant still drew an enormous audience — reaching a peak, in 1970, of over 22 million households. But then the ratings started to slip — and the Pageant was finally forced to catch up with the times.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Song and dance number: "Call Me Ms."

GLORIA STEINEM: It just seemed as if they were just trying to keep the lid on. You know they were just hoping against hope that…that somehow there wouldn’t be too many demonstrations or that the contestants wouldn’t stand up and raise a fist. You know somehow the people who ran the pageant were trying desperately to preserve it.

NARRATOR: The time had come for a new-style Miss America — and in 1973, the Pageant found one in an aspiring attorney from Denver, Colorado named Rebecca Ann King.

REBECCA KING DREMAN, Miss America 1974: I started watching it, the Miss America Pageant as a young girl and I wasn’t really sure that it was the kind of young woman that I was going to be, because I knew I was going to be president of the United States some day. The young women looked a little Barbie dollish to me. They looked a little too made up to me and a little too world peace and I just didn’t think I was that kind of young woman.

NARRATOR: King was finishing up her senior year at Colorado Women’s College, when a friend tried to talk her into entering the Miss America Pageant.

REBECCA KING DREMAN: I said what’s in it for me? She said there’s scholarship money so you can go on to law school. And so I said okay. I’ll think about it, but don’t tell anybody.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: King "During the past 23 years, my grandmother often said to me, that the character of the nation is determined through its womanhood. Through the practice of law, I hope to make a productive contribution to mankind, and find the happiness of a fulfilled woman."

REBECCA KING: I was really in it for the money. And I think it shocked the pageant when I said I was in it for the money. And I didn’t think it was strange at all. I said what is it? It’s a scholarship program, right? Isn’t that what we’re here for?

PAGEANT BROADCAST: Parks "The winner of a 15,000 dollar scholarship and our new Miss America Rebecca Ann King, Miss Colorado…"

REBECCA KING: Well I didn’t fall apart as Miss America. Walked over, got the crown on, and I think my mother received maybe a hundred letters because I didn’t cry. She didn’t cry. What kind of Miss America do we have here on our hands walking down the runway not crying?

NARRATOR: For most Americans, the real surprise came later, when the new Miss America began speaking to the press — and came out in favor of legalized abortion.

REBECCA KING: It was right at the time of Roe v. Wade. I thought a woman ought to have the right to choose whether to continue with the pregnancy or not. And it just blew completely up and the Pageant never said not talk about it.

KATHY PEISS: Well the Miss America pageant in the 1970′s is faced with the growing politicization of women on both the left and the right. And one of the key moments of course is the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision in 1973. So when Miss America comes out as pro-choice, inserting a political stand in the Pageant which had always seen itself as nonpolitical or apolitical it really is an important moment.

REBECCA KING: The pageant has always been a little behind the times, but it was definitely the ’70s. It was time for people to move on and the pageant was trying.

NARRATOR: The national press applauded Miss America’s new image. Even feminists, who had been protesting against the Pageant for half a decade, now called off their war and invited King to speak at the National Organization for Women’s annual convention.

Still Miss America’s television audience continued to shrink, edged out by competition from new cable networks and dismissed by younger viewers as old-fashioned.

LEONARD HORN: I think that a large number of people began not watching the Miss American pageant probably about the mid-70s. The ideals upon which the Miss America pageant appeared to rest no longer seemed very exciting or relevant. And I think we lost a generation of people.

NARRATOR: By the late 1970′s, Pageant organizers were desperate for viewers and casting about for ways to update the show. So they decided to fire Bert Parks, Miss America’s master of ceremonies for a quarter of a century.

It was later reported that the Pageant’s sponsors considered 65-year-old Parks "too old and too out of touch." The decision caused such an uproar that Tonight Show host Johnny Carson even held an on-air campaign to get Parks reinstated. The Pageant replaced him anyway.

But a new host did not bring new viewers.

TRICIA ROSE: I was a teenager in the late-70s, and I, my recollection of the Pageant was that it just being a New Yorker, it just didn’t seem to reflect what the City looked like to me. So the pageant was a sort of helpful travelscape for me like oh this is what women look like in Texas and Florida. I was pretty much sure that the most blonde was going to be in the top two if not the number one slot. If a brunette was going to win, it was because of some other extraordinary traits that were compensating, but I very much understood it as a tall, blonde, you know, Southern woman’s festival.

MARGARET CHO: My father was very into it. And then, at one point when I was a little girl, I said oh I want to be one of those contestants. I want to grow up and do that, and he said no, oh no, you cannot do that, no. You know like, and I took it to mean that the beauty pageant was not open to all women. I mean my father thought that this whole pageant was fascinating and we would pick out the winners, but I was not allowed to even entertain the fantasy of becoming one of these women. And I thought well maybe I’m just not pretty enough. Maybe I’m just not white.

LENCOLA SULLIVAN, Miss Arkansas 1980: I remember always sitting in front of the television watching the Miss America every single year when I was a little kid, and I was the only one watching. Everybody else kind of went to bed, and I would be so excited, mom, mom, I got a … I chose the first runner up or the second runner up. But the interesting thing about that, I always kind of saw myself on stage as well, although no one looked like me. There was no one who looked like me.

NARRATOR: Twenty-year-old Cheryl Brown, Miss Iowa 1970, had been the first African-American woman ever to compete in Atlantic City. In the decade that followed, there had been just ten other black contestants — and of those, only one had made the top five: Lencola Sullivan, Miss Arkansas 1980.

LENCOLA SULLIVAN: You know I made history that night by being the first black woman to ever make top five in the Miss America Pageant’s history. And even though that was wonderful, of course I was sad that I didn’t make it to the top and didn’t walk away with the…the title of Miss America. That was actually one of the questions that was asked of me when I competed, was…is America ready for a black woman to become Miss America? And I said if Arkansas is ready, America is ready, but obviously America wasn’t ready.

NARRATOR: But in 1983, the 61st year of the Miss America Pageant, everything suddenly changed.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: 1983 Vanessa Williams singing and being crowned.

NARRATOR: A twenty-year-old musical theater major at Syracuse University, Williams had entered the Pageant in the hope of breaking into show business. Like so many Miss America before her, she wanted to be a star. But first, she would become a political symbol.

To some, the crowning of a black Miss America was a milestone in the struggle against bigotry. "Thank God I have lived long enough," said Congresswomen Shirley Chisholm, "that this nation has been able to select the beautiful young woman of color to be Miss America."

KIMBERLY AIKEN COCKERHAM, Miss America 1994: I remember watching the pageant, and I don’t know that I had watched it before and I remember her singing. I remember her performance. I remember her being crowned, I remember thinking wow, she looks like me. This is something that I could do. I had never to that point thought that Miss America was something that was for me or something that I could do. So I think that that was a turning point for me. I think everybody was shocked, excited and just looking forward to having a year where there was a Miss America that was black and would get to do all the great things that every other Miss America had ever done. So I think it was just a time of excitement and anticipation.

NARRATOR: Williams’ fans made her the most heavily-booked Miss America in the Pageant’s history. Not quite ten months into her reign, she had already earned a record $125,000 in fees.

WILLIAM GOLDMAN: I remember talking to some pageant people and they said that the best Miss Americas they ever had was Vanessa Williams. Apparently she was just sensational. She was just the most verbal, bright, terrific seller of the Miss America contest they’d ever had.

NARRATOR: But there were those who considered Williams’ victory an affront. For the first time, Miss America received death threats and hate mail. When she made appearances in the South, armed guards had to be posted at her hotel room door. And even in the African-American community, there were those who assailed her for not being "black" enough.

Then, in July of 1984, Williams was informed that an unauthorized pictorial, featuring explicit nude photos she had posed for two years earlier, was about to be published in Penthouse magazine. Pageant officials were quick to respond.

ARCHIVAL: L. Horn press conference: "We do not believe that under the content and spirit of the rules as well as the contracts as well as the image of Miss America that she should remain Miss America and still give this particular program the vitality as well as the respect to which it is entitled. If we don’t draw the line here, where do you draw the line?"

LEONARD HORN: The sponsors were waiting on the sidelines. We had received a warning that if we didn’t handle this right, it didn’t turn out right, they were going to pull out. If they pulled out at the end of July, there would have been no money and no Miss American pageant in 1984. And there would not be a Miss America pageant today. That’s how close we came.

NARRATOR: Williams was given 72 hours to resign. She would be allowed to keep her scholarship and the money she had earned, but her title would be given to the first runner-up, Suzette Charles.

ARCHIVAL/Vanessa Williams: "It is one thing to face up to a mistake that one makes in youth. But it is almost totally devastating to have to share it with the American public and the world at large as both a human being and as Miss America. I put the session in the back of my mind and believed the photos would never be used for any purpose as the photographer had verbally assured me. I never consented to the publication or the use of these photographs in any manner.

NARRATOR: It was the first time in the Pageant’s six-decade history that a Miss America was asked to give up her crown.

KIM AIKEN: A lot of people were very disappointed. And I think any community, any minority community looks to their role models that are so accepted and are so loved by everybody as a point of inspiration, and maybe at that point it is, you are let down that okay, these are choices that she made that have caused a lot of embarrassment to her and her family but also to the black community.

TRICIA ROSE: I do remember feeling … incredibly sorry for her. I just felt that she was carrying the weight of this whole history of vicious stereotypes about black women and simply by trying to win the Pageant, she was in a sense trying to counter many of those stereotypes. And then to have these pictures emerge to undermine it was probably the most vicious way to have it because I would be stunned if she was the first Pageant contestant to have tried to raise money as a model by doing these kinds of pictures. I would be stunned if she were the first. But I wouldn’t be surprised if people were more interested in finding hers to undermine it because she in a sense you know, by definition threw the rest of the contestants into stark relief.

NARRATOR: The Vanessa Williams issue of Penthouse would ultimately bring in over 20 million dollars, the magazine’s all-time, single-issue sales record.

MARGARET CHO: You know what’s great about it is that she’s the only Miss America that anybody remembers, and she’s the only one that ever really became a star and that is what’s really great is that her … she has the most kiss my ass story that you can triumph over anything so she’s certainly a big hero of mine.

NARRATOR: For a time, the scandal revived public interest in the Miss America Pageant, and ticket sales for the 1984 finals rose by twenty percent.

That night, after only two months as Miss America, Suzette Charles walked the Convention Hall runway to a standing ovation, before crowning her successor: 20-year-old Sharlene Wells, a tall, blonde Mormon whom USA Today described as "squeaky-clean."

NARRATOR: Confronted now by the possibility of scandals that Lenora Slaughter never could have imagined, Pageant directors drew up a new contestant contract, gradually adding dozens of regulations to which potential Miss Americas were subject.

KATE SHINDLE, Miss America 1998: That you’ve always been female, is one. Is that hilarious? You have to sign a contract saying I’ve always been female. There is, there’s a clause in the contract that you have never posed in the nude there’s always a clause that you can’t have ever, you can’t be the natural or adoptive parent of a child that you have never done anything that could possibly be interpreted as illegal, immoral, unethical, whatever. And everybody signs the contract, but who didn’t cheat on a second grade math test, you know what I mean?

NARRATOR: With the changes in the contract came a renewed campaign to portray Miss America as a "thinking woman" who could make a positive contribution to society. In 1989, Pageant officials introduced a new competition called "the platform," which required contestants to demonstrate on ongoing commitment to a social problem — and to back it up with community service.

PAGEANT FOOTAGE: Miss Florida ‘Hello from the Sunshine State. I’m devoted to promoting unity through the celebration of our cultural diversity’ … Miss North Dakota, ‘I am devoted to encouraging youth to postpone their sexual activities …’

KATE SHINDLE: It’s one of those things that people love to make fun of. I’d love to, I support world peace and I want to give everyone a flower. It’s, it’s the kind of stereotype that we abhor that we really want to get away from, and the way of doing that at least in my mind is to show that we can walk the walk as well.

PAGEANT FOOTAGE: Kate Shindle being crowned? And talking about AIDS

KATE SHINDLE: Because I was talking about AIDS which was something people don’t necessarily associate with the sort of conservative, white bread grass roots Miss America organization, it got a lot of media attention I took some flack for talking to students about sexual activity, certainly about abstinence but also about safer sex. There are people who don’t want you to come to their high school and say things like that. But I will tell you that Miss America got me so much access. The fact that I was invited to speak at middle and high schools in middle America where they would never never invite an AIDS activist to come and speak to their kids. But they’ll roll out the red carpet for Miss America and hope she brings her crown was an enormous part of what I felt was effective during that year.

NARRATOR: More than eighty years after the first contest was held in Atlantic City, the Miss America Pageant still endures. It is one of the longest-running television programs in American history, seen by more than a billion people since its first broadcast in 1954.

It is also the single largest scholarship organization for women in the world. Each year, 1200 state and local pageants are franchised by the Miss America Organization. And each year, more than 10,000 young women enter those contests, all of them hoping Miss America’s crown will change their lives.

KIM AIKEN: I think every contestant that comes to Miss America has a different agenda. Some contestants and I remember even my year said, I don’t want to win this pageant, I really just want to be on TV. Some contestants come there because they want to be discovered by a modeling agency or they want to go into acting or broadcasting. Many contestants go because of their social activism. Many contestants go just because they have this idea of Miss America with the crown and the walking down the runway and many contestants go for that reason.

PAGEANT BROADCAST: 50′s contestant: I would love to be your next Miss America . . . it would enable me to further my studies at Sacramento State College … It would also give the opportunity to meet many wonderful people that I wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity to meet … and it would considerably broaden my outlook on life … I would love to be your next Miss America.

MARGARET CHO: I think that women’s roles have changed so much in the last twenty years that we are constantly looking for the outside world to tell us who we are and that we really search for this sure identity, for this sure being of who we are and the pageant is one way of defining ourselves.

SARAH BANET-WEISER: It’s not you either love it or you hate it. It’s not it’s either good or bad. It just doesn’t fit that neatly into one of those boxes. I think that what civic rituals do is that they are stories that we tell ourselves about ourselves. And I think that along with considering the Miss America Pageant as popular culture we needed to consider it as a civic ritual, as something that is about imagining citizenship and imagining, who we are, why we’re here, what we’re for.

WILLIAM GOLDMAN: I wonder, I don’t know, do little girls now of six and seven dream of being Miss America? I don’t know. Or do they dream of replacing Bill Gates, I have no idea.

Voir également:

AS IT HAPPENED

ATLANTIC CITY IS A TOWN WITH CLASS — THEY RAISE YOUR MORALS WHILE THEY JUDGE YOUR ASS

Judith Duffett, New York

On Sept. 7, nearly 150 women committed to women’s liberation from New York, New Jersey, Washington DC, Florida, Boston and Detroit, converged on Atlantic City to protest the degrading image of women perpetuated by the Miss America Pageant.

Our goal was No more Miss America! Our objections to the Pageant, its racism (there’s never been a black contestant); its use of Miss America as a military mascot to entertain the troops abroad and symbolize the "unstained, patriotic American womanhood our boys are fighting for"; the degrading Mindless-Boob-Girlie symbol which puts women on a pedestal/auction block to compete for male approval; the consumer con game which makes Miss America a walking commercial and oppresses all women into commodity roles; the cult of youth and the American institution of planned obsolescence which makes last year’s Miss America as stale as yesterday’s news and makes all women "useless" when they are no longer ripe for exploitation as sex objects, the Madonna/Whore image of womanhood which means that Miss America must be seductive in a bathing suit and at the same time be pure and untouched; and the whole idea of beauty contests, which create one "winner" and millions of insecure, frustrated losers, who feel they must meet the imposed standards of beauty or face disaster: "You won’t get a man!"

photo source: "The Liberated Woman’s Appointment Calendar And Survival Handbook, 1971," by Jurate Kazickas and Lynn Sherr. Universe Books, 1970

Our purpose was not to put down Miss America but to attack the male chauvinism, commercialization of beauty, racism and oppression of women symbolized by the Pageant. We arrived on the Boardwalk at 2 p.m. Saturday and began picketing in front of Convention Hall. Some of our signs read: "Everyone is Beautiful," "I am a Woman, Not a Toy, Pet or Mascot," "Who Dares to Judge Beauty," and "Welcome to the Miss America Cattle Auction."

Guerrilla theater was used to illustrate some of our points. A live sheep was crowned "Miss America" and paraded on the liberated area of the boardwalk to parody the way the contestants (all women) are appraised and judged like animals at a county fair.

"Women are enslaved by beauty standards" was the theme of another dramatic action in which some of us chained ourselves to a life-size Miss America puppet. This was paraded and auctioned off by a woman dressed up as a male Wall Street financier. "Step right up, gentlemen, get your late model woman right here–a lovely paper dolly to call your very own property … She can push your product, push your ego, or push your lawnmower …"

The highlight of the afternoon was the giant Freedom Trash Can. With elaborate ceremony and shouts of joy, we threw away instruments of torture to women–high-heeled shoes, Merry Widow corsets, girdles, padded bras, false eyelashes, curlers, copies of Playboy, Cosmopolitan, Ladies Home Journal, etc.

Throughout the afternoon activities, we were observed by some five or six hundred onlookers, mostly men, who were by turns amused, perplexed, and mostly enraged by our presence. The heckling was led by two young men: "You’re just jealous–you couldn’t be Miss America if you were the last man (?) on earth!" "Get back on your broom!" "Why don’t you go back to Russia?" "Which one of your girlfriends is your husband?" The women in the mainly lower middle class crowd by and large agreed with them. One woman, however, crossed the police line with her three children and joined us!

We generally ignored their jeers, but in the evening (we stayed until midnight), when the crowd was somewhat less hostile, we changed our tactics. Many of us put down our signs and went right up to the police line and began engaging in dialogue with the people. Two more women crossed the line to our side, though we did not make any noticeable conversions. But a dialogue was established, and women who had felt confused and hurt by the signs and leaflets which they didn’t understand and demonstrators with whom they could not identify, began to go through some changes in their heads when we started to talk to them personally. Proving what many of us have felt for a long time: women who are unreachable on most radical issues can be reached on this one, since it involves their daily lives.

Sixteen of us purchased tickets to the Pageant and from seats in the balcony near the stage, began a disruption as the outgoing Miss America was making her farewell speech. Although there was no TV coverage of the disruption (we were told later that one of the cameramen was about to pan to the balcony when he was told that if he did he would lose his job), the cameras and microphones did record the visible turning of heads and the stuttering and trembling of Miss America as we shouted "Freedom for Women!" and "No More Miss America" and hung a banner from the balcony reading "Women’s Liberation."

The sixteen were quickly hustled out, and five were arrested, charges against them later dropped. Earlier Peggy Dobbins had been arrested and held on $1,000 bail. She was charged with disorderly conduct and "emanating a noxious odor" for spraying a can of Toni home permanent throughout the audience. The Pageant and city officials were undoubtedly sensitive on this area of commercial products. We had already declared a boycott of the products sponsoring the Pageant, of which Toni is one (the others are Pepsi-Cola and Oldsmobile). We expected that they would sweep Peggy’s case under the rug. Instead the charges against her were escalated to an indictable offense, with a possible sentence of two to three years.

All in all, the day was a tremendous success. We intend to be back in Atlantic City next year and every year until the Miss America Pageant is closed down. It may not take too long. There have been rumors that because of the disturbance, the Pageant next year may be taped with no studio audience.

We have also been in contact with a former Miss America who is on our side, and have heard from a woman who was asked to be a judge but declined, partly because she heard of our plans. I suppose it’s possible to have the Pageant without an audience, but you can hardly have one without contestants or judges!

‘BEAUTY OF THE BLACK WOMAN’

source:http://www.pbs.org/wgbh

"There’s a need for the beauty of the black woman to be paraded and applauded as a symbol of universal pride," said J. Morris Anderson, an organizer of the competing pageant. "We’re not protesting against beauty. We’re protesting because the beauty of the black woman has been ignored. It hasn’t been respected. We’ll show black beauty for public consumption — herald her beauty and applaud it."

At Convention Hall, at least a few of the women pickets were Negroes. They were aware of the Miss Black America contest, but were not sure what they ought to do about it. "I’m for beauty contests," said Mrs. Bonnie Allen, a Negro Bronx housewife in her mid-thirties. "But then again maybe I’m against them. I think black people have a right to protest." "Basically, we’re against all beauty contests," Miss Morgan said. "We deplore Miss Black America as much as Miss White America but we understand the black issue involved."

NEGRO FINALISTS ACTIVE

While the Miss America finalists stayed out of sight, reportedly primping for their last show in Convention Hall, the eight Miss Black America finalists were out on the town acting like

source:http://www.pbs.org

beauty queens. They rode in open convertibles from the Ritz Carlton past the hall, around the business district and on into the Negro community. They waved white-gloved hands, smiled perfect smiles and showed off themselves as well as their elegant evening gowns in the afternoon sun.

They were cheered everywhere. The predominantly white strollers along the boardwalk waved and applauded. But nowhere was the reception more enthusiastic than along the main streets within the Negro community. Besides a motorcycle escort, they were accompanied by music makers with bongos, cowbells and flutes. And after their automobile tour, they went off to swim, party and wait for the midnight judging to begin. The final’s beginning coincided with the Miss America finale.

The Miss America Organization

The Miss America Pageant and its sponsor, the Miss America Organization, has evolved from a beach-side showcase for frolicking bathing beauties to a competition that still includes bathing suits, but now emphasizes scholarships and social causes. In 1921 the winner of the first Inter-City Beauty Contest was crowned "Miss America," and she won a first place prize of $100. The first pageant had only seven contestants from cities along the East Coast. Although the number of contestants and the pageant’s popularity increased throughout the decade, the event was closed down in 1927 due to growing criticism and charges of immorality, as well as a lack of financial support.

In 1933 organizers revived the pageant. By 1940, the pageant had regained its financial footing and respectability. It continued as a not-for-profit event; its official title became the "Miss America Pageant" and chose the Atlantic City Convention Hall as its permanent venue. The national executive director, Lenora Slaughter, shaped the modern pageant by adding features such as state competitions, the scholarship program, and a judging category based on personal interviews.

In the 1990s the pageant was reformed into The Miss America Organization, a not-for-profit corporation which comprised three distinct divisions: the traditional Miss America Pageant, the scholarship fund, and a Miss America foundation. The organization grants state franchises to one "responsible" organization in each state — usually the Junior Chamber of Commerce (Jaycees). The state organization conducts a state competition in accordance with all the rules and regulations established by the Miss America Organization. These include having a panel of Miss-America-certified judges. The state pageant organizations, in turn, are responsible for reciprocal franchising of "responsible" organizations within each state to sponsor local and regional competitions. The local, state, and national organizations all rely on a vast army of volunteers and financial supporters to work throughout the year.

Contestants at all levels of the pageant compete in four categories: talent, evening wear, interview and physical fitness. Further, every Miss America state titleholder must select a platform for a social cause that is important to her. She spends her year’s service as a state winner advocating her issue. On the national level, Miss America also spends her year (since 1989, when the platform requirement was established) advocating her cause to the media, business people, public officials, and civic and charitable organizations.

The pageant competitions and the national broadcast are only one part of what the Miss America Organization does. The national and state organizations operate twelve months a year, raising scholarship funds from large and small businesses. The Miss America Organization’s main mission is to provide contestants with the opportunity to pursue their professional and educational goals through monetary grants and awards.

On the national level, scholarships are distributed as follows:

Miss America, $40,000

First runner-up, $30,000

Second runner-up, $20,000

Third runner-up, $15,000

Fourth runner-up, $10,000

Each of the five semi-finalists also wins $8,000. Each of the other 40 contestants receives $3,000. The three preliminary talent winners get $2000 each. The three preliminary swimsuit winners gain $500 each. One non-finalist interview winner is awarded $1,000. There are a number of other scholarship awards on the national level, including ten Bert Parks non-finalist talent winners, receiving $1,000 each, and a newly established Steinway Music Scholarship of $5,000.

Since establishing the scholarship program in 1945, the Miss America program has distributed more than $150 million in educational grants, making it the world’s largest scholarship program for women. Each year more than $30 million in diverse scholarships are made available to thousands of women who participate in local, state and national Miss America programs.

Lenora Slaughter Transforms the Pageant

From its inception, the Miss America Pageant wrestled with its image. In the 1920s, pageant organizers worked to make it a sophisticated event. But critics such as women’s clubs and religious groups abhorred the display of the female form in public; it was not considered respectable behavior. Although Victorian values had relaxed, new freedoms for women — from the expression of more direct sexuality to winning the vote in 1920 — led to a general anxiety about women’s apparently loosening morals. To make matters worse, most of the women who flocked to the pageant came with hopes of landing a Hollywood or stage career, cashing in on their good looks but raising questions about their morality. The growing criticism caused pageant officials to shut down the event in 1928.

The economic depression of the 1930s brought a more conservative understanding of "proper" femininity. The ideal of the frugal homemaker replaced that of the flapper. Before the pageant could be revived, organizers had to create an event that had a higher moral tone. In 1935 Lenora Slaughter was hired to produce an event that was respectable and legitimate.

Lenora Slaughter, a Southern Baptist and businesswoman, had made a name for herself in St. Petersburg, Florida, by working tirelessly at the Chamber of Commerce to put that town on the map. Slaughter came to the Miss America Pageant on a six-week leave of absence from St. Petersburg. She ended up staying, and in time would become director of the pageant, in a reign that lasted until 1967. The pageant became her passion. She would bring the most significant and lasting changes to its structure.

The newly revived pageant of 1935 marked the beginning of a concerted effort to attract an appropriate "class of girl" to represent the nation with the title of Miss America. Unfortunately, Slaughter’s early years were plagued with scandal and notoriety. In 1935, a sculptor unveiled a nude statue of that year’s Miss America, Henrietta Leaver. Later, Miss America 1937, eighteen-year-old Bette Cooper, changed her mind about becoming Miss America and escaped in the middle of the night.

Slaughter initiated an all-out crusade to improve the pageant’s image. First, she banned contestants who held titles that represented commercial interests, such as newspapers, amusement parks and theaters. Contestants were required to carry the title of a city, region, or state. This distanced the pageant from the crass practices of other pageants where the connection between money and women displaying themselves in public was obvious. The contestants now had to be between 18 and 25 years old, and never married. And while in Atlantic City, they had to observe a 1 am curfew and a ban on bars and nightclubs. Slaughter initiated the talent competition in 1938, introducing the idea that the contestants could be judged on more than beauty.

Slaughter did not stop there. At the time, theaters, swimming pools, state fairs, and amusement parks ran local pageants. She persuaded local Junior Chambers of Commerce (Jaycees) to become sponsors, allowing parents to feel their daughters were in safe hands. Further still, Slaughter persuaded socialites from Atlantic City’s upper strata to act as hostesses and chaperones for the young women when they were in Atlantic City. A pageant judge once asked Slaughter what to look for in a winner. "Honey," she said, "just pick me a lady."

Slaughter’s most significant legacy is the Miss America scholarship program. "I knew that the shine of a girl’s hair wasn’t going to make her a success in life," she wrote in her autobiography. Prizes before Slaughter consisted of such things as a fur coat, a Hollywood contract, or the chance to earn money modeling. In offering opportunities for advancement through education, Slaughter fashioned a pageant that appealed to middle-class sensibilities. Slaughter sat down and personally wrote about three hundred letters to businesses asking for college scholarship money that could be offered as the prize for the Miss America title. She initially raised $5000, and in 1945 the Miss America Pageant became one of the first organizations in the country to offer college scholarships to women. Lenora Slaughter died in December 2000 at the age of 94. By the time of her death, the Miss America Organization was the single largest contributor of scholarships to women in the United States.

Breaking the Color Line at the Pageant

The first African Americans to appear in the Miss America Pageant came onstage as ‘slaves’ for a musical number in 1923. It was not until 1970 that a black woman, Iowa’s Cheryl Brown, won a state title and made it to Atlantic City as a contestant. Lencola Sullivan, Miss Arkansas 1980, was the first African American to make it to the top five. In 1984 Vanessa Williams became the first black Miss America, beginning the year as one of the best Miss Americas ever, in the eyes of many pageant insiders, but ending her reign mid-year amidst scandal.

The pageant’s long history of excluding women of color dates from its beginnings. At some point in the 1930s, it was formalized in the notorious rule number seven of the Miss America rule book. Instituted under the directorship of Lenora Slaughter, rule number seven stated that "contestants must be of good health and of the white race." As late as 1940, all contestants were required to list, on their formal biological data sheet, how far back they could trace their ancestry. In the pageant’s continual crusade for respectability, ancestral connections to the Revolutionary War or perhaps the Mayflower would have been seen as a plus.

Bess Myerson, Miss America 1945 and daughter of Russian-Jewish parents, while technically eligible to compete under rule seven, sensed the far-reaching bigotry behind it. She had, after all, been pressured (unsuccessfully) to change her name to a less Jewish-sounding name. Myerson was the first Jewish Miss America — and the only one ever to be crowned, as of 2001. Myerson later recalled her discussion with Slaughter:

"I said… the problem is that I’m Jewish, yes? And with that kind of name it’ll be quite obvious to everyone else that I’m Jewish. And you don’t want to have to deal with a Jewish Miss America. And that really was the bottom line. I said I can’t change my name. You have to understand. I cannot change my name. I live in a building with two hundred and fifty Jewish families. The Sholom Aleichem apartment houses. If I should win, I want everybody to know that I’m the daughter of Louie and Bella Myerson."

In addition to Myerson, others had pushed the boundaries of the pageant’s unwritten and written rules for inclusion. In 1941 a Native American, Mifauny Shunatona, represented Oklahoma at the pageant, though there would not be another Native American contestant for 30 years. Irma Nydia Vasquez from Puerto Rico, and Yun Tau Zane from Hawaii, the first Asian contestant, both broke the color bar in 1948.

Asian American comedian Margaret Cho recalls watching the pageant: "My father was very into it. And then, at one point when I was a little girl, I said oh I want to be one of those contestants. I want to grow up and do that, and he said no, oh no, you cannot do that, no. …and I took it to mean that the beauty pageant was not open to all women. I mean my father thought that this whole pageant was fascinating and we would pick out the winners, but I was not allowed to even entertain the fantasy of becoming one of these women. And I thought well maybe I’m just not pretty enough. Maybe I’m just not white."

By the 1960s there still had not been a black contestant. Following the advances of the civil rights movement, black Americans set up their own contest in 1968. Black communities had sponsored segregated black beauty contests for years, dating farther back than the Miss America contest. However, the 1968 Miss Black America Contest, held in Atlantic City on the same day as the Miss America Pageant, was organized as a direct protest of the pageant. On that same day, feminists staged a boardwalk demonstration protesting the pageant. The 1968 Miss America Pageant was confronted with its shortcomings on several fronts.

It was not until 1984 that Vanessa Williams of New York was crowned as the first black Miss America. Many likened her accomplishment to that of Jackie Robinson breaking the color line in baseball. Controversy followed Williams as, for the first time, Miss America recieved death threats and hate mail. By all accounts, Williams was doing an excellent job of representing the pageant at her public appearances. But halfway into her year, the discovery of pornographic photos of her forced Williams to resign. She had been pressured into posing for the photographs that she had been told would never appear in print. In 1984 they came out in the most successful issue of Penthouse magazine ever printed, netting publisher Bob Guccione a windfall profit of $14 million.

When Williams resigned, the media and the American public could talk of little else. Williams’ situation seemed to be about more than a single young woman’s error in judgment. Many people, both inside the black community and outside it, saw racial politics at the heart of the scandal, and debated how Williams’ race might have affected events. No matter how people viewed the scandal, Williams often was cast as representing not only herself, but also her race.

Vanessa Williams persevered, and went on to have a major recording career. Her runner-up, an African American woman from New Jersey named Suzette Charles, took over as the 1984 Miss America. Since then, there have been other black Miss Americas, as well as the first Asian Miss America, Angela Baraquio, Miss Hawaii of 2000. Today, the Miss America Pageant has made diversity part of its official mission.

Still, it is a particular kind of diversity. For recent historians and commentators, the question that is becoming most significant is how "diverse" a contestant can be. Is the pageant truly diverse, or is it peddling an outdated image of America as a homogenized melting pot? Do women of color need to fit the idealized white version of femininity that is the legacy of the pageant? Can more ethnic and racially diverse features be represented at the pageant? And can modern beauty even be reduced to a single, representative face? These questions are likely to be raised by the pageant for years to come.

History follows former Miss Iowa First black pageant winner recalls her crowning moment

Shirley Davis

Quad-City Times

October 19, 2000

Cheryl Brown Hollingsworth, now of Lithonia, Ga., is married and the mother of two married children. She hopes to be in Davenport for tonight’s pageant.

Thirty years ago a pretty and talented ballet dancer from Iowa set the international press spinning when she became the first-ever African-American contestant in the Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City, N.J.

The fact that she came from a conservative Midwestern state like Iowa was doubly astounding to those who were reporting on the pageant, and she drew attention not only from newspaper and magazine writers around the world but from the security forces in Atlantic City, who were quite visible during rehearsals in Convention Hall.

Today, Cheryl Brown Hollingsworth of Lithonia, Ga., who was Miss Iowa of 1970, says, “Iowans were very accepting of me, but I think it took the country by surprise to realize that it was a young woman from Iowa who became the first African-American contestant.

“I don’t feel I personally changed the pageant,” Brown said in a phone interview from her home this week, “ but I feel that my presence expanded people’s minds and their acceptance. And, in subsequent years, they were much more open to African-American candidates.” She says, “I didn’t feel hounded by the press, but it was obvious that security was tight —especially at Convention Hall rehearsals when our chaperones weren’t always present.

“There were women’s lib protesters on the Boardwalk, and no one knew whether there would be more protesters because of the African-American connection.” The reigning Miss Iowa, Jennifer Caudle of Davenport, who will give up her crown tonight, is only the second African-American contestant from Iowa in the past 30 years.

Brown, who has been working in banking industry for 26 years, manages a financial center for First Union National Bank in Atlanta, Ga. Her husband Karl, formerly of Moline, is regional human resources manager for the Federal Express. Her mother-in-law, Mildred Taylor, still lives in Moline.

The couple has been married 28 years. Their daughter Etienne Thomas of Durham, N.C., finished law school in December and was married in January. Son Joshua also is married and is an Army paratrooper at Fort Bragg, N.C.

Brown was to have judged this week’s state pageant in Davenport, but a conflict with her job made that impossible at the last minute. At this writing, she planned to arrive in Davenport by Friday evening, operating on a very tight schedule. “I’ll be pushing it,” she said, “but I hope to make it.” She’d also hoped to be here for the 50th anniversary pageant two years ago, but had to cancel because of another conflict. “This would have been only the third pageant I’d have judged,” she said. She was an Iowa judge in the early ’80s.

Brown came to Davenport in 1970 as a student from Luther College in Decorah, Iowa. As Miss Decorah, she won a college scholarship —then more scholarships from the state and national pageants, with an extra scholarship for being a non-finalist talent winner in Atlantic City.

These helped with her education at Luther College, where she met her husband.

Although she didn’t place in the coveted “top 10” in Atlantic City, Brown’s talent brought her back to the Miss America Pageant the following year. “I was one of the Miss America contestants chosen to go on a USO tour to Vietnam, and we were all invited back to the pageant.

“I think it was one of the last Miss America groups to go to Vietnam,” Brown said.

Because she was a New Yorker, Brown stayed in the Bettendorf home of Marge and Walter Steffens during her reign, because her title required her to maintain a Quad-City residence. The Steffens’ daughter Barbara was a friend of Brown’s. She remembers the fun she had shopping for her Atlantic City wardrobe —all at the expense of the pageant board.

Brown now keeps up with Miss Iowa news through a pageant newspaper.

She had hoped to come back for the 50th anniversary of the Miss Iowa Pageant in 1998, but another conflict prevented that.

“My daughter isn’t interested in pageants and is not a dancer,” Brown said. Brown’s father, who had been employed at a New York City airport, died three years ago, and recently her mother moved to Atlanta to be near her.

Fighting Racism, One Swimsuit at a Time

Belva Davis

February 10, 2011

As we celebrate Black History Month and honor progress against racial and gender bias, it’s good to acknowledge some of the roadblocks that had to be overcome, especially for African American women.

In the 1960s, nobody had to tell me that a dark-skinned girl was ineligible to be Miss America; everybody knew the crown was reserved for white girls only. The rare occasions when the pageant included African Americans had been demeaning, such as the 1923 competition in which blacks played the roles of slaves during a Court of Neptune musical extravaganza. By the 1930s, the exclusion was made explicit with Pageant Rule #7, which required that Miss America contestants “be of good health and of the white race.”

By the 1940s, contestants were required to complete a biological data sheet tracing their ancestry as far back as possible —preferably to the Mayflower.

Not until 1970 would a U.S. state be so rebellious as to send a black contestant to the Miss America Pageant, and ironically it would be one of the whitest states in the nation: Iowa. The first black woman to win the Miss America crown was Vanessa Williams in 1983, a surprising triumph at a time when the prototypical “beautiful woman” in the mainstream culture of the day had a slim build, blonde hair and blue eyes.

Internalizing this racism, many black females put themselves through a torturous process trying to appear “less black” —straightening the kinks out of their hair, bleaching their skin, minimizing their curvaceous bodies and even occasionally clamping their wider noses with clothespins in a preposterous attempt to narrow them. They weren’t unaware of the consequences of skin color: Social science research would later establish that lighter-toned African Americans had better employment prospects than their darker counterparts.

But I had no doubt that attractive girls and women came in all colors, from pale porcelain to glorious ebony, as history has taught us. And if the Miss America pageant was too stubbornly prejudiced to see that, I decided, we should simply initiate a contest all our own. Maxine Craig, associate professor of women and gender studies at the University of California, Davis, took note of it in her scholarly paper ”Walking like a Queen: Learning to be Miss Bronze:”

On June 9, 1961 an Oakland, California black newspaper announced the beginning of the ‘first major beauty contest for Negro girls held in Northern California.’ Belva Davis, an energetic free-lance journalist, recruited contestants, trained them, found sponsors, a band and a banquet hall, sold tickets, arranged for press coverage and thus created the first northern California ‘Miss Bronze’ contest.

The pageant was open to unmarried African American women 17 to 25 years old, from the Oregon border all the way south to Fresno. I recruited contestants in the Bay Area via my newspaper column, my radio show and even church appearances. Eventually Sacramento, Merced and Fresno staged their own local pageants, with their winners advancing to the Miss Bronze Northern California finals. The winner and first runner-up, as well as the talent-competition winners, were awarded free trips to Los Angeles to compete in the Miss Bronze California Pageant finals.

I did everything I could to make the competition affordable to all young women. Entrance was free, as were the required charm school classes. We secured donated swimsuits for the contestants — always modest one-pieces, to keep the churches happy —and provided stipends for their evening gowns.

Today, few would consider the creation of a beauty pageant as a serious way to fight injustice, but it proved to be an effective tool four decades ago. The Miss Bronze contest gave our young contestants the confidence and self-pride they needed to pursue the dreams they held of breaking through the crust of doubts about their own self-worth. Simple things such as good posture, a confident smile, the rewards of volunteering–all helped the contestants define and aspire to become their best selves. Participation in the Miss Bronze California pageant opened the door to talented women of that era, some who continue to enjoyed long careers in the entertainment industry–like Oscar nominee (for The Color Purple) Margaret Avery, and Marilyn McCoo and Florence LaRue of The Fifth Dimension.

The words of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave me the comfort I needed to realize the value of what some saw as frivolous and demeaning to women. He said,

If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.

Those words hold true today. Find a place where you can work toward equality, forget the name and go to work.

Belva Davis’s new memoir is Never in My Wildest Dreams; see an excerpt from it in the latest issue of Ms. magazine.

Photo of Marilyn McCoo of The Fifth Dimension performing in 1970, from Wikimedia Commons. McCoo won the Miss Bronze California pageant in 1962.

10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Miss America Pageant

FOX News Magazine

September 13, 2013

The preliminary rounds for this year’s Miss America pageant are already under way in Atlantic City, with the final night of competition airing on ABC this Sunday at 9 p.m. ET.

But before you settle down for an extravaganza of swimsuits, singing and sashaying, why not take a few minutes to learn a bit more about one of America’s favorite national pastimes? After all, there’s a whole lot more to Miss America than meets the eye (besides her hidden talent for playing the marimba).

Here’s a few of the most interesting stories, scandals and secrets surrounding the Miss America pageant.

* * * * *

#1. The Miss America pageant started as a ploy to keep tourists on the Atlantic City boardwalk after Labor Day. In 1920, a group of local businessmen organized an event called the Fall Frolic, which happened to feature a rolling chair parade of young ladies. At the following year’s Fall Frolic, the parade was reworked as the Inter-City Beauty contest, and entrants were chosen through newspaper-sponsored photo contests. Sixteen-year-old Margaret Gorman won the title of "The Most Beautiful Bathing Girl in America" and took home the Golden Mermaid trophy. She returned to defend her title in 1922, where she was informally dubbed "Miss America."

#2. After Yolande Betbeze won the title of Miss America for 1951, she flat-out refused to wear or promote Catalina swimwear, one of the pageant’s sponsors. (Betbeze told the company she was a singer, "not a pin-up.") Because of this, Catalina cut ties with Miss America and created their own beauty competition in 1952: the Miss USA pageant.

#3. To compete for the Miss America crown, a contestant can’t be married — but she can certainly be divorced. A rule change in 1999, which was applied to the 2000 pageant and onward, states that the contestants only need to swear that they’re unmarried, not pregnant, and not the adoptive or biological parent of a child (rather than the previous rule that required a Miss America contestant to swear that she had never been married or pregnant).

#4. California, Oklahoma and Ohio boast the most Miss America wins with six each. Nineteen states and two U.S. territories share the distinction of earning zero Miss America titles.

#5. In 2012, the widow of the songwriter who penned the familiar Miss America tune ("There she is, Miss America … ") filed a lawsuit against the pageant. Phyllis Wayne felt that the song — written by her late husband Bernie Wayne — had been improperly licensed at the 2011 and 2012 ceremonies. A confidential settlement was reached in late 2012, but the song wasn’t heard at the 2013 pageant, and it won’t be heard at the 2014 pageant, either.

#6. Historically, there has always been a set of qualifying criteria that must be met in order to enter the Miss America pageant, but none was as controversial as rule #7. This rule, which was in place until 1940, stated that "contestants must be of good health and of the white race." To satisfy this requirement, Miss America hopefuls were required to trace their ancestry back through as many generations as they could.

#7. The first and only Jewish Miss America, Bess Myerson, was crowned in 1945. She was pressured to change her name to "Beth Merrick" for the pageant, but the Bronx native told her pageant director that she wouldn’t do it. "I said … the problem is that I’m Jewish, yes? And with that kind of name it’ll be quite obvious to everyone else that I’m Jewish. And you don’t want to have to deal with a Jewish Miss America," Myerson recounted. "And that really was the bottom line. I said I can’t change my name. You have to understand. I cannot change my name. I live in a building with two hundred and fifty Jewish families. The Sholom Aleichem apartment houses. If I should win, I want everybody to know that I’m the daughter of Louie and Bella Myerson."

#8. Television and radio announcer Bert Parks has hosted more Miss America pageants than anyone else, having emceed the event every year between 1955 and 1979. When he was fired at the age of 65 (organizers were trying to revamp the show for a younger audience), Johnny Carson staged a "We Want Bert" campaign to get him reinstated. It didn’t work, but Parks was eventually invited back to appear as a guest for the pageant’s 70th anniversary in 1990.

#9. Prior to becoming an Oscar- and Golden Globe-winning actress, Cloris Leachman competed in the 1946 Miss America pageant as Miss Chicago. (In the pageant’s earlier years, delegates representing larger metropolitan areas such as New York City and Chicago were allowed to enter alongside delegates from New York State and Illinois. After complaints, the pageant did away with these positions — as well as the position of Miss Washington D.C., albeit temporarily.)

#10. The morning after winning the title of Miss America at the 1937 pageant, Bette Cooper decided she didn’t want to commit to the role and ran off with a man (by motorboat, some say). She opted to return to school instead of fulfilling her Miss America duties, and no other contestant was awarded the title in her stead.

Regina

Vintage Powder Room

a window into the past

1 Jul, 2012

All hail the Queen! The Regina hair net envelope suggests that any wearer of the net inside will become a queen. Well, a hair net is much easier to wear out in public than a jeweled crown is — unless you’re Miss America.

The Miss America Pageant was conceived in Atlantic City. The Businessmen’s League of Atlantic City devised a plan that would keep profits flowing into the city past Labor Day, which was when tourists traditionally left for home.

The kick-off event was held on September 25, 1920, and was called the Fall Frolic. Who could resist an event in which three hundred and fifty men pushed gaily decorated rolling wicker chairs along a parade route? The main attractions were the young maidens who occupied the chairs. The head maiden was Miss Ernestine Cremona who, dressed in a flowing white robe, was meant to represent peace.

The Atlantic businessmen had scored a major success with the Frolic. They immediately realized the powerful appeal of a group of attractive young women dressed in bathing suits, and so a committee was formed to organize a bather’s revue for the next year’s event.

The bather’s revue committee contacted newspapers in cities as far west as Pittsburgh and as far south as Washington, D.C. asking them to sponsor local beauty contests. The winners of the local contests would participate in the Atlantic City beauty contest.

Atlantic City newspaperman Herb Test reported that the winner of the city’s pageant would be called Miss America.

The 1921 Fall Frolic was five days of, well, frolicking. There were tennis tournaments, parades, concerts, a fancy dress ball and SEVEN different bathing divisions! If you were in Atlantic City during those five days and not dressed in a bathing suit you would have been out of place. Children, men, even fire and police personnel, all were in bathing suits. There was a category created specifically for professional women, and by professional the pageant’s organizers didn’t mean corporate women, secretaries or hookers, they meant stage and screen actresses.

Margaret Gorman

The first Miss America was chosen by a combination of the crowd’s applause and points given to her by a panel of artists who served as judges. Sixteen-year-old Margaret Gorman (30-25-32), who bore a strong resemblance to screen star Mary Pickford, was proclaimed the winner. Gorman was crowned, wrapped in an American flag, and presented with the Golden Mermaid trophy and $100.

Atlantic City expanded the frolic during the 1920s and the number of contestants grew to 83 young women from 36 states. The event drew protestors who thought that the girls were immoral — why else would they be willing to parade around in bathing suits in public? The organizers countered the protests by publicizing that the contestants were wholesome, sweet young things who neither wore make-up, nor bobbed their hair.

Louise Brooks, bobbed haired beauty.

With the runaway success of the Atlantic City pageant, other groups saw an opportunity to jump on the bandwagon by promoting their own ideals of beauty. The 1920s saw pageants for a Miss Bronze America, and even the Ku Klux Klan staged a pageant for Miss 100 Percent America! It’s difficult for me to visualize a woman wearing a bathing suit and one of those dopey conical hats.

For the next several years the Atlantic City pageant continued to thrive and to change. One of the changes was in scoring. How does a panel of judges determine a beauty contest winner? By the mid-1920s a points system was established: five points for the construction of the head, three points for the torso, two points for the leg…I’m wondering just how many points a perky rounded posterior was worth.

Norma Smallwood

In 1926, Norma Smallwood, a small-town girl from Tulsa, Oklahoma, was crowned Miss America. She parlayed her reign into big bucks. She reportedly made over $100k — more than either Babe Ruth or President Calvin Coolidge!

Smallwood appears to have been the first Miss America who realized that her crown was a business opportunity. When she was asked to return to Atlantic City in 1927 to crown her successor, she demanded to be paid. When the pageant reps didn’t come forward with a check, Norma bid them adieu and headed for a gig in North Carolina.

By 1928 women’s clubs, religious organizations and other conservative Americans went on the attack and accused the organizers of the Miss America Pageant of corrupting the nation’s morals. One protester said, “Before the competition, the contestants were splendid examples of innocence and pure womanhood. Afterward their heads were filled with vicious ideas.”

Still from OUR DANCING DAUGHTERS (1928)

The controversy over the beauty contest scared the Atlantic City Chamber of Commerce so badly that, in 1928, they voted twenty-seven to three to cancel the event!

The stock market crash and resulting economic depression made the Atlantic City Chamber of Commerce rethink the event, and it was revived 1933.

In 1933, thirty young women were brought to Atlantic City aboard a chartered train called the Beauty Special.

The Atlantic City Press newspaper reported:

“Queens of pulchritude, representing 29 states, the District of Columbia and New York City, will arrive here today to compete for the crown of Miss America 1933.

The American Beauty Special train will arrive at the Pennsylvania-Reading Railroad Station at South Carolina Avenue at 1:20 p.m. to mark the opening of the eighth edition of the revived Atlantic City Pageant. The five-day program will be climaxed Saturday night with the coronation ceremonies in the Auditorium.

A collection of blondes, brunettes and red heads, will assemble in Broad Street Station, Philadelphia, this morning, and the beauty special will leave at 11:55 a.m.”

It is surprising that more women didn’t participate in the 1933 Miss America pageant. In the midst of the Great Depression the contest prizes sounded fabulous, “Wealth and many honors await the Miss America this year. She will receive many valuable prizes and a cash award as well. In addition, she will have opportunities to pursue a theatrical career.”

Some of the contestants may have believed the stories related in rags-to-Broadway-riches films like GOLD DIGGERS OF 1933. The opportunity for a girl to win a part in a film or on Broadway would have been a potent lure for those who saw themselves as the next Joan Blondell or Ruby Keeler. I can imagine many of the Miss America hopefuls on the Beauty Train singing WE’RE IN THE MONEY.

The 1933 winner was Marian Bergeron, a talented girl from Westhaven, Connecticut. She was poised for a shot at stardom until the newspapers reported her age; she was only fifteen. Her young age put a damper on an offer from RKO, but she was buoyed by a two year reign – no pageant was held in 1934.

Marian Bergeron

During the 1930s the Miss America pageant continued to be viewed by many as a circus of sin. In October 1935 a scandal rocked the contest.

Less than a month after seventeen-year-old Henrietta Leaver had been crowned Miss America, a nude statue of her was unveiled in her hometown of Pittsburgh.

Henrietta swore up and down that she had worn a bathing suit when she posed for the statue, and she also said that her grandmother had been with her each time she had posed. Nobody bought Henrietta’s story and the image of the Miss America pageant was further tarnished.

One of my favorite Miss America contestants of the 1930s was Rose Veronica Coyle (1936 winner). Rose was twenty-two when she won title of Miss America. Rose wore a short ballet shirt with a white jacket, brightened by huge red polka dots, and sang “I Can’t Escape from You”.

Rose Coyle, Truckin’

She then wowed the judges with her eight-minute long tap dance routine performed to TRUCKIN’. The audience loved her so much the judges allowed her an encore — the first in the pageant’s history.

The Miss America Pageant lost its venue after WWII broke out because it was needed by the military. Rose Coyle and her husband, Leonard Schlessinger (National General Manager of Warner Bros. Theaters) saved the day by relocating the Miss America Pageant to the Warner Theatre on the Boardwalk. It would be the pageant’s home until 1946.

Beauty Pageants, Miss America, Miss American Rose Day

A Return to True Beauty

In What Day is it?

October 20, 2009

In thousands of beauty pageants across America, she stands there, an aura around her as she tries with all of her might not to squint under the bright, hot kleig lights causing tiny beads of sweat to form on her forehead, as she focuses on holding that perfect vasoline-covered smile, praying not to trip on the dress while walking past the dimly-lit judges’ table in front of the stage….

Origin of Modern-Day Beauty Pageant

In 1921 the Businessman’s League of Atlantic City, a fun-loving group of guys to be sure, decided to hold what they called a ”Fall Frolic.” Sticking wheels on 350 colorful wicker chairs, the organizers decorated them and assembled together scores of attractive women to pose on the chairs, as men pushed them down the Boardwalk. The spectacle was such a success (go figure) that organizers decided to ask cities far and wide to run photo pageants in their newspapers, perform state-wide runoffs, and send all the winners to Atlantic City the following year as state representatives. A local newspaperman, Herb Test, spoke up and stated that the ultimate winner should be crowned “Miss America.” Although only a handful of states sent women the next year, an empire was born, changing how beauty was perceived for decades to come.

Rubber-stamping Beauty

The nationalizing and glamorizing of beauty pageants significantly helped to standardize what it means to be “beautiful” in America. Oh, I’m not trying to villify the Billion-Dollar pageant industry…. They were only building on the commercial success that came with parading a steady stream of female cinema bombshells in Hollywood. It’s no coincidence that the first winner of the Miss America Pageant was 16-year-old Margaret Gorman, noted to have been popular because she looked like then-famous movie starlet Mary Pickford.

Little girls in small towns scattered across America read about the annual winners, pouring over photographs of the contest in their local papers. Quite a bit more than a handful of young women began that dream of competing someday in what has become over 1,200 local and state-level pageants leading to the now televised national pageants, hoping to be picked (by the new pageant ”experts,” tape measure in hand) as perfect.

Eating Disorders : The 800 lb. Gorilla in the Room

A Johns Hopkins University study showed that the average contestant on Miss America is 5’7″ talls, weighs in at a feathery-light 120 lbs., and has a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 18.5, placing her squarely in the undernourished category for her height. This is to be compared to the average American woman, with a height of 5’4″, weighing 142 lbs., with a BMI of 24.4. In other words, to be considered as the next nationally televised representative of American beauty, a young women has to put serious consideration in joining the population of those residing deeply in the territory bordering an eating disorder.

My three young girls see the woman who is pressed forward by the crowd, to cut the ribbon on the new mall’s ground-breaking with impossibly large scissors. They see the happy young girl waving from the car passing by on the parade, the one in the beautiful white formal. My girls are health, having been known to turn down seconds at the dinner table many a time. Despite these continual exercises in self-control, they don’t see the same figure in the mirror as those that represent our shared ideals of shapeliness. How easy it must be for them to equate success in life with that waif-like figure paraded in front of them in magazines and on television, in music videos and commercials. I work hard to make sure they understand the difference between perception and reality…

It is estimated by the National Institute of Mental Health that between 5-10% of all women in America suffer from eating disorders, and up to 15% have had issues with them in their lives. Women have begun to fight back at this impossible body image, demanding a more realistic view of what is considered beautiful by the media, often lashing out at the beauty pageants, television conglomerates, and fashion industry.

From Skinny to “Fit”

She looks fat?

She looks fat?

Beauty pageant marketers have heard the complaints, simply moving their message from thin to the more popular image of “fit,” adding the word “fitness” to describe swimsuit competitions, as though to wear a skinny slip of fabric is akin to a sporting activity. My Dad used to watch pretty much any sport that was on television, including of all things Bass Fishing. If they had grass growing competitions, I am sure he would have owned a hat with Kentucky Blue Grass emblazoned on it. To my surprise, he also loved to watch Women’s Baskeball. I’m not always sure it was for the right reasons… The players looked pretty fit to me. The average female Olympic women’s basketball player (a Hell of a lot taller, fitter and thinner than the average woman) coincidentally has a BMI averaging 24.4, same as your typical, much shorter red-blooded and totally hot American female.

There is nothing fit in the rapid (and dangerous) weight-loss regimen that one not-long-ago Miss America winner underwent, going from a size 7 to a size 2 in just four months in preparation for the competition. I seriously doubt she played basketball to get in that condition. Our girls cannot (and should not) try to keep up with this dangerous example of American “fitness.” They don’t wind up on stages with tiaras after that type of behavior. They wind up in hospitals.

The Addition of “Good Causes”

National and International Beauty Pageants have further pushed away the issue of eating disorders by brandishing before them (and perhaps hiding behind) a variety of wonderful causes they support financially, including AIDS Education, Women’s Rights, School Violence and Breast Cancer Awareness. They are certainly incredible, worthy causes. I believe in and support them all, in case an apologetic wants to bash me over the head with one. But the pageants continue to fail to take on the 800 lb. gorilla in the room head-on, undertaking the loosening of what body style has to be met to compete and win. What better way to create a more healthy, positive body image for our daughters, one that empowers them to stop looking in the mirror so much and begin looking more seriously at their educations, than to change what they physically see in beauty pageant winners? In that girl who cuts the ribbon or waves in the parade?

Even Barbie is No Longer Skinny Enough…

Cankles? Really?

Cankles? Really?

French Shoe Designer Christian LouBoutin recently complained that he felt that Barbie, the perennial American doll that pretty much everybody acknowledges has impossible proportions, has cankles. Yes, fat ankles. He wants the doll redesigned to have skinnier ankles. Thanks, jerk.

Ralph Lauren model Filippa Hamilton (size 4) sparked controversy in the news recently, stating she was let go for being too fat to fit in the clothing provided to her for photograph sessions. In support of these statements, fashion shots of the 5’10″ 120 lb. model were produced to the media, doctored in order make her hips appear even skinnier than her head, because a size 4 was not small enough to produce the desirable eye-candy on a sailboat look…

The Power of Beauty

There is no mistaking the power of attractiveness. Have we been trained to believe that beautiful people somehow possess greater faculties of the mind, or a deeper reservoir of essential, earthy goodness? Researchers have shown that when handing in homework of equal merit, more attractive students get higher grades on average by their googly-eyed teachers. More attractive criminals tend to get lighter sentences from their jurors. Less attractive people earn less than average-looking people, who make less than more attractive workers holding similar positions.

Where Does It Stop? Who Will Take a Stand?

Thank you Miss American Rose!

Thank you Miss American Rose!

The Miss American Rose Pageant is very unlike other pageants. Competitors of all ages are not invited to attend at a particular location, instead mailing in their applications to pageant headquarters. That’s right, mail-in. There are no travel expenses, no clothing and hairstyle costs, no hotel rooms and trainers, no poise school and singing lessons, no tape under the boobs, no wardrobe malfunctions, no stupid answers to canned questions. And definitely no itching powder in a competitor’s swimsuit.

The competition is based largely on a girl (or woman’s) lifetime achievements, rather than being almost wholely focused on one’s appearance and poise. There are optional competitions based on academics, talent, community service, career, and finally beauty. But before you roll your eyes, the beauty portion of the pageant is based on either photograph or written essay, as outer and inner beauty are each being considered as having their merit..

I have to stand and applaud the Miss American Rose Pagaent. They have shirked the standardized beauty specifications, put down the tape measures and scales, and allowed the definition of what is beautiful to return to the eye of the beholder. They have drawn forth and celebrated the inner beauty in each and every girl and woman, empowering and pushing them to be leaders, teachers, and examples for all of us.

From the bottom of my heart I thank you, Miss American Rose Pageant. My daughters and I love you.

Timeline: Miss America

1845

Women’s History entry

Newspaperman Horace Greeley publishes a landmark book by journalist and social reformer Margaret Fuller, Woman in the Nineteenth Century. The work argues for women’s equality in all aspects of life.

1848

Women’s History entry

Leading women in early feminist movement American women move further into the public sphere; the first Women’s Rights Convention is held at Seneca Falls, New York.

1849

Women’s History entry

Amelia Bloomer begins her crusade to reform American women’s fashions.

1854

Miss America entry

P.T. Barnum’s efforts to launch a live beauty contest are unsuccessful. Respectable women do not parade their beauty in public. He launches a picture-based beauty contest sponsored by local newspapers. It is highly successful and imitated.

1861-64

Civil War soldier holding flag The nation is divided in two as North and South clash in the U.S. Civil War.

1863

January 1: President Abraham Lincoln signs the Emancipation Proclamation.

1880

Miss America entry

The first recorded bathing beauty contest takes place at Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. Inventor Thomas Edison is a judge. A bridal trousseau is the prize. Contestants must be under 25, not married, at least 5 feet 4 inches tall, and weigh no more than 130 pounds.

1889

Women’s History entry

November 18: Journalist Nellie Bly sets off to travel around the world in under 80 days.

1890

Women’s History entry

An umbrella organization, the General Federation of Women’s Clubs, is formed. Women’s clubs are venues for women’s education and development, and will increasingly focus on community service.

In a second wave of U.S. immigration, people from Eastern Europe and Italy come to America.

1893

Miss America entry

The Chicago Columbian Exposition features a Congress of Beauty.

1895

Women’s History entry

The National Federation of Afro-American Women is formed. A year later it joins with the League of Colored Women to become the National Association of Colored Women.

1896

U.S. Supreme Court case Plessy v. Ferguson rules that segregation is not unconstitutional. The doctrine treating African Americans as "separate but equal" holds for the next half century.

1898

Rough Riders, San Juan American soldiers fight the Spanish American War in Cuba and the Philippines.

1902

Women’s History entry

The National Women’s Trade Union League is formed.

Women’s History entry

November: McClure’s Magazine publishes the first installment of muckraker Ida Tarbell’s exposé, The History of the Standard Oil Company.

1907

Miss America entry

Swimmer Annette Kellerman is arrested for indecent exposure while trying to popularize a one-piece swimsuit worn with tights rather than bloomers.

1909

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is founded.

1914

World War I begins in Europe.

1915

D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation is the first full-length feature film in the new motion picture industry. It portrays the Ku Klux Klan as American heroes.

The new sound recording industry begins a phase of rapid growth.

1917-18

World War I poster The U.S. enters World War I. Of the 4.3 million American soldiers who fight, 126,000 are killed. The total number dead in the bloodiest war mankind has ever seen is 8.5 million, from over a dozen nations.

1919

Women’s History entry

Meter readers The First International Congress of Working Women meets in Washington, D.C.

The Red Summer: widespread anti-Communist sentiment, racial and labor unrest, and the aftermath of war combine and cause the nation to erupt in violence.

1920

prohibition January: The Eighteenth Amendment makes the sale, manufacture, and transportation of intoxicating liquors illegal.

Women’s History entry

August: The Nineteenth Amendment is ratified, giving women the right to vote. The National League of Women Voters is organized.

1921

Miss America entry

Margaret Gorman with other contestants September 7: The first Miss America Pageant, called the "Inter-City Beauty Pageant," takes place in Atlantic City as a part of a Fall Frolic to attract tourists. There are seven contestants. Sixteen-year-old Margaret Gorman from Washington, D.C., wins the title, Miss America.

1923

Miss America entry

September: The Inter-City Beauty Contest grows in popularity, attracting over 70 contestants. After pageant officials forget to include a "no marriage" rule, it is discovered that "Miss" Alaska, Helmar Leiderman, is not only married but is also a resident of New York.

Miss America entry

September: Mary Katherine Campbell becomes the only woman to win the Miss America title two years in a row. Pageant officials subsequently establish a rule that a woman cannot hold the title more than once.

1924

The Immigration Act establishes a national quota system for limiting immigration.

1926

Miss America entry

Norma Smallwood, Miss America 1926, makes $100,000 in appearance fees, an income higher than either Babe Ruth or the president of the United States.

1927

September: Baseball star Babe Ruth hits record-breaking home run number 60. All the people in attendance wave handkerchiefs in his honor. The record will stand for over 3 decades.

1929

Miss America entry

Religious groups and women’s clubs protest the loose morals of young women in the pageant. Bad press plus financial trouble shut the pageant down between 1929 and 1932.

Unemployment lines October 24: The stock market crashes. The Great Depression begins.

1931

March 25: Nine black youths are accused of the rape of two white women in Paint Rock, Alabama. The Scottsboro boys’ case becomes one of the most significant legal fights of the twentieth century.

1932

Women’s History entry

Female nurse May 20: Amelia Earhart is the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic. She becomes a Depression-era hero and advocate for women’s equality, saying, "A pilot’s a pilot. I hope that such equality could be carried out in other fields so that men and women may achieve equally in any endeavor…"

Miss America entry

September: Atlantic City sponsors revive the Miss America Pageant. Fifteen-year-old Marian Bergeron is Miss America 1933. Age requirements are instituted afterwards requiring contestants to be between 18 and 26.

1930s

Miss America entry

Sometime in the 1930s a pageant rule is established requiring contestants to be of the white race.

Women’s History entry

Union membership among women in the U.S. increases threefold, to almost 20% of the female workforce.

1933

Franklin Roosevelt President Franklin Delano Roosevelt is inaugurated.

1935

Miss America entry

- Pageant officials hope to re-invent the pageant. They hire Lenora Slaughter to do the job for six weeks. She will stay for 32 years, serving as the pageant’s director.

1937

Miss America entry

Winner Bette Cooper changes her mind about being Miss America, and flees Atlantic City.

1937

Farmer Dust Bowl farmers in the Great Plains suffer the effects of severe dust storms as well as economic hard times.

1938

Miss America entry

A "society matron" chaperone system is enacted, to keep pageant contestants away from scandal.

Miss America entry

A talent competition is added as part of the scoring process.

Miss America entry

Contestants are no longer allowed to represent cities, resorts, or theaters. Instead, they are required to represent states.

1939

April: RCA’s National Broadcasting Company (NBC) broadcasts the opening of the New York World’s Fair. One of the first television sets is displayed at the Fair.

September 1: Germany invades Poland. World War II begins.

1940

Miss America entry

September: The pageant is officially dubbed the Miss America Pageant and moves into Atlantic City’s Convention Hall.

1941

Pearl Harbor December 7: The Japanese bomb a U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. A day later, President Roosevelt declares war on Japan and the U.S. enters World War II.

1941-1945

Women’s History entry

Women working for war effort Women’s employment rises dramatically as women take on new wartime jobs.

1942

Miss America entry

Miss America is transformed into an emblem of patriotism. Miss America 1942, Jean Bartel, turns down a lucrative movie offer to sell a record number of war bonds.

1942-1943

Women’s History entry

Women’s branches of armed forces are formed, including the Army WACS, the Navy WAVES, the Coast Guard SPARS, the Marines MCWR, and the Army Air Force’s WASPS. Women are six percent of the armed services.

1944

January 22: More than 17 months after news of Hitler’s plan to annihilate Europe’s Jews reaches the U.S., President Roosevelt issues an executive order to establish the War Refugee Board.

Miss America entry

Director Lenora Slaughter raises $5000 to launch the Miss America scholarship program. Previously Miss America is offered furs and movie contracts. Now she is offered funds for college. The original scholarship patrons are: Joseph Bancroft and Sons, Catalina Swimwear, F.W. Fitch Company, and the Sandy Valley Grocery Company. She also enlists Junior Chambers of Commerce across the country to sponsor local and state contests.

Miss America entry

September 8: Bess Myerson becomes Miss America 1945, the first Jewish Miss America and the first winner of the scholarship program. She plans to study conducting.

1945

Miss America entry

Bess Myerson receives few offers for appearances and product endorsement. America appears not to be ready for a Jewish Miss America. Myerson decides to spend her year speaking for the Jewish Anti-Defamation League on the topic, "You Can Not Be Beautiful and Hate."

May 8: V-E Day. President Harry Truman announces the end of the war in Europe via radio.

September 2: V-J Day, when Japan formally surrenders, ends World War II.

1946

Miss America entry

Lenora Slaughter bans the phrase "bathing suit"– the garments are to be called "swimsuits."

The Baby Boom begins. The birth rate will rise dramatically over the next decade.

1947

Miss America entry

Lee Meriwether September: For the last time, Miss America is crowned in a bathing suit. Afterwards, winners are crowned in evening gowns.

1948

Women’s History entry

June 12: President Harry Truman signs into law the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act, enabling women to serve as permanent, regular members of the armed services. The law limits the number of women that can serve in the military to two percent of the total forces in each branch.

1949

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is formed.

1950s

A "Cold War" develops between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R.

1950

Korean woman and child June: North Korea invades South Korea. President Truman commits U.S. troops.

Miss America entry

September: Yolande Betbeze sings an operatic aria and is crowned Miss America 1951. Catalina Swimwear withdraws sponsorship of the pageant after Betbeze refuses to appear in public in a swimsuit.

1952

Dwight Eisenhower is elected president.

Miss America entry

Catalina inaugurates the Miss Universe and Miss USA Pageants, two years after withdrawing support for the Miss America Pageant.

1953

June 2: Queen Elizabeth II is crowned in England.

Miss America entry

ABC approaches the pageant about televising the event. Fearful of losing the Atlantic City audience to TV, pageant officials say no. Movie star Eddie Fisher hosts the pageant.

September: Alfred Kinsey’s report, Sexual Behavior in the Human Female, challenges many myths about sexual behavior in American society.

December: Playboy, a men’s magazine featuring photographs of nude women, publishes its inaugural issue, featuring Marilyn Monroe on the cover.

1954

May 17: The "separate but equal" doctrine established by Plessy v. Fergusson in 1892 is overruled in Brown v. Board of Education. The Supreme Court unanimously rules that segregation in schools is unconstitutional.

Miss America entry

Miss America on television Philco Television Sets purchases 1954 television broadcast rights to the pageant for $10,000 and contracts with ABC for the broadcast.

Miss America entry

September 11: Twenty-seven million people tune in to see Lee Ann Meriwether crowned Miss America. Grace Kelly is a judge and Bess Myerson reports from backstage. The scholarship award is $10,000.

1955

Miss America entry

Bert Parks Bert Parks is hired as the pageant’s emcee. He introduces a theme song, There She Is , written by Bernie Wayne.

1959

Miss America entry

Every state in the nation is at last represented at the pageant.

1960s

Women’s History entry

Women protesting in Washington Women are major participants in the civil rights and anti-war movements.

1961

Women’s History entry

The President’s Commission on the Status of Women is established, chaired by former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt. The commission will take two years to publish its Peterson Report, documenting workplace discrimination against women and making recommendations for child care, maternity leave, and equal opportunity for working women.

1963

Women’s History entry

Betty Freidan publishes The Feminine Mystique, reflecting a groundswell of dissatisfaction with women’s social status, and it is a best seller. Gloria Steinem’s magazine article, "I Was a Playboy Bunny," details the author’s undercover investigation of the New York Playboy Club.

Martin Luther King Jr. August 28: Martin Luther King leads a March on Washington to urge support for pending civil rights legislation. He delivers his famous "I have a dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

November 22: President John F. Kennedy is assassinated.

1964

Women’s History entry

The 1964 Civil Rights Act includes a key provision for women. Title VII outlaws discrimination in public accommodations or employment on the basis of race, color, religion, or national origin. At the last minute the word "sex" is added by a Southern congressman, thinking it will kill the entire bill. Instead, it passes.

The Immigration Act abolishes a quota system that had restricted immigration.

1965

President Johnson with American soldiers The first American troops arrive in Vietnam.

1966

Miss America entry

The Miss America Pageant is televised in color in its first year on NBC.

Women’s History entry

October: The National Organization for Women is formed.

1967

Women’s History entry

The women’s liberation movement begins to grow. In Berkeley, California, women gather to raise consciousness about feminist issues.

Miss America entry

Lenora Slaughter, the pageant’s director, retires.

1968

April 4: Martin Luther King is assassinated. Rioting occurs in 100 American cities.

June 6: Senator Robert Kennedy is assassinated.

August: Protesters disrupt the Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

Miss America entry

Miss Black America pagent September 7: Judi Ford is crowned Miss America 1969. Feminists get national media attention for their protest on the Atlantic City boardwalk, where they crown a sheep and throw products like lipstick and hair curlers into a "Freedom Trash Can." The same day, the first Miss Black America Contest is held in Atlantic City in protest of the "white" Miss America Pageant.

Miss America entry

Pepsi Cola withdraws its 11-year sponsorship, claiming the pageant no longer represents the changing values of American society.

Women’s History entry

Shirley Chisholm is the first African American woman to be elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.

1969

Miss America entry

Feminist protesters at Atlantic City Feminist protesters return to Atlantic City, claiming the pageant treats women as sex objects. Protesters will return every year well into the 1970s.

1970

May 4: National Guardsmen kill four students at anti-war demonstrations at Ohio’s Kent State University.

Miss America entry

Rules barring non-whites have finally changed. The first black contestant to make it to Atlantic City is Cheryl Brown, Miss Iowa.

Miss America entry

Pam Eldred, Miss America 1970, has to be evacuated to safety while entertaining soldiers in Vietnam.

1971

Women’s History entry

A prototype of Ms. Magazine is published.

1972

Women’s History entry

March 22: The Equal Rights Amendment passes Congress and is sent to the states for ratification. The amendment will be defeated, after a lengthy battle, in 1982.

Women’s History entry

Title IX of the Higher Education Act bans exclusion on the basis of sex from programs or activities in universities receiving federal financial assistance, marking a turning point for women’s access to athletics programs.

June 17: Five men are arrested for breaking into Democratic National Committee offices at the Watergate apartment and office complex in Washington, D.C.

1973

Women’s History entry

January 22: In Roe v. Wade, the U.S. Supreme Court grants women the right to legal abortions.

March 29: The last American troops leave Vietnam.

Miss America entry

Becky King Rebecca King is chosen Miss America 1974. She is the first winner to use her scholarship award for professional education, studying to become a lawyer.

1974

Women’s History entry

Little League Baseball votes to allow girls on its teams.

President Richard Nixon August 9: President Nixon resigns.

1979

March 28: The nuclear power plant at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania has a meltdown at its core, in America’s worst nuclear accident.

November 4: Militant Islamic students seize hostages at the American Embassy in Teheran, Iran. Fifty-two hostages will be detained for 444 days — over 14 months.

1980

Miss America entry

Miss Alabama, Lencola Sullivan, is the first African American to make the pageant’s top five finalists.

Women’s History entry

Only 27% of the nation’s households conform to traditional ideas of a family with a male breadwinner and female housewife. Two-income families or female-headed households are rapidly replacing the older pattern.

President Ronald Reagan Ronald Reagan is elected president.

1981

Miss America entry

Bert Parks is fired. He is considered too old, too corny, and too sexist for the times. Talk show host Johnny Carson initiates a protest that is unsuccessful. Ron Ely and then Gary Collins replace Parks.

Women’s History entry

September 25: Sandra Day O’Connor becomes the U.S. Supreme Court’s first female judge.

1983

Women’s History entry

Sally Ride June 18: The first woman astronaut, Sally K. Ride, travels into space aboard the Space Shuttle Challenger.

Miss America entry

Vanessa Williams Vanessa Williams is crowned Miss America 1984 and is the first black woman to hold the title. Two months before the end of her reign, Penthouse magazine will publish nude photos of her taken when she was 17. Pageant officials will force her to resign.

1984

Women’s History entry

The Democratic Party nominates Geraldine Ferraro for the vice presidency, the first time a major party has nominated a woman.

1987

Miss America entry

Albert Marks retires as Chairman of the Board of the Miss America Organization after 27 years. The first paid CEO, Leonard Horn, is hired.

1988

Miss America entry

Miss America Kaye Lani Rae Rafko devotes her year to advocacy of care for the terminally ill, becoming the first winner to dedicate her reign to a social issue.

1989

Miss America entry

The social issue platform, where contestants commit to advocating for a cause if they become Miss America, becomes part of the pageant’s requirements.

1990

The Berlin Wall falls, marking the end of the Cold War.

1990-1991

President George Bush with leader of Kuwait Persian Gulf War. The U.S. leads a multi-national coalition against Iraq after that country invades Kuwait; Iraq surrenders.

1991

Women’s History entry

Anita Hill, a law professor, testifies before a U.S. Senate committee that the conservative Supreme Court nominee, Clarence Thomas, engaged in sexual harassment. Issues of race and gender are debated across the country.

1992

Miss America entry

Kim Aiken, Miss America 1993, is the fifth African American Miss America. She uses her year to promote the cause of the homeless.

1994

Miss America entry

Alabama’s Heather Whitestone wins the swimsuit and talent competitions and is crowned Miss America 1995. She is deaf and becomes the first Miss America with a physical handicap.

1996

Miss America entry

Record low TV ratings prompt NBC to drop the Miss America Pageant after 30 years. ABC picks up broadcast rights.

1997

Miss America entry

The swimsuit competition is modified. Contestants can wear any style, including two piece and bikini.

1999

Miss America entry

The swimsuit rules are again modified, barring string bikinis and thong swimsuits.

2000

Miss America entry

In the year 2000, the first Asian American Miss America is crowned. Angela Perez Baraquio of Hawaii is Miss America 2001.

2001

September 11: Terrorists from the Middle East highjack four airplanes. Two crash into New York’s World Trade Center, destroying both towers and killing thousands. One crashes into the Pentagon, also causing extensive damage and loss of life. The fourth plane crashes in a field in Pennsylvania, killing all passengers.

The United States commits to a war on terrorism.

Miss America entry

September 26: Katie Harman, Miss America 2002, rings the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange, along with several New York firefighters.

Voir enfin:

Indian Americans

Pew

June 19, 2012

History

The arrival of more than 6,000 Indians from Asia between 1904 and 1911, mainly to work as farmhands, marked the first major influx of this population into the United States. Indians from Asia in the U.S. were first classified in court decisions of 1910 and 1913 as Caucasians, and therefore could become citizens as well as intermarry with U.S.-born whites. However, the decisions were reversed by the Supreme Court in 1923, when Indians from Asia were legally classified as non-white and therefore ineligible for citizenship.

That court decision prevented Indian immigrants from naturalizing. New immigration from India already had been prohibited by a 1917 law.

The restrictions were lifted after passage of comprehensive immigration legislation in 1965. Since then, a large influx of highly educated professionals from India has immigrated to the U.S. for skilled employment. In 2010, an estimated 2.2 million adult Indian Americans lived in the U.S., according to the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Indians are the third-largest group among Asian Americans and represent about 17% of the U.S. adult Asian population.

Characteristics (2010 ACS)

Nativity and citizenship. Nearly nine-in-ten (87%) adult Indian Americans in the United States are foreign born, compared with about 74% of adult Asian Americans and 16% of the adult U.S. population overall. More than half of Indian-American adults are U.S. citizens (56%), lower than the share among overall adult Asian population (70%) as well as the national share (91%).

Language. More than three-quarters of Indian Americans (76%) speak English proficiently, (41) compared with 63% of all Asian Americans and 90% of the U.S. population overall.

Age. The median age of adult Indian Americans is 37, lower than for adult Asian Americans (41) and the national median (45).

Marital status. More than seven-in-ten (71%) adult Indian Americans are married, a share significantly higher than for all Asian Americans (59%) and for the nation (51%).

Fertility. The share of Indian-American women ages 18 to 44 who gave birth in the 12 months prior to the 2010 American Community Survey was 8.4%, higher than the comparable share for Asian-American women overall (6.8%) and the national share (7.1%). The share of these mothers who were unmarried was much lower among Indian Americans (2.3%) than among all Asian Americans (15%) and the population overall (37%).

Educational attainment. Among Indian Americans ages 25 and older, seven-in-ten (70%) have obtained at least a bachelor’s degree; this is higher than the Asian-American share (49%) and much higher than the national share (28%).

Income. Median annual personal earnings for Indian-American full-time, year-round workers are $65,000, significantly higher than for all Asian Americans ($48,000) as well as for all U.S. adults ($40,000). Among households, the median annual income for Indians is $88,000, much higher than for all Asians ($66,000) and all U.S. households ($49,800).

Homeownership. More than half of Indian Americans (57%) own a home, compared with 58% of Asian Americans overall and 65% of the U.S. population overall.

Poverty status. The share of adult Indian Americans who live in poverty is 9%, lower than the shares of all Asian Americans (12%) and of the U.S. population overall (13%).

Regional dispersion. Indian Americans are more evenly spread out than other Asian Americans. About 24% of adult Indian Americans live in the West, compared with 47% of Asian Americans and 23% of the U.S. population overall. More than three-in-ten (31%) Indian Americans live in the Northeast, 29% live in the South, and the rest (17%) live in the Midwest.

Attitudes

Here are a few key findings from the 2012 Asian-American survey about Indian Americans compared with other major U.S. Asian groups:

Indian Americans stand out from most other U.S. Asian groups in the personal importance they place on parenting; 78% of Indian Americans say being a good parent is one of the most important things to them personally.

Indian Americans are among the most likely to say that the strength of family ties is better in their country of origin (69%) than in the U.S. (8%).

Compared with other U.S. Asian groups, Indian Americans are the most likely to identify with the Democratic Party; 65% are Democrats or lean to the Democrats, 18% are Republican or lean to the Republicans. And 65% of Indian Americans approve of President Obama’s job performance, while 22% disapprove.


Syndrome de Stockholm/40e: Je sentais qu’on était mieux intégré au groupe si on n’était pas 100% français (France discovers anti-white racism)

22 juin, 2013
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b1/The_Intervention_of_the_Sabine_Women.jpghttp://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20071104124311/psychology/images/4/47/Stockholm_syndrome.jpgLes voleurs nous protègent contre la police. Otages du Crédit Suédois de Stockholm (le 23 août 1973)
Le syndrome de Stockholm désigne la propension des otages partageant longtemps la vie de leurs geôliers à développer une empathie, voire une sympathie, ou une contagion émotionnelle avec ces derniers. L’expression « syndrome de Stockholm » a été inventée par le psychiatre Nils Bejerot en 1973. Ce comportement paradoxal des victimes de prise d’otage fut décrit pour la première fois en 1978 par le psychiatre américain Frank Ochberg, en relation avec un fait-divers qui eut lieu en cette même ville. Wikipedia
Ces propos, s’ils ont été dits, interviennent dans un contexte où mes agresseurs étaient drogués ou ivres. Par ailleurs, ils n’étaient pas tous issus de l’immigration. La vidéo de mon agression apparaît comme très stéréotypée car, ce soir-là, je suis habillé de façon bourgeoise et je suis face à quatre jeunes qui faisaient beaucoup de bruit. En aucun cas, je ne veux passer pour l’incarnation d’une certaine image sociale qui aurait été prise à partie par des étrangers. Je ne l’ai pas ressenti comme cela. L’un des assaillants en survêtement, rasé, avait d’ailleurs une couleur de peau très pâle.  F. G. (étudiant de Sciences Po, après son agression dans un bus de nuit parisien, 2009)
Appelons cela le syndrome du Noctilien (en référence à ce bus de nuit parisien dans lequel un jeune passager a été roué de coups, dernièrement) : il consiste à nier la gravité de certaines évidences, en détournant l’attention, si possible, sur la source du désordre. En l’espèce, pour cet étudiant qui n’a pas voulu voir une agression raciste dans ce qui lui est arrivé, les coupables sont celui qui a diffusé la vidéo de son passage à tabac et ceux qui l’ont commentée. Le politiquement correct raisonne de cette manière. Ivan Rioufol
Je ne suis pas du tout raciste, toutes mes copines sont noires ou métisses.  Moi-même, je suis français, quelqu’un me dit ça, je lui mets une baffe ! (…) J’habite dans le 93. Il y a des contrôles de police matin, midi et soir, même quand on travaille. Quelqu’un qui se fait taper, vous le défendez. Voilà comment j’ai appris … Arnaud
Pendant le ramadan, je me cachais pour manger quelque chose de peur que l’on me fasse une réflexion ou que je sois agressé d’une manière ou d’une autre. Guillaume
Il m’est arrivé de mentir plusieurs fois en m’inventant des origines que je n’avais pas (…) Je sentais qu’on était mieux intégré au groupe si on n’était pas 100% français. Céline
Tout élément qui différencie un élève du groupe provoque une réaction hostile, plus ou moins violente. C’est ce qui se passe lorsque des élèves traitent un élève différemment parce qu’il a la peau blanche. Caroline (enseignante)
Il suffit d’une différence – couleur de peau, de cheveux, physique ingrat… – pour être pris pour cible. Tarik Yildiz
Les actes d’intolérance visent les minorités. Or, l’endroit où les Français "pure souche" – les "blancs" – sont les moins représentés demeure les quartiers sensibles. On ne peut pas le nier  Tarik Yildiz
Au terme de l’audience, une question demeure irrésolue : pourquoi Arnaud D., un Blanc, a-t-il frappé Térence C., au motif, comprend-on, que celui-ci était blanc, motif que le coauteur des coups – son complice n’a pu être identifié – réfute ? Ni les parties civiles, ni la défense n’ont jugé utile d’interroger l’accusé, né à Montreuil, sur l’origine de son nom, à consonance maghrébine, probablement kabyle. Elles n’y avaient pas intérêt, ont-elles reconnu à demi-mot entre deux audiences. Les deux avocats de la victime, dont l’un représentait la Licra (Ligue internationale contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme) ne souhaitaient pas politiser un cas déjà suffisamment lourd de sens. Le comment, d’accord, pour le pourquoi, on repassera. Seules les origines de la victime, du fait même de l’infraction jugée, devaient être prises en compte, non celles de ses agresseurs. Quant au défenseur, il était dans son rôle. Questionner le « pedigree » de son client risquait de le mener sur la pente glissante du sentiment d’appartenance, dont on sait qu’il peut être confus, a fortiori chez un « Blanc » vivant dans un environnement qui ne l’est pas majoritairement. Tout le monde sembla donc rassuré quand il fut précisé que les parents d’Arnaud D. se prénommaient Alain et Murielle. Antoine Menusier
Je suis un sale Blanc car dans une vie antérieure j’ai affrété des bateaux à Bordeaux pour traverser l’Atlantique avec mes cargaisons d’esclaves. Benoît Rayski

Vous avez dit syndrome de Stockholm ?

Renvoi de huit mois en l’absence de plaignants, accusé absent parce que non retrouvé, co-accusé jugé mais blanc, refus d’une association anti-raciste (MRAP) de se porter partie civile (Le racisme anti-blanc ne serait qu’une réaction au racisme envers les noirs et les arabes, et serait instrumentalisé politiquement), refus des parties civiles comme de la défense d’interroger l’accusé, né à Montreuil, sur l’origine de son nom, à consonance maghrébine, probablement kabyle

Au lendemain, suite à la bastonnade accompagnée d’injures racistes sur un quai de métro parisien en septembre 2010 d’un jeune homme blanc, du premier pour "racisme anti-blanc" …

Et une semaine après les simples sursis et avertissements des adolescents impliqués dans l’attaque du RER à la gare de Grigny …

Mais aussi trois ans après une vidéo qui avait révélé (outre la suspension et la garde à vue du policier l’ayant mise en ligne et la défense de ses agresseurs par l’agressé: "habillé de façon bourgeoise") le genre de phénomène d’attaques en meute que peuvent subir certains usagers des bus de nuit parisiens …

Comment ne pas voir, évoquée à demi-mot  si l’on en croit les extraits de presse dans le livre d’un jeune sociologue, l’étrange forme de syndrome de Stockholm (qui fête ses 40 ans cette année) …

Qui de la presse à nos belles âmes des beaux quartiers mais aussi apparemment à ses premières victimes que sont les derniers mohicans de certains quartiers des villes d’Ile-de-France les plus touchées par l’immigration (jusqu’à, pression de l’environnement oblige, mentir sur ses propres origines) …

Semble à présent s’être étendu l’ensemble de nos sociétés ?

Comment parler du racisme anti-blanc?

Julie Saulnier

L’Express

14/03/2011

Le racisme anti-blanc est une réalité embarrassante. Dans un essai, le sociologue Tarik Yildiz l’aborde de front, pour éviter notamment de laisser le sujet aux extrêmes.

"Sale Français(e) de merde!" Cette expression les renvoyant à leurs origines françaises, Guillaume, Bastien, Anne, Hasan et les autres l’ont entendue souvent. C’est ce que décrit Tarik Yildiz au travers de neuf entretiens avec un collégien, un lycéen, une étudiante, des professeurs et des parents d’élèves de Seine-Saint-Denis.

Dans son essai, Racisme anti-blanc, Ne pas en parler: un déni de réalité*, ce doctorant en sociologie de seulement 25 ans dresse une cartographie du phénomène dans certains quartiers de certaines villes d’Ile-de-France.

Insultes, crachats, coups, les protagonistes de l’étude se disent victimes d’"une intolérance qui touche les blancs parce qu’ils sont – ou sont considérés – comme des ‘Français de souche’, en opposition aux Français issus de l’immigration", explique l’auteur, par ailleurs collaborateur du Bondy Blog.

Ne pas laisser la voie libre aux extrêmes

"Pendant le ramadan, je me cachais pour manger quelque chose de peur que l’on me fasse une réflexion ou que je sois agressé d’une manière ou d’une autre", raconte Guillaume, collégien. Céline confie que, pendant ses années de collège, elle maquillait la vérité pour qu’on la laisse en paix: "Il m’est arrivé de mentir plusieurs fois en m’inventant des origines que je n’avais pas (…) Je sentais qu’on était mieux intégré au groupe si on n’était pas 100% français." "Chaque jour, la seule chose que j’espérais, c’était de rentrer sans avoir pris de coups ou sans me faire insulter", ajoute de son côté Bastien, lycéen. Anne, sa mère, est abasourdie. "Jamais je n’aurais pu imaginer qu’un tel racisme pouvait exister chez des enfants", déplore-t-elle.

Le phénomène est réel, mais circonscrit. Alain, qui a soutenu un appel "contre les ratonnades anti-blanc" en 2008, précise "que ceux qui profèrent ces insultes (…) représentent une minorité dans les classes. Et comme souvent, la minorité violente est la plus visible." "Tout élément qui différencie un élève du groupe provoque une réaction hostile, plus ou moins violente, analyse Caroline. C’est ce qui se passe lorsque des élèves traitent un élève différemment parce qu’il a la peau blanche." Tarik Yildiz reconnaît qu’il "suffit d’une différence – couleur de peau, de cheveux, physique ingrat… – pour être pris pour cible".

Il faut aussi ne pas oublier, comme Caroline, enseignante, qu’"on a plus de chance de trouver un emploi ou un appartement quand on s’appelle François que quand on s’appelle Kader". Ou qu’il "est plus facile d’entrer en boîte de nuit, qu’on se fait beaucoup moins contrôler par la police quand on a la peau claire." Et d’attirer l’attention sur la dimension sociale: "Les jeunes qui posent des problèmes dans les établissements scolaires sont les plus défavorisés socialement (…) Ce n’est pas vraiment du racisme, mais une manière de vouloir prendre leur place dans une société où ils se sentent mal à l’aise."

Pour sa part, Fatima, étudiante française issue de l’immigration, estime qu’"il ne faut pas faire de distinction entre les racismes". Ce qu’admet bien volontiers Caroline, selon qui faire des différences, "c’est établir une hiérarchie". D’où l’importance de reconnaître l’existence de ces discriminations. "Lorsqu’on ne parle pas d’un problème, les victimes se sentent incomprises, déconsidérées. Cela peut les pousser elles-mêmes vers du racisme", observe Alain. "Ne pas entendre ceux qui souffrent, c’est prendre le risque de l’engrenage et les jeter dans les bras des partis extrêmistes, renchérit Tarik Yildiz. Il ne faut pas laisser le champs de ce qui préoccupe les Français aux extrêmes. Les partis traditionnels ne doivent pas avoir peur d’aborder le racisme ‘anti-blanc’. Ce sont les solutions apportées à cette forme de racisme qui doivent être différentes."

Le racisme anti-blanc, Ne pas en parler: un déni de réalité, Tarik Yildiz, Les Editions du Puits du Roulle, 58 p., 8 euros.

Avertissement de modération: comme vous l’aurez noté, l’un des objectifs de Tarik Yildiz est de ne pas laisser aux extrêmes le sujet du racisme anti-blanc. Nous serons extrêmement attentifs à ce que ces mêmes extrêmes ne puissent exprimer des idées extrémistes dans les commentaires. LEXPRESS.fr

Voir aussi:

"Le racisme anti-blanc est réversible"

Julie Saulnier

L’Express

26/09/2012

Dans son livre Manifeste pour une droite décomplexée, Jean-François Copé dénonce le racisme anti-blanc. Une récupération politique qui risque de "jeter de l’huile sur le feu", selon le sociologue Tarik Yildiz, auteur de Racisme anti-blanc, Ne pas en parler: un déni de réalité.

Dans son livre Manifeste pour une droite décomplexée, Jean-François Copé, candidat à la présidence de l’UMP, dénonce le racisme anti-blanc. Que pensez-vous de ses propos?

Je ne suis pas dupe des intentions électoralistes de Jean-François Copé. Il veut envoyer un message fort à la base de l’UMP et lui dire qu’il est proche d’elle et de ses idées. Car beaucoup de gens pensent et disent que le racisme anti-blanc existe. Jean-François Copé ne fait que relayer cette idée.

Il est bon d’évoquer le racisme anti-blanc, comme il est bon de parler toute sorte de racisme. Mais la récupération partisane d’un sujet aussi délicat que celui-ci risque de jeter de l’huile sur le feu.

Comment éviter de tomber dans cet écueil?

Il faut parler du racisme anti-blanc mais éviter à tout prix la récupération politique. Pour cela, la dénonciation de cette forme de racisme doit venir, en premier lieu, des associations antiracisme. Elles seules peuvent aborder le sujet sans être taxées de xénophobie.

Si ces associations, donc, dénoncent clairement et sans gêne cette réalité, on gagnera en crédibilité. Et les tabous tomberont. Dès lors, les responsables politiques, y compris de gauche, pourront en parler sereinement.

Jean-François Copé limite ce phénomène aux "quartiers sensibles"…

Les actes d’intolérance visent les minorités. Or, l’endroit où les Français "pure souche" – les "blancs" – sont les moins représentés demeure les quartiers sensibles. On ne peut pas le nier. Ce constat dressé, ce n’est pas autant qu’il faut y voir un lien de causalité – mais plutôt un lien de corrélation.

Peut-on endiguer cette forme de racisme?

Oui, car le racisme anti-blanc est quelque chose de très concret et qu’il est perpétré par des jeunes immatures. En cela, ce phénomène me semble réversible. Une bonne politique éducative et une punition adaptée permettraient d’en venir à bout. La solution consisterait à instaurer plus de discipline à l’école, et ce dès le collège, et à fixer des limites à ne pas dépasser pour éviter l’effet de surenchère.

Le sociologue Tarik Yildiz est l’auteur de l’essai Racisme anti-blanc, Ne pas en parler: un déni de réalité.

Avertissement de modération: compte tenu du caractère sensible de ce thème, nous serons particulièrement sensibles à la bonne tenue des débats. Merci donc de ne pas tenir de propos xénophobes, racistes ou discriminatoires.

Voir également:

Justice : un Blanc jugé pour racisme… anti-Blanc

Marc Leplongeon

Le Point

26/04/2013

"Sale Blanc", "blanc-bec"… Un cuisinier était jugé vendredi à Paris pour avoir entaillé le visage d’un homme sur le quai du RER et proféré des injures racistes.

"Racisme anti-Blanc", l’expression est devenue presque banale. Pour SOS Racisme, elle appartient historiquement au vocabulaire de l’extrême droite. Mais elle est devenue ensuite un argument de campagne. Jean-François Copé, candidat à la présidence de l’UMP contre François Fillon, avait raconté fin 2012 l’histoire d’un jeune qui s’était fait "arracher son pain au chocolat par des voyous", au motif qu’"on ne mange pas au ramadan". D’après un rapport de la Commission nationale des droits de l’homme (CNCDH), ces propos pourraient avoir eu une incidence sur la diffusion de l’idée d’un hypothétique racisme "anti-Français" dans la société. "4 % des personnes interrogées considèrent que les Blancs sont les principales victimes de racisme dans l’Hexagone", explique le rapport. Et "le sentiment que les Français sont les principales victimes de racisme en France est en hausse, avec 12 %, dont 18 % parmi les sympathisants de droite et 5 % parmi ceux de gauche", poursuit l’étude.

Vendredi après-midi, au palais de justice de Paris, la Licra (Ligue internationale contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme) s’est portée pour la première fois partie civile dans une affaire de "racisme anti-Blanc". Situation ubuesque : le prévenu est lui-même blanc. "Je n’aime pas ce terme [de racisme anti-Blanc, NDLR]", explique Mario Pierre Stasi, président de la commission juridique de la Licra. "Mais je n’en vois pas d’autres", lâche-t-il. À l’audience, un homme de 37 ans, crâne rasé, est appelé à la barre. La démarche lourde, les mains dans les poches de son jean recouvertes par une veste grise, Arnaud écoute, sans broncher, le président du tribunal. Son casier judiciaire est déjà bien rempli : plusieurs condamnations pour port d’armes (des couteaux), outrages contre policiers et infractions à la législation sur les stupéfiants (cannabis).

Pour Mario Pierre Stasi, avocat de la Licra, une infraction à connotation raciste peut être constituée, "qu’importe la pigmentation de la peau".

Balafre de 15 centimètres

Le 12 septembre 2010, au petit matin, la victime, un jeune homme de 28 ans, attend son métro à la station Strasbourg-Saint-Denis. Il est apostrophé par un homme qui accompagnait Arnaud, mais qui n’a jamais pu être identifié. "Sale Français !" lui aurait-il lancé. La victime descend du métro à Gare du Nord, avant de se rendre sur les quais du RER D. La vidéosurveillance laisse supposer qu’Arnaud et son acolyte l’y ont suivie. Vers 6 heures du matin, quoi qu’il en soit, l’agresseur non identifié se rue vers sa victime et lui porte un premier coup. La bagarre commence. L’agresseur tombe à terre, la victime prend le dessus. "Quand il était à terre, j’ai voulu le défendre. Il l’étranglait avec ses genoux, donc je lui ai mis des coups avec la droite, et un dernier avec un tesson de bouteille", lâche benoîtement Arnaud. Lorsque la bagarre se termine, la victime a une balafre de 15 centimètres de long sur la joue gauche. Le sang coule sur son torse.

Lors de ses premières auditions, Arnaud nie tout, malgré les images des caméras. Jusqu’à ce que le juge d’instruction lui parle d’une éventuelle circonstance aggravante : les injures racistes. Là, Arnaud se décide enfin à parler. "Je suis vraiment dégoûté. Je ne suis pas du tout raciste, toutes mes copines sont noires ou métisses", lâche-t-il. Problème : la victime est "blanche", comme lui. À l’audience, il s’énerve : "Moi-même, je suis français, quelqu’un me dit ça, je lui mets une baffe !" Son acolyte ? Il l’aurait rencontré lors d’une soirée. Mais il n’en dira pas plus. "Je sais juste ce qu’il aimait comme filles, c’est tout", résume-t-il. Pas de provocation dans sa voix, juste le ton un peu benêt qu’il adoptera tout au long de l’audience.

"Sale blanc-bec"

Les témoins de la scène, des usagers et des agents de la société Effia, n’ont pas bougé. Certains n’étaient pourtant qu’à cinq mètres de la bagarre. Seule une dame a eu le cran de s’interposer, note la procureur. Trois d’entre eux ont cependant entendu les insultes "sale Français", "sale Blanc" (en français et en arabe), "sale blanc-bec", "va niquer ta mère", de la bouche de l’agresseur anonyme. Deux témoins sont formels : Arnaud a lui aussi prononcé ces mots avant, pendant et après l’agression. Lui assure que ces mots n’ont pas franchi ses lèvres. Arnaud semble accorder la même importance à une affaire de violences (qui ont causé 39 jours d’interruption temporaire de travail) qu’à quelques insultes racistes. "Pour moi, c’est pareil", lâche-t-il à l’audience.

"Vous vous considérez comme violent ?" lui demande le président du tribunal. "Nan", répond-il. Puis il raconte quelques bribes de sa vie. "J’habite dans le 93. Il y a des contrôles de police matin, midi et soir, même quand on travaille", argue-t-il. "Quelqu’un qui se fait taper, vous le défendez. Voilà comment j’ai appris", lâche le prévenu. Pour l’avocat de la victime, Arnaud n’a rien d’un "sauveur". Il ne croit pas à la thèse de l’agression avec un tesson de flasque d’alcool, qui se serait brisée dans sa poche. Pour l’avocat, Arnaud a utilisé un couteau ou un cutter. Et il enfonce le clou sur les injures racistes. "La victime m’a dit : C’est tombé sur moi parce que j’étais blanc", explique-t-il.

Le procureur réclame quatre ans de prison, dont un avec sursis assorti d’un contrôle judiciaire. Le jugement a été mis en délibéré au 21 juin. Pour l’avocat de la défense, Me Grégoire Etrillard : "On est en train de faire un exemple de racisme anti-Blanc. Il y a une frustration de ne pas avoir attrapé le vrai coupable."

Voir encore:

Le premier procès pour racisme anti-Blancs n’a pas eu lieu

Quand la partie civile n’assume pas son audace de principe

Antoine Menusier

Causeur

29 avril 2013

Le premier procès pour « racisme anti-Blancs », tenu en l’absence de la victime, vendredi 26 avril, devant la 13e Chambre correctionnelle du Tribunal de Grande Instance de Paris, s’est arrêté au plus mauvais moment : quand il aurait pu vraiment commencer. Tant qu’à juger des motivations racistes du prévenu, un jeune homme de 28 ans qui comparaissait libre, cuisinier de métier, condamné à sept reprises pour des délits, la cour et les avocats de la partie civile et de la défense auraient pu aller « au fond », comme disent les juristes. Au fond du sujet. Un procès d’assises l’aurait sans doute permis, des psychologues auraient été cités à charge et à décharge pour éclairer le jury sur la personnalité de l’accusé. Ce dernier a d’ailleurs échappé de peu aux assises, a indiqué la procureur, agitant cette menace a posteriori, le chef d’accusation de tentative de meurtre n’ayant pas été retenu. La magistrate a requis quatre ans ferme, dont un avec sursis et mise à l’épreuve.

Au terme de l’audience, une question demeure irrésolue : pourquoi Arnaud D., un Blanc, a-t-il frappé Térence C., au motif, comprend-on, que celui-ci était blanc, motif que le coauteur des coups – son complice n’a pu être identifié – réfute ?

Ni les parties civiles, ni la défense n’ont jugé utile d’interroger l’accusé, né à Montreuil, sur l’origine de son nom, à consonance maghrébine, probablement kabyle. Elles n’y avaient pas intérêt, ont-elles reconnu à demi-mot entre deux audiences. Les deux avocats de la victime, dont l’un représentait la Licra (Ligue internationale contre le racisme et l’antisémitisme) ne souhaitaient pas politiser un cas déjà suffisamment lourd de sens. Le comment, d’accord, pour le pourquoi, on repassera.

Seules les origines de la victime, du fait même de l’infraction jugée, devaient être prises en compte, non celles de ses agresseurs. Quant au défenseur, il était dans son rôle. Questionner le « pedigree » de son client risquait de le mener sur la pente glissante du sentiment d’appartenance, dont on sait qu’il peut être confus, a fortiori chez un « Blanc » vivant dans un environnement qui ne l’est pas majoritairement. Tout le monde sembla donc rassuré quand il fut précisé que les parents d’Arnaud D. se prénommaient Alain et Murielle.

Les faits : le 12 septembre 2010, vers 6 heures du matin, Arnaud D. se trouve sur un quai de la station de métro Strasbourg-Saint-Denis, à Paris, en compagnie d’un autre homme. Ils rentrent d’une soirée arrosée, se sont connus à cette occasion, raconte le prévenu, qui dit ignorer l’identité du second. Tout aurait commencé par une vague histoire de cigarette entre l’ami d’un soir d’Arnaud D. et Térence C., une vingtaine d’années, vendeur dans le prêt-à-porter, également présent sur le quai. L’ami aurait traité Térence C. de « sale Français », a rapporté la victime aux enquêteurs.

L’altercation reprend à trois stations de là, sur un quai de RER, gare du Nord. Arnaud D. et son acolyte y croisent à nouveau Térence C. – ils étaient à sa recherche, soupçonnent les parties civiles. L’acolyte attaque Térence C., lui donne des coups de poing. Celui-ci parvient à immobiliser son agresseur. C’est à ce moment-là qu’intervient Arnaud D., dans le dos de la victime. Il la frappe de ses poings, lui entaille la joue gauche au moyen d’un tesson de bouteille ou d’un couteau – d’« un tesson d’un flash de Cognac que j’avais dans la poche », explique le prévenu sans convaincre –, « sur quinze centimètres de long », selon le rapport d’enquête.

Une femme tente de s’interposer, en vain. Deux témoins passifs de la scène, agents de la RATP, absents à l’audience – la défense met en doute le sérieux de leurs témoignages –, ont affirmé que ces violences étaient accompagnées d’insultes : « Sale Français », « sale blanc-bec », « sale Blanc, « sale gaouri » (terme dépréciatif en argot maghrébin, désignant un Français ou plus généralement un étranger). Arnaud D. dit n’en avoir proféré aucune : « J’ai jamais entendu “gaouri”, je ne sais pas ce que ça veut dire. » Le président de la cour : « Ça veut dire “sale Français”. »

L’agression a été filmée, sans le son, par des caméras de vidéo-surveillance. Le complice d’Arnaud D. apparaît sur ces images muettes comme étant un Noir ou un métis. N’ayant pas été identifié, il a échappé à la justice. Un début de bande est diffusé au tribunal, mais le président met fin à son déroulé, la touche « avance rapide » ne fonctionnant pas. Ce 12 septembre 2010, Arnaud D. est vêtu d’un pantalon noir, d’un sweat rouge et porte une chaînette au cou. Il a le crâne ras. Ras, comme vendredi à l’audience, à laquelle il s’est présenté en blazer gris, chemise noire et cravate lilas pâle. Grand, sec, il dit le minimum, affirme qu’il ne peut pas être raciste, « toutes mes copines sont noires ou métisses ». Lors de l’instruction, niant dans un premier temps être la personne que les images désignent, il l’a d’abord dépeinte comme de « type arabe », avant d’admettre sa participation à l’agression.

Les insultes qu’il aurait proférées durant l’agression lui valent la circonstance aggravante de racisme, conformément à l’article 132-76 du Code pénal qui établit cette circonstance dès lors que l’infraction est commise « à raison de l’appartenance ou de la non-appartenance, vraie ou supposée, à une ethnie, une nation, une race ou une religion déterminée. » Me Grégoire Etrillard, l’avocat d’Arnaud D., a demandé à la cour de transmettre une Question Prioritaire de Constitutionnalité au Conseil constitutionnel, afin qu’il se prononce sur cette disposition pénale, qu’il trouve floue. En effet, s’étonne-t-il, comment un individu mêlé à une agression au cours de laquelle des propos racistes sont prononcées, pourrait-il en être tenu responsable alors qu’il ne les a pas tenus ?

Sur leur banc, Me Pierre Combles de Nayves, le conseil de la victime, et son confrère Me Mario-Pierre Stasi, plaidant au nom de la Licra, soupirent et s’étranglent en silence. Pas pour longtemps. Me Stasi rappelle que, selon la loi, « le complice (d’une agression) encourt toutes les circonstances aggravantes ». S’ensuit un échange sur un cas, pas que d’école : des violences racistes commises en réunion par des skinheads. Me Etrillard admet qu’en cette circonstance, aucun des agresseurs ne peut se désolidariser pénalement de l’infraction.

Le 26 octobre 2012, Térence C. ne s’était pas présenté à une première audience parce qu’il suivait une formation professionnelle de « trois mois dans la région lilloise ». La tenue du procès avait été reportée. « Je regrette l’absence de Monsieur C. Il n’est pas un héros, c’est un homme comme vous et moi. C’est toujours difficile d’avoir été agressé. Il a été licencié ce matin », a argumenté Me Combles de Nayves pour expliquer la nouvelle défection de son client.

L’accusé a énuméré ses états de service dans la restauration, CAP de cuisine, commis, demi-chef de partie, chef de partie, second de cuisine, un passage « chez Dalloyau », une succession de « CDI ». Il lui arrive de porter sur lui des couteaux de travail, des armes aux yeux de la loi. Une personnalité complexe, dit-on banalement pour caractériser pareil individu. En refusant, par crainte de récupération politique, de fouiller la personnalité de l’accusé, la partie civile s’est peut-être privé de la preuve sinon matérielle du moins morale qui lui aurait permis de le confondre. Verdict le 21 juin.

Voir de même:

Diffusion d’une agression filmée: un policier en garde à vue

La mise en ligne sur Internet des images d’une violente agression survenue en décembre dans un bus parisien a conduit à l’ouverture d’une enquête judiciaire.

Le Parisien

09.04.2009

Hier, un policier a été placé en garde à vue par l’inspection générale des services (IGS). La police des polices soupçonne ce jeune gardien de la paix d’être impliqué dans la diffusion sur le Net de la vidéo d’une agression extrêmement violente d’un passager, tabassé par une bande dans un bus de nuit, le 7 décembre dernier à Paris. Ces images proviennent de la caméra du bus de la RATP.

L’IGS cherche à savoir comment le policier relâché dès hier soir a pu se procurer ce document. La mise en ligne de cette vidéo, relayée et exploitée politiquement par des sites et des blogs d’extrême droite, a créé un buzz sur le Net, qui a explosé cette semaine. « C’est plus qu’une fuite, c’est une manipulation d’un document à usage policier et judiciaire à des fins de communication externe », dénonce Pierre Mongin, le patron de la RATP.

L’agression. Le 7 décembre 2008, vers 3 h 45, plusieurs jeunes gens s’en prennent au passager d’un Noctilien qui circule dans le XVIII e arrondissement de Paris. Assis non loin du chauffeur, l’usager se fait voler son portefeuille puis est violemment frappé par au moins quatre adolescents qui s’acharnent à coups de pieds et de poings, aux cris de « sale Français » et de « fils de pute ». D’autres passagers, dont une personne âgée et une femme, tentent de s’interposer et sont à leur tour molestés. Le chauffeur n’intervient pas mais déclenche une alarme silencieuse reliée au PC de sécurité. « Son attitude a été irréprochable », souligne-t-on à la RATP.

La vidéo. Quelques jours plus tard, les images de l’agression apparaissent en toute illégalité sur une page de Facebook. Le patron de la RATP, qui a porté plainte, rappelle que la « diffusion sur Internet de cette vidéo est constitutive d’un délit ». L’internaute qui l’a mise en ligne serait le policier entendu hier par l’IGS. Ce dernier est affecté au service régional de la police des transports (SRPT), service justement chargé de l’enquête sur l’agression filmée. « Ce fonctionnaire travaille en tenue à la sécurisation dans les trains, il n’a rien à voir avec les investigations sur les faits du 7 décembre, ni de près ni de loin », soutient un policier du SRPT. Reste à connaître les motivations du gardien de la paix. « Si c’est lui, il a dû vouloir montrer certaines réalités à des copains, sans aucune arrière-pensée politique, croit savoir un de ses collègues. Une connerie de jeunesse. » Ce comportement n’est pas anodin.

Le buzz. D’abord passée inaperçue, la vidéo est petit à petit sortie de la confidentialité. Le blogueur d’extrême droite François Desouche est l’un des premiers à l’avoir décelée sur la Toile. La vidéo a fini par faire son apparition sur les grandes plates-formes telles Dailymotion et YouTube. Depuis, ces sites la censurent sans relâche. Mais certains contournent l’obstacle en diffusant le document sur des plates-formes étrangères.

L’enquête. Alertés par le chauffeur du Noctilien, les policiers du SRPT ont interpellé dès la nuit des faits deux des agresseurs présumés, puis un troisième le 11 décembre. Au total, trois majeurs et un mineur ont été mis en examen, deux étant placés en détention provisoire. La vidéo enregistrée par la caméra du bus est une pièce à conviction capitale dans cette affaire, dont l’instruction est terminée.

La sécurité. L’agression du passager est-elle un fait isolé ? « Elle fait partie du top 20 des cas les plus graves que l’on traite. C’est évidemment choquant », indique un policier spécialisé. Selon ce dernier, ce type d’agression est loin d’être rare dans les transports en commun. Il évoque des jeunes, souvent mineurs, qui agissent en « meute » et de façon ultraviolente. « Quant au Noctilien, c’est souvent chaud, à l’image des trains de nuit, ajoute le policier. Si vous n’avez pas d’argent pour un taxi le samedi soir, mieux vaut rester en boîte et attendre le matin. »

Voir encore:

Vidéo de l’agression : la victime nie tout caractère raciste

Le Parisien

10.04.2009

Le jeune homme agressé dans un bus Noctilien, à Paris, dans la nuit du 6 au 7 décembre dernier s’est confié au journal Le Figaro après que la vidéo de son agression a été diffusée à grande échelle sur internet, provoquant une vive polémique.

Agé de 19 ans et élève en première année à Sciences Po Paris, le jeune homme n’a rien oublié de son agression qui a été filmée par une caméra de vidéosurveillance.

Interrogée sur les injures raciales proférées sur la video, la victime identifiée comme F. G., un élève de 19 ans en première année de Science Po, à Paris, affirme: «Personnellement, je n’ai rien entendu de la sorte».

Sur la vidéo montrant l’agression d’un jeune homme par quatre adolescents cherchant à lui dérober son porte-monnaie, la victime était rouée de coups de pied et de poing aux cris de «fils de pute» et de «sale Français».

«Ces propos, s’ils ont été dits, interviennent dans un contexte où mes agresseurs étaient drogués ou ivres», déclare la victime, qui n’a pas souhaité être identifiée, selon le journal.

«Par ailleurs, ils n’étaient pas tous issus de l’immigration. La vidéo de mon agression apparaît comme très stéréotypée car, ce soir-là, je suis habillé de façon bourgeoise et je suis face à quatre jeunes qui faisaient beaucoup de bruit. En aucun cas, je ne veux passer pour l’incarnation d’une certaine image sociale qui aurait été prise à partie par des étrangers. Je ne l’ai pas ressenti comme cela. L’un des assaillants en survêtement, rasé, avait d’ailleurs une couleur de peau très pâle», ajoute F. G.

Aujourd’hui, en pleine forme, le jeune homme estime être totalement sorti de cette affaire.

Voir de même:

Procès pour racisme anti-blanc : lettre ouverte d’un "sale blanc" au Mrap

Alors que s’ouvre le premier procès pour "racisme anti-blanc", le représentant du Mrap a expliqué à Europe 1 pourquoi l’association, exceptionnellement, ne se porte pas partie civile. Le racisme anti-blanc ne serait qu’une réaction au racisme envers les noirs et les arabes, et serait instrumentalisé politiquement.

Mea Culpa

Benoît Rayski

Atlantico

27 avril 2013

Je suis un sale Blanc et j’espère que de l’avoir confessé me vaudra l’indulgence du tribunal où siègent peut-être les membres du Syndicat de la magistrature.

Je suis un sale Blanc car dans une vie antérieure j’ai affrété des bateaux à Bordeaux pour traverser l’Atlantique avec mes cargaisons d’esclaves.

Je suis un sale Blanc car j’ai usé de toute mon influence, qui est grande, pour que des dizaines de milliers d’Africains et d’Antillais soient enfermés dans des prisons appelées HLM.

Je suis un sale Blanc parce qu’un jour où mon fils s’était fait qualifier de "face de craie", frapper et dépouiller à la Foire du Trône je suis allé avec lui porter plainte et je ne l’ai pas dissuadé de dire que ses agresseurs étaient des Noirs.

Je suis un sale Blanc car j’habite un immeuble où aucune seringue ne jonche les escaliers et où aucun guetteur ne signale l’arrivée de mes visiteurs.

Je suis un sale Blanc car un jour, dans un regrettable mouvement de colère, j’ai dit à un grand gaillard notoirement plus foncé que moi et qui m’avait bousculé parce que je tardais à lui donner un clope : "Appelle-moi bwana!" ("Patron", comme disaient les Africains aux administrateurs coloniaux à une certaine époque).

Je suis un sale Blanc car, écrivant dans les journaux, je n’ai pas pris ma plume pour dénoncer l’affreux Eric Zemmour qui s’était permis de dire que les Noirs et les Arabes étaient largement majoritaires dans nos prisons.

Je suis un sale Blanc car, toute honte bue, je n’ai pas jeté à la poubelle mon exemplaire de "Tintin au Congo" que les forces progressistes, anti-racistes et anti-colonialistes tentent, à juste titre, de faire interdire.

Je suis un sale Blanc car je ne milite pas au MRAP et que j’ai refusé -alors que j’ai de la thune- d’envoyer un chèque de soutien au CRAN (Conseil Représentatif des Associations Noires).

Je suis un sale Blanc car j’ai infiniment de respect pour Félix Eboué (nommé gouverneur de l’Afrique Occidentale Française par De Gaulle), pour Léopold Sédar Senghor et pour Rama Yade que je trouve très jolie. Or, ces gens-là sont, comme on dit dans les cités, des "Bounty", noirs à l’extérieur et blanc à l’intérieur, des "suceurs de Blancs", des traîtres.

Et, enfin, je suis un sale Blanc car je suis blanc.

Pour tous ces motifs-là, j’admets que je mérite d’être poursuivi. Je demande pardon pour l’esclavage et pour toutes les horreurs que je viens de citer. Faute avouée étant à moitié pardonnée, j’espère que le MRAP aura la bonté de ne pas exiger un verdict trop sévère. Peut-être même que les juges, compréhensifs et touchés par mon remord sincère, se contenteront de m’épingler sur le "Mur des Cons".

Voir enfin:

The six day war in Stockholm

Dr Nils Bejerot, professor of social medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm

New Scientist (volume 61, number 886, page 486-487)

1974

The use of gas in the Swedish bank drama last August was widely criticised. Here a consultant psychiatrist to the police, who was in the bank throughout the affair, gives his explanation of the strategy adopted. The bank robbery in Stockholm in August 1973 held all Swedes, from the government and police to the mass media and the public, in horrified suspense for six days. I spent the whole of that week at the bank as psychiatric consultant to the police. I consider it instructive to answer the criticism of our strategy expressed during and after the operation.

During the drama I was rung up by some uninitiated psychiatrists and psychologists who declared that all signs pointed to a bloody outcome. In their opinion, the bank robber, when cornered and desperate, would probably shoot the hostages and perhaps himself, too. I was told that it was my duty to persuade the police to stop the action and also to induce the government to change its instructions forbidding the robbers to leave the bank with the hostages. In several newspapers journalists supported this theory, on television a similar opinion was expressed by a well-known child psychiatrist, and nine lecturers in criminology at the University of Stockholm broadcast an appeal along the same lines.

In spite of all this pressure we followed the opposite line. Here I can only give a short account of some of the most important considerations on which our strategy was based.

1. Right at the beginning the robber very nearly killed a policeman with shots from his submachine gun. Conclusion: The man would be a serious danger to the police in a confrontation in the bank, or in a later chase. A few days afterwards another policeman was shot, and here again it was only by chance that this did not end in the murder of a policeman. Or, the other hand in the early stages two policemen, after agreement with the bank robber, were able to go into the bank unharmed and negotiate without being shot at. As a physician I was able to move freely in the bank and speak to the robber at close quarters. It was clear that the man was not under the influence of alcohol or drugs, nor was he psychotic (“insane”). He was a resolute man of normal intelligence, and he functioned in a rational way from the standpoint of his criminal ambitions. Had he been psychotic, it would have been very difficult to predict his behaviour.

2. The robber demanded three million crowns and insisted that Clark Olofsson, a prisoner who had a further six years to serve, and who, two weeks previously, had made an unsuccessful attempt to escape by blowing up a prison door, should be brought to the bank. He also demanded two pistols and safe conduct for himself and Olofsson together with the hostages. Conclusion: ‘We were faced with a shrewd, daring and ambitious professional criminal. He would not be expected to do anything unless he would gain something by it, directly or indirectly. It must be remembered that among professional criminals shooting at the police in a threatening situation gives high status. It is, however, beneath the dignity of these criminals to injure hostages. With political terrorists the whole situation is different, but this subject will not be discussed here.

3. The Swedish government quickly took two decisions: (a) It agreed to the police using Olofsson, with his own consent, in negotiations with the bank robber; (b) the bank robber was not to be permitted to leave the bank with the hostages. Otherwise the police had a free hand. The decision not to let the bank robber take the hostages with him established a vitally important principle. If the government had accepted that the robbers had disappeared with three million crowns and the hostages, we would probably have been faced with a series of similar crimes in many countries, just as with hijacking. We would have been at a great psychological disadvantage in relation to professional criminals and gangsterism.

4. My conversations with Olofsson confirmed the opinion of the police. that he would not commit any desperate act or do anything which would hazard his own life. He was therefore allowed to join the bank robber, although at that stage we were unable to release the hostages in exchange for Olofsson as the government had intended. Conclusion: Apart from the fact that the bank robber seemed to act logically in relation to his aims, we now had in the bank also an intelligent man with a strong will to live and a rational way of thinking.

5. In this situation the outcome of the drama was given, and only a tactical blunder from one side or the other could have caused bloodshed. At an early stage the police had asked for a psychological assessment of the risk to the hostages. I judged this to be about 2 to 3 per cent in unfavourable circumstances, for instance, if we forced the operations too quickly and did not give the robber enough time to realise that the fight was lost. With a drawn-out course and the right amount of pressure, I considered that the action was practically free from risk for the hostages. It was clear to all initiated persons that the hazards would be far greater if the hostages had been allowed to accompany the robber, regardless of where the journey might lead or how long it might take.

6. Throughout the drama the bank robber acted in a way we had predicted at an early stage. He shot at the police when he had a chance, and in order to emphasise his demands he demonstratively detonated explosive paste in the bank hall and in the ventilation system. He kept his promise not to shoot people who came with food and drink, realising that otherwise he would not have received any necessities. As expected, also, he put up a long and determined resistance. Only two unexpected events occurred: (a) In connection with the first attempt to use gas, the robber made the hostages stand up with a noose round their necks. The police and hostages were given to understand that if gas was let in the hostages would be strangled when they were no longer able to stand up. This scheme took us completely by surprise. We heard through the microphones in the vault that the hostages experienced this as a direct threat to their lives, and the action was therefore immediately discontinued for a time. Nobody outside or inside the bank vault had slept properly for three days, and there was a certain risk that one side or the other might make a tactical mistake unless everyone had an opportunity of resting. As with the robber’s previous behaviour, the hanging arrangement was a serious threat, but in my interpretation, not really intended to injure the hostages. The bank robber here proved a little more cunning than we were. A much-needed 12- hour truce followed. (b) The other psychological misjudgement was that we expected the robber, during the final break through into the bank vault, to shoot off all his ammunition through the inner door to the vault before he capitulated. Obviously the tear gas and the determination of the final assault had such an effect on him that he considered it best to give up a few seconds earlier than we predicted.

Criminals are rational

It is astonishing that those critics who consider they have a great understarding of criminals and their reaction patterns, and who declared throughout that we should let the robbers escape with the hostages and the money, is fact did not believe that criminals think in a rational manner. Afterwards the critics argued that it was mere luck that everything went well. We who have worked with criminals for decades and are now accused of regarding them as madmen and monsters, know that they function rationally in the situation in which they have placed themselves. They are like players or gamblers, and they are very good at their game, otherwise they would never have become professional criminals. As a piquant political addendum I would like to point out that the government would have been in an almost hopeless situation if I had collected some of these so-called “progressive” critics, almost all of whom were strong government supporters, and consulted them on the situation. The Prime Minister would then have been confronted with a demand for the release of the robbers with the hostages. Even if I had put in a reservation, the government could hardly have stood out against this massive “expert opinion’”. The release .of the bank robbers on these premises, two weeks before a general election, would have been political suicide.


Présidentielle américaine 2012: C’était pas les Hispaniques, imbécile ! (It was the elderly black women, stupid !)

13 juin, 2013
http://blackgirlsguidetoweightloss.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/aunt-jemima-racist-ads.jpgIt ought to concern people that the most Republican part of the electorate under Ronald Reagan were 18-to-29-year-olds. And today, people I know who are under 40 are embarrassed to say they’re Republicans. They’re embarrassed! They get harassed for it, the same way we used to give liberals a hard time. Republican party strategist
The all-female focus group began with a sobering assessment of the Obama economy. All of the women spoke gloomily about the prospect of paying off student loans, about what they believed to be Social Security’s likely insolvency and about their children’s schooling. A few of them bitterly opined that the Democrats care little about the working class but lavish the poor with federal aid. “You get more off welfare than you would at a minimum-wage job,” observed one of them. Another added, “And if you have a kid, you’re set up for life!”
“I’m going to write down a word, and you guys free-associate with whatever comes to mind,” she said. The first word she wrote was “Democrat.” “Young people,” one woman called out. “Liberal,” another said. Followed by: “Diverse.” “Bill Clinton.”“Change.”“Open-minded.”“Spending.”“Handouts.”“Green.”“More science-based.” When Anderson then wrote “Republican,” the outburst was immediate and vehement: “Corporate greed.”“Old.”“Middle-aged white men.” “Rich.” “Religious.” “Conservative.” “Hypocritical.” “Military retirees.” “Narrow-minded.” “Rigid.” “Not progressive.” “Polarizing.” “Stuck in their ways.” “Farmers.” (…) The session with the young men was equally jarring. None of them expressed great enthusiasm for Obama. But their depiction of Republicans was even more lacerating than the women’s had been. “Racist,” “out of touch” and “hateful” made the list — “and put ‘1950s’ on there too!” one called out. (…) During the whiteboard drill, every focus group described Democrats as “open-minded” and Republicans as “rigid.” “There is a brand,” the 28-year-old pollster concluded of her party with clinical finality. “And it’s that we’re not in the 21st century.”
Several G.O.P. digital specialists told me that, in addition, they found it difficult to recruit talent because of the values espoused by the party. “I know a lot of people who do technology for a living,” Turk said. “And almost universally, there’s a libertarian streak that runs through them — information should be free, do your own thing and leave me alone, that sort of mind-set. That’s very much what the Internet is. And almost to a person that I’ve talked to, they say, ‘Yeah, I would probably vote for Republicans, but I can’t get past the gay-marriage ban, the abortion stance, all of these social causes.’ Almost universally, they see a future where you have more options, not less. So questions about whether you can be married to the person you want to be married to just flies in the face of the future. They don’t want to be part of an organization that puts them squarely on the wrong side of history.” Many young conservatives also said that technological innovation runs at cross-purposes with the party’s corporate rigidity. “There’s a feeling that Republican politics are more hierarchical than in the Democratic Party,” Ben Domenech, a 31-year-old blogger and research fellow at the libertarian Heartland Institute, told me. “There are always elders at the top who say, ‘That’s not important.’ And that’s where the left has beaten us, by giving smart people the space and trusting them to have success. It’s a fundamentally anti-entrepreneurial model we’ve embraced.”
The Republicans did in fact recently have a David Plouffe of their own. As one G.O.P. techie elegantly put it, “We were the smart ones, back in ’04, eons ago.” Referring to the campaign that re-elected George W. Bush, Plouffe told me: “You know how in fantasy baseball you imagine putting up your team against the 1927 Yankees? We would’ve liked to have faced off against the 2004 Republicans. Beating the Clintons” — during the 2008 primaries — “that was, in terms of scale of difficulty, significantly above beating Romney. But going up against the Bushies — that would’ve been something we all would’ve relished.” Plouffe wasn’t referring to competing against Bush’s oft-described architect, Karl Rove — but rather, against the campaign manager, Ken Mehlman. “Mehlman got technology and organization and the truth is — I think it’s completely misunderstood — it was Ken’s campaign,” Plouffe said. (…) Mehlman, according to Bush campaign officials, persuaded Rove to invest heavily in microtargeting (a data-driven means of identifying and reaching select groups of voters), which helped deliver Ohio and thus the election. He advocated reaching out to minority voters both as Bush’s campaign manager and later as chairman of the R.N.C., where he also instructed his staff to read “Moneyball.” “I was like, ‘What does a baseball book have to do with politics?’ ” said Michael Turk, who worked for Mehlman at the R.N.C. “Once I actually took the time to digest it, I realized what he was trying to do — which was exactly the kind of thing that the Obama team just did: understanding that not every election is about home runs but instead getting a whole bunch of singles together that eventually add up to a win.”
“There’s an important book by Ben Wattenberg and Richard Scammon called ‘The Real Majority,’ published in 1970,” Mehlman said as he leaned back in his chair. “The book explains in part how the Republican Party would go on to win five out of six presidential elections through the eyes of the ‘typical’ voter — a working-class couple in Dayton, Ohio. They’re white, worried about crime, feel burdened by taxes and feel like too many Democrats don’t understand these concerns.” Today’s typical voter, he went on to say, could be that same white couple in Dayton. “But here’s the difference,” he said. ‘They worry about economic mobility — can their kids get ahead or even keep up. Their next-door neighbors are Latino whose mom gets concerned when she hears talk about self-deportation or no driver’s licenses. And that couple has a gay niece and an African-American brother-in-law. And too many folks like the couple in Dayton today wonder if some of the G.O.P. understands their lives anymore.” I asked him whether, as even some Republicans have suggested, Ronald Reagan would have trouble building a winning coalition today. “I think he could win, partly because Reagan wouldn’t be the Reagan he was in 1980,” Mehlman replied. “Reagan had an unbelievable intuitive understanding of the electorate, because he’d spent his life as the president of a large union, as an actor who understands his audience, as the governor of the largest state, as a corporate spokesman who traveled — Reagan spent his life listening to people and learning from them and adapting to their concerns. That’s why there were Reagan Democrats — ethnics, working-class voters, Southern voters. So I think a modern Reagan would understand the demography and where the new voters are and would’ve applied his principles accordingly.”
But could a modern-day Reagan, even with Ken Mehlman running his campaign, overcome the party’s angry and antiquated image? To win, a reincarnated Reagan — or a Rubio or a Chris Christie or a Bobby Jindal — would still have to satisfy his base of hard-line conservatives and captivate a new generation of voters at the same time. I ran this quandary by Kristen Soltis Anderson. “It’s a big challenge,” she acknowledged. “But I think that if you can earn the trust of the people, there are ways you can say, ‘Here’s why I take this position.’ I don’t know that someone like Rubio, who may be young and attractive and well spoken, could attract young voters despite his views on gay marriage. I do think that in the absence of a very compelling reason to vote for a candidate, those social issues can be deal-breakers for young voters. The challenge is: Can you make a case that’s so compelling that you can overcome those deal-breaker issues? And I don’t know the answer to that question.”
Bret Jacobson, the Red Edge entrepreneur, insisted that the solution was ultimately a simple one. “I think the answer for a vibrant Republican Party is to make our North Star empowering every individual in this country to follow their own dream, free of legislative excesses,” he told me. “There are millions of Americans who take seriously their religious culture as well as traditions that have been handed down for centuries. And the party has to empower them to fight those battles in the social sphere, not in the government sphere. That’s harder work than taking control of the country for four years. But it’s the appropriate battle.” Robert Draper
Let me tell you something. The Hispanic voters in Nevada, Colorado and New Mexico don’t give a damn about Marco Rubio, the Tea Party Cuban-American from Florida. You know what? We won the Cuban vote! And it’s because younger Cubans are behaving differently than their parents. It’s probably my favorite stat of the whole campaign. So this notion that Marco Rubio is going to heal their problems — it’s not even sophomoric; it’s juvenile! And by the way: the bigger problem they’ve got with Latinos isn’t immigration. It’s their economic policies and health care. The group that supported the president’s health care bill the most? Latinos. David Plouffe (Democratic strategist)
The sleeping giant of the last election wasn’t Hispanics; it was elderly black women, terrified of media claims that Republicans were trying to suppress the black vote and determined to keep the first African-American president in the White House. Contrary to everyone’s expectations, 10 percent more blacks voted in 2012 compared to 2008, even beating white voters, the usual turnout champions. Eligible black voters turned out at rate of 66.2 percent, compared to 64.1 percent of eligible white voters. Only 48 percent of all eligible Hispanic voters went to the polls. (Only two groups voted in larger numbers in 2012 compared to 2008: blacks aged 45-64, and blacks over the age of 65 — mostly elderly black women. In raw numbers, nearly twice as many blacks voted as Hispanics, and nine times as many whites voted as Hispanics. (Ninety-eight million whites, 18 million blacks and 11 million Hispanics.) Ann Coulter
Amnesty is a gift to employers, not employees. The (pro-amnesty) Pew Research Hispanic Center has produced poll after poll showing that Hispanics don’t care about amnesty. In a poll last fall, Hispanic voters said they cared more about education, jobs and health care than immigration. They even care more about the federal budget deficit than immigration! (…) Who convinced Republicans that Hispanic wages aren’t low enough and what they really need is an influx of low-wage workers competing for their jobs? Maybe the greedy businessmen now running the Republican Party should talk with their Hispanic maids sometime. Ask Juanita if she’d like to have seven new immigrants competing with her for the opportunity to clean other people’s houses, so that her wages can be dropped from $20 an hour to $10 an hour. Ann Coulter

A l’heure où, avec les scandales qui s’accumulent, les obamamanes découvrent enfin les vraies couleurs de l’Illusioniste en chef de Chicago

Et que, face à la nouvelle législation sur l’immigration promise depuis longtemps par l’Administration Obama, nombre de Républicains semblent être tentés par l’amnistie …

Retour, avec l’éditorialiste républicaine Ann Coulter, sur le prétendu épouvantail du vote hispanique qui en novembre dernier aurait coulé Romney

Pour rappeler que lesdits hispaniques n’ont non seulement voté qu’à 48% (contre plus de 66% et 64% pour les noirs et les blancs) …

Mais qu’ils ne sont peut-être pas si pressés de voir une arrivée massive d’immigrants pousser leurs propres salaires vers le bas  …

If the GOP is this stupid, it deserves to die

Ann Coulter

6/12/2013

Democrats terrify Hispanics into thinking they’ll be lynched if they vote for Republicans, and then turn around and taunt Republicans for not winning a majority of the Hispanic vote.

This line of attack has real resonance with our stupidest Republicans. (Proposed Republican primary targets: Sens. Kelly Ayotte, Jeff Flake, Lindsey Graham and Marco Rubio.) Which explains why Republicans are devoting all their energy to slightly increasing their share of the Hispanic vote while alienating everyone else in America.

It must be fun for liberals to manipulate Republicans into focusing on hopeless causes. Why don’t Democrats waste their time trying to win the votes of gun owners?

As journalist Steve Sailer recently pointed out, the Hispanic vote terrifying Republicans isn’t that big. It actually declined in 2012. The Census Bureau finally released the real voter turnout numbers from the last election, and the Hispanic vote came in at only 8.4 percent of the electorate — not the 10 percent claimed by the pro-amnesty crowd.

The sleeping giant of the last election wasn’t Hispanics; it was elderly black women, terrified of media claims that Republicans were trying to suppress the black vote and determined to keep the first African-American president in the White House.

Contrary to everyone’s expectations, 10 percent more blacks voted in 2012 compared to 2008, even beating white voters, the usual turnout champions. Eligible black voters turned out at rate of 66.2 percent, compared to 64.1 percent of eligible white voters. Only 48 percent of all eligible Hispanic voters went to the polls.

No one saw this coming, which is probably why Gallup had Romney up by 5 points before Hurricane Sandy hit, and up by 1 point in its last pre-election poll after the hurricane.

Only two groups voted in larger numbers in 2012 compared to 2008: blacks aged 45-64, and blacks over the age of 65 — mostly elderly black women.

In raw numbers, nearly twice as many blacks voted as Hispanics, and nine times as many whites voted as Hispanics. (Ninety-eight million whites, 18 million blacks and 11 million Hispanics.)

So, naturally, the Republican Party’s entire battle plan going forward is to win slightly more votes from 8.4 percent of the electorate by giving them something they don’t want.

As Byron York has shown, even if Mitt Romney had won 70 percent of the Hispanic vote, he still would have lost. No Republican presidential candidate in at least 50 years has won even half of the Hispanic vote.

In the presidential election immediately after Reagan signed an amnesty bill in 1986, the Republican share of the Hispanic vote actually declined from 37 percent to 30 percent — and that was in a landslide election for the GOP. Combined, the two Bush presidents averaged 32.5 percent of the Hispanic vote — and they have Hispanics in their family Christmas cards.

John McCain, the nation’s leading amnesty proponent, won only 31 percent of the Hispanic vote, not much more than anti-amnesty Romney’s 27 percent.

Amnesty is a gift to employers, not employees.

The (pro-amnesty) Pew Research Hispanic Center has produced poll after poll showing that Hispanics don’t care about amnesty. In a poll last fall, Hispanic voters said they cared more about education, jobs and health care than immigration. They even care more about the federal budget deficit than immigration! (To put that in perspective, the next item on their list of concerns was “scratchy towels.”)

Also, note that Pew asked about “immigration,” not “amnesty.” Those Hispanics who said they cared about immigration might care about it the way I care about it — by supporting a fence and E-Verify.

Who convinced Republicans that Hispanic wages aren’t low enough and what they really need is an influx of low-wage workers competing for their jobs?

Maybe the greedy businessmen now running the Republican Party should talk with their Hispanic maids sometime. Ask Juanita if she’d like to have seven new immigrants competing with her for the opportunity to clean other people’s houses, so that her wages can be dropped from $20 an hour to $10 an hour.

A wise Latina, A.J. Delgado, recently explained on Mediaite.com why amnesty won’t win Republicans the Hispanic vote — even if they get credit for it. Her very first argument was: “Latinos will resent the added competition for jobs.”

But rich businessmen don’t care. Big Republican donors — and their campaign consultants — just want to make money. They don’t care about Hispanics, and they certainly don’t care what happens to the country. If the country is hurt, I don’t care, as long as I am doing better! This is the very definition of treason.

Hispanic voters are a small portion of the electorate. They don’t want amnesty, and they’re hopeless Democrats. So Republicans have decided the path to victory is to flood the country with lots more of them!

It’s as if Republicans convinced Democrats to fixate on banning birth control to win more pro-life voters. This would be great for Republicans because Democrats will never win a majority of pro-life voters, and about as many pro-lifers care about birth control as Hispanics care about amnesty.

But that still wouldn’t be as idiotic as what Republicans are doing because, according to Gallup, pro-lifers are nearly half of the electorate. Hispanics are only 8.4 percent of the electorate.

And it still wouldn’t be as stupid as the GOP pushing amnesty, because banning birth control wouldn’t create millions more voters who consistently vote against the Democrats.

Listening to Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus burble a few weeks ago on “Fox News Sunday” about how amnesty is going to push the Republicans to new electoral heights, one is reminded of Democratic pollster Pat Caddell’s reason for refusing to become a Republican: No matter how enraged he gets at Democratic corruption, he says he can’t bear to join such a stupid party as the GOP.

Voir aussi:

Hispanics favor Dems but didn’t decide election

November 22, 2012

Byron York

Chief Political Correspondent

The Washington Examiner

After moments of panic in the immediate aftermath of Mitt Romney’s defeat, some Republicans and conservatives are regaining their equilibrium on the issue of what the GOP should do about immigration and the Hispanic vote.

They’re looking at key questions from the campaign, like how much of Barack Obama’s victory was attributable to Hispanic support. They’re also looking at the Hispanic electorate itself to see how big a role immigration, versus a wide range of other issues, played in voting decisions. The goal, of course, is to win a larger portion of the Hispanic vote, but first to take a clear-eyed look at what actually happened on Nov. 6.

And the lesson for Republicans is: Take your time. Calmly reassess your positions. Don’t pander.

The first question is whether Hispanic voters gave Obama his margin of victory. In a recent analysis, the New York Times’ Allison Kopicki and Will Irving looked at vote totals in each state, plus the percentage of the vote cast by Hispanics, to see what the outcome would have been had Hispanics voted differently.

For example, they looked at Wisconsin, a state the Romney-Ryan team hoped to win. Hispanics weren’t a huge part of the total vote — about 4 percent, according to the exit polls — and Obama won big among them, 65 percent to 31 percent. But going through the totals, Kopicki and Irving concluded that even if every single Hispanic voter in Wisconsin had cast a ballot for Romney, Obama still would have won.

They found the same result for New Hampshire and Iowa, two other swing states Romney looked to win.

Then there was Ohio. According to the exit polls, Obama won 53 percent of the Hispanic vote there. But given how decisively Obama won other voting groups, Kopicki and Irving found that the president would have prevailed in Ohio even if he had won just 22 percent of the Hispanic vote. Put another way, even if Romney had won a stratospheric 78 percent of the Hispanic vote, he still would have lost Ohio.

In Virginia, Obama won the Latino vote 65 percent to 33 percent. Kopicki and Irving found that if those numbers had been reversed — if Romney had won an unprecedented 65 percent of the Latino vote — Obama still would have won Virginia.

Even in states where the Hispanic vote played a bigger role, Romney could have made significant gains among Hispanics and still lost. In Colorado, for example, the president won Hispanics by a huge margin, 75 percent to 23 percent. Kopicki and Irving found that Romney could have increased his margin to 42 percent — a major improvement for a Republican — and still come up short in Colorado.

The bottom line is that even if Romney had made historic gains among Hispanic voters, he still would have lost the election. That means Romney underperformed among more than just Hispanic voters. And that means winning more Hispanic votes is far from the GOP’s only challenge.

Then there is the question of what motivates Hispanic voters. "They should be a natural Republican constituency: striving immigrant community, religious, Catholic, family-oriented and socially conservative (on abortion, for example)," columnist Charles Krauthammer wrote Nov. 8. "The principal reason they go Democratic is the issue of illegal immigrants." Krauthammer urged Republicans to accept amnesty for illegals, accompanied by a completed border fence.

Some other conservatives echoed Krauthammer’s sentiments. But social scientist Charles Murray looked across a broad range of data and found little to support the notion that Hispanics are natural Republicans. Hispanics "aren’t more religious than everyone else … aren’t married more than everyone else … aren’t more conservative than everyone else," Murray wrote. In addition, Hispanics don’t work harder than other groups and are only slightly more pro-life than the rest of the population.

The available data, Murray concluded, "paint a portrait that gives no reason to think that Republicans have an untapped pool of social conservatives to help them win elections."

In addition, exit poll information suggests Hispanics voted on a number of issues beyond illegal immigration — and those issues favored Democrats. A majority of Hispanics who voted Nov. 6 favored keeping Obamacare. A majority favored higher taxes for higher earners. A majority — two-thirds, in fact — said abortion should be legal.

None of this is to say the GOP shouldn’t seek more Hispanic votes. There are opportunities; for example, Romney made significant inroads among Hispanic voters with college degrees. But the fact is, Republicans had a serious problem with lots of voters, as well as potential voters who didn’t go to the polls. The Hispanic vote was just part of it.

Byron York, The Examiner’s chief political correspondent, can be contacted at byork@washingtonexaminer.com. His column appears on Tuesday and Friday, and his stories and blog posts appear on washingtonexaminer.com.

Voir encore:

Can the Republicans Be Saved From Obsolescence?

Robert Draper

The New York Times

February 14, 2013

One afternoon last month, I paid a visit to two young Republicans named Bret Jacobson and Ian Spencer, who work in a small office in Arlington, Va., situated above an antique store and adjacent to a Japanese auto shop. Their five-man company, Red Edge, is a digital-advocacy group for conservative causes, and their days are typically spent designing software applications for groups like the Heritage Foundation, the Republican Governors Association and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Lately, however, Jacobson and Spencer have taken up evangelizing — and the sermon, delivered day after day to fellow conservatives in the form of a 61-point presentation, is a pitiless we-told-you-so elucidation of the ways in which Democrats have overwhelmed Republicans with their technological superiority.

They walked me through a series of slides showing the wide discrepancies between the two campaigns. “And just to make them feel really bad,” Jacobson said as he punched another image onto the overhead screen. “We say, ‘Just wait — this is the most important slide.’ And this is what kills them, because conservatives always look at young voters like the hot girl they could never date.” He read aloud from the text: “1.25 million more young people supported Obama in 2012 over 2008.”

In the light of his Apple monitor, Jacobson’s grin took on a Luciferian glow. He is 33, wiry and well dressed and has the twitchy manner of a highly caffeinated techie. “And then we continue with the cavalcade of pain,” he said. The next chart showed that while the Romney campaign raised slightly more money from its online ads than it spent on them, Obama’s team more than doubled the return on its online-ad investment.

Spencer chimed in: “That’s when one of our clients moaned, ‘It’s even worse than I thought.’ ” Spencer, who is 29, possesses the insectlike eyes of a committed programmer. He and Jacobson are alumni of the University of Oregon, where they both worked on the Commentator, a conservative alternative paper whose slogan was, “Free Minds, Free Markets, Free Booze.”

“Then, once people think we’ve gotten them through the worst,” Jacobson said, “we pile on more — just the way Obama did.” He put up Slide 26, titled, “Running Up the Score.” “Obama was the very first candidate to appear on Reddit. We ask our clients, ‘Do you know what Reddit is?’ And only one of them did. Then we show them this photo of Obama hugging his wife with the caption ‘Four more years’ — an image no conservative likes. And we tell them, ‘Because of the way the Obama campaign used things like Reddit, that photo is the single-most popular image ever seen on Twitter or Facebook.’ Just to make sure there’s plenty of salt in the wound.”

Back in August 2011, Jacobson wrote an op-ed in Forbes alerting Republicans to Obama’s lead on the digital front. His warnings were disregarded. Then last summer, he and Spencer approached the conservative super PAC American Crossroads with their digital-tool-building strategies and, they say, were politely ignored. It’s understandable, then, that a touch of schadenfreude is evident when Jacobson and Spencer receive the policy-group gurus and trade-association lobbyists who file into Red Edges’s office to receive a comeuppance.

“Business is booming for us,” Jacobson said. “We’ll double or triple our bottom line this year, easily. But this isn’t about getting new business. We need the entire right side of the aisle to get smart fast. And the only way they can do that is to appreciate how big the chasm was.”

Exhibit A is the performance of the Romney brain trust, which has suffered an unusually vigorous postelection thrashing for badly losing a winnable race. Criticism begins with the candidate — a self-described data-driven chief executive who put his trust in alarmingly off-the-mark internal polls and apparently did not think to ask his subordinates why, for example, they were operating on the assumption that fewer black voters would turn out for Obama than in 2008. Romney’s senior strategist, Stuart Stevens, may well be remembered by historians, as one House Republican senior staff member put it to me, “as the last guy to run a presidential campaign who never tweeted.” (“It was raised many times with him,” a senior Romney official told me, “and he was very categorical about not wanting to and not thinking it was worth it.”)

Under the stewardship of Zac Moffatt, whose firm, Targeted Victory, commandeered the 2012 digital operations of the Romney campaign, American Crossroads and the Republican National Committee, Team Romney managed to connect with 12 million Facebook friends, triple that of Obama’s operation in 2008; but Obama in 2012 accrued 33 million friends and deployed them as online ambassadors who in turn contacted their Facebook friends, thereby demonstrably increasing the campaign’s get-out-the-vote efforts in a way that dwarfed the Republicans’. While Romney’s much-hyped get-out-the-vote digital tool, Orca, famously crashed on Election Day, Obama’s digital team unveiled Narwhal, a state-of-the-art data platform that gave every member of the campaign instant access to continuously updated information on voters, volunteer availability and phone-bank activity. And despite spending hundreds of millions of dollars, the Romney television-ad-making apparatus proved to be no match for the Obama operation, which enlisted Rentrak, the data corporation for satellite and cable companies, through which it accrued an entirely new layer of information about each and every consumer, giving the campaign the ability to customize cable TV ads.

“They were playing chess while we were playing checkers,” a senior member of the campaign’s digital team somberly told another top Romney aide shortly after the election. Later, the top aide would participate in a postelection forum with Obama’s campaign manager. He told me (albeit, like a few people I spoke to, under the condition that he not be identified criticizing his party), “I remember thinking, when Jim Messina was going over the specifics of how they broke down and targeted the electorate: ‘I can’t play this game. I have to play a different game, so that I don’t look like an idiot in front of all these people.’ ”

But the problem for the G.O.P. extends well beyond its flawed candidate and his flawed operation. The unnerving truth, which the Red Edge team and other younger conservatives worry that their leaders have yet to appreciate, is that the Republican Party’s technological deficiencies barely begin to explain why the G.O.P. has lost the popular vote in five of the last six presidential elections. The party brand — which is to say, its message and its messengers — has become practically abhorrent to emerging demographic groups like Latinos and African-Americans, not to mention an entire generation of young voters. As one of the party’s most highly respected strategists told me: “It ought to concern people that the most Republican part of the electorate under Ronald Reagan were 18-to-29-year-olds. And today, people I know who are under 40 are embarrassed to say they’re Republicans. They’re embarrassed! They get harassed for it, the same way we used to give liberals a hard time.”

It was not long after the election that elder statesmen of the G.O.P. began offering assurances that all would soon be right. But younger Republicans were not buying it. On Dec. 6, Moffatt addressed an audience of party digital specialists at the R.N.C.’s Capitol Hill Club. Moffatt spoke confidently about how, among other things, the Romney digital team had pretty much all the same tools the Obama campaign possessed. Bret Jacobson was shocked when he read about Moffatt’s claim the next day. “That’s like saying, ‘This Potemkin village will bring us all prosperity!’ ” Jacobson told me. “There’s something to be said for putting on a happy face — except when it makes you sound like Baghdad Bob.”

A few days after the Moffatt gathering, the R.N.C.’s chairman, Reince Priebus, announced that the committee would conduct a wide-ranging investigation — called the Growth and Opportunity Project — into the ways the party was going astray. To guide the investigation were familiar names, like the former Bush White House press secretary Ari Fleischer, the longtime Florida operative Sally Bradshaw and the R.N.C. veteran Henry Barbour. Erik Telford, the 28-year-old founder of the RightOnline bloggers’ convention, told me that he found himself wondering aloud: “Do you want an aggressive investigation from people who’ve built their careers on asking skeptical questions? Or do you want a report from people who are symptomatic of what’s gone wrong?”

Equally galling to younger Republicans was the op-ed Stuart Stevens wrote in The Washington Post on Nov. 28. In it, Romney’s top strategist struck an unrepentant tone, proudly noting that the candidate “carried the majority of middle-class voters” and that the party therefore “must be doing something right.” From her office near the Capitol, Kristen Soltis Anderson, a 28-year-old G.O.P. pollster, tried not to come unglued. “But you didn’t win the election,” she told me she thought at the time. “I’m really glad you scored that touchdown in the third quarter, I am — but you lost the game!”

Anderson is a fantasy-football fanatic, with the rat-a-tat argumentative cadence that gives her away as a former high-school debater. Upon graduating from college, she became the lead singer of the Frustrations, a rock-ska group that folded, as only a D.C.-based band could, when one member decided to attend law school and another needed more time to study for the bar exam. Anderson, for her part, is now a pollster and vice president of the Winston Group. Like the Red Edge partners and virtually every other young Republican with whom I spoke, she regards herself as a socially tolerant, limited-government fiscal conservative. (Today Republicans of all age groups strenuously avoid describing themselves as “moderate,” a term that the far right has made radioactive.) Camera-ready and compulsively perky — she has twice appeared on Bill Maher’s ”Real Time” panel as a token conservative — she nonetheless lapses into despondency when talking about her party’s current state of denial. During one of the postelection panels, Anderson heard a journalist talk about his interviews with Romney staff members who had hoped to build a winning coalition of white voters. “That just stunned me,” she told me one afternoon over coffee. “I thought: Did you not see the census? Because there was one! And it had some pretty big news — like that America’s biggest growing population is the Latino community! Surprise, surprise! How have we not grasped that this is going to be really important?”

One afternoon last month, I flew with Anderson to Columbus, Ohio, to watch her conduct two focus groups. The first consisted of 10 single, middle-class women in their 20s; the second, of 10 20-something men who were either jobless or employed but seeking better work. All of them voted for Obama but did not identify themselves as committed Democrats and were sufficiently ambivalent about the president’s performance that Anderson deemed them within reach of the Republicans. Each group sat around a large conference table with the pollster, while I viewed the proceedings from behind a panel of one-way glass.

The all-female focus group began with a sobering assessment of the Obama economy. All of the women spoke gloomily about the prospect of paying off student loans, about what they believed to be Social Security’s likely insolvency and about their children’s schooling. A few of them bitterly opined that the Democrats care little about the working class but lavish the poor with federal aid. “You get more off welfare than you would at a minimum-wage job,” observed one of them. Another added, “And if you have a kid, you’re set up for life!”

About an hour into the session, Anderson walked up to a whiteboard and took out a magic marker. “I’m going to write down a word, and you guys free-associate with whatever comes to mind,” she said. The first word she wrote was “Democrat.”

“Young people,” one woman called out.

“Liberal,” another said. Followed by: “Diverse.” “Bill Clinton.”“Change.”“Open-minded.”“Spending.”“Handouts.”“Green.”“More science-based.”

When Anderson then wrote “Republican,” the outburst was immediate and vehement: “Corporate greed.”“Old.”“Middle-aged white men.” “Rich.” “Religious.” “Conservative.” “Hypocritical.” “Military retirees.” “Narrow-minded.” “Rigid.” “Not progressive.” “Polarizing.” “Stuck in their ways.” “Farmers.”

Anderson concluded the group on a somewhat beseeching note. “Let’s talk about Republicans,” she said. “What if anything could they do to earn your vote?”

A self-identified anti-abortion, “very conservative” 27-year-old Obama voter named Gretchen replied: “Don’t be so right wing! You know, on abortion, they’re so out there. That all-or-nothing type of thing, that’s the way Romney came across. And you know, come up with ways to compromise.”

“What would be the sign to you that the Republican Party is moving in the right direction?” Anderson asked them.

“Maybe actually pass something?” suggested a 28-year-old schoolteacher named Courtney, who also identified herself as conservative.

The session with the young men was equally jarring. None of them expressed great enthusiasm for Obama. But their depiction of Republicans was even more lacerating than the women’s had been. “Racist,” “out of touch” and “hateful” made the list — “and put ‘1950s’ on there too!” one called out.

Showing a reverence for understatement, Anderson said: “A lot of those words you used to describe Republicans are negative. What could they say or do to make you feel more positive about the Republican Party?”

“Be more pro-science,” said a 22-year-old moderate named Jack. “Embrace technology and change.”

“Stick to your strong suit,” advised Nick, a 23-year-old African-American. “Clearly social issues aren’t your strong suit. Stop trying to fight the battle that’s already been fought and trying to bring back a movement. Get over it — you lost.”

Later that evening at a hotel bar, Anderson pored over her notes. She seemed morbidly entranced, like a homicide detective gazing into a pool of freshly spilled blood. In the previous few days, the pollster interviewed Latino voters in San Diego and young entrepreneurs in Orlando. The findings were virtually unanimous. No one could understand the G.O.P.’s hot-blooded opposition to gay marriage or its perceived affinity for invading foreign countries. Every group believed that the first place to cut spending was the defense budget. During the whiteboard drill, every focus group described Democrats as “open-minded” and Republicans as “rigid.”

“There is a brand,” the 28-year-old pollster concluded of her party with clinical finality. “And it’s that we’re not in the 21st century.”

Of course, many conservatives like their brand just the way it is, regardless of what century it seems to belong to. Anderson did not relish a tug of war over the party’s identity between them and more open-minded Republicans. She talked to me about Jon Huntsman, the presidential candidate whose positions on climate change and social issues she admired, and the unseemly spectacle of his denigrating the far right. To prosper, the party should not have to eat its own, she maintained. Still, to hear her focus-group subjects tell it, the voice of today’s G.O.P. is repellent to young voters. Can that voice, belonging to the party’s most fevered members, still be accommodated even as young Republicans seek to bring their party into the modern era?

This conundrum has been a frequent postelection topic as youthful conservative dissidents huddle in taverns and homes and — among friends, in the manner of early-20th-century Bolsheviks — proceed to speak the unspeakable about the ruling elite. I sat in on one such gathering on a Saturday evening in early February — convened at a Russian bar in Midtown Manhattan, over Baltika beers. The group of a half-dozen or so conservative pundits and consultants calls itself Proximus, which is Latin for “next,” and they seem to revel in their internal disagreements. One of them argued, “Not all regulation is bad,” while another countered, “I hate all regulations, every single one of them” — including, he cheerfully admitted, minimum-wage and child-labor laws. Nonetheless, the focal point of Proximus’s mission is not policy formulation but salesmanship: how to bring new voters into the fold while remaining true to conservative principles.

“This is a long-term play,” conceded John Goodwin, a founder of the group and former chief of staff to the outspoken conservative congressman Raúl Labrador. “This isn’t going to happen by 2014. But we want to be able to show voters that we have a diversity of opinion. Right now, Republicans have such a small number of vocal messengers. What we want to do is add more microphones and eventually drown out the others.”

“And we can’t be afraid to call out Rush Limbaugh,” said Goodwin’s fiancée, S. E. Cupp, a New York Daily News columnist and a co-host of ”The Cycle” on MSNBC. “If we can get three Republicans on three different networks saying, ‘What Rush Limbaugh said is crazy and stupid and dangerous,’ maybe that’ll give other Republicans cover” to denounce the talk-show host as well.

Cupp, who is 33, defines her brand of conservatism as “rational — and optimistic!” She is staunchly anti-abortion but also pro-gay-marriage and a “warheads on foreheads” hawk whose heroes are Barry Goldwater and William F. Buckley Jr. Like many Republicans today — and indeed like liberal Democrats in the 1980s, before Bill Clinton came along and charted a more centrist course — Cupp finds herself in the unenviable position of maintaining that Americans largely side with her party’s worldview, even if their votes suggest otherwise. “Public polling still puts the country center-right on a host of issues,” she told me.

The problem is that her party’s loudest voices sound far more right than center. The voters in Kristen Soltis Anderson’s focus groups condemned Republicans for their unchecked hatred of Obama and for threatening to take away financing for Planned Parenthood, ban abortion, outlaw gay marriage and wage war. From where they stood, at the center-right of S. E. Cupp’s domain, the party had been dragged well out of plain view.

Proximus seeks to marginalize the more strident talking heads by offering itself up to — or if necessary, forcing itself upon — the party as a 21st-century mouthpiece. “If I were training a candidate who’s against gay marriage,” Cupp told me, “I’d say: ‘Don’t change your beliefs, just say legislatively this is not a priority, and I’m not going to take away someone’s right. And if abortion or gay marriage is your No. 1 issue, I’m not your guy.’ ”

I tried to imagine how Cupp’s kinder-gentler message-coaching would go over with the Tea Party, a group that was never mentioned by the young Republicans I spoke with until I broached it. Still, the influence of the far right on the party’s image remains hard to ignore. When I brought up the subject of the Tea Party to Cupp, she said: “People aren’t repelled by the idea of limited government or balancing the budget or lowering taxes. Those Tea Party principles are incredibly popular with the public, even if they don’t know it. Again, that’s a messaging issue, that’s not a principle issue.”

She went on to say, “I don’t think we win by subtraction” — meaning, by casting out the party’s right wing to entice the centrists. Instead, Cupp and her fellow travelers hope to revive Lee Atwater’s bygone “big tent,” under which gay people and Tea Party members and isolationists and neocons would coexist without rancor. But Atwater, the legendary R.N.C. chairman, did not have to worry about freelance voices like Limbaugh and Todd Akin offending whole swaths of emerging demographic groups. Nor during the Atwater era, when Ronald Reagan was president, did the party’s most extreme wing intimidate other Republicans into legislating like extremists themselves, thereby further tarnishing the party’s image. When I mentioned this to the Proximus gathering, Goodwin explained the dilemma faced by Republicans in Congress. “What forces them to vote that way, 9 times out of 10, is a fear of a primary challenge,” he said. “What we hope to accomplish is to bring more voters into Republican primaries, so that it isn’t just the far right that shows up at the polls.”

The dilemma, Goodwin acknowledged, is that the far-right rhetoric may well repel such voters from participating in G.O.P. primaries to begin with. “We recognize that this isn’t something that’s going to happen anytime soon,” he said.

On Nov. 30, more than 2,000 progressives shuffled into the Washington Convention Center to participate in RootsCamp, an annual series of seminars hosted by the New Organizing Institute, where the most cutting-edge digital and grass-roots organizing techniques are discussed. The shaggy and the achingly earnest are well represented at RootsCamp, which makes it an easy target of derision from the right. A reporter from the conservative publication The Daily Caller attended the postelection gathering in 2010 and made great sport of the “unconference,” with its self-conscious inclusiveness, which the reporter termed “multilingual, multicultural and multi-unpurposeful.”

But the handful of conservatives who attended the conference this past November were in no mood to sneer. One was Patrick Ruffini, a 34-year-old leader of the G.O.P.’s young-and-restless digerati. At RootsCamp, his breathless tweets of the sessions held by top Obama organizers — “In eight years, calling people will be obsolete”; “Digital organizing director and field director will be one and the same” — set off a buzz among Republican techies. Ruffini was plainly impressed by the openness of the experience. “I’m like, Wow, they’re doing this in front of 2,000 people, and the system seems to actually work,” he told me a month later. “The thing I was struck by at RootsCamp was that in many ways, the Democratic technology ecosystem has embraced the free market — whereas the Republican one sort of runs on socialism, with the R.N.C. being the overlord.”

The success of the RootsCamp, and its smaller and more intensive offshoot gathering, the New Media Boot Camp, helps explain the yawning digital divide between the two parties. In 2006, a few holdovers from the Howard Dean and John Kerry campaigns eschewed lucrative offers from Washington consulting firms in order to devote some of their time to the communal information-sharing ideals of the New Organizing Institute. Since then, numerous Boot Camp alumni have gone on to help run the tech operations of the Obama campaign and throughout the Democratic Party infrastructure, while RootsCamp has served as a crash course in best practices for thousands of lefties.

Young Republicans now lament that no one from their side has stepped up to organize a conservative version of RootsCamp. Michael Turk, a 42-year-old Republican digital guru, suggested that the failure of G.O.P. technologists to do this springs from a uniquely Republican trait. “They all wanted to make money,” he said. “And so as a result, Katie Harbath, who was one of my deputies at the R.N.C., is now at Facebook, and Mindy Finn” — a longtime G.O.P. digital operative — “is at Twitter, and Patrick and I each started our own companies. We all found ways to parlay that into a living for our families, as opposed to just doing it for the cause.”

Several G.O.P. digital specialists told me that, in addition, they found it difficult to recruit talent because of the values espoused by the party. “I know a lot of people who do technology for a living,” Turk said. “And almost universally, there’s a libertarian streak that runs through them — information should be free, do your own thing and leave me alone, that sort of mind-set. That’s very much what the Internet is. And almost to a person that I’ve talked to, they say, ‘Yeah, I would probably vote for Republicans, but I can’t get past the gay-marriage ban, the abortion stance, all of these social causes.’ Almost universally, they see a future where you have more options, not less. So questions about whether you can be married to the person you want to be married to just flies in the face of the future. They don’t want to be part of an organization that puts them squarely on the wrong side of history.”

Many young conservatives also said that technological innovation runs at cross-purposes with the party’s corporate rigidity. “There’s a feeling that Republican politics are more hierarchical than in the Democratic Party,” Ben Domenech, a 31-year-old blogger and research fellow at the libertarian Heartland Institute, told me. “There are always elders at the top who say, ‘That’s not important.’ And that’s where the left has beaten us, by giving smart people the space and trusting them to have success. It’s a fundamentally anti-entrepreneurial model we’ve embraced.”

Erik Telford explained it this way: “I think there’s a very incestuous community of consultants who profit off certain tactics, and that creates bias and inhibits innovation.” Telford was suggesting that many of the party leaders, like Karl Rove and his American Crossroads super PAC, saw no financial advantage to bringing in avant-garde digital specialists, the types who were embraced by the Obama operation. For that matter, Zac Moffatt and his firm, Targeted Victory, enjoyed a virtual monopoly on the G.O.P.’s digital business during the lackluster 2012 cycle, which has made Moffatt an irresistible symbol for all that’s clubby and backward-thinking about the party. As Bret Jacobson said, half-jokingly, “If you have one firm that’s doing the top candidate, plus the R.N.C., plus the top outside group — the Department of Justice, in any other industry, would be actively asking questions.”

One of several G.O.P. digital whizzes who went unused by Moffatt’s shop in 2012 was Vincent Harris, a savvy 24-year-old social-media consultant whose efforts in Texas helped catapult Ted Cruz to an upset victory over a better-known candidate in the U.S. Senate primary. Harris told me he saw the Romney campaign as “a very insular, closed operation,” symptomatic of a partywide affliction. “There’s an old guard in Republican politics, and that old guard is mostly made up of television and direct-mail consultants,” he said. “And you can say that’s generational — but at the same time, David Axelrod has to be the same age as Karl Rove, right? The old guard in the Democratic Party made the adjustment with the Obama digital operation. There hasn’t been a concerted effort among the established G.O.P. folks to figure this stuff out.”

Harris suffers no illusions that the Roves of his party will turn over the keys to young techies like him. “We’re the second rung,” he told me. “The first tier isn’t going away for another 20 years.”

It is Harris’s last point — that the G.O.P. is stuck with its current leadership for the next decade or more — that incites particular angst in young Republicans. With palpable envy, they describe the forward-leaning impulses of the Obama campaign: Axelrod’s tweeting endlessly; the deputy campaign manager Stephanie Cutter’s becoming a YouTube dynamo with her sassy Web rebuttals to the Romney campaign; Jim Messina’s traveling westward to receive wisdom from Eric Schmidt, Steve Jobs and Steven Spielberg. (From Spielberg, about not trying to replicate their 2008 campaign: “You can only be the Rolling Stones from 1965 once. And then you’re a touring band that has to sell tickets each time you come to town.”) One leading G.O.P. digital operative told me: “We’re looking for someone who comes to us and is like: ‘All right, what do we need to do? I’m going to trust you to do it, I’m going to give you a real budget, you’ll have a seat at the table and will be just as important as the communications guy and the field guy. And you know what, those other guys need to be more modern, too, and that’s the campaign we’re going to run. So let’s start plotting out how we’re going to do that.’ ”

Echoing the opinion of nearly every other young Republican with whom I spoke, the operative concluded sadly, “And we haven’t had that person yet.”

The person they are seeking is the Republican incarnation of David Plouffe — the seemingly unremarkable Hill staffer and itinerant consultant who, like the Howard Dean strategist Joe Trippi before him, recognized that the only way his relatively unknown and underfinanced candidate could prevail over the front-runner would be to muster a guerrilla operation. To accomplish this, in 2007, Plouffe met with a 25-year-old former Dean techie named Joe Rospars and promptly enlisted him to help marshal candidate Obama’s volunteer support through high-tech means. Plouffe, Rospars told me, became the champion of “using digital to build the campaign from the bottom up.” Employing then-nascent social media channels like Facebook, YouTube and Twitter, Rospars’s team raised enormous sums of money online while also plugging a nationwide grass-roots network into Obama’s get-out-the-vote efforts. Four years later, Stephanie Cutter said, “Plouffe was a big proponent” of completely reimagining the 2008 effort.

A few days before this year’s inauguration — after which he would take leave of the Obama White House and of politics as a profession — Plouffe met with me in his small and uncluttered West Wing office. He wore a blue shirt and a purple tie and, with his work now done, was uncharacteristically expansive. He told me he was surprised by the Romney campaign’s strategic shortcomings. After naming one particular member of Romney’s high command, he said, “We had 15 people more qualified to do that job than him.”

Plouffe cut his teeth as the deputy chief of staff of Representative Dick Gephardt, whose impressive farm team also included those who would go on to be White House advisers, like Paul Begala, George Stephanopoulos and Bill Burton. Now it was the Obama operation that, he said, “is going to generate a lot of people who are going to run presidential and Senate campaigns.” They were apt pupils of a campaign that was “a perfect-storm marriage between grass-roots energy and digital technology.” He continued: “Not having that is like Nixon not shaving before his first debate — you’ve got to understand the world you’re competing in. Our thinking always was, We don’t want people when they interact with the Obama campaign to have it be a deficient experience compared to how they shop or how they get their news. People don’t say, ‘Well, you’re a political campaign, so I expect you to be slower and less interesting.’ Right? We wanted it to be like Amazon. And I still don’t think the Republicans are there.”

But, I asked Plouffe, wasn’t the G.O.P. just one postmodern presidential candidate — say, a Senator Marco Rubio — away from getting back into the game?

Pouncing, he replied: “Let me tell you something. The Hispanic voters in Nevada, Colorado and New Mexico don’t give a damn about Marco Rubio, the Tea Party Cuban-American from Florida. You know what? We won the Cuban vote! And it’s because younger Cubans are behaving differently than their parents. It’s probably my favorite stat of the whole campaign. So this notion that Marco Rubio is going to heal their problems — it’s not even sophomoric; it’s juvenile! And by the way: the bigger problem they’ve got with Latinos isn’t immigration. It’s their economic policies and health care. The group that supported the president’s health care bill the most? Latinos.”

Plouffe readily conceded that he and his generation held no iron grip on political wisdom, but then he flashed a grin when I brought up the R.N.C.’s Growth and Opportunity Project, composed of party stalwarts. “If there’s a review board the Democrats put together in 2032, or even 2020, and I’m on it,” he said, “we’re screwed.”

The Republicans did in fact recently have a David Plouffe of their own. As one G.O.P. techie elegantly put it, “We were the smart ones, back in ’04, eons ago.” Referring to the campaign that re-elected George W. Bush, Plouffe told me: “You know how in fantasy baseball you imagine putting up your team against the 1927 Yankees? We would’ve liked to have faced off against the 2004 Republicans. Beating the Clintons” — during the 2008 primaries — “that was, in terms of scale of difficulty, significantly above beating Romney. But going up against the Bushies — that would’ve been something we all would’ve relished.”

Plouffe wasn’t referring to competing against Bush’s oft-described architect, Karl Rove — but rather, against the campaign manager, Ken Mehlman. “Mehlman got technology and organization and the truth is — I think it’s completely misunderstood — it was Ken’s campaign,” Plouffe said. He added that he and Mehlman were friends, and that during the 2012 cycle, Mehlman — who had been informally advising the Romney campaign — was also “very free with advice about structure, how they dealt with an incumbent president, how they dealt with debate prep.” (Similarly, the former Bush senior strategist Matthew Dowd told me that Axelrod reached out to him for advice and they sat down together. “Which never happened with me and Romney-world.”)

Mehlman, according to Bush campaign officials, persuaded Rove to invest heavily in microtargeting (a data-driven means of identifying and reaching select groups of voters), which helped deliver Ohio and thus the election. He advocated reaching out to minority voters both as Bush’s campaign manager and later as chairman of the R.N.C., where he also instructed his staff to read “Moneyball.” “I was like, ‘What does a baseball book have to do with politics?’ ” said Michael Turk, who worked for Mehlman at the R.N.C. “Once I actually took the time to digest it, I realized what he was trying to do — which was exactly the kind of thing that the Obama team just did: understanding that not every election is about home runs but instead getting a whole bunch of singles together that eventually add up to a win.”

I met with Mehlman one morning in his office near the Capitol. He left politics in 2007 and subsequently came out as gay — and after that, became a vigorous if behind-the-scenes supporter of legalizing same-sex marriage in New York and beyond. Mehlman is now a partner at the private-equity giant Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, wealthy and free from his party’s fetters. He was nonetheless hesitant to criticize his fellow Republicans, though implicitly his comments were damning.

“There’s an important book by Ben Wattenberg and Richard Scammon called ‘The Real Majority,’ published in 1970,” Mehlman said as he leaned back in his chair. “The book explains in part how the Republican Party would go on to win five out of six presidential elections through the eyes of the ‘typical’ voter — a working-class couple in Dayton, Ohio. They’re white, worried about crime, feel burdened by taxes and feel like too many Democrats don’t understand these concerns.”

Today’s typical voter, he went on to say, could be that same white couple in Dayton. “But here’s the difference,” he said. ‘They worry about economic mobility — can their kids get ahead or even keep up. Their next-door neighbors are Latino whose mom gets concerned when she hears talk about self-deportation or no driver’s licenses. And that couple has a gay niece and an African-American brother-in-law. And too many folks like the couple in Dayton today wonder if some of the G.O.P. understands their lives anymore.”

I asked him whether, as even some Republicans have suggested, Ronald Reagan would have trouble building a winning coalition today. “I think he could win, partly because Reagan wouldn’t be the Reagan he was in 1980,” Mehlman replied. “Reagan had an unbelievable intuitive understanding of the electorate, because he’d spent his life as the president of a large union, as an actor who understands his audience, as the governor of the largest state, as a corporate spokesman who traveled — Reagan spent his life listening to people and learning from them and adapting to their concerns. That’s why there were Reagan Democrats — ethnics, working-class voters, Southern voters. So I think a modern Reagan would understand the demography and where the new voters are and would’ve applied his principles accordingly.”

But could a modern-day Reagan, even with Ken Mehlman running his campaign, overcome the party’s angry and antiquated image? To win, a reincarnated Reagan — or a Rubio or a Chris Christie or a Bobby Jindal — would still have to satisfy his base of hard-line conservatives and captivate a new generation of voters at the same time. I ran this quandary by Kristen Soltis Anderson. “It’s a big challenge,” she acknowledged. “But I think that if you can earn the trust of the people, there are ways you can say, ‘Here’s why I take this position.’ I don’t know that someone like Rubio, who may be young and attractive and well spoken, could attract young voters despite his views on gay marriage. I do think that in the absence of a very compelling reason to vote for a candidate, those social issues can be deal-breakers for young voters. The challenge is: Can you make a case that’s so compelling that you can overcome those deal-breaker issues? And I don’t know the answer to that question.”

Bret Jacobson, the Red Edge entrepreneur, insisted that the solution was ultimately a simple one. “I think the answer for a vibrant Republican Party is to make our North Star empowering every individual in this country to follow their own dream, free of legislative excesses,” he told me. “There are millions of Americans who take seriously their religious culture as well as traditions that have been handed down for centuries. And the party has to empower them to fight those battles in the social sphere, not in the government sphere. That’s harder work than taking control of the country for four years. But it’s the appropriate battle.”

But, I asked him, don’t social conservatives feel a moral obligation to legislate their beliefs? Did Jacobson really expect the Rick Santorums of his party to let a new generation of Republican leaders tell them what to accept and how to behave?

Jacobson did not back down. “Even the Republican Party rejected Santorum,” he said. “He got some attention, and he certainly received votes. But he didn’t win.”

In a sense, however, Santorum and his fellow archconservatives did win, by tugging Mitt Romney and his pliable views rightward. Then Romney lost, and so did the Republicans.

Two days after Obama’s inauguration, Bret Jacobson flew to Charlotte to attend the R.N.C.’s winter conference and sit on a panel devoted to discussing new digital techniques. “Bret’s presentation was one of the best-received of the panel, by far,” the seminar’s organizer, Ryan Cassin, told me. Still, Jacobson was disappointed to see only 30 people in attendance. President Obama, meanwhile, announced the previous week that his campaign juggernaut would be transformed into an advocacy group, Organizing for Action, that would use the vast social network amassed during the 2012 cycle to advance the administration’s policy goals. The Republican panel amounted to a first step — a baby step — while the competition was lapping them.

Jacobson did not stick around the next day to hear Reince Priebus declare to the conferees, “We’re the party of innovation!” Instead, he left his own panel early to catch a plane back to Washington. Calls were continuing to come into Red Edge’s office from establishment Republicans inquiring about Jacobson and Spencer’s cautionary slide presentation.

Jacobson wanted to interpret this interest as a good thing. But I could tell from his voice that the experience at the R.N.C. conference deflated his hopes about Republicans being well on the road to enlightenment. “My primary worry,” he told me without his characteristic levity, “is that I’m going to become the Al Gore of the right” — meaning, a forecaster of doom, appreciated and unheeded as the clever if somewhat lonely guy who told them so.

Robert Draper is a contributing writer for the magazine. His most recent book is “Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives.”


Emeutes du Trocadéro: Après le mariage,… l’émeute pour tous! (Paris riots: It’s just the fun and the adrenaline, stupid !)

15 mai, 2013
http://www.dreuz.info/wp-content/uploads/black-1.jpgContre un chèque à six chiffres, aucune star ne résiste à l’aller-retour à Doha. L’Express
J’ai participé aux émeutes, j’ai renversé une voiture, fracassé la Banque de Montréal, les arrêts d’autobus… Une grosse soirée! Sienna St-Laurent (14 ans)
Je ne sais pas, je voulais me sentir cool. Sienna St-Laurent
Tous sur les Champs, on va tout casser. Cris de casseurs du Trocadéro
Paris est à nous ! Cris des émeutiers du Trocadéro
Manuel Valls montre progressivement son vrai visage: celui d’un ministre partisan, sévère avec les familles lorsqu’elles sont de droite, inerte avec les délinquants protégés par la culture de l’excuse de la gauche. Geoffroy Didier (co-leader de la Droite forte)
Pour Patrice Ribeiro, secrétaire général de Synergie-Officiers, «le renseignement a peut-être péché par excès d’optimisme» (…) La prévision dont le préfet dit avoir eu connaissance était de «quelques centaines» de trublions susceptibles de passer à l’acte, comme la veille donc. Or, a-t-il confié, pressé des questions, ils ont été «des milliers» lundi soir. (…) Les premiers incidents ayant éclaté la veille sur l’avenue des Champs-Élysées à l’annonce de la victoire du PSG à Lyon étaient pourtant un premier coup de semonce. Un «tour de chauffe» des casseurs qui aurait dû inciter les forces de l’ordre à davantage de prudence et d’anticipation. (…) Le préfet parle de sept à neuf unités mobilisées (600 à 700 hommes). Et encore, pas toutes concentrées sur l’événement, puisqu’il fallait protéger aussi les palais nationaux, l’Élysée, Matignon. Si les prévisions s’étaient avérées justes, cela aurait correspondu à deux agents par casseurs. Mais lundi soir, les casseurs étaient peut-être trois fois plus nombreux que les policiers. Les vingt-sept patrouilles de brigades anticriminalité appelées à la rescousse n’ont pas suffi à colmater les brèches du dispositif. (…) Le Trocadéro avait été choisi pour trouver un cadre prestigieux à ce qui devait être une fête et ce malgré l’alerte de la veille. A-t-on sacrifié les impératifs de la sécurité à l’image d’une remise de coupe avec la tour Eiffel en ligne de mire? Les Champs-Élysées avaient été refusés aux organisateurs. Et les Qatariens, propriétaires du PSG, voulaient un lieu symbolique. La publicité donnée à ce fiasco n’en a été que plus retentissante. (…) Le préfet de police a lui-même reconnu qu’il ne fallait pas provoquer les ultras présents dans la foule par une présence policière trop ostentatoire. «Les autorités en étaient encore à privilégier la logique festive au début des incidents, alors qu’il eût fallu d’emblée montrer sa force pour éviter d’avoir à s’en servir, comme au temps de Pierre Ottavi, grand directeur de la sécurité publique parisienne dans les années 1990», estime Bruno Beschizza, conseiller régional UMP de Seine-Saint-Denis et ancien syndicaliste policier. Le Figaro
Débordés par un groupe qui s’enfonce avenue Kléber, en direction des Champs-Elysées, les CRS décident à 20 h 30 de quitter, sirènes hurlantes, la place du Trocadéro, livrant cette dernière aux émeutiers. Chauffés à blanc et privés de leur adversaire, près de 800 casseurs se retrouvent seuls sur la place où les bris de verre et débris en tout genre jonchent le sol. Pendant vingt longues minutes, les mutins vont émietter les abris-bus, saccager les vitrines des magasins, briser les devantures des cafés de la place à coups de chaises balancées avant d’en piller certains. Certains renversent les scooters, cassent des voitures à coups de bâtons et en brûlent une. A 20 h 50, les compagnies de CRS et de gendarmes réinvestissent la place et délogent les émeutiers en moins de trois minutes. Le Monde
La France doit arrêter ses conneries, les élites politiques françaises doivent arrêter de ne voir que des Noirs dans les banlieues. Lors des émeutes de 2005 au lieu de voir ça comme un grand mouvement d’insurrection sociale, ils y ont vu un mouvement de protestation de Noirs, d’Arabes etc. (…) [Dans Noirs de France vous dites que, étant jeune, vous étiez indépendantiste…] Pas seulement jeune, je le suis encore. (…) Moi je n’ai pas un discours indépendantiste, j’ai une pratique militante indépendantiste, ce n’est pas la même chose. J’ai vécu en clandestinité. Tous les deux jours je devais changer de lieu, tout en trimbalant un bébé de deux mois. J’ai pris des risques, mon époux a été en prison pendant un an et demi. Mes autres camarades ont été emprisonnés. Donc ce n’est pas une question de discours, c’est une pratique politique. Ça c’était jusqu’en 1982. Pourquoi ? Parce qu’en 1981, quand la gauche est arrivée au pouvoir les Guyanais ont dit qu’ils laissaient tomber les histoires d’indépendance. Les gens n’étaient pas indépendantistes mais ils acceptaient le débat. Régulièrement ici, le gouvernement emprisonnait les indépendantistes et les gens étaient solidaires. Ils n’étaient pas d’accord mais ils étaient solidaires. En 1981, ils ont dit: « C’est bon, la gauche ce n’est pas colonial, c’est fini ». On a tenu pendant un an et en 1982 moi j’ai arrêté de militer. Ce n’est pas une question de discours chez moi. (…) Il y a un mouvement indépendantiste, il va plus souvent aux élections que moi: vous parliez de contradictions ? En 1992 lorsque je me lance dans la campagne des législatives, c’est parce que les gens ont organisé un mouvement populaire autour de moi, me demandant d’aller me présenter. La première fois de ma vie que j’ai voté, c’était pour moi en 1993. J’étais indépendantiste, anti-électoraliste. Mais quand on a une demande d’un peuple… J’aurais pu dire « je suis indépendantiste, j’ai raison, je reste chez moi ». J’étais directeur de société avant d’être élue député. Je n’ai pas besoin de notoriété. Je donnais des conférences internationales. Je venais de signer un contrat de professeur-chercheur avec l’Université de Montréal. Je ne suis pas dans une contradiction politique. En 1992 cela faisait dix ans que nous avions arrêté de militer. Christiane Taubira (06.12.11)
J’ai, à cet égard, une position constante depuis une quinzaine d’années. La reconnaissance légale de la traite et de l’esclavagisme en tant que crimes contre l’humanité est une grande réparation solennelle. L’article 2 sur l’enseignement de cette histoire, à tous les niveaux, primaire, collège, lycée et université, est aussi une belle réparation. Il y a une action publique à mener dans la lutte contre le racisme, la déconstruction du racisme, à ses racines. Faire en sorte que les pays d’Europe qui, aujourd’hui, portent en leur sein les traces de cette histoire comprennent qu’ils sont pluriels et que la diversité de leur population est l’héritage de cette histoire-là. Les survivances de cette violence, ce sont aujourd’hui les discriminations et le racisme. On doit lutter résolument contre cela, de la même façon que les esclaves, les marrons, et les humanistes ont lutté contre le système esclavagiste. Il y a en outre deux sujets spécifiques, qui concernent les territoires d’outre-mer et l’Afrique. En outre-mer, il y a eu une confiscation des terres ce qui fait que, d’une façon générale, les descendants d’esclaves n’ont guère accès au foncier. Il faudrait donc envisager, sans ouvrir de guerre civile, des remembrements fonciers, des politiques foncières. Il y a des choses à mettre en place sans expropriation, en expliquant très clairement quel est le sens d’une action publique qui consisterait à acheter des terres. En Guyane, l’État avait accaparé le foncier, donc là, c’est plus facile. Aux Antilles, c’est surtout les descendants des "maîtres" qui ont conservé les terres donc cela reste plus délicat à mettre en œuvre. Christiane Taubira (ministre de la justice, 11 mai 2013)
On nous demandait de ne citer aucun prénom. C’était considéré comme trop stigmatisant. Communicant sous Jospin
Le discours de l’excuse s’est alors trouvé survalorisé, les prises de position normatives ont été rejetées comme politiquement incorrectes et les policiers ont fait office de boucs émissaires. Lucienne Bui Trong
A Paris, on s’alarme de trois courses-poursuites dans les rues de la capitale, mais chez nous les règlements de compte entre bandes sont très, très fréquents, pour ne pas dire quotidiens. On a rarement des courses-poursuites comme il y en a eu à Paris. Les jeunes ont largement dépassé ce stade-là, puisqu’ils en sont carrément au règlement de compte avec armes de guerre. D’une certaine manière, on est content quand ils règlent leurs comptes en dehors de chez nous. Loïc Lecouplier (secrétaire du syndicat Alliance en Seine-Saint-Denis)
En s’attaquant à la mémoire des millions de Français descendants d’esclaves, à l’identité des milllions d’étrangers issus de territoires mis en coupe réglée pendant 350 ans, au crime contre l’humanité que la République a décidé de nommer par la loi Taubira de 2001, le député Vialatte franchit une ligne rouge inacceptable pour un représentant du peuple français et l’image de la Nation. La Fédération du mémorial de la traite des noirs a décidé de porter plainte contre le député Jean-Sébastien Vialatte pour fausses accusations, diffamation et incitation à la haine raciale. Une plainte sera déposée au procureur de la République du Var, au président de l’UMP, ainsi qu’au président de l’Assemblée nationale et au Président de la République. Fédération du mémorial de la traite des noirs
La population qui joue au football aujourd’hui est à 75% issue de banlieue. En 2010, quand ont eu lieu les événements de Knysna, le fait que l’équipe de France était menée par ce type de "leaders racailles", qui correspondaient à la définition donnée par Nicolas Sarkozy 5 ans plus tôt, a sauté aux yeux du grand public. (…) En 1998, tout allait bien, c’était l’extase nationale. La France était un modèle d’intégration. Même à l’étranger, tout le monde en parlait comme d’un exemple. En préparant le livre, j’ai été stupéfait de relire les déclarations des hommes politiques de l’époque, de droite comme de gauche, qui mettaient en avant une France « phare du monde » avec son universalisme républicain. Jean-Marie Le Pen était fini, et avec lui l’extrême droite en France. On connait la suite. Jean-Marie Le Pen arrive au second tour en 2002 et quelques années plus tard le débat sur l’identité nationale éclate. On remarque aujourd’hui que la plupart des gens n’éprouvent aucune sympathie particulière pour l’équipe de France précisément à cause du « code racaille » de ses joueurs. (…) La hiérarchie est clairement définie. Les joueurs qui viennent de banlieue s’imposent toujours aux autres. Il y a les "boss" et les "bolosses" : Franck Ribéry c’est le "boss", et Yohan Gourcuff est le "boloss". Gourcuff n’a pas les codes et ne peut donc pas s’intégrer. Il a été repoussé comme on repousse n’importe quel étranger qui essaye de s’intégrer dans un cercle aussi fermé. Ce cercle, aujourd’hui en équipe de France, c’est la banlieue et ses codes : la virilité, l’argent, le bling-bling, etc. (…) Tous les clubs doivent faire avec cet état de fait. Chacun essaye de se débrouiller comme il peut. J’ai rencontré des dirigeants qui en ont réellement marre de s’occuper de cela et d’autres qui tentent à leur manière de régler les problèmes. (…) Des présidents ont instauré des quotas officieux de musulmans, d’africains ou même de jeunes de banlieue. Quand Mediapart a révélé cette affaire, ils n’ont pas trouvé bon d’adresser le vrai problème et ont préféré rester dans cette posture moraliste qui les caractérise. La vérité c’est que nous avons ghettoïsé le football en pensant que les costauds étaient noirs et que les petits joueurs techniques étaient maghrébins. Forcément, nous sommes allés chercher ces profils là où ils se trouvaient. Je me rappelle d’une phrase d’un dirigeant français : "Chez nous, il suffit de secouer une tour pour qu’ils tombent tous" ou même d’un recruteur de Lens qui cherchait absolument des "grands noirs" quitte à leur "redresser les pieds" si les qualités footballistiques n’étaient pas au rendez-vous. Les racailles du football, ce sont aussi celles en col blanc ! Ces raisonnements simplistes sont allés trop loin. Les clubs se sont fait manger par les "joueurs racailles" et aujourd’hui, après l’affaire de la Coupe du monde 2010, tout le monde se réveille. Cependant, les réponses apportées par les dirigeants sont parfois très maladroites. Chacun fait ses petits quotas, son petit bazar. A Rennes, des joueurs ont été dégagés l’été dernier car il y avait trop de musulmans. A Saint-Etienne, on passe la consigne aux recruteurs de ne pas trop recruter d’Africains. Nous sommes passés d’un extrême à l’autre. Autre exemple : les affiches publicitaires pour l’équipe de France après 2010. Les instances ont demandé aux photographes de les "blanchir", de mettre en avant les joueurs blancs, alors que la tendance marketing est souvent au multiculturalisme. (…) Le problème vient effectivement de l’évolution de notre société depuis mai 68 et de la mentalité libérale-libertaire qui s’est imposée. L’autorité est mal vue dans notre système d’éducation nationale et cela s’est propagé dans nos centres de formation, jusqu’au sein de l’équipe de France. (…) De plus, en ce qui concerne l’équipe de France, nous avons abandonné tous les symboles nationaux au Front national au début des années 80. Il ne faut pas s’étonner du fait que des joueurs comme Karim Benzema mettent un point d’honneur à ne pas chanter la Marseillaise maintenant. Le sentiment anti-français est très répandu en banlieue, et cela, ce n’est pas le foot qui l’arrangera. Daniel Riolo
La notion des années 1960 selon laquelle les mouvements sociaux seraient une réponse légitime à une injustice sociale a créé l’impression d’une certaine rationalité des émeutes. Les foules ne sont toutefois pas des entités rationnelles. Les émeutes de Londres ont démontré l’existence d’un manque de pensée rationnelle des événements du fait de leur caractère tout à fait spontané et irrationnel. Les pillards ont pillé pour piller et pour beaucoup ce n’était pas nécessairement l’effet d’un sentiment d’injustice. Au cours des émeutes danoises il y avait d’un côté un sens de la rationalité dans les manifestations de jeunes dans la mesure où ils étaient mus par une motivation politique. Cependant, les autres jeunes qui n’étaient pas normalement affiliés à  l’organisation "Ungdomshuset" se sont impliqués dans le  conflit et ont participé aux émeutes sans en partager les objectifs. Ils étaient là pour s’amuser et l’adrénaline a fait le reste. Les émeutes peuvent assumer une dynamique auto-entretenue qui n’est pas mue par des motifs rationnels. Lorsque les individus forment une foule, ils peuvent devenir irrationnels et être motivés par des émotions que génèrent  les émeutes elles-mêmes. L’aspect intéressant des émeutes  de Londres était de confirmer l’inutilité du traitement du phénomène de foule par  une stratégie de communication. La méthode rationnelle n’aboutit à rien contrairement à la forme traditionnelle de confinement. Cela montre bien qu’à certains moments, la solution efficace est de ne pas gérer les foules par le dialogue. Christian Borch

Après le mariage,… l’émeute pour tous!

Vitrines brisées, magasins pillés, voitures calcinées, arrêts de bus saccagés, agression des forces de l’ordre et des journalistes…

Au lendemain d’un énième épisode de guérilla urbaine …

Qui, entre les millions à nouveau des pompiers-pyromanes qataris et des forces de police  soudainement (après avoir tant brillé contre les jupes plissées et les lodens des anti-mariage pour tous et malgré le coup de semonce de la veille) dépassées, a cette fois vu le saccage du quartier du Trocadéro …

Et alors que, trois jours après la proposition de la ministre noire de service du gouvernement et maitresse es lois liberticides de "rendre leurs terres aux descendants d’esclaves" (avant, on suppose, les Cathares, protestants, chouans et autres Vendéens ?), nos pleureuses professionnelles nous ont ressorti comme explication les habituelles excuses de la misère supposée desdites populations et fustigé comme il se doit le seul responsable politique ayant osé pointer la dimension à nouveau évidemment raciale (pardon: ethnique) des émeutes du moment …

Comment ne pas voir avec le chercheur danois Christian Borch et contre les sophismes de nos sociologues qui, depuis les années 60, nous bassinent avec la prétendue rationalité de "mouvements sociaux" censés répondre à un sentiment d’injustice …

La criante évidence du goût spontané et irrationnel de la violence pour la violence comme l’entrainement mimétique du phénomène de foule générant lui-même les émotions et l’adrénaline nécessaires ?

Mais aussi, comme l’ont montré les émeutes londoniennes, danoises ou d’ailleurs, l’inefficacité dans nombre de cas des méthodes de contrôle basées sur le dialogue avec les émeutiers ?

Riots Create Irrational Behavior

Christian Borch

Apr. 30, 2013 — Participants of group riots have since the end of the 1960s been viewed as rational individuals driven by a sense of injustice. But in today’s world this is misleading, concludes sociologist and PhD Christian Borch in a newly published doctoral thesis, and he encourages the police to take the destructive behaviour of some participants into account when dealing with groups of rioters.

During the so-called ‘UK Riots’ in the summer of 2011, discontented young people set the streets of London alight and looted shopping centres. The initial strategy of the police which was to communicate with rioters soon failed. Instead they resorted to using batons and containment. Within a Danish context, the violent reactions to the clearance of ‘Ungdomshuset’ in 2007 show that a revolt can develop into serious criminal actions.

According to Christian Borch, these examples illustrate that group rioting are not solely based on righteous indignation and considered planning:

"The notion of the 1960s that social movements happened as a legitimate response to social injustice created the impression of riots as being rational. Crowds however do not have to be rational entities," says Christian Borch.

In a new doctoral thesis "The Politics of Crowds: An Alternative History of Sociology" from University of Copenhagen, Christian Borch analyses the historical development of the concept of crowds in a sociological context.

"The riots in London demonstrate the existence of a lack of rational thought processes as the events had an entirely spontaneous and irrational character. People looted for the sake of looting, for many this was not necessarily born out of a sense of injustice," says Christian Borch who has analysed the strategies of the Metropolitan police in connection with the London riots.

Danish riots attracted violent supporters

The riots surrounding the clerance of "Ungdomshuset" at Jagtvej 69 in Denmark illustrate that demonstrations are capable of creating a self-perpetuating sense of dynamics which accenture the irrational elements. Thus, setting cars alight and breaking windows became part of the rioting.

"During the Danish riots there existed on the one hand a sense of rationality within the young people’s protests, in so far as they were drive by a political motivated interest. However, other people who were normally not affiliated with ‘Ungdomshuset’ became a part of the conflict and participated in the riots without any shared purpose. They were having fun and the adrenalin kicked in," says Christian Borch.

It is inner group dynamics which fuel pointless behaviour.

"Riots can assume self-perpetuating dynamics which is not driven by rational motives. When individuals form a crowd they can become irrational and driven by emotion which occur as part of the rioting," says Christian Borch.

Inspiration to police tactics

Thinking of crowds as rational entities has since 2000 affected the way in which the British police have handled riots. The UK Riots serve as an example of this. The police worked on the promise that they were dealing with rational individuals with sensible objectives which is why their plan of action was based on communication rather than containment. This however, did not work in practice.

"The interesting aspect of the London riots was to ascertain that it was pointless to address the crowds through a communication strategy. The rational way of regarding the crowds came to nothing whereas the traditional form of containment did. This shows that at certain times a successful solution is not to handle crowds based on dialogue-orientated efforts," says Christian Borch.

In addition to the police, Christian Borch encourages town planners, sociologists and economists to apply a more critical approach when dealing with the concept of crowds.

Voir aussi:

Émeutes du Trocadéro : c’est la faute à Barjot !

Les casseurs du PSG vus par les penseurs du PS

Théophane Le Méné

Causeur

15 Mai 2013

La grand-messe organisée par le PSG qui devait avoir lieu sur le Trocadéro avant-hier soir a donc viré à l’émeute. Au lieu d’une démonstration festive, censée couronner la victoire du club parisien, certains supporters se sont livrés à une toute autre manifestation : vitrines brisées, magasins pillés, voitures calcinées, arrêt de bus saccagés, agression des forces de l’ordre et des journalistes… Dès le lendemain, les banderilles des élus de droite commençaient à pleuvoir sur les responsables de ce fiasco. En première ligne, le député-maire du XVIème arrondissement, Claude Goasguen, a demandé la démission de Manuel Valls, lui reprochant de ne pas avoir anticipé la sécurité des personnes alors même que ces débordements semblaient prévisibles. Nadine Morano lui a emboité le pas, fustigeant un ministre « incapable d’anticiper et d’assurer la sécurité ». François Fillon s’est, lui, adressé au président de la République en demandant sans plus tarder des sanctions à l’endroit des casseurs.

La réaction de la gauche ne s’est pas fait attendre. Dans un communiqué, le ministre de l’Intérieur a affirmé qu’un important dispositif de sécurité avait été déployé et a condamné le comportement des fauteurs de troubles, promettant tous les moyens disponibles pour les identifier. Plus prompt encore à se prévaloir de ses propres turpitudes pour s’exonérer d’une quelconque responsabilité, Jean-Christophe Cambadélis [1] a évoqué une « connexion » entre les auteurs des « incidents » lors de la Manif pour tous et les hooligans : comprenez quelques nervis d’extrême droite réactionnaires, pressés d’en découdre avec les forces de l’ordre.

La comparaison est osée. S’il est au moins une chose dont n’ont pas à rougir les organisateurs de la Manif pour Tous, c’est bien du pacifisme dont ils ont fait preuve. Des poèmes de Péguy et d’Aragon, à la lueur des bougies, dans l’obscurité des Invalides, aux comptines entonnées dans les cortèges de poussettes, le mot d’ordre a toujours été l’apaisement malgré la brutalité des forces de l’ordre et la surdité du gouvernement. En sept mois de manifestations, jamais un policier ou gendarme n’a été blessé ni une dégradation constatée. On ne peut plus nier un deux poids deux mesures en matière de maintien de l’ordre. Quand, le 15 avril dernier, soixante-sept veilleurs étaient envoyés en garde à vue pour avoir lu Eluard et chanté du Baden Powell, sagement posés dans l’herbe, on a eu avant-hier trois gardes à vue pour bris de vitres, vol en réunion et dégradation volontaire par incendie. Geoffroy Didier, co-leader de la Droite forte, s’en est d’ailleurs ému : « Manuel Valls montre progressivement son vrai visage: celui d’un ministre partisan, sévère avec les familles lorsqu’elles sont de droite, inerte avec les délinquants protégés par la culture de l’excuse de la gauche.»

Dans les agapes douloureuses d’avant-hier soir, difficile en effet de débusquer des opposants acharnés au mariage pour tous. Au milieu de supporters heureux, c’était surtout une partie de la jeunesse de banlieue que l’on pouvait rencontrer. Ceux-là venaient moins célébrer la victoire que jouer les casseurs. On avait assisté aux mêmes scènes de guérilla urbaine en marge des manifestations contre le Contrat Premier Embauche (CPE) en 2006, et place de la Bastille en mai 2012, après l’élection de François Hollande.

Lors de la manifestation contre le mariage gay le 24 mars dernier, le premier secrétaire du PS, Harlem Désir, avait dénoncé des « groupes extrémistes cherchant des affrontements » tandis que le député PS du Cher, Yann Galut, reprochait à Laurent Wauquiez de « défendre les casseurs du GUD s’en prenant aux CRS ». De deux choses l’une : soit certains groupuscules factieux se sont soudain ouverts aux banlieues, soit la barbarie n’est pas l’apanage de l’extrême droite.

[1] Jean-Christophe Cambadélis: http://www.lepoint.fr/politique/psg-violences-a-paris-cambadelis-pointe-le-climat-installe-par-les-manifs-anti-mariage-gay-14-05-2013-1666349_20.php

Voir également:

PSG – Paris : violences au Trocadéro, pourquoi c’est (très) grave

Le Point

14/05/2013

Derrière les hooligans se cachaient des "jeunes" venus de tous les horizons qui n’avaient rien à faire là. Et s’ils préparaient le "grand soir" ?

Jérôme Béglé

Sans préjuger de l’enquête en cours, il y a deux interprétations possibles des événements qui ont gâché lundi soir la remise officielle du titre de champion de France 2012-2013 au PSG. La première fait peser la faute sur les supporteurs. Les ultras chassés du Parc des princes sous la présidence de Robin Leproux afin de rendre possible une cession du club aux Qatariens se seraient vengés. Aidés de quelques casseurs professionnels et avinés, ils ont rappelé au propriétaire du club qu’ils existaient et que bien qu’interdits de stade, il fallait compter sur eux pour changer l’or en plomb.

La deuxième interprétation dédouane les instances dirigeantes, mais elle est plus inquiétante. Beaucoup plus inquiétante. Elle reprend une thèse maintes fois évoquée notamment par Éric Zemmour ou Alain Finkielkraut, celle de ces hordes provenant des banlieues qui, un jour, débarqueraient dans les villes. Les (graves) incidents de lundi ne seraient que la répétition générale de ce grand soir qui terrorise tout le monde. Une jeunesse découragée, humiliée, sans espoir ni perspective que de se rappeler bruyamment au mauvais souvenir de la classe politique, rode une lutte finale pour rappeler qu’elle existe, qu’elle est parquée en banlieue et que rien n’y personne n’a pu lui redonner foi en la vie et en l’avenir. Elle y ajoute un discours d’exclusion et des slogans revanchards. Des témoins et des images montrent déjà des drapeaux algériens, marocains, tunisiens brandis par des "supporteurs" qui préféraient entonner des chants de guerre plutôt que des refrains de victoire.

Des interdictions qui marginalisent un peu plus les supporteurs

La version hooliganisme des violences du Trocadéro se soldera par des mises en examen et quelques incarcérations parmi les 21 personnes interpellées. Elle s’accompagnera d’un contrôle encore plus sévère des accès au Parc des princes et sans doute par des interdictions de garnir les gradins du Kop de Boulogne ou de celui d’Auteuil. On jugera tout cela suffisant, oubliant que pour beaucoup de ces jeunes, le football est un exutoire, presque une raison de vivre, et que les interdire de stade constitue une vexation, une humiliation supplémentaire, et contribue un peu plus encore à les marginaliser.

La version "crise des banlieues" est évidemment effrayante et annonce des lendemains dramatiques. Personne ne veut y croire, et le débordement des forces de l’ordre, l’incapacité des renseignements généraux à anticiper ces violences pourtant probables montrent à quel point Paris et la France n’ont pas mesuré qu’un tel scénario n’est pas une fiction, mais est entré dans le champ des possibles.

On reparlera souvent de cette triste soirée du 13 mai 2013. Soirée au cours de laquelle les Qatariens ont voulu montrer au monde entier que Paris était à eux. Que c’étaient eux autant que Beckham, Ibrahimovic et Ancelotti qui avaient apporté un titre de champion à la ville lumière. La mise en scène de leur victoire au pied de la tour Eiffel, puis la descente de la Seine devaient offrir des images en mondovision. Piteusement, BeIn Sport et Al Jazeera, leurs chaînes de télévision à rayonnement mondial, ont dû interrompre leur direct. Ils ont frôlé le ridicule et écorné une image qu’ils construisent à coups de milliards de dollars. Si ce n’est que cela, c’est un moindre mal…

Voir encore:

Incidents au Trocadéro : le dispositif de sécurité critiqué

Le Monde.fr avec AFP

14.05.2013

Alliance, le second syndicat des gardiens de la paix, accuse les autorités d’avoir sous-estimé l’ampleur de la cérémonie.

Une trentaine de blessés, une dizaine de commerces pillés, dix-huit voitures vandalisées, deux bus de la RATP dégradés… Les scènes d’émeutes urbaines qui ont éclaté lundi 13 mai au soir place du Trocadéro autour de la cérémonie de remise du titre de champions de France au PSG auraient-elles pu être évitées ? C’est le sentiment de deux syndicats de policiers proches de la droite, Alliance et Synergie-officiers. Sous le feu des critiques, le préfet de police de Paris défend un dispositif important, avec 800 agents mobilisés. Selon des sources interrogées par Le Monde, le fiasco du Trocadéro pourrait être dû à un problème de coordination.

Syndicats de police : "Nous avons été débordés"

Les débordements de lundi soir étaient-ils prévisibles ? Ils sont en tout cas loin d’être inédits. Le 23 juin 2010, des violences avaient accompagné la diffusion au stade Charléty d’un match de la Coupe du monde opposant les Etats-Unis à l’Algérie. Plus de deux cents jeunes avaient alors dévasté le quartier. Et dimanche, quelques heures à peine après la victoire du PSG à Lyon, qui lui assurait le titre, des violences avaient déjà eu lieu sur les Champs-Elysées.

Alliance, le second syndicat des gardiens de la paix, accuse ainsi les autorités d’avoir sous-estimé l’ampleur de la cérémonie. "Nous avons été débordés" alors que "nous savions tous ce qui aurait pu se passer", assure le secrétaire national, Fabien Vanhemelryck.

Patrice Ribéiro, de Synergie (second syndicat d’officiers) pense également qu’il y avait eu "sous-estimation du risque" et "de la dangerosité" des présumés auteurs des incidents, qui "avaient déjà agi dimanche sur les Champs-Elysées". Ce sont des "casseurs venus de banlieue, on savait qu’ils allaient revenir (…). Reste à déterminer les responsabilités", note le syndicaliste.

Préfet de police de paris : "Un dispositif conséquent"

En face, le préfet de police de Paris, Bernard Boucault, défend un "dispositif conséquent" : sept unités de forces mobiles, renforcées rapidement par deux compagnies de CRS et des équipages des brigades anticriminalité (BAC). Au total, 800 agents étaient mobilisés, a annoncé le préfet de police, en soulignant qu’il y avait des milliers de casseurs. "Il n’y aura plus de manifestation festive sur la voie publique pour le PSG", a-t-il ajouté.

Portrait : Bernard Boucault, un ‘haut fonctionnaire de gauche’ préfet de police

Une réponse que certains jugent insuffisante. "Je ne vois pas comment le préfet de police, qui n’en est pas à son premier échec, peut être maintenu dans ses fonctions", a notamment déclaré le chef de l’opposition, Jean-François Copé. "Je considère que le préfet de police a failli à sa mission", a lancé le député, reprochant à Bernard Boucault ses explications "très embarrassées", la veille, avec "en particulier cette idée" selon laquelle "une fête n’est plus une fête si on met trop de policiers sur place".

Au total, trente-neuf personnes ont été interpellées, dont trente-huit placées en garde à vue pour jets de projectiles, vols, dégradations, violences, recel de vols, et participation à un attroupement armé. Des arrestations ont eu lieu jusqu’en Seine-Saint-Denis, à Noisy-le-Sec, où trois personnes ont été prises avec des vêtements volés sur les Champs-Elysées.

Un problème de coordination

Selon plusieurs sources interrogées par Le Monde, il semble que ce soit davantage, comme le 24 mars ou lors de la manifestation salafiste devant l’ambassade des Etats-Unis, le 15 septembre 2012, la coordination entre le renseignement, les forces mobiles et les policiers de sécurité publique qui a échoué. Les participants ont ainsi pu assister, vers 20 h 30, à une scène un peu surréaliste, avec des CRS quittant précipitamment le Trocadéro, pourtant encore en proie à des bandes violentes, pour les Champs-Elysées, où d’autres commençaient à sévir. "Le dispositif n’a pas fonctionné, on ne peut pas dire le contraire, et il va y avoir un débriefing", souligne l’entourage du ministre de l’intérieur, qui reconnaît que les manifestations quotidiennes et imprévisibles des opposants au mariage pour tous "commencent à peser sur les forces mobiles".

La vidéoprotection pour identifier les casseurs

Les bandes de vidéoprotection seront mises à la disposition des enquêteurs pour "identifier" les casseurs qui ont sévi à Paris, a déclaré dans la soirée le ministre de l’intérieur, Manuel Valls, confirmant que trente personnes ont été blessées. "Une minorité de participants, pour partie composée de supporteurs de la mouvance ultra et pour partie de groupes de jeunes casseurs, ont provoqué bousculades et mouvements de foules", déplore-t-il.

Lire les réactions : La droite accable Valls, le PS pointe la responsabilité du PSG

"Je tiens à saluer le travail du préfet de police et des forces de l’ordre qui, en concertation avec la Ligue de football professionnel et le club, ont rapidement ramené l’ordre à Paris et maîtrisé les débordements", a déclaré de son côté la ministre des sports, Valérie Fourneyron, dans un communiqué.

"C’est dommage qu’il y ait eu une poignée de perturbateurs, les débordements ont été contenus, la fête n’a pas été gâchée", a par ailleurs estimé lundi le maire de Paris, Bertrand Delanoë, venu remettre le trophée avec le président de la Ligue de football professionnel (LFP), Frédéric Thiriez, et du président du club de la capitale, Nasser al-Khelaïfi.

Voir enfin:

Racaille Football Club : comment le foot s’est-il ghettoïsé ?

Atlantico

8 mai 2013

Le journaliste Daniel Riolo sort cette semaine un livre polémique sur la ghettoïsation du football français et sur l’impuissance (ou l’incompétence) de nos instances sportives face à ce phénomène.

Atlantico : Vous sortez cette semaine un livre intitulé "Racaille Football Club" dans lequel vous dénoncez notamment la ghettoïsation du football français. Comment définiriez-vous ce terme racaille ?

Daniel Riolo : J’ai choisi le mot "racaille" par rapport à la perception que les gens en avaient. Une définition publique, et même présidentielle, a été donnée par Nicolas Sarkozy en 2005. Il s’agit de manière schématisée du "mec de banlieue qui pose des problèmes". C’est tout cet amalgame entre la capuche, le casque pour la musique, le rap, etc.

La population qui joue au football aujourd’hui est à 75% issue de banlieue. En 2010, quand ont eu lieu les événements de Knysna, le fait que l’équipe de France était menée par ce type de "leaders racailles", qui correspondaient à la définition donnée par Nicolas Sarkozy 5 ans plus tôt, a sauté aux yeux du grand public. En partant de ce constat-là, j’ai voulu remonter tout le fil depuis 1998.

En 1998, tout allait bien, c’était l’extase nationale. La France était un modèle d’intégration. Même à l’étranger, tout le monde en parlait comme d’un exemple. En préparant le livre, j’ai été stupéfait de relire les déclarations des hommes politiques de l’époque, de droite comme de gauche, qui mettaient en avant une France « phare du monde » avec son universalisme républicain. Jean-Marie Le Pen était fini, et avec lui l’extrême droite en France.

On connait la suite. Jean-Marie Le Pen arrive au second tour en 2002 et quelques années plus tard le débat sur l’identité nationale éclate. On remarque aujourd’hui que la plupart des gens n’éprouvent aucune sympathie particulière pour l’équipe de France précisément à cause du « code racaille » de ses joueurs.

Ces joueurs-là ont imposé selon vous un "esprit de clan" au sein de l’équipe de France, et des clubs français en général. Comment expliquez-vous cela ?

La hiérarchie est clairement définie. Les joueurs qui viennent de banlieue s’imposent toujours aux autres. Il y a les "boss" et les "bolosses" : Franck Ribéry c’est le "boss", et Yohan Gourcuff est le "boloss". Gourcuff n’a pas les codes et ne peut donc pas s’intégrer. Il a été repoussé comme on repousse n’importe quel étranger qui essaye de s’intégrer dans un cercle aussi fermé. Ce cercle, aujourd’hui en équipe de France, c’est la banlieue et ses codes : la virilité, l’argent, le bling-bling, etc.

Comment les dirigeants français adressent-ils ce problème ?

Tous les clubs doivent faire avec cet état de fait. Chacun essaye de se débrouiller comme il peut. J’ai rencontré des dirigeants qui en ont réellement marre de s’occuper de cela et d’autres qui tentent à leur manière de régler les problèmes.

Le championnat de basketball américain, la NBA, a su régler ce problème en donnant, ironiquement, un grand coup de kärcher… Le langage des joueurs, leur code vestimentaire, et leurs attitudes sont maintenant surveillés étroitement, et de manière très stricte, par les instances du sport. En France, le président de l’équipe de Rennes, Frédéric de Saint-Sernin, a essayé d’interdire les sacoches Louis Vuitton par exemple.

La NBA a réagi en multinationale. Elle a été capable de tout régler elle-même. En France, cela n’existe pas. Chacun règle les dysfonctionnements à son petit niveau. Et c’est à partir de là que certains problèmes sont apparus.

Des présidents ont instauré des quotas officieux de musulmans, d’africains ou même de jeunes de banlieue. Quand Mediapart a révélé cette affaire, ils n’ont pas trouvé bon d’adresser le vrai problème et ont préféré rester dans cette posture moraliste qui les caractérise. La vérité c’est que nous avons ghettoïsé le football en pensant que les costauds étaient noirs et que les petits joueurs techniques étaient maghrébins. Forcément, nous sommes allés chercher ces profils là où ils se trouvaient. Je me rappelle d’une phrase d’un dirigeant français : "Chez nous, il suffit de secouer une tour pour qu’ils tombent tous" ou même d’un recruteur de Lens qui cherchait absolument des "grands noirs" quitte à leur "redresser les pieds" si les qualités footballistiques n’étaient pas au rendez-vous. Les racailles du football, ce sont aussi celles en col blanc !

Ces raisonnements simplistes sont allés trop loin. Les clubs se sont fait manger par les "joueurs racailles" et aujourd’hui, après l’affaire de la Coupe du monde 2010, tout le monde se réveille. Cependant, les réponses apportées par les dirigeants sont parfois très maladroites. Chacun fait ses petits quotas, son petit bazar. A Rennes, des joueurs ont été dégagés l’été dernier car il y avait trop de musulmans. A Saint-Etienne, on passe la consigne aux recruteurs de ne pas trop recruter d’Africains. Nous sommes passés d’un extrême à l’autre.

Autre exemple : les affiches publicitaires pour l’équipe de France après 2010. Les instances ont demandé aux photographes de les "blanchir", de mettre en avant les joueurs blancs, alors que la tendance marketing est souvent au multiculturalisme.

De nombreuses réunions sur ce problème sont organisées dans tous les clubs. L’idée que l’attitude est aussi importante que la technique du joueur est maintenant très répandue dans le milieu du foot français. Mais si le cadre posé par les clubs était aussi stricts que celui du club allemand du Bayern de Munich par exemple, nous n’aurions même pas besoin de nous préoccuper de la couleur ou de l’origine de nos joueurs.

Ce manque d’encadrement et d’autorité, n’est-il pas un problème de société plus large ? Les dirigeants du football français peuvent-ils vraiment y faire quelque chose ?

Beaucoup de sociologues ont parlé de cela avant moi, même s’ils sont automatiquement taxés de conservatisme… Le problème vient effectivement de l’évolution de notre société depuis mai 68 et de la mentalité libérale-libertaire qui s’est imposée. L’autorité est mal vue dans notre système d’éducation nationale et cela s’est propagé dans nos centres de formation, jusqu’au sein de l’équipe de France. Ensuite, Nicolas Sarkozy a amorcé une fracture terrible avec son mot sur les racailles. Et puis, la manière dont il a géré son quinquennat en chef de gang n’a pas arrangé les choses.

Quand Raymond Domenech sort un livre pour dénoncer le comportement de ses joueurs, cela me fait sauter au plafond ! Je veux bien qu’il fasse son mea culpa et qu’il nous révèle ce qui se passait vraiment dans les vestiaires. Mais pourquoi les a t-il alors soutenus ? Pourquoi ne les a t-il pas sanctionnés ? En 2010, de nombreux dirigeants et entraîneurs voulaient que tout le monde soit banni. Nous avons raté à ce moment-là une excellente opportunité de tout remettre à plat. Finalement, nous avons une nouvelle fois victimisé les joueurs en insistant sur le fait que ce n’était pas de leur faute, et que finalement, c’est la société "qui les avait abîmés"…

De plus, en ce qui concerne l’équipe de France, nous avons abandonné tous les symboles nationaux au Front national au début des années 80. Il ne faut pas s’étonner du fait que des joueurs comme Karim Benzema mettent un point d’honneur à ne pas chanter la Marseillaise maintenant. Le sentiment anti-français est très répandu en banlieue, et cela, ce n’est pas le foot qui l’arrangera.

Propos recueillis par Jean-Benoît Raynaud

Voir par ailleurs:

Between Destructiveness and Vitalism: Simmel’s Sociology of Crowds

Entre destructivité et vitalisme : la sociologie des foules de Georg Simmel

Christian Borch

This article studies Georg Simmel’s contribution to the sociology of crowds. The aim of the article is (1) to demonstrate the importance Simmel ascribed to the crowd topic, (2) to illustrate how his early view on crowds was inspired by the work of the major crowd theorists of his time, and (3) to reconstruct a vitalist image of crowds from Simmel’s later thought. The first part of the article portrays Simmel’s general perspective on the crowd as it appears in some of his key writings. The following parts are based on less familiar material, not least Simmel’s book reviews of Gustave Le Bon, Scipio Sighele, and Gabriel Tarde. Thus, the second part of the article analyzes Simmel’s discussions of Tarde and Le Bon. The third part demonstrates how Simmel’s explanation of destructive crowd behavior was inspired by his reading of Sighele’s work. Finally, the fourth part of the article examines the crowd in the light of Simmel’s essays on the metropolis and sociability. It is argued that this part of Simmel’s work allows for a vitalist interpretation of crowds, which differs greatly from what Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde suggested, and which anticipates Elias Canetti’s theory of crowds.

Introduction

1At the end of the nineteenth century a comprehensive scholarly interest in crowds and their allegedly destructive nature emerged. This was in many respects an attempt to come to terms with the French Revolution and its aftermath as well as with recent mass phenomena such as urbanization. The crowd psychologists whose work arguably received the widest attention was Gustave Le Bon. In his seminal 1895 study of The Crowd, he argued that modern society was on the verge of an entirely new social order, one in which the crowd was the main defining feature. In Le Bon’s famous words, ‘[t]he age we are about to enter will in truth be the ERA OF CROWDS’ (1960: 14, emphasis in original). Le Bon was not the only scholar to stress the societal importance of this new mass phenomenon. Other key theorists belonging to this ‘first generation’ of crowd theory included the sociologist Gabriel Tarde (1892; 1893) and the criminologist Scipio Sighele (1897). The research agenda promoted by these scholars described crowds and crowd behavior in almost exclusively negative terms and often associated them with feminine, socialist, and barbarian traits. Moreover, crowds were seen as essentially unruly and irrational entities that hypnotized their members to commit acts they would never carry out under normal circumstances, i.e., when not under the spell of the crowd and especially its leader. Related to this, crowds were believed to have de-individualizing effects; they suspended any individual traits and subsumed the crowd members under a collective identity.

2While Le Bon and Sighele only belonged to the margins of sociology in the sense that the latter’s work mainly revolved around criminological debates and that the former was never really accepted by the sociologists of his time, things were quite different for Tarde. Thus, even if several of his contributions to crowd debates had a criminological framing, he was a highly respected sociologist and he managed to demonstrate the sociological significance of taking the crowd topic seriously. Although the sociological debates on crowds started out as a predominantly French affair, they soon spread. In the USA, for example, Robert E. Park became a crucial advocate of the sociology of crowds or collective behavior, as he and Ernest W. Burgess would later call it. Yet crowds were also discussed among central German sociologists, including Georg Simmel, whose view on crowds I shall discuss in this article.

3Besides demonstrating the importance Simmel attributed to the crowd issue, the article has two objectives. First, I wish to illustrate how Simmel’s early analysis of crowds was developed in close dialogue with the work of Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde. As mentioned above, these scholars characterized the crowd as a destructive, irrational entity, and Simmel’s early analyses largely subscribed to that image, which expressed a fear or anxiety of crowds. This changed in his later work where, even if he retained his interest in the crowd issue, his general approach to it was modified. This was related to a rupture in his thinking where he moved beyond his evolutionist perspective of the 1890s. In line with this, the second objective of the article is to demonstrate that, contrary to the negative view on crowds that Simmel expressed in his early discussions of the topic, it is possible to derive an alternative and much more positive account of crowds from Simmel’s subsequent writings. This alternative account, which I identify in Simmel’s work on sociability, is characterized by a vitalist impulse, and it is one that anticipates Elias Canetti’s vitalist theory of crowds.

4The two objectives point to the double-sided character of the article. On the one hand, it offers a historical contextualization of Simmel’s analyses of crowds in the sense that it shows how these analyses were deeply embedded in the discussions of his time. This historical contextualization should not be confounded with the historical approach presented by scholars such as Rudé (1959) and Thomson (1971) who have analyzed specific crowd occurrences. Rather, the article aims to contribute to the understanding of particular aspects of a more general history of sociological crowd semantics, i.e., the history of the theoretical, conceptual, and analytical frameworks and ideas on crowds that emanated in France in the late nineteenth century and were then disseminated and modified in social theory throughout the twentieth century. That is, the article offers an attempt to understand how Simmel is situated in this semantic history. On the other hand, the article also has a more theoretical ambition in that it wishes to draw some implications from Simmel’s work that might inform current debates on crowd behavior.

1 Another exception is Frisby (1984a: 83–5) whose discussion of Simmel’s sociology of crowds is very (…)

5Whereas the crowd theories of Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde have been thoroughly analyzed in the past (Barrows, 1981; Borch, 2005; 2009; McClelland, 1989; Nye, 1975; Stewart-Steinberg, 2003; van Ginneken, 1992), only little attention has been paid to the place that the notion of crowds occupies in Simmel’s thought. One notable exception is Fransisco Budi Hardiman (2001: Ch. 1) who discusses Simmel’s contribution to crowd theory at length.1 Beginning with Simmel’s famous excursus, in Soziologie, on the possibility of society, Hardiman develops a Simmelian argument on the epistemological possibility of crowds. Somewhat surprisingly, however, Hardiman ignores a number of Simmel’s explicit engagements with the crowd issue. Although Hardiman’s exposition is both original and interesting, the present article will pursue a different analytical strategy. Specifically, I will emphasize a part of Simmel’s work which is not that well known, namely his book reviews of Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde.

6The article has four parts. To set the stage I begin by illustrating some of the general characteristics Simmel attributed to crowds. Here I do not distinguish between the various phases in his work. The following two parts analyze in more detail how Simmel explained crowd behavior in his early work. I draw here on his book reviews of Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde and show how the ideas expressed in these reviews corresponded to ideas Simmel developed in his evolutionist treatise Über sociale Differenzierung from 1890. Finally, in the fourth part of the article, I examine the status of the crowd in the light of Simmel’s later essays on the metropolis and sociability. It is in this part of his work that I identify a vitalist theory of crowds.

Simmel’s General Characterization of Crowds

7Contrary to Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde, Simmel never devoted an entire article or book to the study of crowds. Yet the crowd topic does appear in his work, e.g. in Soziologie (1992) and in Grundfragen der Soziologie (1999e). On the very first page of Soziologie, for example, the first edition of which was published in 1908, he placed the very ‘problem of sociology’ in the context of the masses. Simmel described the advent of the science of sociology as a theoretical reflection of the transformation of the power relation between masses and individuals during the nineteenth century. During that century, he argued, the masses experienced a significant rise to power, visible in the fact that people from the lower estates now appeared not as singular individuals but as a ‘unitary mass’ vis-à-vis the higher estates (Simmel, 1992: 13). This acknowledgement did not take Simmel in a Marxist direction, although the opening page of Soziologie did refer to the notion of classes. Here as elsewhere, Simmel was not really concerned with class struggles but rather with sociation (Vergesellschaftung), social forms, and the reciprocal effects (Wechselwirkungen) among individuals. The investigation of these matters must, Simmel believed, pay great attention to crowds and other mass phenomena. Indeed, he asserted, the crowd was a perfect entry to the study of sociality.

8This became clear in the second chapter of Soziologie, where Simmel discussed the topic of crowds. The chapter analyzed how social life in groups was affected by the group size. Having studied the sociological structure of small groups, Simmel turned to larger ones, and one of the larger groups that showed some unique qualities was the crowd. When the mass is not dispersed but as a crowd is characterized by psychical proximity, a peculiar situation unfolds:

innumerable suggestions swing back and forth, resulting in an extraordinary nervous excitation which often overwhelms the individuals, makes every impulse swell like an avalanche, and subjects the mass to whichever among its members happens to be the most passionate. … The fusion of masses under one feeling, in which all specificity and reserve of the personality is suspended, is fundamentally radical and hostile to mediation and consideration. It would lead to nothing but impasses and destructions if it did not usually end before in inner exhaustions and repercussions that are the consequences of the one-sided exaggeration. (Simmel, 1950c: 93–4; 1992: 70)

9This image recalled the picture of the crowd and its de-individualizing effects that had been advanced previously by Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde and which further emphasized that the crowd’s intellectual level was lower than that of isolated individuals (Le Bon, 1960; Sighele, 1897; Tarde, 1892; 1893).

10Several other quotes may substantiate Simmel’s observations from the passage just cited. At one point, for example, Simmel asserted that ‘[i]n a crowd, therefore, the most ephemeral incitations often grow, like avalanches, into the most disproportionate impulses, and thus appear to eliminate the higher, differentiated and critical functions of the individual’ (1950c: 227–8; 1992: 206). This, Simmel believed, implicitly referring to Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde, was the reason for the ‘innumerable observations concerning the “stupidity” of crowds’ (1950c: 228; 1992: 206). In another context he argued that the crowd, like any large group, is based on a social bond of negativity (1950c: 396 ff.; 1992: 533 ff.). Similarly, in his 1917 essay on Grundfragen der Soziologie, Simmel listed a number of examples of how mere physical proximity allegedly produced ‘an extreme intensification of feeling’, and he reported a Quaker description of how ‘by virtue of the members’ unification into one body, the ecstasy of an individual often spreads to all others’ (1950b: 35, 36; 1999e: 98).

11It may be argued that, in spite of his general fear of crowds, Tarde’s conception of sociality as imitation-suggestion proposed a perspective according to which the crowd constitutes the most intense form of sociality (Borch, 2005). Simmel made a similar assertion when claiming that sociality is best observed in crowds. In Simmel’s terminology the crucial notion was not imitation but reciprocal effects. According to Simmel, it is in the crowd that ‘the purest reciprocal effects take place’ (1989: 211). ‘It is’, he claimed in Grundfragen der Soziologie, ‘one of the most revealing, purely sociological phenomena that the individual feels himself [sic] carried by the “mood” of the mass’ (1950c: 35; 1999e: 97–8, emphasis added). So, far from being a marginal social phenomenon, the crowd was conceived by Simmel as the social entity par excellence: In the crowd we face the most intense reciprocal impulses. Simmel was aware that the ‘extraordinary nervous excitation’ of the crowd (see quote above) made it a rather unstable entity. This extreme intensity of crowds explained, he believed, the ‘often immense effects of passing stimulations’ which were said to be visible in crowds and which implied that ‘the slightest impulses of love and hate’ could ‘swell like an avalanche’ (Simmel, 1989: 212).

12It is well known that Simmel was an eclectic writer, famous for not offering many details about his sources and for often not being very explicit about the theoretical sources he drew upon and reacted to in his work. This is also true of his discussions of crowds. Outside his book reviews there is no mention of Tarde, Le Bon, and Sighele in Simmel’s analyses of crowd behavior. I will therefore center the following discussion upon these reviews so as to make clear both that Simmel was well-acquainted with the work of these scholars and how his own perspective gained substantial input – but also diverged – from these.

Simmel on Tarde and Le Bon: The Primitivism of Crowds

2 Simmel also followed Tarde’s subsequent work as is evident from a letter he sent to Tarde in 1894, (…)

3 Simmel would later use the competition example to explain the difference between form and content (…)

13Simmel showed the greatest respect for Tarde and his Laws of Imitation.2 In his review of the first edition of this book, published in 1890, Simmel characterized it as ‘thoughtful’, ‘stimulating’, ‘creditable’, and ‘original’, and he emphasized the ‘very interesting manner’ in which Tarde had demonstrated ‘that imitation [is] a kind of hypnotic suggestion’ (Simmel, 1999a: 248, 250). He further praised Tarde for, as he put it, distinguishing between the form and content of imitation. Imitation has a general form which can be analyzed independently of the various ways in which it appears in practice. This quality, Simmel (1999a: 249) said, is equal to competition, for instance.3 A final laudatory remark regarded the relation between psychology and sociology. According to Simmel, Tarde had successfully demonstrated how ‘individual psychology’ had to be supplemented with an understanding of the events taking place in ‘the social group’ (1999a: 250). Simmel’s review of Tarde was not all backslapping, however. For example, he criticized Tarde for not giving adequate attention to opposition and antagonism, an objection which was not entirely unjustified in the case of Laws of Imitation but which was not warranted with respect to Tarde’s subsequent work (most notably, Tarde, 1999a).

14One may argue that, on the topic of crowds, Tarde’s Laws of Imitation is far less important than some of his essays devoted explicitly to the subject. However, Simmel’s review of this book is nevertheless interesting because it demonstrates that at this point (i.e., 1890–91) Simmel was very fascinated with the idea of hypnotic suggestion, which would soon constitute the theoretical cornerstone in the European crowd debates. This fascination was about to change. As it will be demonstrated below, Simmel later became skeptical about this notion.

15The next famous crowd scholar to have his work scrutinized by Simmel was Le Bon whose The Crowd he reviewed when it was published in 1895. Simmel found the explanatory horizon of the book superficial in several respects and he argued that Le Bon did not clearly distinguish between the various forms of crowds that he described. In spite of this, and even if Simmel misjudged the political impact of The Crowd when asserting that ‘[t]he book in itself is not very important’ (1999b: 354), he praised the book for being ‘one of the rare attempts to make a psychology of the human being as a mere social creature’ (1999b: 354). I will pinpoint four elements from Simmel’s discussion of Le Bon that I find important. First, he noted Le Bon’s emphasis on suggestion (1999b: 354), and he did so with no further qualification, which suggests that in 1895 he was still not critical of this vocabulary. Second, Simmel briefly praised the crucial sociological value that could be gained (even beyond crowd theory) from Le Bon’s observations on the ability of the crowd leader to lead through prestige (Le Bon, 1960: 129–40; Simmel, 1999b: 355).

4 Simmel did not seem to be aware that this explanatory framework was surprisingly akin to Le Bon’s (…)

5 In Grundfragen der Soziologie Simmel described the hierarchy between feelings and intellect in the (…)

16Third, Simmel emphasized Le Bon’s idea that crowds are characterized by lower intellectual and ethical capabilities than the individual crowd members if left to themselves. Simmel accepted this idea – calling it the ‘sociological tragedy as such’ (1950b: 32; 1999e: 94) – but offered his own explanation of the alleged primitivism of crowds, an explanation which, he believed, was based on a ‘deeper psychological’ foundation (1999b: 356). Thus, Simmel asserted in a partly evolutionist argument, the psychological qualities that are common to different persons are always only the lower ones and the ones which have been transmitted hereditarily (see also Simmel, 1950b; 1999e: 90–1).4 This presumed a hierarchy between lower qualities (e.g. feelings and instincts) and higher qualities (e.g. intellect and civility) which ultimately cast crowds as a threat to everything that civilization had accomplished. When a large and diverse group of people act in unity, it is only the primitive and lowest psychological qualities (e.g. feelings and instincts in contrast to intellect and civility) which are certainly present in every member of the group/crowd.5 It is therefore only these primitive qualities that can be the foundation of the crowd’s action, Simmel thought (1999b: 356–7). Consequently, the crowd’s action is never a reflection of the average qualities of the singular crowd members (i.e., the average of higher and lower qualities); rather, the crowd reflects the common denominator which will always be lower than the average.

6 The argument being that, if crowd behavior is mainly to be explained through suggestion, then the (…)

7 Or to be more precise, this would most often be the case, but Simmel did observe a few exceptions (…)

17It is interesting that Simmel accepted the basically Le Bonian view of the intellectual and ethical inferiority of crowds and simply advanced his own explanation. For, just as one may argue against Le Bon that the great interest in the alleged intellectual primitivism of crowds is not necessarily consistent with the importance attributed to hypnotic suggestion,6 so may one find Simmel’s explanation equally inadequate in this respect. Be this as it may, Simmel drew two consequences from his argument. First, educational strategies would matter little vis-à-vis the intellectual and ethical derangement of crowds. Even the most skilled group of individuals will fall back on the lowest common denominator.7 Enlightenment and civilization seemed in other words to face their limits in crowd action. Second, Simmel agreed with Le Bon that the ‘crowd regime’ should be strongly condemned and that it was warranted to ‘speak of the idiotic, blunt, insane [unzurechnungsfähigen] crowd without these attributes thereby being valid for any of its members’ (1999b: 358).

8 There is also a more theoretical explanation, though, as Simmel considered hypnotic suggestion a t (…)

18The potential theoretical inconsistency between suggestion and the intellectual inferiority of crowds might in Simmel’s case be explained by the fact that he had developed the idea of the lowest common denominator before he began to associate crowd action with suggestion (and that he did not subsequently realize that the suggestion doctrine potentially undermined his evolutionist scheme).8 Thus his 1890 treatise Über sociale Differenzierung (1989) anticipated several of the remarks he would later make in his review of Le Bon. In this book, Simmel developed his evolutionist argument that only the lower qualities are common to everybody and that joint action will always be based on precisely these lower traits. He quoted Schiller’s epigram affirmatively, that everyone is clever on his or her own, but an idiot when acting in concert (Simmel, 1989: 205). And he even applied his evolutionist idea to explain that, ‘[w]hen a crowd acts in unity this always happens on the basis of the simplest possible ideas’ (1989: 206). Also, Simmel’s argument on the inability to change the nature of crowds through education was already developed in Über sociale Differenzierung: since crowds are characterized by lower rather than higher qualities, and since ‘feelings belong without doubt to a phylogenetically lower level than thinking’, crowds cannot be governed through ‘theoretical convictions, but rather essentially by appealing to their feelings’ (1989: 210). In other words, crowds do not react to rational arguments but only to those feelings that correspond to their lower qualities.

9 Similar arguments about the diminishing individual responsibility that were said to follow from a (…)

19The fourth and final point from Simmel’s discussion of Le Bon that I will draw attention to here regards the ‘diminishing feeling of responsibility’ which the individual, according to Simmel (1999b: 358), experiences while being in a group. Simmel’s considerations on this matter are interesting because they demonstrate how he extended the apparent qualities of the crowd to a wider range of social phenomena, specifically the relations between individual and group. Illustratively, the examples he referred to were not taken from the realm of crowd behavior in any traditional sense. He argued, for instance, that the introduction in American cities of regulative boards, constituted by several members to take care of specific administrative duties, made every single member feel less responsible for actions taken in common.9

20As a last remark on Simmel’s review of Le Bon I would like to return to his claim that Le Bon did not present a satisfactory distinction between the different forms of crowds that he analyzed. While this was a fair objection, it was nevertheless somewhat surprising given the fact that Simmel himself was even more reluctant to provide classificatory precision. Thus, Simmel’s notion of crowds remained rather abstract although it usually referred to situations of physical co-presence.

Explaining Destructive Crowd Behavior: The Inspiration from Sighele

10 A similar point has recently been made by Teresa Brennan in her brilliant study of the Transmissio (…)

21Simmel offered two somewhat interrelated explanations of the behavior of crowds in Über sociale Differenzierung (1989: 214 ff.). The first was based on a bio-social argument. When people are in close physical proximity to one another, they experience so many stimulations that each person feels an ‘inner nervous excitement’. Simmel did not advance any biological reductionism here. Quite the opposite, he was simply emphasizing the ‘enhancement of the nervous life which is caused by sociation’ (1989: 214).10 This explanatory horizon might suggest that the ability to gather physically was to blame for the irrational insurrections produced by crowds and that face-to-face encounters in large groups therefore had to be prevented. This would not really touch the deeper logic of crowd behavior, however. For in addition to the physiological explanation, Simmel proposed a more sociological, and to him ‘more important’ (1989: 214), account based on the notion of imitation.

11 It is very hard not to see in Simmel’s discussion of imitation a strong influence from Tarde whose (…)

22According to Simmel, imitation is a fundamental feature of social life. We instinctively imitate others’ behaviors, ways of dressing, etc. Even if imitation has this instinctive character and thus counts as ‘one of the lower intellectual functions’, in social life imitation is ‘of great, and in no way sufficiently accentuated, importance’ (1989: 216). This becomes very obvious in the crowd where, Simmel claimed, the urge to imitate others is significantly magnified and where we are likely to imitate not only the acts of others but even their affective states (1989: 215). If our fellow crowd members express a certain feeling (love, hate, anger, etc.), then we are apt to imitate, and hence subscribe to and further intensify, that feeling. It is important to stress that this Simmelian explanation relied on a purely sociological understanding of imitation and that, for Simmel (as well as for Tarde), imitation did not require physical proximity. Yet while imitation (and the transmission of affect) is certainly possible at a distance, there is no doubt that it is more likely to take place when people are physically close to one another. In this sense the two explanations offered by Simmel – the one focusing on physio-psychological aspects, the other on imitation – were interconnected.11

23The interrelatedness of the physiological and social (imitative) factors did not seem to become clear to Simmel before reading the Italian criminologist and crowd theorist, Scipio Sighele’s book on criminal crowds. Simmel reviewed the German translation of this book, Psychologie des Auflaufs und der Massenverbrechen, when it was published in 1897. The review began very critically and it did so on a somewhat surprising ground. Simmel rejected explanations which take recourse to phenomena such as ‘human nature’, ‘force’, or the ‘milieu’. But, he continued, the tendency of his time to explain various incidents through suggestion was equally problematic. Indeed, he claimed, suggestion had turned into a ‘magic formula’, it signified ‘superficialities’, and was applied mainly by ‘dilettantes’ (Simmel, 1999c: 389). What disturbed Simmel in the case of Sighele was precisely that the latter used suggestion as the principal, even universal, explanation of crowd behavior, and that he subsumed other important concepts, such as for instance imitation, into that of suggestion (Simmel, 1999c: 394). The reason why this critique appears astonishing is that, as noted above, a few years earlier Simmel had applauded Tarde for describing imitation as ‘a kind of hypnotic suggestion’ (1999a: 248). Yet Simmel had not completely changed his mind on suggestion. He did not intend to dismiss the notion entirely, but merely wanted to reserve it to one specific group of events. Rather than referring to any influence or stimulation of one person on another, a proper definition of suggestion should, according to Simmel, point only to situations where the power of ideas, feelings, etc. of ‘one soul leads to the same emotions in other souls’ (1999c: 395, emphasis added). Thus defined, suggestion could be relevant to the study of crowds.

24Even if Sighele, due to his broadly conceived notion of suggestion, counted as a dilettante in Simmel’s eyes, the latter nevertheless felt that Psychologie des Auflaufs und der Massenverbrechen was concerned with ‘such a great number of the most important problems in social philosophy’ (1999c: 390) that it merited a careful investigation. One point in particular attracted Simmel’s attention and it concerned the abovementioned relation between physiological and sociological dimensions. Simmel repeated his argument from Über sociale Differenzierung that people tend to imitate one another instinctively and that the affective state of one person may be transmitted to others through imitation. The original suggestion of Sighele was now, Simmel claimed, that ‘mild, conciliatory, moral’ affects are expressed less energetically and less impressionably than ‘bad, wild, and corrupt’ ones (1999c: 396). The underlying argument was that, ‘[w]hile the physiognomy and the gesticulations of a mild and peace-loving individual are quiet, contained, and discrete, hate, brutality, and offensive impulses produce greatly conspicuous gestures, noises, and violent transformations of the physical nature’ (1999c: 396). Since, so the argument went, aggressive affects are stamped more easily on our facial expressions and are more easily represented in physical gestures, they are also more likely to be transmitted to and reproduced by others than are caring and friendly feelings. It was this relation which, according to Simmel, explained why in ‘a crowd, which is dominated by suggestions, the influence of violent and brutal personalities has an extraordinary lead’ over mild and pleasant ones (1999c: 396). It was in other words not least because of these bio-sociological factors that crowds tended to be violent and destructive rather than peaceful (see also Sighele, 1897: 93 ff.).

Metropolitan Crowd Sociability: Anticipating Canetti’s Vitalism

25While Simmel’s early sociology of crowds came very close to ideas developed by major contemporary crowd theorists such as Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde, Simmel’s later work was characterized by a new and different conception of crowds. Rather than focusing on the alleged primitivism and destructiveness of crowds, he gradually opened up for a more positive view of crowd behavior. Before arriving at this positive account, however, it is important to examine Simmel’s analysis of metropolitan life – the spatial setting of crowds.

26This spatial-metropolitan setting is interesting because Simmel’s emphasis on the bio-social side of crowd behavior may suggests that crowd phenomena are predominant in metropolises where many people are in close physical proximity with one another. It is, one may argue, especially in cities that the suggestions of crowds are likely to give rise to ‘an extraordinary nervous excitation which often overwhelms the individuals’ (1950c: 93; 1992: 70). The metropolis seems in other words to provide the material background for a mental life that is particularly predisposed for crowd behavior (Frisby, 1984a: 131). While this claim would fit well with Tarde’s analysis (Borch, 2005), Simmel argued for an understanding of metropolitan life that seemed to run counter to this assertion about the urban crowd disposition. In his famous 1902–03 essay on ‘The Metropolis and Mental Life’ Simmel thus described how the metropolitan individual is constantly exposed to the city’s ‘rapidly changing and closely compressed contrasting stimulations of the nerves’ (1950a: 414). Because of these stimulations – the numerous and constantly changing impressions – the individual eventually relaxes his or her nervous system, and evermore radical impressions are therefore required to wake him or her from the state of indifference. As a result, Simmel said, the metropolitan individual develops a blasé attitude toward things, but possibly, one might speculate, also toward crowd phenomena. Indeed, the metropolitan individual might gradually develop inhibitions against the suggestive influences of crowds. Or to put it differently, the crowd has to exert an extremely intense suggestive force in order to attract the attention of, and then hypnotize, the metropolitan individual.

27Moreover, Simmel (1950a: 410) claimed, the metropolis has a more intellectual and sophisticated nature than the village, the mental life of which is characterized by feelings. In a sense, this idea was also at odds with the hypothesis about the urban disposition to crowd behavior. For does not the crowd produce eruptions of feelings, rather than intellectual deliberation? One might see in Simmel’s (1950a: 410) opposition of the ‘head’ of the metropolis and the ‘heart’ of the village a reiteration of a classical antagonism between civilization and affect/passions. But one may also interpret it more specifically as yet another indication of the exceptional and de-individualizing nature of crowds. After all, while intellectuality is a way for the individual to protect him or herself ‘against the threatening currents and discrepancies of his [or her] external environment’, and which thereby ‘preserve[s] subjective life against the overwhelming power of metropolitan life’ (1950a: 410, 411), the crowd signifies an outburst of passions that undermines the intellectuality and personality of the crowd members.

28On closer inspection, however, the metropolitan attitude is not entirely concomitant with intellectualism; it includes an affective dimension as well. Thus, argued Simmel, the metropolitan individual develops a distance, a reserve to other people. On the one hand, this distance has something cool and impassionate about it, but on the other hand,

the inner aspect of this outer reserve is not only indifference but, more often than we are aware, it is a slight aversion, a mutual strangeness and repulsion, which will break into hatred and fight at the moment of a closer contact, however caused. (1950a: 415–6, emphasis added)

29So the blasé attitude toward things, which is developed in order to cope with the numerous nervous stimulations in the metropolis, is combined with a reserve to other people, which itself is based on an underlying fear of being touched physically. Our social reserve to other people in other words operates in tandem with a physical distance that cannot be violated without producing anxiety. Simmel here touched upon an important theme which would later be further developed by Elias Canetti in his Crowds and Power (1984; see also Hardiman, 2001: 55). Canetti famously opened this book by emphasizing our ‘repugnance to being touched [which] remains with us when we go about among people; the way we move in a busy street, in restaurants, trains or busses, is governed by it’ (1984: 15). According to Canetti, this fear of being touched is suspended in crowds. Contrary to Canetti’s account, in which this fear is seen as an anthropological constant, Simmel argued that it is intimately related to a particular metropolitan attitude. That is, in Simmel’s sociological analysis it is the urban environment which incites the repugnance to being touched by others. And this repulsion requires an exceptional occurrence to disappear, an occurrence like the formation of a crowd.

12 This idea runs counter to the approach advanced by Rudé, Thomson, and other historians of crowd be (…)

30One might point to an additional parallel between Canetti’s crowd theory and Simmel’s sociology. In a paper presented in 1910 Simmel developed his notion of sociability (Geselligkeit). Simmel did not explicitly address the crowd issue in this essay. I will nevertheless claim that several of the ideas he put forward in this essay can be applied to the study of crowd behavior. Most importantly, Simmel identified ‘an impulse to sociability in man’ and argued that associations [Vergesellschaftungen], whatever their specific purpose, ‘are accompanied by a feeling for, by a satisfaction in, the very fact that one is associated with others and that the solitariness of the individual is resolved into togetherness, a union with others’ (Simmel, 1971: 128). It may be argued that this impulse to come together with others is an important driving force behind crowd behavior, as the individual is here relieved of his or her loneliness and people are brought together in multiplicity. The crowd might be associated with specific purposes such as, for instance, revolutionary intent. Yet, following Simmel’s analysis, it appears that irrespective of these purposes the crowd’s primary function is ‘the satisfaction of the impulse to sociability’ (1971: 130). More simply, the fundamental feature of the crowd is its sociability; it is formed to bring people together and is only subsequently endowed with an external objective (e.g. improvement of the social conditions through revolutionary action).12 And by acquiring such external objectives, the crowd ‘loses the essential quality of sociability and becomes an association determined by a content’ (1971: 131).

31Simmel’s analysis suggests that the crowd in its pure sociable form can be seen to create ‘an ideal sociological world’ where ‘the pleasure of the individual is always contingent upon the joy of others’ (1971: 132). So rather than constituting a threatening alternative to a rational, civilized social order (as Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde used to argue), the crowd may give vent to an affective cohesion of rare purity. In addition, this ideal social order held great democratic potential. According to Simmel,

This world of sociability, the only one in which a democracy of equals is possible without friction, is an artificial world, made up of beings who have renounced both the objective and the purely personal features of the intensity and extensiveness of life in order to bring among themselves a pure interaction [Wechselwirkung], free of any disturbing material accent. If we now have the conception that we enter into sociability purely as ‘human beings,’ as that which we really are, lacking all the burdens, the agitations, the inequalities with which real life disturbs the purity of our picture, it is because modern life is overburdened with objective content and material demands. Ridding ourselves of this burden in sociable circles [including crowds, CB], we believe we return to our natural-personal being and overlook the fact that this personal aspect also does not consist in its full uniqueness and natural completeness, but only in a certain reserve and stylizing of the sociable man. … If association itself is interaction [Wechselwirkung], it appears in its purest and most stylized form when it goes on among equals. (1971: 132–3, emphasis in original)

32This quote contains crucial parallels to Canetti, who argued that the crowd provides the individual with the opportunity to rid him or herself of the inequalities of everyday life, the ‘burdens of distance’ in Canetti’s terminology. In the crowd ‘distinctions are thrown off and all feel equal’, Canetti stated (1984: 18, emphasis in original). This has a double effect: an ideal democratic entity is created in which no-one is above the others; and by being freed from the burdens of distance and inequality, each individual acquires the ability to transform him or herself. As Canetti put it, ‘[i]n the crowd the individual feels that he [sic] is transcending the limits of his own person’ (1984: 20). This basically emancipating aspect is also present in Simmel’s account of sociability. However, as both Simmel and Canetti were aware, no full and independent liberating transformation is possible – in Simmel’s eyes because the sociable being is itself socially mediated (stylized), in Canetti’s eyes because the crowd only exists momentarily, soon after its discharge the individuals return to their homes and to their burdens of distance.

33There is one more parallel between Simmel and Canetti to be emphasized. Thus the impulse to sociability that Simmel refers to, and which, I have argued, can be identified in crowd behavior, signifies a vitalist urge. It points to a desire to gather for the purpose of celebrating life itself (on Simmel’s vitalism, see also Lash, 2005). This vitalist dimension marks a clear contrast to the view of Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde who tended to see crowd behavior as a threat to life. Serge Moscovici has analyzed the vitalist dimension in Canetti very convincingly. As Moscovici makes clear, Canetti’s vitalist account plays both on the sheer life-producing joy of the crowd and on the vitalism that is associated with its destructive actions. Whereas the former element has to do with the freedom that the crowd offers (the suspension of the burdens of distance), the latter element is explained by the (alleged) fact that by acting destructively and violently – by ultimately destroying life – the crowd confirms its own vitality. As Moscovici puts it, ‘[i]f body-to-body contact with a living individual frees us of our fear of being touched in the crowd, body contact with a lifeless individual frees us of the fear of death’ (1987: 53).

34The recognition of this vitalist interpretation of crowd behavior suggests two tensions in Simmel’s work. First, there seems to be a tension between the vitalist urge and the fear of being touched in the metropolis. The impulse to sociability tends to bring people together, whereas the fear of being touched works in an opposite direction. What then is the stronger tendency? One of Simmel’s reflections on space suggests that the sociability is likely to be predominant. In Soziologie, Simmel thus argued for an intimate relation between a crowd’s suggestibility and its spatial setting:

The suggestive and stimulative effects of a great mass of people and their overall psychological manifestations, in whose form the individual no longer recognizes his or her own contribution, increase in proportion to the crowdedness and, more significantly, the size of the space that the crowd occupies. A locality that offers the individual a breathing space of an unaccustomed size through a dense crowd, necessarily favours that feeling of an expansion extending into the unknown and that heightening of powers which is so easily instilled in large masses, and which occurs only occasionally among exceptional individuals in the narrow, easily surveyed confines of an ordinary room. (Simmel, 1992: 704; 1997: 145)

35What are the implications of this observation? Simmel here indicated that particularly urban squares, or other open urban spaces, are likely to stimulate crowd formation. Contrary to narrow streets, these squares endow people with a ‘breathing space [Luftraum]’ which ‘gives people a feeling of freedom of movement, of an ability to venture into the unknown’ (Simmel, 1992: 704; 1997: 145). Besides the almost Sloterdijk-like (2004) emphasis on the atmospheric role of the breathing space, this suggests that the metropolitan crowd produces a double liberation: one which is related to sociability and one which is spatial in character. In sum, therefore, the metropolitan fear of being touched is counteracted or neutralized by the urge to gather as a crowd in urban space.

36The second tension concerns Simmel’s theoretical proximity to the crowd scholars of his time and the argument, which I have derived from his later work, that people may have a desire to form crowds, a desire driven by joy and the celebration of life (and, one may add, of the freedom of movement). This tension is not easily reconciled, and perhaps one should not even attempt to do so. In fact, it may be argued that Simmel’s major contribution to the sociology of crowds lies precisely in his sensitivity to both the vitalist dimension and to its opposite, destructive side. This sensitivity is also central to Canetti’s theory of crowds which, as I have tried to demonstrate, finds an early precursor in Simmel (for an analysis of this double sensitivity in Canetti, see Moscovici, 1987).

13 For a recent discussion which embarks on such an endeavor by combining Simmel’s notion of sociabil (…)

37 It is not my intention here to compare the Simmelian position with current theorizing on collective behavior. Suffice to say that John Lofland’s 1982 complaint about the ‘long-standing neglect of collective joy’ (1982: 379) seems to apply just as well to the present situation. In order to ‘bring joy back into the study of collective behavior’, as Lofland (1982: 355–6) called for, one may take as a theoretical starting point a Simmelian vitalist conception of crowd sociability.13 Rather than pursuing this theoretical debate any further, however, I would like to end with a brief historical contextualization. It thus seems as if the double-sided nature of the crowd might be reflected in Simmel’s views on World War I. Similar to many other intellectuals at the time, Simmel was very excited when the war was announced. In a lecture from November 1914, delivered in Strasburg to where he had just moved to take a position as professor, Simmel expressed how the outbreak of the war filled him with hope (see Liebersohn, 1988: 156–8). The title of the talk, ‘Deutschlands innere Wandlung’ [‘Germany’s inner transformation’] (Simmel, 2003), clearly articulated the expectations he had for the war: While recognizing the obviously terrible and destructive (outer) sides of the war, Simmel was primarily occupied with the idea that, in terms of its inner edifice, ‘Germany is once again full of a great opportunity’, namely the possibility of creating ‘a new man [Menschen]’, a new attitude (2003: 283). In particular, Simmel argued, this new German attitude would grow out of the new ‘point of unity and unconditional solidarity’ that the war was believed to evoke (2003: 275).

38Simmel’s reflections are important for several reasons. First, they could be seen as promoting, on a general societal or national level, the kind of transition toward de-personalized unity and cohesion that his sociological work ascribed to the crowd and its sociability. Second, the vitalist, individual transformation that would result from this sociability was dependent on a destructive event, namely the war. Third, the new cohesion would take place in a context where physical proximity was no longer essential. On the contrary, the entire nation would be captured by the new unity. This amounted to a semantic transformation that would later be more fully developed by other scholars, namely the transformation from crowd to mass: The features typically associated with crowds of co-present individuals were said to suddenly seize the entire nation which therefore emerged as a mass.

39Interestingly, Simmel’s war enthusiasm did not last. In 1917, he thus published a book entitled Der Krieg und die geistigen Entscheidungen which contained the 1914 essay on ‘Deutschlands innere Wandlung’, but which also included subsequent and much more skeptical analyses (Simmel, 1999d). In other words, Simmel here had a personal experience to confirm his theoretical point that no complete transformation is possible.

Conclusion

40This article has focused on a part of Simmel’s work that has only received little attention previously, namely, his contribution to the sociology of crowds. I have demonstrated how centrally he placed the crowd in his sociological work, both in the early and later phases, thereby legitimizing the topic as sociologically relevant, if not outright indispensable. I would like to end by emphasizing, and summarizing, three dimensions that Simmel shared with the major crowd scholars of his time. To begin with, he was wary and even fearful of crowds adopted a very frightened notion and described the crowd as a state of exception that ‘arouses the darkest and most primitive instincts of the individual, which ordinarily are under control’ (1950d: 228; 1992: 206). This, second, was related to the fact that the crowd is subject to dynamics of hypnotic suggestion. In the crowd, ‘there emerges a hypnotic paralysis which makes the crowd follow to its extreme every leading, suggestive impulse’ (1950d: 228; 1992: 206). This pointed to the crowd’s de-individualizing capacity but also to the reciprocal effects (Wechselwirkungen) which was the notion in Simmel’s theory that tended to subsume that of hypnotic suggestion. Third, Simmel agreed that the crowd was not merely a sum of individuals. ‘It is a new phenomenon made up, not of the total individualities of its members’, but rather, and this was of course Simmel’s own contribution, ‘only of those fragments of each of them in which he coincides with all others’, namely ‘the lowest and most primitive’ fragments (1950b: 33; 1999e: 95–6).

41While these three dimensions suggest a strong agreement between Simmel and Le Bon, Sighele, and Tarde, Simmel’s conception of crowds also differed from that of his contemporaries. Most importantly, I have argued, the vitalist interpretation of crowds that I have derived from Simmel anticipates Canetti’s point that crowds may actually express enjoyment, democracy, and liberation. And this is where Simmel’s major contribution to the sociology of crowds and collective behavior lies: in this combined awareness of the crowd’s destructive potential and the recognition of its ability to promote life.

42Acknowledgements

I am grateful to the Editor, anonymous reviewers, and Thomas Basbøll for valuable comments. Research for this article was funded by a grant from the Carlsberg Foundation.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

BARROWS, Susanna, 1981, Distorting Mirrors: Visions of the Crowd in Late Nineteenth-Century France. New Haven and London, Yale University Press.

BORCH, Christian, 2005, ‘Urban Imitations: Tarde’s Sociology Revisited’, Theory, Culture & Society, 22, 3: 81–100.

BORCH, Christian, 2009, ‘Body to Body: On the Political Anatomy of Crowds’, Sociological Theory, 27, 3: 271–290.

BRENNAN, Teresa, 2004, The Transmission of Affect. Ithaca and London, Cornell University Press.

CANETTI, Elias, 1984, Crowds and Power, trans. Carol Stewart. New York, Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

de la FUENTE, Eduardo, 2007, ‘On the Promise of a Sociological Aesthetics: From Georg Simmel to Michel Maffesoli’, Distinktion, 15: 91–110.

FRISBY, David, 1984a, Georg Simmel. Chichester, Ellis Horwood.

FRISBY, David, 1984b, ‘Georg Simmel and Social Psychology’, Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 20, 2: 107–127.

FRISBY, David, 1992, Simmel and Since: Essays on Georg Simmel’s Social Theory. London and New York, Routledge.

HARDIMAN, Fransisco Budi, 2001, Die Herrschaft der Gleichen. Masse und totalitäre Herrschaft. Eine kritische Überprüfung der Texte von Georg Simmel, Hermann Broch, Elias Canetti und Hannah Arendt. Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang.

KÖHNKE, Klaus Christian, 1984, ‘Von der Völkerpsychologie zur Soziologie. Unbekannte Texte des jungen Georg Simmel’, pp. 388–429 in Heinz-Jürgen Dahme and Otthein Rammstedt (eds) Georg Simmel und die Moderne. Neue Interpretationen und Materialien. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

LASH, Scott, 2005, ‘Lebenssoziologie: Georg Simmel in the Information Age’, Theory, Culture & Society, 22, 3: 1–23.

Le BON, Gustave, 1960, The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind. New York, The Viking Press.

LIEBERSOHN, Harry, 1988, Fate and Utopia in German Sociology, 1870-1923. Cambridge, Massachusetts, The MIT Press.

LOFLAND, John, 1982, ‘Crowd Joys’, Urban Life, 10, 4: 355–381.

McCLELLAND, John, 1989, The Crowd and the Mob: From Plato to Canetti. London, Unwin Hyman.

MOSCOVICI, Serge, 1987, ‘Social Collectivities’, pp. 42–59 in Essays in Honor of Elias Canetti. New York, Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

NYE, Robert, 1975, The Origins of Crowd Psychology: Gustave LeBon and the Crisis of Mass Democracy in the Third Republic. London, Sage.

RUDÉ, George, 1959, The Crowd in the French Revolution. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

SIGHELE, Scipio, 1897, Psychologie des Auflaufs und der Massenverbrechen, trans. Hans Kurella. Dresden and Leipzig, Verlag von Carl Reissner.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1950a, ‘The Metropolis and Mental Life’, pp. 409–424 in The Sociology of Georg Simmel, ed. Kurt H. Wolff. New York, The Free Press.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1950b, ‘The Social and the Individual Level: An Example of General Sociology’, pp. 26–39 in The Sociology of Georg Simmel, ed. Kurt H. Wolff. New York, The Free Press.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1950c, The Sociology of Georg Simmel, trans., ed., and with an Introduction by Kurt H. Wolff. New York, The Free Press.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1950d, ‘Subordination under a Plurality’, pp. 224–249 in The Sociology of Georg Simmel, ed. Kurt H. Wolff. New York, The Free Press.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1971, ‘Sociability’, pp. 127–410 in Georg Simmel on Individuality and Social Forms. Selected Writings, ed. Donald N. Levine. Chicago and London, University of Chicago Press.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1989, ‘Über sociale Differenzierung: Sociologische und psychologische Untersuchungen’, pp. 109–295 in Heinz-Jürgen Dahme (ed) Georg Simmel Gesamtausgabe, Vol. 2. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1992, Soziologie. Untersuchungen über die Formen der Vergesellschaftlichung, ed. Otthein Rammstedt. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1997, ‘The Sociology of Space’, pp. 137–169 in David Frisby and Mike Featherstone (eds) Simmel on Culture: Selected Writings. London, Sage.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1999a, ‘Book Review: Gabriel Tarde, Les lois de L’imitation’, pp. 248–250 in Georg Simmel Gesamtausgabe, Vol. 1, ed. Klaus Christian Köhnke. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1999b, ‘Book Review: Gustave Le Bon, Psychologie des Foules’, pp. 353–361 in Georg Simmel Gesamtausgabe, Vol. 1, ed. Klaus Christian Köhnke. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1999c, ‘Book Review: Scipio Sighele, Psychologie des Auflaufs und der Massenverbrechen’, pp. 388–400 in Georg Simmel Gesamtausgabe, Vol. 1, ed. Klaus Christian Köhnke. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1999d, ‘Der Krieg und die geistigen Entscheidungen’, pp. 7–58 in Gesamausgabe, Vol. 16, ed. Gregor Fitzi and Otthein Rammstedt. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp.

SIMMEL, Georg, 1999e, ‘Grundfragen der Soziologie’, pp. 59–149 in Georg Simmel Gesamtausgabe, Vol. 16, ed. Gregor Fitzi and Otthein Rammstedt. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

SIMMEL, Georg, 2003, ‘Deutschlands innere Wandlung’, pp. 271–285 in Georg Simmel Gesamtausgabe, Vol. 15, ed.Uta Kösser, Hans-Martin Kruckis and Otthein Rammstedt. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

SIMMEL, Georg, 2005, Georg Simmel Gesamtausgabe, Vol. 22. Briefe 1880–1911, ed. Klaus Christian Köhnke. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

SLOTERDIJK, Peter, 2004, Sphären III. Schäume. Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

STEWART-STEINBERG, Suzanne R., 2003, ‘The Secret Power of Suggestion: Scipio Sighele and the Postliberal Subject’, Diacritics, 33, 1: 60–79.

TARDE, Gabriel, 1892, ‘Les crimes des foules’, Archives de l’Anthropologie Criminelle, 7: 353–386.

TARDE, Gabriel, 1893, ‘Foules et sectes au point de vue criminel’, Revue des Deux Mondes, 332: 349–387.

TARDE, Gabriel, 1962, The Laws of Imitation. Gloucester, Peter Smith.

TARDE, Gabriel, 1989, L’opinion et la foule, Introduction par Dominique Reynié. Paris, Presses Universitaires de France.

TARDE, Gabriel, 1999a, L’opposition universelle. Essai d’une théorie des contraires. Paris, Institut Synthélabo pour le progrès de la connaissance.

TARDE, Gabriel, 1999b, La logique sociale. Paris, Institut Synthélabo.

THOMPSON, E. P., 1971, ‘The Moral Economy of the English Crowd in the Eighteenth Century’, Past and Present, 50, February: 76–136.

Van GINNEKEN, Jaap, 1992, Crowds, Psychology, and Politics, 1871–1899, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Haut de page

Notes

1 Another exception is Frisby (1984a: 83–5) whose discussion of Simmel’s sociology of crowds is very brief, though.

2 Simmel also followed Tarde’s subsequent work as is evident from a letter he sent to Tarde in 1894, writing that he looked forward to receiving the latter’s La logique sociale (Simmel, 2005: 135; Tarde, 1999b). Simmel’s review of Laws of Imitation is mentioned by Köhnke (1984: 411–2), who goes through a number of Simmel’s early book reviews, depicting the great variety in Simmel’s theoretical interests. However, Köhnke only discusses Simmel’s reviews of books published from 1884–92 and thereby excludes Simmel’s appraisals of the work of Le Bon and Sighele. All three reviews (of Le Bon, Tarde, and Sighele) are discussed instead by Frisby (1984b: 116–7; 1992: 34–5).

3 Simmel would later use the competition example to explain the difference between form and content in his discussion of ‘the problem of sociology’ (Simmel, 1992: 26). See also Frisby (1984b: 117).

4 Simmel did not seem to be aware that this explanatory framework was surprisingly akin to Le Bon’s (1960: 82, 83) emphasis on racial and hereditary factors.

5 In Grundfragen der Soziologie Simmel described the hierarchy between feelings and intellect in the following manner: ‘If one arranges psychological manifestations in a genetic and systematic hierarchy, one will certainly place, at its basis, feeling (though naturally not all feelings), rather than the intellect. Pleasure and pain, as well as certain instinctive feelings that serve the preservation of individual and species, have developed prior to all operation with concepts, judgments, and conclusions.’ (1950b: 34; 1999e: 96–7, emphasis in original)

6 The argument being that, if crowd behavior is mainly to be explained through suggestion, then the intellectual height of the crowd should be analyzed on the level of the person from which this suggestion radiates.

7 Or to be more precise, this would most often be the case, but Simmel did observe a few exceptions to this general tendency. He thus granted very ‘noble and intellectual personalities’, characterized by truly decent and honorable traits, the ability to suppress the inferior elements and to adhere strictly to their higher ones, ethically as well as intellectually (1950b: 38–9; 1999e: 101–2). Further, in Le Bonian style he argued that, in spite of the ethical derangement of crowds: ‘[m]ass excitement … also has its ethically valuable aspect: it may produce noble enthusiasm and an unlimited readiness to sacrifice. Yet this does not eliminate its distorted character and its irresponsibility [see also the fourth point in my discussion of Simmel’s Le Bon review, CB]. It only stresses our removal from the value standards that individual consciousness has developed, whether practically effective or not.’ (1950b: 36; 1999e: 99)

8 There is also a more theoretical explanation, though, as Simmel considered hypnotic suggestion a two-way rather than a unidirectional phenomenon. In a discussion, which echoed Tarde’s remarks from L’opinion et la foule on the mutual influence of a journalist and his or her public (Tarde, 1989: 41), Simmel claimed that this reciprocal influence was visible not least in the case of journalists: ‘The journalist gives content and direction to the opinions of a mute multitude. But he is nevertheless forced to listen, combine, and guess what the tendencies of this multitude are, what it desires to hear and to have confirmed, and whither it wants to be led. While apparently it is only the public which is exposed to his suggestions, actually he is as much under the sway of the public’s suggestion.’ (1950c: 185–6; 1992: 164–5, emphasis in original)

This was merely one illustration of a general fact, to be detected even in hypnotic suggestion in its pure form: ‘in every hypnosis the hypnotized has an effect upon the hypnotist’, hence hypnotic suggestion too ‘conceals an interaction [Wechselwirkung], an exchange of influences, which transforms the pure one-sidedness of superordination and subordination into a sociological form’ (1950c: 186; 1992: 165, emphasis in original).

9 Similar arguments about the diminishing individual responsibility that were said to follow from a quantitative enlargement of groups were developed in more detail in Simmel (1989: Ch. 2).

10 A similar point has recently been made by Teresa Brennan in her brilliant study of the Transmission of Affect (2004).

11 It is very hard not to see in Simmel’s discussion of imitation a strong influence from Tarde whose Laws of Imitation he reviewed the same year as Über sociale Differenzierung was published. However, he opposed the Tardean model in one important respect by rejecting the idea of searching for almost natural laws in the social realm (Simmel, 1989: 217 ff.). This ran counter to Tarde’s (1962) wish to describe the course of imitation as following specific logical and extra-logical laws.

12 This idea runs counter to the approach advanced by Rudé, Thomson, and other historians of crowd behavior who have argued that crowds are rational and moral responses to social injustices and hence characterized by clear objectives. The Simmelian point is that such a perspective underplays the independent attraction of forming a social collective.

13 For a recent discussion which embarks on such an endeavor by combining Simmel’s notion of sociability with Michel Maffesoli’s theory of postmodern tribalism, see de la Fuente (2007).

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence électronique

Christian Borch, « Between Destructiveness and Vitalism: Simmel’s Sociology of Crowds », Conserveries mémorielles [En ligne], #8 | 2010, mis en ligne le 25 septembre 2010, Consulté le 14 mai 2013. URL : http://cm.revues.org/744

Haut de page

Auteur

Christian Borch

is an Associate Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. His research interests include architecture, urban theory, crowd theory, economic sociology, and politics. His articles on crowd theory have appeared in journals such as Acta Sociologica, Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory, Economy and Society, European Journal of Social Theory, and Theory, Culture & Society. He is currently completing a book on the history of crowd semantics.

Christian Borch est Professeur associé au Département de Management, Politique et Philosophie à la Copenhagen Business School au Danemark. Ses intérêts de recherche sont notamment l‘architecture, les théories des villes, les théories des foules, la sociologie économique et la politique. Ses articles sur la théorie des foules ont été publiés dans des revues telles que Acta Sociologica, Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory, Economy and Society, European Journal of Social Theory et Theory, Culture & Society. Il complète présentement un livre sur l‘histoire des sémantiques de la foule.

Voir également:

La Foule. Réflexions autour d’une abstraction

The Crowd. Reflexions around an Abstraction

Vincent Rubio

En reconstituant, à partir de l’antiquité grecque, le cheminement qu’a suivi le thème de la foule au long de la modernité occidentale, en examinant, par ce biais, le traitement intellectuel dont il a été l’objet, on s’aperçoit que la « chose foule » a toujours été envisagée comme une abstraction. Quelles que soient les disciplines particulières qui s’y sont intéressées (philosophie, littérature, psychologie, sociologie, etc.), la foule a été systématiquement présentée comme un être sui generis, un (être) en-soi.

Cette assertion n’a rien d’anodin. Pour s’en convaincre, il est nécessaire d’en revenir au texte de Psychologie des foules publié par Gustave Le Bon en 1895. Sans qu’il soit ici question d’examiner la question de l’originalité qu’il est possible de lui reconnaître, on peut dire que cet essai est un parfait « modèle réduit », non seulement de la psychologie des foules et de l’ensemble des travaux qui ont précédé l’apparition de cette discipline au cours de la dernière décennie du XIXe siècle, mais, au fond, de ce qui pourrait être qualifié de « théorie des foules ». Or, sa lecture laisse apparaître un raisonnement tautologique tel que, sans le moindre doute, « c’est la foule qui fait la foule », « c’est la foule qui, subrepticement, se fait elle-même ».

Bien sûr, il ne s’agit pas de dire que la foule serait dénuée de toute existence empirique. Les difficultés théoriques qu’elle pose invitent néanmoins à reconsidérer la question de son statut et de sa nature en tant que fait social.

1C’est au cours de la dernière décennie du 19e siècle, en France et en Italie, que vit le jour un champ disciplinaire consacré à la foule. Malgré la relative effervescence qui en accompagna l’apparition, son existence fut éphémère. Entré dans l’histoire sous le nom de psychologie des foules, il demeura en marge de l’Université. Pour autant, sa postérité – disons « en sous-main » – ne peut être que difficilement ignorée aujourd’hui. De la sociologie à la science politique, en passant par les théories des médias de masses, les vases communicants avec cette « science maudite » ne manquent pas. Le fondateur de la théorie des représentations sociales et initiateur de la psychologie sociale en France, Serge Moscovici, sera l’un des seuls – sinon le seul – à reconnaître cette filiation1. De son côté, après son « épisode freudien », la foule, sans jamais tout à fait disparaître, s’effacera au profit de concepts qui marqueront le 20e siècle. Ainsi le public, la masse et, bien entendu, la « toute-puissante » opinion publique.

2Juristes ou médecins de formation, l’Italien Scipio Sighele et les Français Henry Fournial, Gabriel Tarde et Gustave Le Bon sont les principaux acteurs de cette singulière page de l’histoire des idées. Chacun à leur manière, plus ou moins ponctuellement, ils contribuent à son émergence. Le premier, né en 1868, a achevé ses études de droit en 1890. Elève d’Enrico Ferri et disciple de Cesare Lombroso, il publie en 1891 La Folla Delinquente. Traduit en français l’année suivante sous le titre La foule criminelle, cet ouvrage peut être considéré comme le premier consacré à la psychologie des foules. C’est en cette même année 1892 qu’Henry Fournial, jeune étudiant à la Faculté de médecine de Lyon sous la direction d’Alexandre Lacassagne, fera paraître un volume extrait de sa thèse : Essai sur la psychologie des foules : Considérations médico-judiciaires sur les responsabilités collectives. Peu original, très inspiré des travaux de Sighele notamment, ce livre n’apportera ni reconnaissance ni carrière à Fournial qui disparaîtra presque aussitôt de la vie intellectuelle française. De son côté, malgré le succès de La foule criminelle, le juriste italien n’intégrera jamais les rangs universitaires qu’au titre de conférencier invité.

3Plus âgés que leurs jeunes confrères, Gabriel Tarde et Gustave Le Bon sont également moins anonymes lorsque les dernières lueurs du siècle apparaissent. Leur destin n’est pas du même acabit non plus. Né en 1843, Tarde jouit déjà d’une solide réputation dans le domaine de la criminologie. Il n’est pourtant que « simple » juge d’instruction à Sarlat jusqu’en 1894 et sa nomination à la Direction de la statistique judiciaire du Ministère de la justice. Fait Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur en 1895 avant d’être choisi de préférence à Henri Bergson pour la chaire de philosophie moderne au Collège de France en 1900, il est intronisé cette même année membre de l’Académie des Sciences morales et politiques. Entre « Les crimes des foules », communication réalisée en 1892 au Troisième Congrès international d’Anthropologie criminelle, et L’opinion et la foule qui paraît en 1901, il multiplie les études consacrées à la foule.

4Lorsqu’il publie Psychologie des foules en 1895, Gustave Le Bon est pour sa part l’auteur d’un grand nombre d’articles et d’ouvrages. De l’étude des générations spontanées à l’alcoolisme, en passant par l’hydrothérapie ou encore les phénomènes volcaniques, il ne compte pas les incursions dans les domaines les plus divers. Ayant débuté une carrière dans le milieu médical grâce au soutien de Pierre-Adolphe Piorry, il se fit même remarquer en 1892 pour son ouvrage sur L’équitation actuelle et ses principes2. Psychologie des foules, qu’il publie à l’âge de 54 ans, sera quant à lui un véritable succès de librairie international. Cet essai assurera une audience grandissante et une renommée aussi importante que parfois peu enviable à son auteur, polygraphe « touche à tout » qui, malgré ses multiples tentatives, verra les portes de l’Université comme celles de l’Académie lui rester à jamais fermées.

Itinéraires

5Incontestablement, c’est le nom de Le Bon qui est resté attaché au thème de la foule et à la psychologie des foules, comme si, d’une certaine manière, le « célèbre docteur » en était à la fois le précurseur et le dépositaire. De toute évidence, cette image est en trompe l’œil. Sighele, Fournial et Tarde ont bien l’antériorité sur Gustave Le Bon. En un certain sens, l’essentiel du travail de l’auteur de Psychologie des foules consista à reprendre et à synthétiser – voire à plagier stricto sensu – les propos de ses prédécesseurs sur le sujet (en particulier Scipio Sighele et Gabriel Tarde). Sa manière de les ignorer dans l’ensemble de son ouvrage – si ce n’est pour les « dénigrer » -, dépasse ainsi le simple manque d’élégance3.

6Sur un ton plus ou moins vif, mais sans ambages, l’historienne américaine Susanna Barrows, les sociologues Yvon-Jean Thiec et Jean-René Tréanton, ou, plus récemment, le politiste et historien Olivier Bosc par exemple, ont tous souligné cet aspect des travaux menés par Gustave Le Bon sur la question des foules4. Le fait que son nom ait été si fortement associé à la psychologie des foules n’est pas resté sans effets ni conséquences en tout cas. Le discrédit dans lequel s’est vite trouvée rejetée cette discipline renvoie ainsi pour une large part aux liens étroits qu’elle entretient avec le nom de Le Bon, personnage et intellectuel controversé s’il en est.

7Pour autant – et sans qu’il faille voir là une forme d’apologie bien entendu -, on peut se demander si, en reprenant à son compte les analyses de ses prédécesseurs, Gustave Le Bon ne fit pas, au fond, que leur emboîter le pas. Ni plus ni moins. Certes, manifestement coutumier du fait, Le Bon semble avoir le plus souvent opéré de manière subreptice. Mais, qu’il s’agisse de Scipio Sighele ou de Gabriel Tarde – et à plus forte raison d’Henry Fournial -, ses « collègues » ont eux-mêmes abondamment « emprunté » aux nombreuses hyperboles historiques et littéraires (médicales dans une certaine mesure également) qui parcourent l’ensemble du 19e siècle et qui, d’une façon ou d’une autre, prennent la foule pour personnage principal en la mettant en scène.

8Susanna Barrows a ainsi montré comment l’ensemble de la psychologie des foules – Sighele et Tarde les premiers – avait refondu le message des Origines de la France contemporaine de Taine et du Germinal de Zola dans un moule analytique. On le sait, ce message est celui du danger incarné par le peuple et son pendant, la foule ; message qui, de diverses manières, faisait écho aux peurs d’une société encore sous le choc de la violence collective ayant rythmé (et qui rythmerait encore) le 19e siècle. Ainsi, selon Barrows, « la documentation et la vision fournies par ces deux œuvres demeureront au cœur des ouvrages à venir, mais à la description et à la narration succèderont la théorie, et à l’observation l’axiome » (1990 : 103).

9Taine et Zola ne sont d’ailleurs que les deux faces visibles de l’iceberg si l’on peut dire. Par la violence de leur propos et la force des images qu’ils mettent en œuvre, leurs textes constituent les références les plus évidentes de la psychologie des foules. Ils sont ainsi explicitement mentionnés – voire cités stricto sensu – par Sighele et Tarde5. Il n’en reste pas moins que, sans conteste, un nombre bien plus important d’auteurs pourrait (devrait) être sollicité pour reconstituer la source originelle au sein de laquelle les pionniers de la psychologie des foules ont communément baignés.

10Ainsi, les Réflexions sur la Révolution de France de Burke ou l’Histoire de la révolution française de Michelet regorgent de descriptions de la foule aussi métaphoriques qu’inquiétantes6. Chez les écrivains, le « serpent aux mille couleurs » que constitue pour Balzac la population parisienne gisant « dans les exhalaisons putrides des cours, des rues et des basses œuvres », sortant de ses « alvéoles [pour] bourdonner sur les boulevards », est tout à fait remarquable à cet égard (1998 : 352-358). Tout autant que l’image de la nuit et la métaphore océanique du peuple comme masse en fusion chez Hugo, ou bien encore son exclamation à l’intention des vainqueurs des Trois glorieuses dans son Dicté après juillet 1830 des Chants du crépuscule : « Hier vous n’étiez qu’une foule : Vous êtes un peuple aujourd’hui » (1963 : 108 ; 1964 : 821). Sur l’eau, dans lequel Maupassant pourfend la foule et son âme « envoûtante », pourrait compléter une liste assurément non exhaustive.

11Le constat posé par Barrows reste juste cependant, presque trop peu sévère en réalité si l’on s’en tient aux termes dans lesquels il vient d’être exposé. Car non seulement les pionniers de la psychologie des foules se sont-ils inspirés de la littérature qui mobilisa le sujet au long du 19e siècle (citant régulièrement Taine ou Zola, cela vient d’être dit), mais, plus loin, leurs « théories » et leurs « axiomes » consistent pour l’essentiel en une stricte paraphrase. Le propos de cet article est tout autre, mais, disons-le sans appréhension ni mauvaise intention, la complexification, le « raffinement » et le caractère scientifique croissant de la forme, du vocabulaire et des illustrations propres au discours de la psychologie des foules, semblent n’être avant tout qu’une poudre jetée aux yeux de lecteurs n’en demandant pas tant7.

12Aussi, si Gustave Le Bon a sans aucun doute puisé dans les travaux de Sighele et de Tarde pour élaborer ses propre recherches, si, de ce fait, sa psychologie des foules est en grande partie la stricte imitation de celles proposées par le juriste italien et le magistrat français, il faut souligner en parallèle que ces derniers n’ont probablement pas procédé autrement ; en partie tout au moins et avec des « sources » que l’on qualifiera de « plus diversifiées ». Le Bon peut ainsi être considéré comme le « simple » point d’acmé – disons mieux, la figure emblématique – d’un mouvement dont il ne serait finalement qu’un des acteurs.

13Sur le fond, on peut donc dire que la « science des foules » élaborée par Sighele et Tarde, puis « reprise » par Le Bon, ne se distingue en rien des récits historiques ou des métaphores littéraires qui mobilisèrent le personnage de la foule au cours du 19e siècle. Tout juste en constitue-elle une excellente synthèse. Que, à suivre les analyses de Susanna Barrows, l’histoire et la littérature dont il est ici question aient elles-mêmes mobilisé une multitude de lieux communs et autres stéréotypes à l’endroit des couches populaires, ne peut bien entendu qu’aiguiser les interrogations – oserait-on dire les « soupçons » ? – sur la scientificité de la psychologie des foules. De ce point de vue, si, pour reprendre à nouveau les mots de Barrows, « tous les rudiments de la psychologie des foules sont dans les Origines de la France contemporaine, à l’exception de l’hypnotisme » (le mot lui-même tout au moins) (1990 : 79), c’est alors toute « la fabrique » de la psychologie des foules qui exigerait d’être revisitée en réalité. Mais tel n’est pas notre propos ici, nous l’avons dit.

14On comprend en tout cas sans difficulté que les emprunts au discours médical – et, plus largement, au registre des sciences de la nature – aient joué un rôle majeur dans les modalités de la « reformulation scientifique » en quoi consiste la psychologie des foules. Ainsi les références aux phénomènes d’hypnose, de contagion et de suggestion qui – par-delà l’explication de la manière dont un ensemble d’individus quelconque est censé se transformer en une foule dotée d’une âme collective (ou, plus exactement, la « sophistication » de cette explication) -, assureront à la psychologie des foules une caution et une légitimité scientifiques, certes provisoires, mais non dénuées d’efficacité (au moins dans un premier temps). En la matière, les travaux de Jean-Martin Charcot sur l’hystérie, ceux d’Hippolyte Bernheim sur la suggestion, mais également les analyses d’Alfred Espinas dans Des sociétés animales par exemple, seront abondamment mis à contribution.

Un être sui generis

15A défaut de ce qui serait une tradition constituée, il est donc possible de parler de l’existence d’une seule et même « théorie des foules » ; à tout le moins d’une singulière récurrence sur le sujet. En la matière, la psychologie des foules incarnerait une forme d’accomplissement, comme le degré ultime d’élaboration formelle. « Théorie » ou « récurrence d’idées » que, d’une certaine manière, l’ouvrage de Gustave Le Bon « parachève », et dont, à bien y regarder, il est possible de faire remonter « l’origine » à la Grèce antique. Ainsi, le questionnement soulevé par Platon au sujet du nombre et/ou de la quantité, et, plus encore peut-être, la distinction entre Plethos et Démos que souligna en son temps Aristote (c’est-à-dire la masse grégaire, bestiale et irrationnelle d’un côté, et l’agrégat de consciences citoyennes unies dans l’amour de la liberté et de l’ordre de l’autre)8.

16Pour le dire simplement, cette « théorie » est composée d’un intangible triptyque. Ses éléments constitutifs sont « l’être de la foule », le triple phénomène hypnose-contagion-suggestion, et, enfin, la figure du meneur. Le principe général que développe cette « théorie » est que la foule représente un impérieux danger ; y compris lorsqu’elle incarne la possibilité d’un avenir radieux (c’est-à-dire la perspective de la mise au jour du peuple constitué et souverain). Aussi, elle est un être à la physionomie monstrueuse, animé et mis en branle par la force irrésistible de la contagion, et au cœur duquel se développe, toujours, l’action suggestive et hypnotique de meneurs (le plus souvent) malintentionnés.

17Le point le plus remarquable de cette approche est assurément que la foule apparaît systématiquement sous les traits de ce qui pourrait être qualifié d’être en soi. Qu’il s’agisse de la notion de contact physique qui en définit la situation et lui donne corps, son assimilation au peuple – plus exactement à l’individu du peuple – qui lui donne à proprement parler un visage, ou bien encore ses diverses pathologies qui en font l’équivalent du pire de l’homme, si ce n’est de l’animal, tous ces éléments tendent à faire de la foule un être sui generis. Le Bon et « l’ensemble de ses prédécesseurs » sont unanimes sur ce point. Du Plethos d’Aristote au « monstre aux millions de têtes » d’Hippolyte Taine (Taine, 1986 : 295) ou au « volcan » de Jules Michelet (1979 : 137), du« fauve innomé et monstrueux » de Gabriel Tarde (1972 : 324) au « sphinx » de Gustave Le Bon (2002 : 59), etc., la foule est un vaste et grand être aux apparences des plus effroyables9.

18En réalité, ce qui se dessine sous la plume de ces auteurs, ce n’est rien d’autre qu’une métonymie anthropomorphique ; métonymie anthropomorphique par le truchement de laquelle, le contenu se métamorphosant en contenant, la foule devient, à l’image de l’homme, un être doué d’un corps, de sens, et (si l’on peut dire) d’un esprit. Si Susanna Barrows a montré avec justesse que, de Taine à Le Bon, le peuple avait été (arbitrairement) assimilé à la foule, et, ainsi, « discrédité », il faut donc souligner de manière symétrique que, de l’antiquité grecque à nos jours, la foule a tout autant été assimilée au peuple, très exactement à l’homme du peuple, plus loin même, à un animal, et qu’elle est ainsi devenue un être sui generis.

19Cette « métamorphose » peut d’ailleurs être envisagée comme avantageuse si l’on considère l’extrême difficulté de la tâche consistant à établir une définition (objective) de la foule à partir du raisonnement alternatif, c’est-à-dire relevant, non pas de l’abstraction, mais de la mesure. Le paradoxe du tas de sable cher aux logiciens de l’antiquité grecque est révélateur à cet égard. Le problème est bien connu. En substance, on peut le présenter de la manière suivante : A partir de combien de grains de sable y a-t-il un tas de sable ? Si l’on ôte un grain au tas de sable, le tas est-il encore un tas ? Ainsi, à partir de combien de grains ôtés, le tas n’est-il plus un tas ? Nul besoin d’expliciter plus avant le parallèle pour souligner les difficultés devant lesquelles on se trouve dès lors pour penser la foule.

20Quand bien même d’ailleurs, tenterait-on d’y échapper en en ramenant les termes à une autre variation sur le même thème de la mesure ; en l’occurrence au rapport entre quantité (ou nombre) et espace (disponible), ainsi que l’a fait Daniel Stokols. Dans la perspective du psychologue américain, si la foule ne réside plus dans une sorte « d’individu ajouté » (ce qui est bien le cas dans la situation du tas de sable décrite à l’instant, puisque, si 99 individus ne font pas foule et que 100 la font, alors c’est bien en un seul et unique individu que, précisément, réside la foule), si la foule ne réside donc plus dans une sorte « d’individu ajouté », son essence ne peut alors se trouver autre part que dans un mètre carré supplémentaire d’espace disponible, un « mètre carré ajouté » en somme (bien que, en toute logique, le mètre carré en question soit plus certainement ôté qu’ajouté ici). Il est même plus probable encore que, dans ces conditions, l’essence de la foule renvoie à une combinaison « d’individu(s) ajouté(s) » et de « mètre(s) carré(s) ôtés ».

21Il est ainsi toujours question, dans l’un ou l’autre de ces cas, d’un supplément ou d’une diminution de quantité ; qu’il s’agisse d’une « quantité d’humain », d’une quantité d’espace, ou de ces deux quantités rapportées l’une à l’autre. Et c’est à chaque fois entreprise bien vaine que de chercher à identifier une limite au-delà ou en deçà de laquelle il y aurait foule. En un mot, il n’existe pas de seuil, quel qu’il soit, à partir duquel on pourrait objectivement affirmer qu’il y a (ou qu’il n’y a pas) foule. De ce point de vue, le raisonnement faisant de la foule un être sui generis semble bien présenter de tout autres potentialités heuristiques.

Un raisonnement tautologique

22Pour apprécier la réelle pertinence de cette assertion, il est nécessaire d’en revenir au texte même de Psychologie des foules en tant que « modèle réduit » de la « théorie des foules ». Malgré le caractère aride de cette entreprise, c’est aux occurrences de la définition de la foule qu’il conviendra d’être attentifs. L’essentiel du raisonnement de Le Bon en la matière se trouve dans le premier chapitre intitulé « Caractéristiques générales des foules. Loi psychologique de leur unité mentale ». On y relève deux propositions visant à définir la foule et à expliquer le processus de sa genèse.

23La première définition de la foule que formule Le Bon est la suivante :

Dans certaines circonstances données, et seulement dans ces circonstances, une agglomération d’hommes possède des caractères fort différents de ceux de chaque individu qui la compose. La personnalité consciente s’évanouit, les sentiments et les idées de toutes les unités sont orientés dans une même direction, il se forme une âme collective, transitoire sans doute, mais présentant des caractères très nets. La collectivité devient alors ce que, faute d’une expression meilleure, j’appellerai une foule organisée, ou, si l’on préfère, une foule psychologique. Elle forme un seul être et se trouve soumise à la loi de l’unité mentale des foules (2002 : 9).

24Le mécanisme de formation de la foule semble clair. Le phénomène débute par la dislocation de la personnalité consciente des individus. C’est là le point de départ du processus. Les sentiments et les idées de tous sont alors orientés dans une même direction. C’est ainsi qu’ils fusionnent unanimement dans une âme collective au sein de laquelle les frontières individuelles sont abolies. Cette âme collective possède des caractères propres, distincts de ceux de chacun des individus qui lui appartiennent et qui composent la foule. C’est elle qui donne naissance à la foule dans toute sa singularité.

25Gustave Le Bon explique le passage (décisif) de la « simple » dislocation de la personnalité consciente des individus, à la fusion de tous leurs sentiments et idées dans une même direction, par les caractéristiques de l’état inconscient dans lequel ils sont alors plongés. Car « dans l’âme collective, les qualités inconscientes dominent ». La particularité de cet inconscient réside dans le fait qu’il est commun à tous les individus appartenant à la foule. C’est ce que Le Bon nomme la même race. En effet, « c’est surtout par les éléments inconscients composant l’âme d’une race, que se ressemblent tous les individus de cette race ». Et, poursuit-il, « les qualités générales du caractère, régies par l’inconscient et possédées à peu près au même degré par la plupart des individus normaux d’une race, sont précisément celles qui, chez les foules, se trouvent mises en commun » (Le Bon,2002 : 12)10.

26C’est donc à partir d’une sorte de fonds commun spécifique à un peuple, nommé âme de la race, et sous l’effet de la contagion imitative, que l’âme collective de la foule s’érigerait11. Autrement dit, c’est bien dans cet « inconscient collectif » que l’âme collective et la foule puisent (conjointement) leur substance. De quelle matière est donc constituée cette âme de la race ? La réponse à cette question se trouve dans l’ouvrage que Le Bon publia en 1894, Lois psychologiques de l’évolution des peuples. Y sont mentionnés les éléments principaux de la position qu’il soutient sur les thèmes de la race et de la civilisation, pierre angulaire de toute sa théorie de l’homme et des sociétés. L’existence de différentes races pouvant être ordonnées et classées suivant une échelle hiérarchique stricte – échelle fonction du « degré de civilisation » de chaque race -, représente le cœur de cette étude. Pour Le Bon, « l’inévitable problème de la race domine tous les autres » (1919 : 141).

27Dans cette démonstration particulièrement confuse, il est fait mention des « caractères moraux et intellectuels dont l’évolution d’un peuple dérive ». On apprend alors que c’est « l’ensemble de ces caractères qui forme l’âme d’une race », et que l’âme d’une race est « la synthèse de son passé, l’héritage de ses ancêtres, les mobiles de sa conduite ». En réalité, « chaque race possède une constitution mentale aussi fixe que sa constitution anatomique […] La majorité des individus de cette race possède toujours un certain nombre de traits psychologiques communs, aussi stables que les caractères anatomiques permettant de classer les espèces. Comme ces derniers, les caractères psychologiques se reproduisent par l’hérédité avec régularité et constance » (Le Bon, 1919 : 23-24).

28Une race est donc un ensemble d’individus possédant un fonds psychologique commun, fait de couches d’éléments moraux et intellectuels lentement sédimentées par hérédité. Ce fonds psychologique est doué d’une grande stabilité, d’une puissante force d’inertie, et repose sur trois grands piliers : « sentiments communs, intérêts communs et croyances communes» (Le Bon, 1919 : 28-29). Bien sûr, un regard critique et distancié doit être porté sur cet aspect des travaux de Gustave Le Bon. Les réguliers et (souvent) subreptices amalgames qu’il opère entre le psychologique et l’anatomique, le culturel et le biologique, constituent en particulier autant d’éléments à questionner.

29Mais ce qui doit retenir en priorité l’attention ici, c’est que l’idée de l’existence d’un fonds commun, d’une âme de la race, ou encore d’un « inconscient collectif », si nébuleuse soit-elle sous la plume de Le Bon, permet de comprendre, au moins sur le plan théorique, la métamorphose d’un certain nombre d’individus en une foule soumise à la loi de l’unité mentale. Car si ces derniers disparaissent, se perdent et, dans le même temps, se (re)trouvent au sein d’une âme collective, ce n’est en vertu de rien d’autre que de cet inconscient qu’ils partagent ; inconscient qui, en l’occurrence, remplit une fonction de ciment dans la genèse de la foule. Aussi, est-il aisé de saisir dans quelle mesure la foule n’est pas, « au point de vue psychologique » dira Le Bon, une réunion d’individus comme une autre.

30De la même manière, la topographie ou l’architectonique de la foule et de son schéma d’analyse apparaît clairement. Si l’âme collective est le fondement de la foule, sa substance même, l’âme de la race représente, de son côté, le socle sur lequel repose cette âme collective. Ainsi, la race et son âme constituent le sol sur lequel la foule psychologique s’enracine à partir de l’effet suggestif et contagieux du nombre. Reformulant sa première proposition de définition, Le Bon confirmera le rôle essentiel tenu par ces éléments : « C’est uniquement à cette phase avancée d’organisation [de la foule] que, sur le fonds invariable et dominant de la race, se superposent certains caractères nouveaux et spéciaux » (2002 : 11).

31À bien y regarder cependant, une zone d’ombre demeure ici. En examinant avec attention la définition initiale proposée par Gustave Le Bon, on ne peut que rester étonné devant le caractère pour le moins énigmatique des « certaines circonstances données » dans lesquelles « une agglomération d’hommes possède des caractères fort différents de ceux de chaque individu qui la compose ». Incontestablement, ces mystérieuses circonstances nécessitent éclaircissement. Un élément à ce point déterminant du processus de constitution de la foule, ne saurait rester aussi flou. Car ce n’est de rien d’autre que des conditions originelles de l’apparition de l’âme collective de la foule dont il s’agit.

32D’ailleurs, le lecteur attentif de Psychologie des foules ne manque pas de s’interroger lorsqu’il découvre la suite du texte. Ainsi, la reformulation de la première définition dévoile une incohérence au sein de la démonstration. Pour saisir parfaitement les modalités du problème qui se pose alors, il est nécessaire de citer dans sa totalité le passage contenant cette reformulation : « C’est uniquement à cette phase avancée d’organisation que, sur le fonds invariable et dominant de la race, se superposent certains caractères nouveaux et spéciaux, produisant l’orientation de tous les sentiments et pensées de la collectivité dans une direction identique. Alors seulement se manifeste ce que j’ai nommé plus haut, la loi psychologique de l’unité mentale des foules » (Le Bon, 2002 : 11).

33Si l’on suit le raisonnement développé ici, il ne fait aucun doute que ce sont bien les caractères nouveaux et spéciaux qui provoquent l’orientation de tous les sentiments et des pensées dans une même direction. Or, dans la première proposition de définition, c’est bien parce que les sentiments et les pensées de tous étaient orientés dans une même direction, qu’apparaissaient les caractères nouveaux et spéciaux de la foule. En d’autres termes, se pose la question de savoir si ces caractères spéciaux propres à la foule sont le produit de l’orientation des idées et des sentiments de tous dans une seule et même direction (et, au préalable, de l’évanouissement de la personnalité consciente de chacun de ces individus), ou s’ils sont plutôt le moteur de cette fusion des sentiments et des pensées dans un même sens ? Dans un cas, Le Bon opte pour la première possibilité, dans l’autre, il choisit la seconde, ne laissant pas de se contredire à quelques pages d’intervalle.

34À ce stade de l’analyse, on ne sait donc plus très bien ce que sont ces caractères, présentés d’un côté comme « nouveaux », « très nets » et « fort différents de ceux de chaque individu » composant la foule, et, décrits, de l’autre, comme « nouveaux et spéciaux ». Ne pouvant se fier au choix du vocabulaire utilisé par Le Bon en la matière – manifestement révélateur d’un « flottement » sémantique -, on est amené à se demander s’il parle vraiment des mêmes caractères dans l’une et l’autre de ces assertions ?

35Ainsi, ne pourrait-il pas s’agir, dans la première proposition, des caractères de la foule et de son âme collective, et, au sein de la seconde, des caractères de l’individu en foule, en pleine métamorphose, en pleine « fusion » avec les autres ? L’interrogation est surprenante, son sens sujet à caution. En réalité, il n’est pas certain qu’y répondre éclairerait plus avant la démonstration de Le Bon (en particulier sur le point tout à fait essentiel des modalités de l’apparition de la collectivité qu’est la foule) ; démonstration qui, pour tout dire, devient de plus en plus difficile à suivre.

36Le Bon ne fournit d’ailleurs aucun élément qui permette d’esquisser la moindre tentative de réponse à cette question La seule information tangible dont le lecteur dispose à cet instant, et à laquelle il lui est possible de se raccrocher, est que, dans l’un et l’autre des deux énoncés, il ne semble pas être fait mention des mêmes « sentiments et pensées orientées dans une même direction ». Dans le premier, les sentiments et pensées sont ceux « de toutes les unités », alors que dans le second, il s’agit de ceux « de la collectivité ». Étonnant glissement qui oblige à repenser la signification du propos lebonien, en tentant de concilier ces deux propositions divergentes.

37En effet, ne se trouverait-on pas alors devant le schéma suivant : Dans des circonstances particulières, la personnalité consciente des individus s’évanouirait. Plongeant dans une certaine forme d’inconscient collectif, ces individus verraient leurs sentiments et leurs idées orientés dans une même direction, formant ainsi une âme collective douée de caractères très nets et différents de ceux de chacun des individus composant la foule. Dans une ultime phase, ces caractères produiraient « l’orientation de tous les sentiments et pensées de la collectivité dans une direction identique ».

38C’est à nouveau la stricte identité des « caractères nouveaux » mentionnés dans la première et dans la seconde proposition, qui constitue ici le principe général. Mais alors, une nouvelle question ne manque pas de se poser. Elle concerne l’ultime phase orientant tous les sentiments et pensées de la collectivité dans une direction identique. Pourquoi donc orienter dans une même direction, des sentiments et des pensées qui sont déjà ceux de la collectivité, qui sont déjà ceux d’une collectivité dont la nature d’être en soi ne fait aucun doute ? Car l’âme collective existe déjà à cette étape du processus, et, par conséquent, la foule est (déjà) devenue « un seul être ». Autrement dit, ces sentiments et ces pensées sont, par définition, déjà fondus dans une seule et même direction. Il semble donc pour le moins déroutant de devoir les fondre dans un même ensemble.

39On le voit, à mesure que l’on parcourt et que l’on tâche de comprendre de manière rigoureuse le raisonnement tenu par Le Bon, les interrogations et les contradictions se multiplient de façon exponentielle. À tel point d’ailleurs, qu’on n’est plus même certain d’y saisir le moindre argument, la moindre articulation logique, et, au fond, la moindre idée claire et cohérente. Surtout, le mécanisme de genèse de la foule semble singulièrement s’obscurcir, rendant ainsi nécessaire de s’interroger sur ce qui crée les mystérieux caractères nouveaux dont il vient d’être question. Car ce sont bien eux qui se trouvent au centre des difficultés.

40Il faut alors avancer dans la lecture du texte. Mais, autant le souligner dès à présent, l’étonnement et la perplexité ne se dissiperont nullement. Bien au contraire même, montrant peut-être par là que les questions soulevées jusqu’ici ne constituent en fait que les symptômes d’un « mal plus profond ». Ainsi, découvre-t-on la seconde définition de la foule : « Le fait le plus frappant présenté par une foule psychologique est le suivant : quels que soient les individus qui la composent, quelque semblables ou dissemblables que puissent être leur genre de vie, leurs occupations, leur caractère ou leur intelligence, le seul fait qu’ils sont transformés en foule les dote d’une sorte d’âme collective » (Le Bon,2002 : 11).

41En rapportant cette définition à la première, on s’aperçoit que, si dans celle-ci, c’était « l’âme collective qui faisait la foule », dans celle-là, c’est « la foule qui fait l’âme collective ». Aucune autre signification ne peut être donnée à ce passage : « Le seul fait qu’ils sont transformés en foule les dote d’une sorte d’âme collective ». C’est donc bien la transformation en foule qui, ici, fond les individus dans une seule et même âme collective. En d’autres termes, si, dans un cas, l’âme collective fait la foule, et si, dans l’autre cas, la foule fait l’âme collective, alors force est de constater que, à chaque fois et in fine, c’est la foule qui fait la foule, c’est la foule qui se fait elle-même pour ainsi dire. Formulation bien maladroite qui n’a d’autre fondement que le caractère tautologique de toute la rhétorique lebonienne, et pour autre issue que l’impasse des analyses en termes de mesure.

42Et ceci, quelle que soient le rôle et l’action précis des phénomènes suggestifs et contagieux (et, plus précisément encore, de la suggestibilité des hommes en foule) ; véritable force motrice initiale de l’effacement des cloisonnements individuels et, ce faisant, de la fusion des individus sur le mode de l’inconscient collectif12. Car ces phénomènes sont eux-mêmes pris dans la tautologie de la démonstration lebonienne. Ainsi, cet autre passage de Psychologie des foules :

L’individu plongé depuis quelque temps au sein d’une foule agissante, tombe bientôt – par suite des effluves qui s’en dégagent, ou pour toute autre cause encore ignorée – dans un état particulier, se rapprochant beaucoup de l’état de fascination de l’hypnotisé entre les mains de son hypnotiseur […] Tel est à peu près l’état de l’individu faisant partie d’une foule. Il n’est plus conscient de ses actes. Chez lui, comme chez l’hypnotisé, tandis que certaines facultés sont détruites, d’autres peuvent être amenées à un degré d’exaltation extrême. L’influence d’une suggestion le lancera avec une irrésistible impétuosité vers l’accomplissement de certains actes (Le Bon,2002 : 13-14).

43Si, en s’en tenant strictement aux mots utilisés par Le Bon, c’est bien la suggestibilité de l’individu qui rend ce dernier susceptible de fusionner avec les autres au sein de l’inconscient collectif – et, par suite, rend possible la création de l’unité mentale de la foule -, il ne fait pas le moindre doute que, dans le même temps, c’est la foule elle-même qui, « en amont », rend l’individu suggestible (car hypnotisé) ici. Ce faisant, une fois encore – et abstraction faite des « effluves qui se dégagent de la foule », expliquant le pouvoir hypnotique de la foule sur l’individu, et peu convaincantes d’un point de vue argumentatif -, on peut dire que Gustave Le Bon suppose bien que c’est la foule qui fait la foule. Le mécanisme de la suggestion, qui explique le passage de l’individuel au collectif, qui explique la création de l’âme de la foule et, ce faisant, la foule elle-même, est donc lui aussi « englué » dans la construction tautologique de la démonstration composant le cœur de Psychologie des foules.

44À l’image de ses prédécesseurs, Gustave Le Bon « explique » donc la foule par elle-même. Non pas comme le social s’explique par le social, ainsi que le dira Emile Durkheim, mais bien plutôt comme l’éruption d’un volcan s’expliquerait par elle-même, en dehors de l’ensemble des mouvements du globe terrestre, ex nihilo en somme. Cette tautologie, en vertu de laquelle les « certaines circonstances données » déterminant la foule ne sont donc rien d’autres que la foule « préexistant subrepticement à elle-même », permet à Le Bon et à la psychologie des foules d’éviter la délicate question : « Comment l’âme collective, qui fait la foule, se crée-t-elle (autrement que par la foule elle-même) » ? Comment passe-t-on d’une somme d’individus quelconque(s) à un être collectif doué d’une âme de la même nature ?

45On saisit ainsi mieux pourquoi, par exemple, Psychologie des foules sera consacrée aux seules foules dans la «phase de leur complète organisation » (Le Bon,2002 : 11). De la même manière, Le Bon étendra le vocable de foule à tous les groupes (sociaux), quelles que soient leur taille, leur structuration, leur durée de vie, etc., de manière (notamment) à ne pas se contredire et à ne pas laisser dévoilées les contradictions qui gangrènent de toute part son propos, et, par extension, celui de toute la psychologie des foules.

Ouvertures

46Cette analyse n’a rien d’une discussion stérile sur les mots. Les insuffisances de la forme trahissent l’étonnante fragilité du fond. Car ce que révèle le caractère tautologique et purement rhétorique de la démonstration lebonienne, c’est bien que l’idée de la foule en soi constitue une proposition aussi fascinante que fragile. En d’autres termes, pour ce qui est de « saisir la chose foule », la logique de l’abstraction n’est pas plus « efficace » que la logique de la mesure.

47Il ne s’agit pas de dire par-là que la foule serait dépourvue de la moindre existence empirique. Bien entendu. Les difficultés théoriques qu’elle pose invitent néanmoins à reconsidérer la question de son statut et de sa nature en tant que fait social. Aussi, plutôt que de chercher vainement un objet que l’on qualifiera de « définissable », ne serait-il pas plus pertinent de raisonner ici en termes de mythe, de figure mythique ; figure mythique qui, au moins en partie on le sait, échappe toujours à l’enclosure définitionnelle et/ou conceptuelle ?

48Trois éléments donnent crédit à cette hypothèse, invitant, croyons-nous, à l’explorer plus avant. Les deux premiers ont été mentionnés au cours des lignes qui précèdent. Il s’agit, pour le premier, de la récurrence d’un même récit à l’endroit de la foule, et, pour le second, de l’apparition systématique de cette dernière sous la forme d’un être en soi, d’une (pure) abstraction. Ce retour cyclique à l’identique, ce « recyclage palingénésique » d’un discours prenant les apparences d’un récit originel qui met en scène un même personnage, est évidemment troublant ; en particulier, bien sûr, parce qu’il permet à la foule d’emprunter les traits d’un personnage à part entière (et pour le moins inquiétant s’il en est). Le lien particulièrement lâche que ce récit entretient avec le réel ne suscite d’ailleurs pas moins le trouble. On peut parler à ce sujet d’un étonnant entrelacement du réel et du fictionnel. Il s’agit là du troisième élément cité ci-dessus.

49Une nouvelle fois, les recherches de Susanna Barrows sont d’un grand intérêt en la matière. Elles ont en effet permis de mettre au jour combien les descriptions et les analyses de la foule (en particulier celles du 19e siècle, bien entendu) étaient parfois farfelues et, au fond, relevaient bien souvent de l’ordre du fantasme. L’historienne américaine a parlé très justement de miroirs déformants à ce propos. Au cours du 20e siècle, différents historiens ont montré l’important décalage existant entre la « réalité de l’histoire » et les récits hyperboliques sur la foule. Il est par exemple apparu que les violences (de la répression) subies par cette dernière étaient souvent bien plus réelles que les exactions dont elle s’était elle-même rendue coupable13. Plus loin, à l’image de la castration de Maigrat inventée par Zola en 1885 pour Germinal – castration dont on retrouvera de manière saisissante nombre de traits au cours de la défénestration de l’ingénieur Watrin à Decazeville l’année suivante -, on peut même se demander dans quel sens précis réel et imaginaire s’interpénètrent ici.

50Mais le temps n’est pas à ces développements qui exigeraient de nombreuses pages. Il n’est peut-être pas inutile de souligner cependant que, dans une telle perspective, c’est à « l’efficacité symbolique » du mythe de la foule qu’il conviendrait de s’intéresser. Autrement dit, ce qui deviendrait central, c’est le rôle, la fonction remplie par cette singulière figure. Cela ne fait pas mystère, toute civilisation, toute société repose sur une mythologie spécifique, sur un récit légendaire qui forme un ensemble d’idées, d’images et autres symboles auxquels (auquel) elle croit, et qui lui permet(tent) de construire une vision cohérente du monde, d’y introduire un certain ordre et, finalement, de s’y situer.

51Évanescente, labile et insaisissable, objet de toutes les peurs, voire fantasmée, la foule pourrait incarner l’un des personnages principaux de « l’histoire fictive » sur laquelle notre monde moderne s’est construit. Elle en autoriserait alors une autre lecture, en creux. Une lecture qui, à la lumière de l’évidente « coïncidence » existant entre l’éclosion d’un intérêt prononcé pour la foule et les tentatives de constitution de la modernité politique (elle-même fille de l’antiquité grecque ; autre « moment » où tente de s’instituer un monde organisé autour des valeurs de l’Individu et de la Raison.), ne saurait être tout à fait étrangère aux interrogations que soulève l’essence même de la démocratie et de l’idée républicaine.

Haut de page

Bibliographie

BALZAC Honoré de, 1998, Histoire des treize, Paris, Poche, (1ère éd. 1835).

BARROWS Susanna, 1990, Miroirs déformants. Réflexions sur la foule en France à la fin du XIXe siècle, Paris, Aubier.

BAUDELAIRE Charles, 1987, Le spleen de Paris (petits poèmes en prose). La Fanfarlo, Paris, Garnier-Flammarion.

BERNHEIM Hippolyte, 1911, De la suggestion, Paris, Albin Michel.

BOSC Olivier, 2007, La foule criminelle. Politique et criminalité dans l’Europe du tournant du XIXe siècle, Paris, Fayard.

BURKE Edmund, 1980, Réflexions sur la Révolution de France, Genève, Slatkine, (1ère éd. 1790).

COOPER-RICHET Diana, 1998, « La foule en colère : les mineurs et la grève au XIXe siècle », Revue d’Histoire du XIXe siècle, n°17 – Les foules au XIXe siècle, pp.57-67.

EDELMAN Nicole, 1998, « L’espace hospitalier des aliénistes et des neurologues : un laboratoire pour penser les foules citadines (années 1850-années 1880) ? », Revue d’Histoire du XIXe siècle, n°17 – Les foules au XIXe siècle, pp.43-56.

ESPINAS Alfred, 1878, Des sociétés animales, Paris, Germer Baillière.

FOURNIAL Henry, 1892, Essai sur la psychologie des foules : Considérations médico-judiciaires sur les responsabilités collectives, Lyon, A. Storck – Paris, G. Masson.

FREUD Sigmund, 2001, « Psychologie des foules et analyse du moi », in Essais de psychanalyse, Paris, Payot & Rivages, pp.137-242, (1ère éd. 1921).

HUGO Victor, 1963, Les Misérables, tome I, Paris, Gallimard, (1ère éd. 1862).

HUGO Victor, 1964, Œuvres poétiques, Avant l’exil 1802-1851, tome I, Paris, Gallimard.

HUGO Victor, 1985, L’Année terrible, Paris, Gallimard, (1ère éd. 1872).

KRAKOVITCH Odile, 1998, « La foule des théâtres parisiens sous le Directoire, ou de la difficulté de gérer l’opinion publique », Revue d’Histoire du XIXe siècle, n°17 – Les foules au XIXe siècle, pp.21-41.

LE BON Gustave, 1919, Lois psychologiques de l’évolution des peuples, Paris, Alcan, (1ère éd.1894).

LE BON Gustave, 2002, Psychologie des foules, Paris, Presses universitaires de France, (1ère éd. 1895).

LEFEBVRE Georges, 1988, La grande peur de 1789, Paris, Colin, (1ère éd. 1932).

LEVILLAIN Philippe, 1998, « Remarques sur les foules religieuses en France au XIXe siècle (1815-1914) », Revue d’Histoire du XIXe siècle, n°17 – Les foules au XIXe siècle, pp.15-20.

MARPEAU Benoît, 2000, Gustave le Bon. Parcours d’un intellectuel. 1841-1931, Paris, CNRS.

MAUPASSANT Guy (de), 1993, Sur l’eau, Paris, Gallimard, (1ère éd. 1888).

MAC CLLELAND John, 1989, The crowd and the mob from Plato to Canetti, London, Unwin Hyman.

MICHELET, 1993, Le peuple, Paris, Garnier-Flammarion, (1ère éd. 1846).

MICHELET Jules, 1979, Histoire de la révolution française, Paris, Robert Laffont, Coll. « Bouquins », (1ère éd. 1847).

MOLLIER Jean-Yves, « Les foules au XIXe siècle », Revue d’Histoire du XIXe siècle, n°17 – Les foules au XIXe siècle, pp.9-14.

MOSCOVICI Serge, 1981, L’âge des foules. Un traité historique de psychologie des masses, Paris, Fayard.

NYE Robert A., 1994, Origins of crowds psychology, Gustave Le Bon and the crisis of Mass democracy in the third Republic, London, Sage Publications, (1ère éd. 1975).

PAGES Alain, 1998, « La danse des foules », Revue d’Histoire du XIXe siècle, n°17 – Les foules au XIXe siècle, pp.69-76.

PARK Robert Ezra, 2007, La foule et le public, Lyon, Parangon, (1ère éd. 1904).

PERROT Michelle, 1974, Les ouvriers en grève. France 1871-1890, tomes I et II, Paris, La Haye, Mouton.

RUDE George, 1982, La foule dans la révolution française, Paris, Maspero.

SIGHELE Scipio, 1892, La foule criminelle, essai de psychologie collective, Paris, Alcan, (1ère éd.1891).

SIGHELE Scipio,1901, La foule criminelle, essai de psychologie collective, Paris, Alcan, (2ème éd. française)

STOKOLS Daniel, 1972, « On the Distinction between Density and Crowding : Some Implications for Futur Research », Psychological review, 79-3, pp.275-277.

TAINE Hippolyte, 1986, Les origines de la France contemporaine. L’Ancien Régime, La Révolution : L’anarchie-La conquête jacobine, tome I, Paris, Robert Laffont, (1ère éd.1875).

TARDE Gabriel, 1892, « Les crimes des foules », Archives d’anthropologie criminelle et des sciences pénales, 7, n°40, pp.353-386.

TARDE Gabriel, 1893, « Foules et sectes au point de vue criminel », Revue des Deux Mondes, Décembre 1893, pp.349-387.

TARDE Gabriel, 1898, « Le public et la foule », Revue de Paris, juillet 1898, pp.287-306, et août 1898, pp.615-635.

TARDE Gabriel, 1972, La philosophie pénale, Paris, Masson, (1ère éd. 1890).

TARDE Gabriel, 1989, « L’opinion et la conversation »,in TARDE Gabriel, 1989, L’opinion et la foule, Paris, Presses universitaires de France, (1ère éd. 1899), pp.73-137.

TARDE Gabriel, 1989, L’opinion et la foule, Paris, Presses universitaires de France, (1ère éd. 1901).

THIEC Yvon-Jean, 1981, « Gustave Le Bon, prophète de l’irrationalisme de masse », Revue française de sociologie, XXII-3, pp.409-428.

THIEC Yvon-Jean et TREANTON Jean-René, 1983, « La foule comme objet de « science » », Revue française de sociologie, XXIV-1, pp.119-136.

ZOLA Emile, 1998, Germinal, Paris, Poche, (1ère éd. 1885).

Haut de page

Notes

1 Voir à cet égard l’ouvrage publié par Moscovici en 1981, L’âge des foules. Un traité historique de psychologie des masses.

2 Si l’on suit Benoît Marpeau, il semblerait que Le Bon n’ait en fait jamais effectué des études de médecine complètes. Le titre de docteur en médecine qu’il porte dès 1866 – ne se faisant plus appeler autrement que « le Docteur Gustave Le Bon » – est donc manifestement usurpé (Marpeau, 2000 : 33-34).

3 Dans Psychologie des foules, les noms de Sighele et Tarde apparaissent à une seule reprise (deux pour Tarde en réalité), à l’occasion d’une note de bas de page en toute fin d’introduction. Le Bon y souligne les limites de leurs travaux strictement criminologiques, ainsi que le caractère peu « personnel » de La foule criminelle (qu’il nomme, en l’occurrence, Les foules criminelles !). Enfin, il prend soin d’en distinguer ses propres « conclusions sur la criminalité et la moralité des foules », qu’il définit comme « contraires » à celles de ces « deux écrivains » (Le Bon, 2002 : 6). À n’en pas douter, Sighele et Tarde connurent des hommages plus élogieux.

4 Au sujet de la thèse du plagiat, la meilleure présentation en a sans doute été réalisée par Susanna Barrows dans ses Miroirs déformants (1990 : 145-168).

5 A titre d’exemple, notons que dans la première édition française de La foule criminelle, Scipio Sighele cite Taine à huit reprises et Zola deux fois.

6 Voir par exemple Burke, 1980 : 12-16 ou 146-147, et Michelet, 1979 : 305 ou 344.

7 Sur ce point, nous nous permettons de renvoyer à nos travaux : Rubio, 2008.

8 On lira notamment sur cette question Les Lois et La République chez Platon, et Les Politiques et la Constitution d’Athènes chez Aristote.

9 Aristote avait quant à lui comparer les vertus de la foule à celles de l’homme (Aristote, 1993 : III-XI/1281b-1282a et VII-I/1323b).

10 Ces qualités générales du caractère sont celles qui, chez l’homme, ne relèvent pas de l’intellect, de la raison.

11 Le Bon utilise indifféremment les termes race et peuple, montrant par là qu’il les considère synonymes.

12 Selon Le Bon, il existe en effet trois grandes causes à l’apparition de l’âme de la foule : « La première est que l’individu en foule acquiert, par le fait seul du nombre, un sentiment de puissance invincible lui permettant de céder à des instincts, que, seul, il eût forcément réfrénés ; […] une seconde cause, la contagion mentale, intervient également pour déterminer chez les foules la manifestation de caractères spéciaux et en même temps leur orientation. La contagion est un phénomène aisé à constater, mais non expliqué encore, et qu’il faut rattacher aux phénomènes d’ordre hypnotique […] Chez une foule, tout sentiment, tout acte est contagieux à ce point que l’individu sacrifie facilement son intérêt personnel à l’intérêt collectif ; une troisième cause, et de beaucoup la plus importante, […] est la suggestibilité, dont la contagion mentionnée plus haut n’est d’ailleurs qu’un effet » (Le Bon, 2002 : 13). S’il y a donc trois causes à la mise en commun de l’âme de la race par les individus composant une foule, seule la suggestibilité semble véritablement déterminante. Elle est en effet la cause de la contagion, mais également, on peut le supposer, décisive dans l’apparition du sentiment de puissance, tout sentiment étant contagieux dans une foule selon Le Bon.

13 À côté des travaux de Barrows, on pourra par exemples consulter sur ce point les recherches de Michelle Perrot (Les ouvriers en grève. France 1871-1890, 1974), ou encore celles de George Rudé (La foule dans la révolution française, 1982).

Haut de page

Pour citer cet article

Référence électronique

Vincent Rubio, « La Foule. Réflexions autour d’une abstraction », Conserveries mémorielles [En ligne], #8 | 2010, mis en ligne le 25 septembre 2010, Consulté le 14 mai 2013. URL : http://cm.revues.org/737

Haut de page

Auteur

Vincent Rubio

est chargé d‘enseignements en Sciences Sociales de l‘Université Paris Descartes. Il est également chercheur au sein de l‘Unité de Recherche en Sciences Humaines et Sociales de l‘Institut de cancérologie Gustave Roussy – Canceropôle Ile de France (URSHS/IGR). Ses thèmes de recherche sont la sociologie de la maladie et de la santé, la sociologie politique et la sociologie de l‘information et de la communication. Il a publié La Foule. Un mythe républicain ? (2008) de même que plusieurs articles sur la théorie des foules.

Vincent Rubio is Lecturer in Social Sciences at the Université Paris Descartes. He is also researcher at the Unité de Recherche en Sciences Humaines et Sociales de l‘Institut de cancérologie Gustave Roussy – Canceropôle Ile de France (URSHS/IGR). His research interests are sociology of health and illness, political sociology and sociology of information and communication. He has published La Foule. Un mythe républicain ? (2008) as well as numerous articles on crowd theory.

Foules, espaces publics urbains et apprentissage de la co-présence chez les adolescents des quartiers populaires d’Ile de France

Crowds, urban public spaces and learning co-presence: the Case of the Adolescents residing in the popular districts of the Ile-de-France

Nicolas Oppenchaim

Résumé | Index | Plan | Texte | Bibliographie | Citation | Auteur

Résumés

Français English

Cet article porte sur le rapport qu’entretiennent les adolescents à la foule urbaine et sur la manière dont ils apprennent à y trouver une place. Pour ce faire nous procéderons en trois temps. Nous exposerons tout d’abord en quoi, s’appuyant sur les travaux de R. Park et G. Tarde, Isaac Joseph fait du passage de la foule au public une des caractéristiques majeures des sociétés contemporaines. Ce passage concerne à la fois l’espace métaphorique des mobilisations collectives, mais également l’espace urbain : le propre des villes contemporaines n’est pas les grands rassemblements de foule dominés par les émotions, mais les espaces publics, lieux de co-présence organisés autour de l’inattention civile. Ces espaces offrent ainsi des possibilités de rencontre tout en garantissant un droit à l’intimité.

Cependant nous montrerons dans un second temps que cette perception apaisée des grands rassemblements dans la ville ne va pas de soi, notamment à l’adolescence. Il est donc nécessaire d’introduire la problématique de l’apprentissage dans les réflexions sur les espaces publics urbains. Ainsi, une partie des adolescents des quartiers populaires d’Ile de France ont une perception de ces lieux de co-présence très proche de celle développée dans les discours du 18ème et 19ème siècle sur la peur des foules urbaines. Plus largement, les adolescents de quartiers populaires se différencient dans leurs discours par quatre grandes positions idéal-typiques vis-à-vis des foules urbaines : « foule source d’animation potentielle », « foule indifférente », « foule menaçante », ou « foule espace public ».

Nous verrons alors dans un troisième temps que ce rapport différencié des adolescents à la foule est à mettre en relation avec le lien entretenu avec le quartier de résidence et les modalités d’apprentissage de la mobilité.

Haut de page

Entrées d’index

Mots-clés :

foule, espace public, apprentissage, quartiers populaires, mobilités quotidiennes, adolescents

Keywords :

crowd, public space, learning, popular districts, daily mobility, teenagers

Haut de page

Plan

De la foule au public

Les arènes publiques et les espaces publics urbains

La coopération interactionnelle est-elle naturelle ?

Foule lieu de tension potentielle, d’indifférence, de menace ou d’anonymat ?

La « foule tension »

La « foule indifférente »

La « foule menace »

La « foule espace public »

Le rapport au quartier et l’apprentissage de la mobilité : deux variables clés pour comprendre le rapport des adolescents à la foule urbaine

Haut de page

Texte intégral

PDF Signaler ce document

De la foule au public

1Les sociétés modernes se caractérisent par le passage de la foule au public. Telle est la thèse centrale qu’identifie Isaac Joseph dans deux ouvrages publiés au début du 20ème siècle, L’opinion et la foule de Gabriel Tarde en 1901 et La foule et le public de R. Park qui paraît trois ans plus tard.

2Le sociologue français défend ce point de vue dans un article publié en 2001, « Tarde avec Park. À quoi servent les foules ? » (Joseph, 2001). Ces deux auteurs ont en commun selon Joseph de rejeter une psychologie collective consistant à concevoir un « nous » existant en dehors et au dessus des esprits individuels. Ils œuvreraient au contraire à la naissance d’une psychologie sociale dont l’objet de recherche serait les interactions et influences réciproques entre individus. La plus simple de ces influences est ainsi la conversation. À partir de ce point de départ, Tarde isole deux grands types d’influence et d’action réciproque, la foule et le public qu’il oppose terme à terme :

la foule est une forme d’actions réciproques régie par la proximité spatiale. Elle est un lieu de contagion psychique basée sur les contacts physiques, et est par là proche de l’agrégat animal.

le public est au contraire une « foule dispersée, où l’influence des esprits les uns sur les autres est devenue une action à distance, à des distances de plus en plus grandes » (Tarde, 1901 : 7). Il s’agit donc d’une forme évoluée des interactions réciproques : les associations entre individus dans le public se font par simultanéité des convictions, par des contacts impersonnels comme la lecture d’un même journal et non par la proximité physique.

3Alors que la foule est la forme d’action sur autrui du passé, le public est au contraire une forme adaptée à l’évolution de nos sociétés contemporaines de plus en plus hétérogènes et traversés par des clivages divers. Trois traits caractéristiques du public expliquent cette adéquation : d’une part, comme dit précédemment, il rassemble des personnes issus d’origines géographiques et sociales différentes ; d’autre part ce rassemblement repose sur une base impersonnelle et non sur une proximité physique ou affective ; enfin il tolère non seulement les particularismes en son sein, mais bien plus les intensifie. Les dissidences partielles prennent ainsi la place des oppositions manichéennes et des grands dualismes.

4Robert Park reprend lui aussi cette idée d’une meilleure adéquation du public à nos sociétés contemporaines par rapport à la foule. Comme chez Tarde, cette dernière est une entité mouvante dans laquelle les individus fusionnent les uns avec les autres, l’influence mutuelle des émotions formant une émotion collective s’imposant à chacun des membres. Au contraire, le comportement d’un public est le résultat d’un ensemble de discussions dans lesquels les individus ont des opinions différentes. La scène publique est alors analogue à un dispositif théâtral : l’identification à des personnages publics permet d’endosser symboliquement un rôle dans le drame social et de se situer par rapport à d’autres acteurs dans une intrigue ou un scénario.

5Cette idée, commune à Tarde et Park, d’un passage d’une forme d’influence mutuelle à une autre, de la foule au public, se développera par la suite dans deux directions : d’une part l’étude des engagements collectifs dans le domaine public métaphorique des arènes publiques et d’autre part celle des interactions dans l’espace public urbain. Si cette double dimension est moins présente chez Tarde, elle est centrale dans l’œuvre de Park, dont on connaît le rôle tenu dans le développement des travaux de l’Ecole de Chicago sur la ville : qu’il s’agisse de rassemblements métaphoriques des opinions lors d’un débat au Parlement ou de la fréquentation d’un parc, le public constitue une même forme d’organisation de l’attention. Celle-ci ne repose pas sur un contenu émotionnel s’imposant au groupe mais sur une organisation raisonnée des conduites.

Les arènes publiques et les espaces publics urbains

6Nous ne développerons pas le destin qu’a eu cette distinction entre foule et public dans l’étude des mobilisations collectives. Cette filiation a en effet été fort bien résumée dans un ouvrage récent (Cefaï, 2007). Dans cette tradition, dont la figure centrale est le philosophe pragmatiste John Dewey (1927 [2003]), l’opinion publique n’est plus façonnée par le tumulte de la foule, mais par l’échange raisonné dans des arènes publiques. Ces arènes sont le lieu de confrontation de différents acteurs pour résoudre une situation problématique. L’objectif des mobilisations collectives est en effet de faire émerger des problèmes dans le domaine public afin de pouvoir y échanger des arguments raisonnés. Cet objectif suppose tout un travail de mise en forme d’une situation perçue comme problématique et d’organisation de l’attention de l’opinion à ce sujet :

Le point de départ est la confrontation à une situation problématique où des personnes éprouvent un trouble indéterminé et perçu initialement comme relevant de la vie privée. Le public n’est pas donné d’avance avec la positivité d’un corps civique ou d’une audience médiatique. Il émerge à travers le jeu des interactions entre ces personnes qui se constituent comme un collectif d’enquêteurs, d’explorateurs et d’expérimentateurs qui vont monter des dispositifs de mobilisation pour définir leur trouble, l’ériger en problème d’intérêt public et interpeller les pouvoirs publics en vue de le résoudre. (Cefaï et Pasquier, 2003 : 11).

7Nous souhaitons pour notre part nous attarder sur la seconde filiation qu’a eu cette distinction dans l’étude des villes contemporaines. La figure centrale de cette filiation n’est plus John Dewey mais Erving Goffman. Ce dernier réussit le tour de force théorique de ne plus concevoir la ville et les rassemblements de personnes qu’elle occasionne (« gatherings » dans son vocabulaire) comme le lieu de la foule anonyme, dominée par le tumulte des émotions telle qu’elle a pu être décrite par la psychologie des foules à la fin du 19ème siècle. En effet, ces rassemblements dans l’espace urbain ne s’organisent plus autour d’une émotion commune. Ils perdent leur aspect menaçant pour devenir le lieu d’élaboration en commun d’une coopération civile malgré les tensions et incidents mineurs qui marquent la vie urbaine. Cette coopération est soulignée par l’importance des rituels réparateurs comme les formules de politesse. Le tournant opéré par le sociologue américain dans l’étude des villes est alors d’ « abandonner la foule sans pour autant quitter la rue » (Joseph, 1998 : 43).

8Les lieux emblématiques de cette coopération entre citadins sont les espaces publics urbains. Espaces de circulation, ils sont régis par un droit de visite et ne relèvent pas de l’appropriation individuelle. Mais ils sont également des espaces de communication entre individus, régis par un droit de regard de chaque citadin (Joseph, 1992 : 210-217). Nous espérons alors que le détour théorique opéré précédemment autour de la distinction entre la foule et le public est dès lors plus compréhensible par le lecteur : de manière similaire à l’espace public métaphorique, l’espace public urbain n’est pas le lieu de la foule compacte et indifférenciée, mais au contraire le lieu d’exposition des différences, et par là de toutes les tensions et autres épreuves de la civilité ordinaire. Le citadin n’est pas englouti dans une foule urbaine, son individualité s’en extirpe au contraire pour se confronter à celle des autres citadins et pour participer en commun à l’élaboration d’une coopération visant à assurer la sauvegarde de l’interaction.

La coopération interactionnelle est-elle naturelle ?

9Le passage d’une vision des espaces urbains comme lieu d’une foule compacte et indifférenciée à un lieu d’exposition des différences est subordonné à l’importance des possibilités de mobilité dans la ville contemporaine : le citadin est avant tout selon Isaac Joseph un « être de locomotion » qui passe d’un espace public à un autre et est donc confronté à la co-présence avec les autres utilisateurs de ces espaces. C’est cette importance de la mobilité dans les villes contemporaines qui nous a amené à nous intéresser au cas des adolescents de quartiers populaires d’Ile de France. Ces adolescents sont bien souvent présentés, à tort, comme immobiles et ne sortant guère de leurs quartiers. Nous avons donc souhaité mieux comprendre le rapport aux espaces publics urbains et à la mobilité de ces adolescents. Pour cela, nous avons mené un travail ethnographique d’une dizaine de mois dans une maison de quartier d’une « zone urbaine sensible » (ZUS) de la grande couronne parisienne ainsi que des projets avec cinq établissements scolaires de banlieue parisienne (deux classes de seconde générale, une de seconde professionnelle et deux de troisième). Ces projets articulaient soixante-quinze entretiens semi-directifs d’une heure et des ateliers thématiques sur la mobilité (photographies, écriture de textes et réalisation de questionnaires par les élèves autour de cette thématique). Ce dernier matériau nous a ainsi permis d’accéder aux populations adolescentes fortement mobiles et n’étant guère présentes sur le quartier de résidence. Dans la présentation de cet article, nous avons privilégié les longs extraits d’entretien, afin de faire entendre ces voix qui sont si peu présentes dans les caricatures souvent véhiculées sur ces jeunes.

10Or, parmi les résultats principaux de ce travail, nous avons constaté qu’une partie de ces adolescents décrivent les espaces publics franciliens en utilisant le vocabulaire de la foule anxiogène tel qu’il pouvait être employé au 19ème siècle dans la psychologie des foules. Certains énoncent notamment une crainte de perte de singularité dans l’anonymat urbain et le peu de goût pour la diversité qui s’exprime dans les espaces publics. L’emploi de ce vocabulaire avait déjà été signalé par d’autres auteurs comme Vincent Rubio, pour qui « il est effectivement saisissant de constater à quel point les individus qui composent notre société sont imprégnés de cette théorie de la foule née dans l’antiquité grecque dont Le Bon a élaboré la parfaite synthèse il y a à présent plus d’un siècle » (2008 : 81).

Là où je vais c’est Cergy et La Défense. J’aime pas trop aller à Châtelet, là bas y’a trop de monde, c’est la foule, j’aime pas la foule. Je sais pas, y’a trop de monde, ça vient dans tous les sens, à droite, à gauche, j’aime pas, y’a des mecs qui font de la tecktonik et tout…Paris j’aime pas trop, c’est des mecs bizarres. Alors qu’à La Défense ou Cergy, c’est que des mecs de quartier qui y travaillent(…) En plus le samedi y’ a moins de monde, y’a des endroits où on peut se poser derrière, on est pas obligé d’être dans la foule (Lycéen, 17 ans).

Moi j’aime pas aller à Rosny pour traîner comme ça, parce que moi j’aime pas traîner, si j’ai quelque chose de concret je vais le faire, mais je vais pas aller traîner comme ça, galérer dans un endroit debout, j’aime pas ça, c’est une perte de temps à rester comme ça debout, donc je vais jamais à Rosny, Châtelet (…) J’aime pas trop la foule, ça dépend dans quel contexte, mais la foule j’aime pas trop. Dans les soirées, ça c’est normal, ça ça va, mais en pleine journée, des gens qui sont là, qui n’ont rien à faire…J’aime pas Châtelet, déjà les gens de là bas, à s’habiller n’importe comment et à faire leur intéressant pour rien, les gens tecktonick tout ça, nous on veut pas voir ça, donc on préfère éviter. Je connais un ami il va à Châtelet, mais c’est pour acheter, traîner non, jamais (Lycéen, 17 ans).

11Percevoir les espaces publics centraux et les rassemblements de personnes qui s’y trouvent comme un espace de collaboration où il est aisé de trouver une place est donc loin d’être naturel. Le risque d’effondrement de la coopération interactionnelle se situe certes toujours en arrière-fond des travaux de Goffman : malaises occasionnés par les contacts mixtes entre normaux et stigmatisés, embarras éprouvé régulièrement par un des acteurs de l’interaction… Néanmoins, à de rares exceptions près (Breviglieri, 2007), le thème de l’apprentissage est complètement absent des travaux sur les espaces publics urbains. Constater l’emploi d’un vocabulaire anxiogène vis-à-vis de la foule chez certains adolescents n’est alors qu’une première étape de recherche. Celle-ci doit alors être complétée par la compréhension du non usage de ce vocabulaire par les autres jeunes Plus largement, comment expliquer le rapport différencié entretenu par ces adolescents aux rassemblements de personnes dans les espaces publics urbains ? Nous avons une acception large de ces espaces publics, qui incluent selon nous autant l’espace des transports en commun que des lieux de mobilité divers (notamment Châtelet, les Champs Elysées, les grands centres commerciaux de banlieue comme Rosny ou La Défense). Les deux extraits d’entretien cités précédemment montrent ainsi bien que l’emploi du terme de « foule » par les adolescents peut porter sur des rassemblements urbains variés. Le jugement porté sur ces rassemblements dépend ainsi très fortement de la fréquentation et des qualités des lieux où ils prennent place. La perception qu’ont les adolescents des différents lieux fréquentés, dans leur matérialité et leur sensorialité, devra donc être examinée avec soin.

Foule lieu de tension potentielle, d’indifférence, de menace ou d’anonymat ?

12Les adolescents de quartiers populaires d’Ile de France développent quatre grandes perceptions idéales typiques des rassemblements de personnes dans les espaces publics urbains. Certains adolescents se caractérisent tout d’abord par une vision de la foule urbaine et de son anonymat comme une source d’animation et de tension potentielles qu’ils opposent à la « galère » régnant sur le lieu de résidence. L’invisibilité qu’elle procure permet une confrontation plus ou moins conflictuelle avec les autres adolescents (séduction, raillerie, agression plus ou moins bon enfant), sans trop risquer d’être contrôlé voire interpellé par la police. D’autres adolescents développent pour leur part une véritable phobie vis-à-vis des foules urbaines. Ils considèrent cette foule et la présence massive d’inconnus comme une menace, à la fois d’agressions potentielles, mais également de perte d’identité. Une troisième catégorie est constituée d’adolescents se déclarant indifférents aux foules urbaines. Ils privilégient la fréquentation de lieux fermés ou moins fréquentés, dans lesquels ils ont leurs habitudes. Ils ne voient d’intérêt à la fréquentation des foules urbaines que dans des occasions spécifiques comme les grandes festivités du Nouvel An. Enfin, une partie des adolescents utilisent le vocabulaire de l’espace public pour décrire ces rassemblements. Ils valorisent ainsi la présence d’un anonymat et d’une diversité auxquels ils n’ont pas accès sur leur lieu de résidence. Ils aiment se perdre dans la foule, qui leur offre des possibilités de contact, moins conflictuel que pour le premier groupe, avec d’autres adolescents inconnus.

13Ces différentes perceptions des foules urbaines différencient très fortement les adolescents de ZUS. Elles sont cependant en partie contingentes à l’âge, aux conditions de la mobilité ainsi qu’aux qualités des lieux fréquentés. Le retour biographique dans les entretiens et l’évolution de certains jeunes durant l’enquête ethnographique montrent ainsi que ces perceptions peuvent évoluer dans le temps avec très souvent un passage de la « foule tension » à la « foule espace public ». De même, certains adolescents utilisent, dans un même entretien, le vocabulaire de la « foule tension » ou de la « foule espace public » selon les lieux qu’ils fréquentent ou selon qu’ils se soient déplacés en groupe ou non.

La « foule tension »

14Nous désignons tout d’abord par le terme « foule tension » un rapport particulier aux rassemblements urbains chez des adolescents qui y recherchent une animation, qu’ils ne trouvent pas sur le lieu de résidence. Cette recherche d’animation passe en grande partie par la confrontation plus ou moins tendue avec les autres adolescents présents dans ces rassemblements urbains :

Généralement à Rosny on rentre pas dans les magasins. On va au centre commercial, on marche mais on rentre pas trop dans les magasins, celui qui veut acheter un truc il va rentrer avec deux autres personnes, les autres nous on reste dehors. Mais la différence avec notre quartier, c’est que là bas y’a quelque chose à faire, tu galères pas, chez nous c’est la galère t’es posé et tu dis « ben on fait quoi ? », alors que quand tu te déplaces voilà quoi peut- être qu’il y aura une embrouille ou n’importe quoi… Y’a de l’animation.

L’animation elle commence à Rosny ou dès le trajet de bus ?

Non, dès le trajet de bus. Y’a rien de spécial, mais je sais pas, y’a celui qui fout la merde, celui qui… C’est pas tout le monde et c’est gentil, c’est plutôt avec des jeunes de mon âge. Y’en a un qui voit une fille, il va la voir et après il se mange un vent, après voilà. (…) Dans le centre commercial c’est pareil, des fois y’a des embrouilles, si y’a quelqu’un qui fait problème ben on y va. Généralement c’est le regard, mais j’ai des potes ils cherchent un peu, ils marchent à côté du gars, ils le collent lui mettent un coup d’épaule, ils lui rentrent dedans comme ça si le mec il répond…On provoque d’autres mecs de cité, généralement c’est toujours comme ça, on provoque d’autres jeunes. (…) Ca part vite, dès que la première patate elle part c’est bon on rentre dans le délire. Mais bon ça arrive pas trop souvent quand même, ça se passe pas trop souvent, ça arrive pas à chaque fois qu’on y va on va dire. Après les vigiles ils arrivent, ils contrôlent. Des fois après on recroise des groupes avec qui on s’est embrouillé, ben on les regarde et c’est tout. (Collégien, 15 ans).

15Cette recherche d’animation concerne alors la confrontation à trois catégories de jeunes : les filles, les adolescents qui vont être catégorisés « jeunes de cité » et enfin ceux qui vont être catégorisés comme « parisiens » ou « bolos », c’est-à-dire craintifs, exploitables et ne répondant pas aux provocations. Or, cette confrontation ne sera pas la même selon la nature des rassemblements urbains où elle a lieu : les espaces à proximité du quartier de résidence, les grands rassemblements festifs comme le Nouvel An ou le 14 Juillet, dans les grandes centralités commerciales de Paris intra-muros comme Châtelet.

16Le premier type de rassemblements urbains fréquentés par ces adolescents prend place dans des lieux jugés accueillants en raison de leur fréquentation par des jeunes de même origine ethnique et sociale. D’autres caractéristiques rendent également, selon eux, ces lieux hospitaliers : type d’enseigne et de restaurant présents, architecture, présence de personnes du quartier y travaillant. Ces lieux peuvent se situer aux portes de la capitale (marché aux Puces de Porte de Clignancourt, Foire du Trône) mais sont le plus souvent les grandes centralités commerciales situées à proximité du quartier de résidence : Rosny 2 à Rosny, Belle Epine à Thiais, Parinor à Aulnay, les Trois Fontaines à Cergy (Saint Pierre, 2002). Ces centres commerciaux sont fréquentés par de nombreux adolescents du département, qu’ils soient issus des classes moyennes ou des quartiers populaires. Ils offrent alors des occasions de séduction entre filles et garçons, mais également de provocations d’autres adolescents catégorisés comme « jeunes de cité » :

Tu t’es déjà embrouillé pour passer le temps ?

Oui, des fois à Rosny. Je sais pas, quand y’a beaucoup de gens, des fois y’ a quelqu’un il regarde mal, ou y’a quelqu’un il pousse, même sans faire exprès… C’est toujours avec des mecs de cité, parce que les autres, ils font pas ça. Les tecktonick tout ça, ils font pas ça, ils passent, ils calculent pas, ils sont dans leur délire. Les mecs de cité, eux ils calculent. Mais on fait ça quand on est en bande, quand on est tout seul on fait pas. Je sais pas, on voit une autre bande, mais on sait à qui on s’attaque en fait, on va pas s’attaquer à des grands de deux mètres cinq, balèses et tout, on sait à qui on s’attaque en fait, après y’en a un qui pousse…Mais ça a jamais dégénéré, juste quelqu’un une fois il s’est pris un coup de matraque électrique. Par un surveillant de Rosny 2. Souvent, ils nous attrapent avant qu’on fasse, parce qu’on dirait ils ont des caméras dedans, parce qu’ils nous guettent et comme avant de faire ça on fait d’autres trucs, y’a quelqu’un il va dans un magasin et il rigole, ben après on se fait attraper. C’est un peu un jeu, des fois on fait ça juste ça pour les emmerder. Ca passe le temps. Par exemple, quelqu’un il veut acheter des trucs, il a pas de sous, il voit quelqu’un passer il lui dit « t’as pas des sous », et si l’autre il veut pas, ben ça va se battre (…) Ben, si ils ont des grands frères, ben on est là, ils viennent dans la cité, ben on est là et ça part. Soit ils reviennent tout seul et on revient tout seul, soit ils reviennent avec leurs grands frères et nous avec les grands frères. Mais c’est jamais arrivé, parce qu’en général ils savent pas de quelle cité on vient, parce qu’à Rosny y’a tout le monde qui y va, on sait pas de quelle cité ils sont non plus, on va dire on se retrouve jamais (Lycéen 16 ans).

17Cette appropriation ludique des rassemblements urbains situés à proximité du domicile pour en faire des lieux d’animation et de provocation concerne alors également les transports en commun. C’est particulièrement le cas sur les lignes joignant le quartier de résidence et les centralités commerciales à proximité. En effet, sur certains tronçons de lignes et à certains horaires, les jeunes savent qu’ils ont peu de risque de se faire contrôler et investissent le lieu en nombre. Ce savoir est d’ailleurs partagé par l’opérateur de transport et les autres usagers plus âgés, qui bien souvent évitent de prendre le transport à cet horaire :

J’aime bien aller à Rosny avec mes potes, c’est marrant dans le bus, on y va à 10,11, on prend la moitié du bus, le chauffeur il pête un câble parce qu’on fait trop de bruit, on parle fort et tout, on met la musique, des fois on chante, des fois y’en a même qui danse… C’est marrant, c’est la fête, à chaque fois c’est comme ça. C’est marrant y’a même des fois des gens ils nous connaissent pas ils viennent ils dansent aussi. On rigole, j’aime bien, à l’aller et au retour c’est la même chose. Chaque fois qu’on rentre dans un bus, même si c’est juste pour une station, c’est obligé qu’on mette de la musique (Collégien, 15 ans).

18Le second type de rassemblements urbains dans lesquels ces adolescents aiment à trouver de l’animation sont les grands rassemblements festifs organisés dans les rues de Paris pour la Fête de la Musique, le Quatorze Juillet ou le Nouvel An. L’invisibilité procurée par la foule à cette occasion permet des relations de séduction ou de provocation avec des jeunes d’autres milieux sociaux, sans trop risquer d’être contrôlé voire interpellé par la police ou les vigiles :

Notre délire dans la foule en général, c’est foutre la merde. Pas trop foutre la merde, mais c’est pour s’amuser bien comme il faut. C’est pas bien ce qu’ils font, mais y’en a qui vont casser les couilles aux gens dans le métro, leur poser des questions qu’ils ont pas le droit de poser, y’a des filles ils vont aller la faire chier « ouais donne- moi ton numéro ». Puis après quand on arrive au concert à la fête de la musique, ben on embête des gens, on leur lance des trucs, de l’eau… comme n’importe quelle bande de potes quoi. (…) C’est plutôt les jeunes comme nous qu’on embête, pas les victimes, eux on les laisse tranquille, ou sans ça les filles. Les adultes, nous on les laisse de côté. On drague et on embête. Des fois, on commence à draguer et dès qu’elle commence à foutre un vent, ben là ça commence à devenir embêter. Le mec il va se manger un vent, ben il est pas content de se manger un vent, alors il va l’embêter, pour pas dire casser les couilles. (…) On regarde le spectacle, on danse, y’en a qui vont draguer, nous on rigole, y’en a un il va se manger un grand vent on va rigoler. (…) Par exemple, la nouvelle année avec les potes on a tout fait, vraiment le bordel. On crie « bonne année » partout, on jette des bouteilles… C’est bon enfant, ça a jamais trop dégénéré… Bon après y’a toujours des bagarres, si après y’a un autre groupe de jeunes qu’est chaud, ben on va pas rigoler avec eux (Lycéen, 17 ans).

Le premier Janvier on est allé sur les Champs. J’aime bien, y’a une bonne ambiance, tu peux taper de partout, après y’a tellement de monde qu’ils savent pas c’est qui, ça fait rigoler. Même si par exemple tu te manges un coup par derrière, t’es tellement heureux comme c’est le premier janvier qu’ils disent rien. Dès que je me mangeais un coup nous on le coursait mais y’avait des gens ils disaient rien, c’était les gens de Paris et tout, ils étaient là on mettait des coups par derrière et ils disaient rien, ils rigolaient, ils étaient heureux. C’était marrant, c’était des vrais coups, on leur mettait des coups par derrière, ils tombaient par terre et ils rigolaient. Ils étaient sous l’effet de…, ils étaient bourrés, ils étaient mal quoi. C’était des gens de Paris ça se voyait, avec les vestes longues et tout. Ils étaient en train de danser au milieu de la rue, ils dansaient et on leur mettait des coups de pompe, après ils tombaient par terre et après ils se relevaient ils dansaient. Ils s’énervaient pas, on dirait ils avaient peur, ils voulaient pas venir alors qu’ils savaient très bien que c’était nous, ils rigolaient. Nous on marchait, on marchait, en fait on a fait tous les Champs en marchant. (Lycéen, 16 ans).

19Cette invisibilité procurée par ces grands rassemblements festifs tranche selon eux avec le sentiment qu’ils ont habituellement de ne pas être les bienvenus dans les grandes centralités de Paris intra-muros. Ce sentiment concerne prioritairement le centre commercial des Halles et ses environs :

Je me sentais pas à ma place à Châtelet. J’avais vraiment l’impression que ça se voyait trop que je venais pas d’ici. En fait quand je marchais dans la rue et que je regardais les gens autour de moi, j’avais l’impression que sur ma tête y’avait marqué que je venais pas d’ici. Peut être que ça se voyait pas, mais c’était une impression que j’avais… Je me sentais pas forcément mal à l’aise, mais ça me faisait bizarre, déjà les gens ils me regardaient bizarrement, j’avais cette impression là. Y’en avait certain ça se voyait dans le regard, on avait vraiment l’impression qu’ils savaient qu’on était pas d’ici (Collégienne, 15 ans).

20Contrairement à d’autres adolescents (voir supra), ils ne sont pas sensibles et ne se reconnaissent pas dans la diversité de styles vestimentaires présente dans ces lieux :

J’aime pas traîner là-bas c’est tout. A Châtelet, si t’es pas gothique ou tecktonick, ben les mecs ils te regardent bizarre. C’est quoi ces conneries ? J’y suis allé il y a deux semaines, j’ai vu trente gars gothiques qui marchaient comme ça. C’est pas que j’aime pas, ils font ce qu’ils veulent, mais je préfère les éviter, je vais pas là-bas (Lycéen, 17 ans).

21En conséquence, ces adolescents développent une cartographie des rassemblements urbains extérieurs au quartier reposant sur une vision d’un monde urbain clivé. Ils distinguent ainsi les lieux fréquentés par des jeunes de même origine géographique, sociale et ethnique qu’eux, et les lieux fréquentés par les autres citadins, en particulier les adolescents de Paris intra muros. Il est d’ailleurs symptomatique qu’ils décrivent de la même manière les « parisiens » et les « bolos » (expression qui désigne au départ les personnes étrangères à la cité venues s’y fournir en drogue ou en vêtements) : craintifs, exploitables et ne répondant pas aux provocations. Ils trouvent des indices de ce clivage dans le style vestimentaire et le comportement :

Les jeunes aussi là-bas ils s’habillent bizarre. Ils ont des manières bizarres de s’habiller. Comme à Châtelet, y’a les gothiques et tout, on dirait qu’ils ont tous un problème dans leur tête en fait. Dans les cités il va passer pour un débile le mec avec les jeans serrés, les longues coupes on dirait des filles.

Comment tu vois qu’un mec il vient de cité ?

La manière de s’habiller. Dans les cités c’est un peu large et à Paris c’est serré, ils se prennent pour des filles je crois (rires). (Lycéen, 16 ans)

Quand vous bougez à Paris, comment tu vois les autres jeunes ?

C’est des bolos on va dire.

Comment tu vois qu’un mec c’est un bolos ?

Je sais pas, sa tête, la manière de parler, façon de s’habiller, tout ça quoi. Tout ce qui est tecktonick par exemple. Voilà bolos c’est des gens ils ont peur de parler, par exemple y’en a un qui marche, il répond pas c’est « vas y casses toi bolos », tu le provoques il répond pas (Collégien 15 ans).

22Cette conscience forte des clivages entre jeunes dans les rassemblements urbains recoupe deux phénomènes : d’une part un fort sentiment d’appartenance au quartier de résidence, en raison notamment de la forte sociabilité amicale qui y règne ; mais d’autre part une conscience aigue de la ségrégation, entendue ici comme une concentration résidentielle dans leur quartier d’adolescents de même origine ethnique et sociale. Cette conscience s’actualiserait alors dans leurs déplacements lors d’interactions avec des citadins d’un autre milieu social. Ces derniers leur feraient sentir qu’ils ne sont pas forcément les bienvenus, en raison du triple stigmate, social, ethnique et d’âge, dont ils sont porteurs. Différents indices leur font sentir cette hostilité : regards désobligeants, jugement agressif sur le comportement en particulier l’écoute de musique et l’appropriation du train, refus de s’engager dans des interactions :

On pourrait pas débarquer avec ma bande de potes à Paris. Ca c’est clair et net. Ca serait mal vu, une bande de six noirs et arabes, qui ont des capuches alors qu’il pleut pas, ça serait mal vu. En plus avec des baggys, ou avec des joggings, ils se disent…voilà quoi.

Si c’est par rapport aux vêtements, ce regard négatif il peut venir de personnes noires également ?

Ca serait plus des blancs qui diraient ça, mais même si je rencontre des noirs à Paris forcément, les noirs ils ont l’air vraiment « bien », ils marchent normalement, ils parlent bien, ils sont bien habillés…donc c’est pas des noirs de cité, y’a une grosse différence.

Toi tu te sens plus proche de qui ?

Clairement « noir de cité ». C’est encore par rapport aux blancs on va dire. Un « noir de Paris », un blanc il passe à côté il continue comme ça (NDLR : mime une trajectoire rectiligne), alors qu’avec un « noir de cité », ils passeront comme ça (NDLR : mime l’évitement), le blanc il le regardera comme ça, il le regardera mal. Même encore à cinq kilomètres, il se retournera encore pour dire « il fait quoi là lui ? », ça tu le sens clairement (…)C’est pareil l’autre fois on est allé acheter PES 2006 à Virgin avec ma soeur, à Paris sur les Champs, , on a fini d’acheter et on est sorti du magasin, le vigile c’était un blanc, il nous dit « madame, je peux vérifier ? », on dit « oui bien sur », il regarde normal, le ticket de caisse tout est en règle normal, on se dit qu’il fait son métier et tout, mais moi j’ai regardé derrière y’a un autre mec il est passé et le vigile a pas vérifié. Et le mec c’était un blanc, comme quoi on est trois noirs et ça pose problème. Donc tu vois, moi net quand je vais à Paris, je me sens dans ma bulle, dans mon cocon, j’essaie de passer inaperçu, parce que je sais après forcément j’aurais des problèmes de discrimination. Même durant le trajet de métro, je sais qu’il y aura quelque chose à Paris, je pense déjà aux choses que je vais dire aux vigiles pour qu’ils me laissent rentrer dans les magasins, je sais que je vais devoir faire face à ces situations (Lycéen, 17 ans).

23Ces adolescents ont alors fortement conscience de l’image qu’ils dégagent et de la méfiance qu’ils suscitent. Ils peuvent toutefois en jouer dans une posture agressive et une mise en scène de soi, de sa virilité et de sa résidence en ZUS, qui n’est pas forcément possible dans leur quartier par peur des réactions des jeunes plus âgés. Ce triple stigmate est renforcé dans les interactions avec les veilleurs d’espaces (vigiles, contrôleurs, mais surtout les policiers) soupçonnés de vouloir entraver leur mobilité en adoptant des comportements spécifiques à leur égard :

Y’a trop de contrôles de police, quand on est aux Champs et qu’on est quinze, vingt, ben direct on se fait contrôler. Direct, dès qu’on sort du métro en général, on marche dix minutes et ça y’est on se fait contrôler. Du coup on va rarement aux Champs Elysées ou on y va à moins. Quand vraiment, genre c’est le jour de l’An, ben on y va, là on y est allé cette année, c’était bien, y’avait beaucoup de monde, bon ils nous ont saoulé quand même, on marchait et ils sont arrivés à 150 ils nous ont entouré, les CRS, ils commençaient à nous insulter, à nous mettre des baffes, ils nous embrouillaient en fait et ils attendaient juste qu’on réagisse, et vu que nous on savait que si on réagit c’était foutu, ben on parlait pas on parlait pas, on restait comme ça tranquille. En fait ils provoquent pour pouvoir intervenir, parce que si on les tape pas après ils peuvent rien faire. Ils nous ont dit « rentrez dans vos cités bande de cons, nanana », ils nous disent « contre le mur, contre le mur », ils nous mettent contre le mur et dès qu’on est contre le mur ils nous mettent des baffes de derrière. Ils disent « bande de cons, vous faîtes quoi ici ? »(…) En fait c’est surtout dans les lieux touristiques. Je sais pas pourquoi, mais je crois que c’est parce que sur les Champs Elysées y’a pas souvent des groupes de jeunes qui viennent, vraiment des groupes de jeunes, donc ça fait ils se disent « on vient là pour faire des trucs », alors que nous on est venu pour se balader, mais eux ils se disent qu’on est venu faire des arrachés ou je sais pas, donc ça fait ils préfèrent prévoir. Ca fait ils nous contrôlent comme pour dire « on est là, on est là alors faites pas de conneries », après ils nous laissent, mais après s’ils nous revoient par exemple, ça peut être une heure ou deux après, ben ils nous recontrôlent, une autre patrouille, pour nous faire comprendre qu’il faut pas qu’on reste. Ils attendent qu’on réagisse, par exemple ils nous mettent une baffe et ils attendent qu’on riposte comme ça ils nous sautent tous dessus. C’est pour ça qu’il faut être intelligent (Lycéen, 17 ans).

24Cette hostilité qu’ils perçoivent de la part d’autres citadins et des veilleurs d’espace les conduit alors à vivre leur présence dans certaines foules urbaines comme une épreuve. La mobilité en groupe peut certes les aider à surmonter cette épreuve, mais ils minimisent bien souvent leur fréquentation de ces foules et privilégient les lieux où ils se sentent davantage les bienvenus. Cette vision d’un monde urbain clivé sur des variables sociales et ethniques est alors beaucoup moins présente dans les trois autres grandes catégories d’adolescents de catégorie populaire que nous allons maintenant présenter.

La « foule indifférente »

25La « foule indifférente » constitue le second grand type de rapport aux rassemblements urbains chez les adolescents de quartier populaire. Ils essaient de minimiser leur fréquentation des grands rassemblements urbains et n’y recherchent pas des occasions de rencontre. La présence dans des lieux très fréquentés est alors simplement vue comme fonctionnelle, conséquence la plupart du temps d’un achat ou d’une sortie entre amis :

Des fois quand je vais à Châtelet, y’a trop de monde c’est pas très… on est pas très à l’aise, serré et tout. Moi quand je vais là bas c’est pour acheter des vêtements, pas trop pour me promener ou pour faire des rencontres, quand je veux me promener c’est dans mon quartier. A Châtelet, on va acheter des vêtements, je regarde les vêtements pas les gens. Moi j’aime pas sortir et m’ennuyer, je préfère aller dans un endroit précis, faire ce que j’ai à faire, et après je rentre chez moi. J’aime pas me promener comme ça, j’ai rien à faire, ça arrive quelque fois mais c’est rare, quand j’ai pas envie de rester chez moi ma copine elle dit « viens on sort », après on sort on a un peu d’argent. Je peux sortir, me promener, mais je vais faire quelque chose, je vais pas prendre le métro comme ça, faut que j’aille acheter des vêtements, quelque chose de précis. Quand y’a pas de but précis c’est dans mon quartier. Je vais chez mes amis, j’appelle ou elles m’appellent (Lycéenne, 15 ans).

26Ces adolescents se déplacent généralement pour exercer une passion (danse hip hop, mangas, musique…) qui les a amenés à sortir de leur quartier et à fréquenter des adolescents d’autres origines géographiques et sociales. Cette passion a structuré fortement leur mobilité, au sens où leurs déplacements ne sauraient être que fonctionnels : l’usage de l’espace extérieur au quartier est dévolu uniquement à l’exercice de la passion ou d’activités en compagnie de personnes rencontrées dans le cadre de celle-ci. À l’exception des grands rassemblements festifs décrits précédemment (14 Juillet, Nouvel An…), ils n’aiment ainsi guère passer du temps à flâner et à se perdre dans les foules urbaines. De la même manière, ils ne voient dans les déplacements en transports commun qu’une simple fonctionnalité et ils s’accommodent de la co-présence avec les autres usagers plus qu’ils ne l’apprécient. Ces adolescents se projettent alors vers une mobilité en voiture et rejettent très fortement la promiscuité du métro et du RER :

J’écoute de la musique dans le métro. En fait, je suis pas patiente, quand je vais quelque part je veux direct y aller, que ça se termine et tout. Le trajet il me saoule en plus, il faut pas venir me parler, si on me parle je vais m’énerver, des fois y’a des gens ils viennent, ils accostent et tout ça, et c’est trop saoulant. Parce que sinon moi je me retourne et je pars quand c’est comme ça, mais quand on est dans le métro forcément on est trop gênés. Ils viennent « ouais ouais t’as pas un numéro et tout », après ça me saoule, je me lève je me déplace. Donc voilà, parce que déjà je suis grave énervée parce que j’aime pas le métro, en plus après on vient on me saoule, ça m’énerve quoi (Lycéenne, 16 ans).

La « foule menace »

27Le troisième rapport aux rassemblements urbains, la « foule menace », concerne des adolescents qui sont non pas indifférents aux foules, mais en ont une profonde phobie. Ils expliquent cette phobie par le sentiment d’étouffer dans les grands rassemblements et surtout la crainte d’agressions et de contacts avec des individus louches. Cette peur a la plupart du temps été transmise par des parents qui encadrent très fortement la mobilité de leurs enfants et ne les autorisent que très rarement à sortir du quartier de résidence :

Ma mère elle veut pas que j’aille à Paris, ça lui dit rien. J’ai la carte Imagin’R mais elle veut pas que j’y aille, elle aime pas Paris, elle a pas confiance (…) La carte Imagin’R je l’ai depuis cette année, mais je l’attendais pas vraiment non plus avec impatience, j’aime pas les transports en fait aussi. J’aime pas prendre les transports, j’ai pas confiance y’a toujours soit des pervers soit des gens bizarres…

Et y’a des transports où tu te sens plus à l’aise ?

Le tram et le bus. Le métro je le prends jamais, faut pas que je sois tout seul pour prendre le métro, le RER encore moins. C’est le tram que je préfère, alors que le métro j’aime pas, quand je descends en bas j’ai peur, je me sens pas en confiance. Y’a plein de pervers, des gens qui viennent t’accoster pour rien, soit qui t’agressent. J’ai peur de ça en fait.

Tu l’as déjà pris ?

Ouais. Avec des copines. Elles elles ont confiance, elles vont partout elles, elles s’en foutent. Quand elles partent, je vais avec elles, mais j’ai pas confiance. Mais j’ai une pote elle a une gazeuse sur elle, donc ça va maintenant on est en confiance (rires). Elle l’a achetée spécial pour ça. (…) Mais bon le métro quand je suis avec mes potes ça va, on rigole, je pense pas à que je vais me faire agresser et tout, parce qu’elles savent comment faire pour pas que je pense à ça, mais sinon non j’aime pas le métro.

Et Paris ?

Je suis pas trop à l’aise, parce que j’aime pas Paris non plus, je sais pas j’aime pas j’ai confiance nulle part sauf à la campagne parce que y’a personne » (Lycéenne, 16 ans).

28Cette peur des rassemblements urbains concerne principalement les mobilités vers Paris. Elle se cristallise alors très fortement sur les transports en commun, notamment le métro et le RER.

29Ceux-ci, lieux de promiscuité et de contacts physiques, matérialisent en effet les craintes d’agression. L’emploi du bus est au contraire beaucoup moins anxiogène, en raison de la présence du conducteur et du sentiment de pouvoir quitter ce lieu plus facilement à tout moment.

Déjà j’aime pas le métro, parce que chaque fois que j’y vais, je rencontre des gens bizarres. Des vieux qui m’accostent alors qu’ils sont bourrés, ça m’est même arrivé en journée, ou des jeunes. Y’en a même un carrément, on était dans le métro et il me regardait, il devait avoir 35, 40 ans et quand le métro il s’est arrêté, je me lève pour sortir, il commence à me suivre et à me toucher, j’ai hurlé, y’a tout le monde qui me regardait j’ai fait un cinéma dans le métro. C’était à Gare du Nord. J’ai commencé à crier, à l’engueuler, y’avait tout le monde qui regardait, « tu me touches pas toi, t’es fou, qu’est-ce que tu mets tes mains sur moi »… et il répondait pas, il regardait par terre et il répondait pas. C’est pour ça que j’aime pas le métro, chaque fois que j’y vais il m’arrive quelque chose. Je le prends une fois par mois, mais c’est quand je suis obligée de le prendre que je le prends, par exemple si je peux y aller en bus je vais y aller en bus, je préfère le bus. En plus le métro c’est souterrain. Les gens ils sont bizarres dedans (Lycéenne, 16 ans).

La « foule espace public »

30Au contraire du rapport précédent, un dernier groupe d’adolescents témoigne d’une forte attraction pour les rassemblements urbains. Ils utilisent pour décrire ces rassemblements un vocabulaire très proche de celui employé par Isaac Joseph sur les espaces publics. C’est la raison pour laquelle nous avons nommé ce rapport « la foule espace public ». Ces adolescents apprécient fortement les rassemblements dans les grandes centralités commerciales métropolitaines, en particulier autour du forum des Halles à Châtelet. Certains d’entre eux aiment également se rendre dans le quartier de Trocadéro, en raison des nombreux spectacles de rue qui s’y tiennent. Ces rassemblements permettent d’après les adolescents une coupure avec le quartier de résidence en offrant anonymat, diversité de fréquentation et possibilités de rencontre. En effet, ils sont tout d’abord le lieu d’une mise en scène de soi, les jeunes adoptant, grâce à l’anonymat, des comportements non tolér