Ebola: C’est Sarkozy qui avait raison (Perfect storm: Outdated beliefs and funeral rituals, witch craftery, denial, conspiracy theories, suspicion of local governments, distrust of western medicine, civil war, corrupt dictatorship, collapsed health systems)

18 octobre, 2014
https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xfp1/v/t1.0-9/10405614_4809587734638_648492990704325538_n.jpg?oh=2c9c795d1d03a335609916c27cf1b805&oe=54B2DF56&__gda__=1424902741_06ca2d972aa259e25142ae08c8c666e1

Nous sommes là pour dire et réclamer : laissez entrer les peuples noirs sur la grande scène de l’Histoire. Aimé Césaire
Ebola (…) J’ai l’impression qu’il y a vraiment un programme d’extermination qui est en train d’être mis en place … Dieudonné
Le drame de l’Afrique, c’est que l’homme africain n’est pas assez entré dans l’histoire. Le paysan africain, qui, depuis des millénaires, vit avec les saisons, dont l’idéal de vie est d’être en harmonie avec la nature, ne connaît que l’éternel recommencement du temps rythmé par la répétition sans fin des mêmes gestes et des mêmes paroles. Dans cet imaginaire, où tout recommence toujours, il n’y a de place ni pour l’aventure humaine, ni pour l’idée de progrès. Dans cet univers où la nature commande tout, l’homme échappe à l’angoisse de l’histoire qui tenaille l’homme moderne mais reste immobile au milieu d’un ordre immuable où tout semble écrit d’avance. Jamais l’homme ne s’élance vers l’avenir. Jamais il ne lui vient à l’idée de sortir de la répétition pour s’inventer un destin. Le problème de l’Afrique, et permettez à un ami de l’Afrique de le dire, il est là. Guaino-Sarkozy
Moi, je pense que non seulement l’homme africain est entré dans l’histoire mais qu’il a même été le premier à y entrer. Rama Yade
Quelqu’un est venu ici vous dire que ‘l’Homme africain n’est pas entré dans l’histoire’. Pardon, pardon pour ces paroles humiliantes et qui n’auraient jamais dû être prononcées et – je vous le dis en confidence – qui n’engagent ni la France, ni les Français. Ségolène Royal
Et si Sarkozy avait raison… (…) L’opinion africaine dite intellectuelle s’est mobilisée, depuis quelques temps, contre le discours de Dakar du président français Nicolas Sarkozy, considéré, à notre avis, sans raison, de discours raciste, méprisant, humiliant. Et pourtant il ne faisait que nous rappeler, amicalement, sans doute d’une manière brutale et maladroite, qu’il était temps que nous sortions de la préhistoire pour entrer dans l’histoire contemporaine d’un monde qui est faite d’imagination, de techniques, de sciences, au lieu de nous complaire dans la médiocrité actuelle de nos choix. Il nous faut, en effet, sortir de notre logique fataliste, fondée sur un ancrage intellectuel, philosophique et culturel dans un passé plusieurs fois centenaire alors que le siècle qui frappe à notre porte exige notre entrée dans l’histoire contemporaine. Baba Diouf (Le Soleil)
Aid, by itself, has never developed anything, but where it has been allied to good public policy, sound economic management, and a strong determination to battle poverty, it has made an enormous difference in countries like India, Indonesia, and even China. Those examples illustrate another lesson of aid. Where it works, it represents only a very small share of the total resources devoted to improving roads, schools, heath services, and other things essential for raising incomes. Aid must not overwhelm or displace local efforts; instead, it must settle with being the junior partner. Because of Africa’s needs, and the stubborn nature of its poverty, the continent has attracted far too much aid and far too much interfering by outsiders. (…) In the last 20 years, some states — like Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, and Mali — have broken the mould, recognized the importance of taking charge, and tried to use aid more strategically and efficiently. Some commentators would add Benin, Zambia, and Rwanda to that list. But most African governments remain stuck in a culture of dependence or indifference. There are still too many dictators in Africa (six have been in office for more than 25 years) and many elected leaders behave no differently. (…) The Blair Commission Report on Africa in 2005 reported that 70,000 trained professionals leave Africa every year, and until they — and the 40 percent of the continent’s savings that are held abroad — start coming home, we need to use aid more restrictively. An obvious solution is to focus aid on the small number of countries that are trying seriously to fight poverty and corruption. Other countries will need to wait — or settle with only small amounts of aid — until their politics or policies or attitudes to the private sector are more promising. We should also consider introducing incentives for countries to match outside assistance with greater progress in raising local funds. (…) We must not be distracted by recent news of Africa’s « spectacular » growth and its sudden attractiveness to private investment. Some basic things are changing on the continent, with real effects for the future; above all, Africans are speaking out and refusing to accept tired excuses from their governments. But the truth is that most of Africa’s growth — based on oil and mineral exports — has not made a whit of difference to the lives of most Africans. Political freedoms shrank on the continent last year, according to the U.S.-based Freedom House index. A quarter of school-age children are still not enrolled, according to World Bank statistics; many of those that are, are receiving a very mediocre education. And agricultural productivity — the key to reducing poverty — is essentially stagnant. The really good news is likely to stay local and seep out in small doses, until it eventually overwhelms the inertia and indifference of governments. Five years ago, Kenya managed to double its tax revenues because a former businessman, appointed to head the national revenue agency, took a hatchet to the dishonest practices of many tax collectors. He had every reason to do so. Only five percent of Kenya’s budget comes from foreign aid, compared with 40 percent in neighboring countries. This is a good example of the sometimes-perverse effects of aid, but also of the importance of imagination and individual initiative in promoting a better life for Africans. Robert Calderisi
A month ago I visited Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. This suburb of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is home to more than one million people, who eke out a living in an area of about one square mile — roughly 75% the size of New York’s Central Park. (…)  Kibera festers in Kenya, a country that has one of the highest ratios of development workers per capita. This is also the country where in 2004, British envoy Sir Edward Clay apologized for underestimating the scale of government corruption and failing to speak out earlier. Giving alms to Africa remains one of the biggest ideas of our time — millions march for it, governments are judged by it, celebrities proselytize the need for it. Calls for more aid to Africa are growing louder, with advocates pushing for doubling the roughly $50 billion of international assistance that already goes to Africa each year. Yet evidence overwhelmingly demonstrates that aid to Africa has made the poor poorer, and the growth slower. The insidious aid culture has left African countries more debt-laden, more inflation-prone, more vulnerable to the vagaries of the currency markets and more unattractive to higher-quality investment. It’s increased the risk of civil conflict and unrest (the fact that over 60% of sub-Saharan Africa’s population is under the age of 24 with few economic prospects is a cause for worry). Aid is an unmitigated political, economic and humanitarian disaster. Few will deny that there is a clear moral imperative for humanitarian and charity-based aid to step in when necessary, such as during the 2004 tsunami in Asia. Nevertheless, it’s worth reminding ourselves what emergency and charity-based aid can and cannot do. Aid-supported scholarships have certainly helped send African girls to school (never mind that they won’t be able to find a job in their own countries once they have graduated). This kind of aid can provide band-aid solutions to alleviate immediate suffering, but by its very nature cannot be the platform for long-term sustainable growth. Whatever its strengths and weaknesses, such charity-based aid is relatively small beer when compared to the sea of money that floods Africa each year in government-to-government aid or aid from large development institutions such as the World Bank. Over the past 60 years at least $1 trillion of development-related aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Yet real per-capita income today is lower than it was in the 1970s, and more than 50% of the population — over 350 million people — live on less than a dollar a day, a figure that has nearly doubled in two decades. Even after the very aggressive debt-relief campaigns in the 1990s, African countries still pay close to $20 billion in debt repayments per annum, a stark reminder that aid is not free. In order to keep the system going, debt is repaid at the expense of African education and health care. Well-meaning calls to cancel debt mean little when the cancellation is met with the fresh infusion of aid, and the vicious cycle starts up once again. (…) The most obvious criticism of aid is its links to rampant corruption. Aid flows destined to help the average African end up supporting bloated bureaucracies in the form of the poor-country governments and donor-funded non-governmental organizations. In a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in May 2004, Jeffrey Winters, a professor at Northwestern University, argued that the World Bank had participated in the corruption of roughly $100 billion of its loan funds intended for development. As recently as 2002, the African Union, an organization of African nations, estimated that corruption was costing the continent $150 billion a year, as international donors were apparently turning a blind eye to the simple fact that aid money was inadvertently fueling graft. With few or no strings attached, it has been all too easy for the funds to be used for anything, save the developmental purpose for which they were intended. (…) A constant stream of « free » money is a perfect way to keep an inefficient or simply bad government in power. As aid flows in, there is nothing more for the government to do — it doesn’t need to raise taxes, and as long as it pays the army, it doesn’t have to take account of its disgruntled citizens. No matter that its citizens are disenfranchised (as with no taxation there can be no representation). All the government really needs to do is to court and cater to its foreign donors to stay in power. Stuck in an aid world of no incentives, there is no reason for governments to seek other, better, more transparent ways of raising development finance (such as accessing the bond market, despite how hard that might be). The aid system encourages poor-country governments to pick up the phone and ask the donor agencies for next capital infusion. It is no wonder that across Africa, over 70% of the public purse comes from foreign aid. (…) Africa remains the most unstable continent in the world, beset by civil strife and war. Since 1996, 11 countries have been embroiled in civil wars. According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, in the 1990s, Africa had more wars than the rest of the world combined. (…) Proponents of aid are quick to argue that the $13 billion ($100 billion in today’s terms) aid of the post-World War II Marshall Plan helped pull back a broken Europe from the brink of an economic abyss, and that aid could work, and would work, if Africa had a good policy environment. Dambisa Moyo
En Afrique, oui, il y a un risque d’épidémisation, mais je ne pense pas qu’elle puisse s’étendre au reste du monde. Bien sûr, il y aura des cas sporadiques en Occident, on recensera encore quelques personnes contaminées venues d’Afrique, ainsi que quelques cas d’infections survenues au contact de ces malades. Mais cela restera très rare. D’une part, les conditions du cycle de propagation naturelle du virus ne sont pas réunies comme c’est le cas en Afrique, où nous avons un parasite porteur du virus, de fortes concentrations humaines, certains comportements humains ou rites particuliers (comme toucher les morts), des conditions sanitaires défavorables, un certain type d’alimentation, etc. D’autre part, le développement de la médecine occidentale permet de mettre en place des moyens d’action pour éviter une généralisation, avec notamment l’isolement absolu du patient, un strict protocole, des équipements médicaux pointus et le développement de stratégies de détection rapide du virus. Malgré un manque au niveau des traitements à l’heure actuelle, le risque n’est donc pas majeur dans les pays développés, mais Ebola sera l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines. Le XXe siècle a marqué le retour des épidémies : dans les années 70, sont apparues les fièvres hémorragiques (dont Ebola); dans les années 80, le VIH; dans les années 90, l’hépatite C; et dans les années 2000, le Sras, la grippe H1N1, le chikungunya, etc. Ces maladies n’ont pas toutes les mêmes caractéristiques épidémiologiques ni la même transmission vectorielle, mais elles se sont propagées à cause d’une série de facteurs, comportementaux et environnementaux. Les échanges, les migrations, les voyages intercontinentaux, mais aussi la pénétration humaine en forêt et la déforestation, qui ont amené les hommes à entrer en contact avec une faune sauvage porteuse d’agents pathogènes, ont favorisé la contamination. Et l’Afrique est un continent qui a un lot considérable d’agents infectieux. Il ne faut d’ailleurs pas oublier qu’Ebola n’est pas le seul fléau en Afrique. Des études ont montré que ce continent concentre 70% des cas de VIH et 90% des cas de choléra. Et 90% des décès de paludisme surviennent en Afrique. Mais il y a aussi toute une conjonction qui fait que c’est un continent malade. La structure sanitaire y est déficitaire, du fait des régimes instables ou des zones de guerre. C’est aussi un territoire de migration. Et encore une fois, les comportements humains sont souvent responsables de la propagation des virus. L’éducation en général, et l’éducation sanitaire en particulier, joue un rôle fondamental. De simples gestes d’hygiène permettraient de réduire les fléaux médicaux qui touchent l’Afrique. Par exemple, les diarrhées «normales» tuent chaque année des centaines de milliers d’enfants. Se laver les mains permettrait de réduire de 50% le taux de mortalité.(…)  Mais Ebola est plus dangereux dans le sens où tous les émonctoires (l’urine, la salive, le liquide séminal…) sont vecteurs de transmission. Le simple fait de toucher le patient est dangereux, ce qui n’est pas le cas avec le sida. Néanmoins, le sida est une maladie chronique de longue durée, tandis qu’Ebola est une maladie très aiguë, avec un très fort taux de mortalité, très rapide. Avec Ebola, l’épidémisation est donc moins forte. (…) J’espère en tout cas qu’Ebola servira de déclencheur pour les différents régimes politiques, qu’ils deviendront plus désireux d’investir l’argent dans un système de santé efficace, sans détourner les fonds. J’espère aussi que cette épidémie va faire prendre conscience aux organisations internationales qu’il faut accorder une aide majeure à l’Afrique, et lui apporter une aide logistique et humaine plus importante. On a commencé, mais c’est encore timide. Pour ce qui est de la société elle-même, des efforts considérables d’information sont à faire. Mais passé une période d’incompréhension et la recherche de responsables (la population met notamment en cause les pouvoirs politiques), la société pourra peut-être aussi changer beaucoup de comportements. Jean-Pierre Dedet
« After the typhoon, we got flooded with calls asking, ‘How do I give?' » Sweeny said. « With this (Ebola), we’re not getting those kinds of requests. » Why the difference? For starters, it’s been evident that national governments will need to shoulder the bulk of the financial burden in combatting Ebola, particularly as its ripple effects are increasingly felt beyond the epicenter in West Africa. Regine A. Webster of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, which advises nonprofits on disaster response strategies, said the epidemic blurred the lines in terms of the categories that guide some big donors. « This is a confusing issue for the private donor community — is it a disaster, or a health problem? » Webster said. « Institutions and individuals have been quite slow to respond. » Officials at InterAction, an umbrella group for U.S. relief agencies active abroad, see other intangible factors at work, including the video and photographic images emerging from West Africa. Joel Charny, InterAction’s vice president for humanitarian policy, said it was clear from the imagery out of Haiti and the Philippines that donations could help rebuild shattered homes and schools, while the images of Ebola are more frightening and less conducive to envisioning a happy ending. « People give when they see that there’s a plausible solution, » Charny said. « They can say, ‘If I give my $50 or $200, it’s going to translate in some tangible way into relieving suffering.’ … That makes them feel good. » « With Ebola, there’s kind of a fear factor, » he said. « Even competent agencies are feeling somewhat overwhelmed, and the nature of the disease — being so awful — makes it hard for people to engage. » Huffington Post
Le drame avec Ebola, c’est que cette épidémie s’attaque cruellement et insidieusement à nos valeurs culturelles ! Il y a par exemple la question des enterrements traditionnels, où les familles touchent le corps pendant les rites funéraires. Qui, à présent, pour s’occuper d’une personne emportée par le virus Ebola ? Au Liberia, de nombreux malades atteints par le virus Ebola, préfèrent rester chez eux plutôt que de se rendre dans les centres de santé. La psychose s’est répandue partout. Nul ne se sent désormais à l’abri, dans une Afrique lacérée par des traditions hétéroclites et des pratiques religieuses tenaces. Combattre le virus Ebola, que d’engagements, d’implications mais surtout de renoncements ! Des marchés aux rassemblements qu’occasionnent les naissances, les mariages, les baptêmes, les deuils, les prières et autres rites funéraires, les Africains aiment à s’illustrer comme de bons exemples. Qu’ils soient simples fidèles, parents, amis, connaissances ou voisins, ils ne veulent pas se voir rejetés pour avoir failli un tant soit peu.(…) Avec Ebola, au-delà des modes de vie, c’est aussi le mode de fonctionnement de la cellule familiale et de la société tout entière qu’il faudra revoir. Il faudra oser s’attaquer à des valeurs ancrées dans la cosmogonie africaine, revisiter nos croyances et nos comportements. De vrais défis ! Au Nigeria, on a dû incinérer le cadavre d’une victime d’Ebola. Le médecin qui l’avait soigné a aussi été mis en quarantaine. Pourra-t-on intégrer ces pratiques dans les nouvelles habitudes ? Il le faut pourtant. Pire que la peste et le choléra réunis, l’épidémie d’Ebola détruit les espaces de solidarité. Les pesanteurs socioculturelles ajoutées au manque de moyens (humains, matériels, financiers), le manque de coordination des actions, font de la fièvre rouge, une maladie aussi redoutable qu’effroyable sur le continent. Le médecin traitant, lui-même, est vulnérable. Une implication de l’Occident est requise. Elle doit être forte. Mais, parce qu’il engloutit des sommes colossales, l’Occident doit exiger en contrepartie que les dirigeants africains s’assument plus sérieusement que face au SIDA. En effet, le problème de la délinquance politique et économique reste toujours posé du côté de l’Afrique. Outre les questions relatives à l’hygiène publique et à l’assainissement, des problèmes de mal gouvernance se trouvent au cœur même de la gestion de nos grands fléaux. Pour le cas d’Ebola, celle-ci se propage parce que les politiques africaines de développement, de santé, d’environnement, de population tout court, sont généralement inadéquates. A preuve, des mesures préventives sont recommandées, sans que des dispositions ne soient toujours prises pour annihiler les conséquences fâcheuses au plan socio-économique. Il est bien de défendre aux gens de manger de la viande de brousse ou de chauves-souris, pour se prémunir contre l’infection au virus d’Ebola. Mais, que faire pour compenser les pertes au niveau des chasseurs, des intermédiaires et des vendeurs de viandes prisées de certaines populations ? Il faudra veiller à une saine utilisation des fonds qui seront mis à la disposition des Etats frappés par le mal. Le passé est à ce sujet suffisamment lourd d’enseignements. Face au SIDA, que n’a-t-on pas vu sur ce continent? La délinquance à tous les étages, impliquant des personnes insignifiantes et des hauts cadres, y compris le sommet de l’Etat. Face à l’épidémie d’Ebola, des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises. Si Ebola fait des ravages au point d’ébranler l’âme de l’Afrique, il faut éviter que les délinquants à col blanc ne perpétuent continuellement la saignée du continent, en profitant sans vergogne et impunément des efforts de la communauté internationale. L’expérience de fléaux comme celle du SIDA montre qu’en Afrique, une saine gestion des fonds, sur fond de bonne gouvernance politique, est un bon préalable au recul de l’épidémie. Le Pays
L’état de vétusté des infrastructures sanitaires, la faiblesse des ressources humaines, les problèmes d’hygiène et les traditions funéraires, entre autres, font des pays africains un terreau fertile à la propagation de ce virus. Dans le domaine culturel justement, cette épidémie est en train de détruire l’âme africaine. Les efforts pour contenir les infections commandent, entre autres, une attitude à la limite du rejet des victimes. Les parents et voisins sont invités à éviter de toucher aux corps des personnes ayant succombé, afin d’éviter tout risque de contamination par le virus. Nul doute que cette capacité du virus à se transmettre même après la mort de sa victime, est une cause de panique au sein des populations et cela sape les valeurs légendaires de solidarité africaine de même que des pans de la culture en ce qui concerne le traitement des corps des personnes décédées. (…) la vérité c’est que l’Afrique a, une fois de plus, failli. Comme à son habitude, elle aura manqué de prospective. Si non, comment comprendre qu’un virus qui a fait son apparition depuis 1976 et fait jusque-là de nombreuses victimes en Afrique centrale, n’ait pas, près de 40 ans après, encore été pris au sérieux au point qu’il puisse ressurgir et faire autant de victimes ? Comment comprendre que malgré tous les discours sur la souveraineté de l’Afrique, le sort et le salut du continent soient encore entre les mains des mêmes Occidentaux régulièrement conspués ? Que reste-t-il vraiment encore de la fierté des Africains ? Hélas, tout ce qui intéresse vraiment les dirigeants africains, c’est le pouvoir. (…) Aux Africains donc de se ressaisir, à commencer par leurs dirigeants, pour mériter le respect qu’ils réclament des autres, mais aussi et surtout pour prendre en main eux-mêmes leur destin. Le Pays
Ebola met à nu les tares des systèmes sanitaires africains La gouvernance des Etats africains présente beaucoup d’insuffisances. (…) Une des illustrations les plus frappantes de ce fait est la situation chaotique dans laquelle se trouvent nos systèmes de santé. En effet, la propagation du virus Ebola a contribué à mettre à nu toute l’étendue de cette triste réalité, qui doit désormais interpeller toutes les consciences. Lorsque l’on fait l’état des lieux, l’on peut avoir des raisons objectives d’être remonté contre nos gouvernants.Les zones d’ombre sont nombreuses. Elles se rapportent notamment à l’insuffisance du personnel soignant qualifié, au niveau rudimentaire des plateaux techniques, à la gestion artisanale des structures de santé, au manque de professionnalisme et de motivation des agents de santé, etc. Dans ces conditions, l’on comprend pourquoi la moindre épidémie peut constituer une véritable épreuve pour les autorités sanitaires. (…) Lorsque l’on prend le cas du Libéria qui est l’un des pays le plus touché par le virus, l’on peut tomber des nues de constater que ce pays, qui est indépendant depuis 1847, dispose seulement de 250 médecins, soit un ratio effroyable d’un ou de deux médecins pour 100 000 habitants. Il n’est donc pas étonnant que le pays de William Tolbert ait beaucoup de mal à déployer un personnel qualifié suffisant, pour la prise en charge des personnes infectées et affectées. Que l’on n’aille surtout pas brandir l’insuffisance de moyens financiers pour justifier cet état de fait. En effet, le Libéria regorge d’énormes richesses minières dont l’exploitation judicieuse pourrait permettre au peuple libérien de sortir la tête de l’eau. Malheureusement, ces richesses sont exploitées au profit d’une caste politique qui vit sur un îlot d’opulence, dans un océan de misère et d’indigence indescriptibles. L’exemple du Libéria est celui de la plupart des Etats africains. Lorsqu’il s’agit de répondre aux besoins de base des populations en termes d’éducation, de santé, de logement, l’on n’hésite pas en haut lieu à invoquer le manque de moyens financiers et à tendre sans gêne la sébile à la communauté internationale. Par contre, lorsqu’il s’agit de dépenser pour réaliser des activités dont l’intérêt pour les populations n’est pas évident, l’argent est vite mobilisé. Pour revenir à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, l’on a envie de dire que l’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision. Gouverner, dit-on, c’est prévoir. Mais en Afrique, c’est tout le contraire. C’est le pilotage à vue qui est érigé en mode de gouvernance. Lorsque survient la moindre urgence, c’est le sauve-qui-peut, nos Etats donnant l’impression d’être complètement désarmés. D’ailleurs, le fait qui consiste pour les princes qui nous gouvernent de courir, toutes affaires cessantes, en Occident, même pour soigner leurs petits bobos, est un aveu du peu d’intérêt et de crédit qu’ils accordent à nos structures sanitaires et à nos spécialistes de la santé. La tendance est loin d’être inversée. En effet, nos hôpitaux se présentent de plus en plus comme des antichambres de la mort : les urgences médicales sont difficilement assurées, l’encombrement et l’insalubrité crèvent les yeux. Le Pays
It is traditional beliefs and modern expressions of Christianity that is contributing to the spread of Ebola. This is not just a biomedical crisis, this is driven by beliefs, behaviours and denial. (…) It is enough to have one person who, for example, is at a funeral and can go on to contaminated 10 to 20 people, and it all starts again. (…) We thought it was over, and then a very well known person, a woman who was a powerful traditional practitioner and the head of a secret society, died (…) ‘People from three countries came to her funeral, there dozens of people got infected. From there the virus spread to Sierra Leone and Liberia. (…) It took about 1,000 Africans dying and two Americans being repatriated. That’s basically the equation in the value of life and what triggers an international response. Professor Peter Piot (director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine)
Ultimately the spread is due to different cultural practices, as well as infrastructure. Chief among these is how people handle disease, from the avoidance, to the treatment, containment, and the handling of the victims. One aspect of certain beliefs and practices in the area is a deep distrust of medicine, as accusations of cannibalism by doctors, alongside suspicion that the disease is caused by witchcraft, and other conspiracy theories have caused riots outside treatment centres in Sierra Leone, and families to break into hospital to remove patients. The primary issue, however, is the funerary practices. The virus is able to capitalize on the tenderness in West African traditions, with devastating results. Traditional funeral proceedings in West Africa in involve lots of touching, kissing, and general handling (like washing) of the deceased; each victim, in effect, becomes far more dangerous after the virus has killed. A big part of this containment is the fact that urban centres are both better able to handle dangerous cases, and less likely to host them in the first place. This is especially bad, because it means that the most deadly strains are spread the most, and milder variants go extinct. The good news? It’s unlikely that Ebola will become a global pandemic. While there is some possibility of mutations occurring that increase the ability to spread, the fundamental mechanism that makes it deadly would likely be interrupted. The bad news is that until the population is educated in hygiene, the medical establishment, and the dangers of eating carrier species (pig, monkeys, and bats) the virus will continue to ravage these smaller villages. Oneclass
The idea is to train these people here to go back and disseminate the main instructions about the disease.” An Ebola infection often looks like malaria at first, so people may not suspect they have it. It later progresses to the classic symptoms of a hemorrhagic fever, with vomiting, diarrhea, high fever and both internal and external bleeding. With so many bodily fluids pouring from a patient, it is easy to see how caregivers could become infected. we’ve shown people how to do a traditional burial, only wearing gloves. And you can allow the body to be washed briefly. Workers have been attentive to the traditions, allowing the body to be wrapped without exposing people to the virus.” Genetic analysis of the virus causing the current outbreaks show it’s distinct from the virus seen in east Africa. This suggests it may be from a local source. No one’s sure just where Ebola cames from. It can affect great apes but fruit bats are a prime suspect. Today

 C’est Sarkozy qui avait raison !

Croyances et rites funéraires d’un autre âge, sorcellerie, déni, théories du complot, suspicion généralisée des administrations locales, méfiance à l’égard de la médecine occidentale, guerres civiles, dictatures corrompues, effondrement des systèmes de santé, attaques de centres d’isolement  …

A l’heure où 50 ans après les indépendances et des dizaines de milliards de ressources et d’aide détournées (pour un total d’au moins mille milliards de dollars sur 60 ans pour la seule aide au développement !) …

Un continent qui continue à concentrer les misères du monde (70% des cas de VIH, 90% des cas de choléra et des décès de paludisme, entre 26 et 40% d’alphabétisation, sans parler des filles, pour les pays les plus pauvres) 

Est en train, avec l’une des pires épidémies de son histoire et pendant qu’à l’instar de leurs coreligionnaires d’Irak les djihadistes sahéliens multiplient les exactions, de démontrer au monde toute l’étendue de son sous-développement …

Pendant que jusqu’en Occident même certains propagent les pires théories du complot

Comment ne pas repenser aux paroles, qui avait tant été dénoncées, du discours de Dakar de l’ancien président Sarkozy de juillet 2007 sur la non-entrée dans l’histoire de l’homme noir ?

Et ne pas voir, comme l’ont bien perçu nombre de commentateurs en Afrique même, que c’était bien Sarkozy qui avait raison ?

RAVAGES DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Quand Ebola ébranle l’âme de l’Afrique
Avec le virus Ebola, l’identité culturelle est dangereusement remise en cause par une épidémie qui, du début de l’année à ce jour, a fait 887 morts en Afrique subsaharienne. Des cas ont été signalés aux Etats-Unis.

Le Pays

5 août 2014

Si les deux cas révélés aux Etats-Unis étaient effectivement hors de danger, cela augurerait de bonnes perspectives pour la recherche. Celle-ci semble piétiner depuis la découverte du virus en 1976. A ce propos, l’Occident n’est point exempt de critique. Pourquoi avoir tant négligé les risques de propagation du mal qui avait d’abord sévi en Afrique centrale ? Sans aller jusqu’à jeter l’anathème sur l’Occident, il conviendrait de s’interroger sur le manque patent de médicaments à ce jour : insuffisance de ressources ou tout simplement manque de volonté politique ? Avec les révélations de cas en Occident (Etats-Unis), il faut souhaiter de meilleures dispositions, afin que la recherche vienne à bout de ce fléau.

Ebola s’attaque à nos valeurs culturelles

En tout cas, selon l’OMS, il existe des traitements, même si aucun vaccin homologué n’a encore vu le jour. Cela vient ainsi contredire les idées reçues selon lesquelles la maladie est mortelle à 100%. Que dire du docteur Kent Brantly et de son assistante Nancy Writebol, de retour aux Etats-Unis, après avoir contracté le virus lors de leur mission au Liberia ? Hospitalisés, ils avaient reçu plusieurs injections d’un mystérieux sérum baptisé ZMapp, conçu à San Diego en Californie. Les deux coopérants qui se trouvaient dans un état critique, seraient aujourd’hui dans un état « stable ». Jusque-là, le sérum n’avait été testé que sur quatre singes infectés par Ebola. Ils ont survécu après avoir reçu une dose du produit.Malheureusement, des membres des personnels de santé d’Afrique n’auront pas eu la chance des deux experts américains. Tombés les armes à la main, ces médecins, infirmiers ou sages-femmes méritent d’être célébrés. Le drame avec Ebola, c’est que cette épidémie s’attaque cruellement et insidieusement à nos valeurs culturelles ! Il y a par exemple la question des enterrements traditionnels, où les familles touchent le corps pendant les rites funéraires. Qui, à présent, pour s’occuper d’une personne emportée par le virus Ebola ? Au Liberia, de nombreux malades atteints par le virus Ebola, préfèrent rester chez eux plutôt que de se rendre dans les centres de santé.

La psychose s’est répandue partout. Nul ne se sent désormais à l’abri, dans une Afrique lacérée par des traditions hétéroclites et des pratiques religieuses tenaces. Combattre le virus Ebola, que d’engagements, d’implications mais surtout de renoncements ! Des marchés aux rassemblements qu’occasionnent les naissances, les mariages, les baptêmes, les deuils, les prières et autres rites funéraires, les Africains aiment à s’illustrer comme de bons exemples. Qu’ils soient simples fidèles, parents, amis, connaissances ou voisins, ils ne veulent pas se voir rejetés pour avoir failli un tant soit peu.

La lutte contre Ebola est difficile, mais pas impossible ! Elle devra se mener vaille que vaille, au plan individuel et collectif. Avec Ebola, au-delà des modes de vie, c’est aussi le mode de fonctionnement de la cellule familiale et de la société tout entière qu’il faudra revoir. Il faudra oser s’attaquer à des valeurs ancrées dans la cosmogonie africaine, revisiter nos croyances et nos comportements. De vrais défis ! Au Nigeria, on a dû incinérer le cadavre d’une victime d’Ebola. Le médecin qui l’avait soigné a aussi été mis en quarantaine. Pourra-t-on intégrer ces pratiques dans les nouvelles habitudes ? Il le faut pourtant. Pire que la peste et le choléra réunis, l’épidémie d’Ebola détruit les espaces de solidarité.

Des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises

Les pesanteurs socioculturelles ajoutées au manque de moyens (humains, matériels, financiers), le manque de coordination des actions, font de la fièvre rouge, une maladie aussi redoutable qu’effroyable sur le continent. Le médecin traitant, lui-même, est vulnérable. Une implication de l’Occident est requise. Elle doit être forte. Mais, parce qu’il engloutit des sommes colossales, l’Occident doit exiger en contrepartie que les dirigeants africains s’assument plus sérieusement que face au SIDA. En effet, le problème de la délinquance politique et économique reste toujours posé du côté de l’Afrique. Outre les questions relatives à l’hygiène publique et à l’assainissement, des problèmes de mal gouvernance se trouvent au cœur même de la gestion de nos grands fléaux. Pour le cas d’Ebola, celle-ci se propage parce que les politiques africaines de développement, de santé, d’environnement, de population tout court, sont généralement inadéquates. A preuve, des mesures préventives sont recommandées, sans que des dispositions ne soient toujours prises pour annihiler les conséquences fâcheuses au plan socio-économique. Il est bien de défendre aux gens de manger de la viande de brousse ou de chauves-souris, pour se prémunir contre l’infection au virus d’Ebola. Mais, que faire pour compenser les pertes au niveau des chasseurs, des intermédiaires et des vendeurs de viandes prisées de certaines populations ?

Il faudra veiller à une saine utilisation des fonds qui seront mis à la disposition des Etats frappés par le mal. Le passé est à ce sujet suffisamment lourd d’enseignements. Face au SIDA, que n’a-t-on pas vu sur ce continent? La délinquance à tous les étages, impliquant des personnes insignifiantes et des hauts cadres, y compris le sommet de l’Etat. Face à l’épidémie d’Ebola, des dispositions plus rigoureuses doivent être prises. Si Ebola fait des ravages au point d’ébranler l’âme de l’Afrique, il faut éviter que les délinquants à col blanc ne perpétuent continuellement la saignée du continent, en profitant sans vergogne et impunément des efforts de la communauté internationale. L’expérience de fléaux comme celle du SIDA montre qu’en Afrique, une saine gestion des fonds, sur fond de bonne gouvernance politique, est un bon préalable au recul de l’épidémie.

Voir aussi:

PROPAGATION DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Ebola ou la désintégration des peuples
C’est le branle-bas de combat dans tous les pays ou presque. Ceux qui sont touchés cherchent les voies et moyens de contenir le virus ; les autres pays prennent des mesures nécessaires pour prévenir une quelconque infection. En plus de la sous-région ouest-africaine où le cap des 1 000 morts d’Ebola a été dépassé, selon les chiffres de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS), les Etats-Unis d’Amérique, l’Inde et le Canada font face à la menace Ebola à travers leurs ressortissants vivant dans les pays touchés. Le virus fait des ravages au point d’être classé ennemi public à l’échelle mondiale.

Le Pays

10 août 2014

Pour l’Afrique, la situation est critique

En effet, face à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, la communauté internationale est à présent sur le pied de guerre. L’OMS, au regard de l’ampleur que prend l’épidémie, a estimé que «les conditions d’une urgence de santé publique de portée mondiale sont réunies » et a sonné la mobilisation générale.

Pour l’Afrique particulièrement, la situation est critique. L’état de vétusté des infrastructures sanitaires, la faiblesse des ressources humaines, les problèmes d’hygiène et les traditions funéraires, entre autres, font des pays africains un terreau fertile à la propagation de ce virus. Dans le domaine culturel justement, cette épidémie est en train de détruire l’âme africaine. Les efforts pour contenir les infections commandent, entre autres, une attitude à la limite du rejet des victimes. Les parents et voisins sont invités à éviter de toucher aux corps des personnes ayant succombé, afin d’éviter tout risque de contamination par le virus. Nul doute que cette capacité du virus à se transmettre même après la mort de sa victime, est une cause de panique au sein des populations et cela sape les valeurs légendaires de solidarité africaine de même que des pans de la culture en ce qui concerne le traitement des corps des personnes décédées. Les mesures prises de part et d’autre pour limiter la propagation du virus sont, bien entendu, fort compréhensibles. Les contrôles des passagers dans bien des pays en Afrique de l’Ouest, participent des moyens de contenir l’épidémie. Mais, on peut s’interroger sur l’efficacité de telles mesures. Les frontières en Afrique, faut-il le rappeler, sont très poreuses et il n’est pas évident de pouvoir soumettre à des tests toutes les personnes qui vont d’un pays à un autre. Cela est surtout vrai pour ceux qui voyagent en train, en bus ou par divers autres moyens de déplacement. Ils sont difficiles à passer au scanner des forces de contrôle. C’est le cas notamment des voyageurs qui empruntent de simples pistes et sentiers reliant des pays. Cela dit et loin de jouer les oiseaux de mauvais augure, il est certain que le virus touche déjà bien plus de pays ouest-africains que la Sierra Leone, le Liberia, la Guinée et le Nigeria. Il ne faut pas se leurrer, le mal touche probablement plus de pays qu’on ne le pense. Et cela n’est pas sans conséquence sur l’intégration des peuples et les activités économiques. En effet, les mesures de riposte ou de prévention prises par la plupart des pays, ont un impact certain sur la libre circulation des personnes. Les entrées étant plus contrôlées aux frontières terrestres ou aériennes des pays, les voyages sont rendus de facto, plus difficiles. De plus, la psychose des contaminations amène des populations à limiter par elles-mêmes leurs déplacements vers d’autres pays, à défaut de les annuler purement et simplement.

La volonté politique et les moyens ne sont pas à la hauteur

En cela, on peut dire que le virus Ebola est un facteur de désintégration des peuples. Et cette désintégration s’accompagne d’une morosité des activités économiques. En témoigne la suspension des liaisons aériennes entre certains pays. L’espoir une fois de plus pourrait venir de l’Occident, notamment de l’Amérique. En tout cas, il est attendu beaucoup du sérum expérimental développé par les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Il faut croiser les doigts pour que ce vaccin soit le plus rapidement possible, disponible avant 2015, comme initialement prévu et qu’il soit efficace. Certes, on peut se dire qu’il aura fallu que les économies et des vies occidentales soient en danger pour que la réponse s’organise à l’échelle mondiale et que des esquisses de solution voient le jour. Mais ce serait faire un faux procès à l’Occident que de ne voir la situation que sous ce prisme. Les Occidentaux défendent leurs intérêts et c’est, le moins du monde, normal. Il est de bon ton que les Etats-Unis d’Amérique se préoccupent du sort de leurs compatriotes contaminés par un virus de l’autre côté de la planète et cela devrait donner à réfléchir à bien des gouvernants. Car, la vérité c’est que l’Afrique a, une fois de plus, failli. Comme à son habitude, elle aura manqué de prospective. Si non, comment comprendre qu’un virus qui a fait son apparition depuis 1976 et fait jusque-là de nombreuses victimes en Afrique centrale, n’ait pas, près de 40 ans après, encore été pris au sérieux au point qu’il puisse ressurgir et faire autant de victimes ? Comment comprendre que malgré tous les discours sur la souveraineté de l’Afrique, le sort et le salut du continent soient encore entre les mains des mêmes Occidentaux régulièrement conspués ? Que reste-t-il vraiment encore de la fierté des Africains ? Hélas, tout ce qui intéresse vraiment les dirigeants africains, c’est le pouvoir. C’est le moins que l’on puisse dire au regard du fait qu’ils sont incapables de résoudre les problèmes de santé et d’éducation des populations pour ne citer que cela. L’Afrique devrait pouvoir prendre en charge elle-même la recherche dans des domaines où ses intérêts sont en jeu. Elle a la matière grise pour cela. Seulement, l’esprit d’anticipation fait largement défaut. On attend toujours que la situation soit hors de contrôle ou en passe de l’être, pour réagir. De plus, la volonté politique et les moyens ne sont pas à la hauteur pour des pays qui rêvent d’émergence. Il n’y a qu’à observer les parts des budgets réservées à la recherche qui, comme on le sait, sont généralement modiques sous nos tropiques. Pourtant, il est évident que dans la lutte contre le virus Ebola et les autres maladies qui écument le continent, si les chercheurs africains arrivaient à mettre au point des vaccins ou des remèdes dont la qualité scientifique est éprouvée, le reste du monde ne pourrait que s’incliner devant de telles découvertes. C’est dire que le respect et la reconnaissance des autres en matière de recherches scientifiques comme dans bien d’autres domaines, se méritent. Aux Africains donc de se ressaisir, à commencer par leurs dirigeants, pour mériter le respect qu’ils réclament des autres, mais aussi et surtout pour prendre en main eux-mêmes leur destin.

Voir encore:

PROPAGATION DE LA FIEVRE ROUGE : Quand Ebola met à nu les tares des systèmes sanitaires africains
La gouvernance des Etats africains présente beaucoup d’insuffisances. Il n’y a que les personnes de mauvaise foi qui peuvent en douter. Une des illustrations les plus frappantes de ce fait est la situation chaotique dans laquelle se trouvent nos systèmes de santé. En effet, la propagation du virus Ebola a contribué à mettre à nu toute l’étendue de cette triste réalité, qui doit désormais interpeller toutes les consciences. Lorsque l’on fait l’état des lieux, l’on peut avoir des raisons objectives d’être remonté contre nos gouvernants.

Pousdem Pickou

Le Pays
21 août 2014

L’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision

Les zones d’ombre sont nombreuses. Elles se rapportent notamment à l’insuffisance du personnel soignant qualifié, au niveau rudimentaire des plateaux techniques, à la gestion artisanale des structures de santé, au manque de professionnalisme et de motivation des agents de santé, etc. Dans ces conditions, l’on comprend pourquoi la moindre épidémie peut constituer une véritable épreuve pour les autorités sanitaires. Certes, Ebola n’est pas comme les autres maladies infectieuses, mais la précarité et le dénuement dans lesquels évoluent les systèmes sanitaires de bien des Etats africains, peuvent expliquer en partie sa propagation. Lorsque l’on prend le cas du Libéria qui est l’un des pays le plus touché par le virus, l’on peut tomber des nues de constater que ce pays, qui est indépendant depuis 1847, dispose seulement de 250 médecins, soit un ratio effroyable d’un ou de deux médecins pour 100 000 habitants. Il n’est donc pas étonnant que le pays de William Tolbert ait beaucoup de mal à déployer un personnel qualifié suffisant, pour la prise en charge des personnes infectées et affectées. Que l’on n’aille surtout pas brandir l’insuffisance de moyens financiers pour justifier cet état de fait. En effet, le Libéria regorge d’énormes richesses minières dont l’exploitation judicieuse pourrait permettre au peuple libérien de sortir la tête de l’eau. Malheureusement, ces richesses sont exploitées au profit d’une caste politique qui vit sur un îlot d’opulence, dans un océan de misère et d’indigence indescriptibles. L’exemple du Libéria est celui de la plupart des Etats africains. Lorsqu’il s’agit de répondre aux besoins de base des populations en termes d’éducation, de santé, de logement, l’on n’hésite pas en haut lieu à invoquer le manque de moyens financiers et à tendre sans gêne la sébile à la communauté internationale. Par contre, lorsqu’il s’agit de dépenser pour réaliser des activités dont l’intérêt pour les populations n’est pas évident, l’argent est vite mobilisé. Pour revenir à la propagation de la fièvre rouge, l’on a envie de dire que l’Afrique est en train de payer pour son manque de vision. Gouverner, dit-on, c’est prévoir.

Il y a urgence à repenser les systèmes de santé des pays africains

Mais en Afrique, c’est tout le contraire. C’est le pilotage à vue qui est érigé en mode de gouvernance. Lorsque survient la moindre urgence, c’est le sauve-qui-peut, nos Etats donnant l’impression d’être complètement désarmés. D’ailleurs, le fait qui consiste pour les princes qui nous gouvernent de courir, toutes affaires cessantes, en Occident, même pour soigner leurs petits bobos, est un aveu du peu d’intérêt et de crédit qu’ils accordent à nos structures sanitaires et à nos spécialistes de la santé. La tendance est loin d’être inversée. En effet, nos hôpitaux se présentent de plus en plus comme des antichambres de la mort : les urgences médicales sont difficilement assurées, l’encombrement et l’insalubrité crèvent les yeux. Ces réalités laissent de marbre certains gouvernants. C’est dans ce contexte que certains Etats africains poussent l’indécence jusqu’à l’extrême, en parlant d’émergence. Face à un tel ridicule qui consiste à se chatouiller pour rire, l’on a envie de se poser la question suivante : Sacrée Afrique, quand est-ce que tu vas cesser d’être la risée des autres ? Cela dit, aujourd’hui plus jamais, il y a urgence à repenser les systèmes de santé des pays africains. Cela nécessite certes des moyens financiers, mais surtout de l’ingéniosité et de la volonté politique. L’Afrique a certainement des chercheurs de qualité. Mais encore faut-il qu’ils aient le minimum de moyens pour mener leurs recherches. C’est en adoptant de nouvelles résolutions, en termes de bonne gouvernance, que l’on pourra dire que l’Afrique a tiré leçon des ravages que la fièvre rouge est en train de faire sur son sol.

Voir de plus:

L’homme africain et l’histoire

Henri Guaino
Le Monde

26.07.2008

Il y a un an à Dakar, le président de la République française prononçait sa première grande allocution en terre africaine. On sait le débat qu’elle a provoqué. Jamais pourtant un président français n’avait été aussi loin sur l’esclavage et la colonisation : « Il y a eu la traite négrière. Il y a eu l’esclavage, les hommes, les femmes, les enfants achetés et vendus comme des marchandises. Et ce crime ne fut pas seulement un crime contre les Africains, ce fut un crime contre l’homme, ce fut un crime contre l’humanité tout entière (…). Jadis les Européens sont venus en Afrique en conquérants. Ils ont pris la terre de vos ancêtres. Ils ont banni les dieux, les langues, les croyances, les coutumes de vos pères. Ils ont dit à vos pères ce qu’ils devaient penser, ce qu’ils devaient croire, ce qu’ils devaient faire. Ils ont eu tort. »

Mais il a voulu rappeler en même temps que, parmi les colons, « il y avait aussi des hommes de bonne volonté (…) qui ont construit des ponts, des routes, des hôpitaux, des dispensaires, des écoles (…) ». Il doit beaucoup à Senghor, qui proclamait : « Nous sommes des métis culturels. » C’est sans doute pourquoi il a tant déplu à une certaine intelligentsia africaine qui trouvait Senghor trop francophile. Il ne doit en revanche rien à Hegel. Dommage pour ceux qui ont cru déceler un plagiat. Reste que la tonalité de certaines critiques pose une question : faut-il avoir une couleur de peau particulière pour avoir le droit de parler des problèmes de l’Afrique sans être accusé de racisme ?

A ceux qui l’avaient accusé de racisme à propos de Race et culture (1971), Lévi-Strauss avait répondu : « En banalisant la notion même de racisme, en l’appliquant à tort et à travers, on la vide de son contenu et on risque d’aboutir à un résultat inverse de celui qu’on recherche. Car qu’est-ce que le racisme ? Une doctrine précise (…). Un : une corrélation existe entre le patrimoine génétique d’une part, les aptitudes intellectuelles et les dispositions morales d’autre part. Deux : ce patrimoine génétique est commun à tous les membres de certains groupements humains. Trois : ces groupements appelés « races » peuvent être hiérarchisés en fonction de la qualité de leur patrimoine génétique. Quatre : ces différences autorisent les « races » dites supérieures à commander, exploiter les autres, éventuellement à les détruire. »

Où trouve-t-on une telle doctrine dans le discours de Dakar ? Où est-il question d’une quelconque hiérarchie raciale ? Il est dit, au contraire : « L’homme africain est aussi logique et raisonnable que l’homme européen. » Et « le drame de l’Afrique n’est pas dans une prétendue infériorité de son art, de sa pensée, de sa culture, car pour ce qui est de l’art, de la pensée, de la culture, c’est l’Occident qui s’est mis à l’école de l’Afrique ».

Est-ce raciste de dire : « En écoutant Sophocle, l’Afrique a entendu une voix plus familière qu’elle ne l’aurait cru et l’Occident a reconnu dans l’art africain des formes de beauté qui avaient jadis été les siennes et qu’il éprouvait le besoin de ressusciter » ?

Parler de « l’homme africain » était-il raciste ? Mais qui a jamais vu quelqu’un traité de raciste parce qu’il parlait de l’homme européen ? Nul n’ignore la diversité de l’Afrique. A Dakar, le président a dit : « Je veux m’adresser à tous les Africains, qui sont si différents les uns des autres, qui n’ont pas la même langue, la même religion, les mêmes coutumes, la même culture, la même histoire, et qui pourtant se reconnaissent les uns les autres comme Africains. »

Chercher ce que les Africains ont en commun n’est pas plus inutile ni plus sot que de chercher ce que les Européens ont en partage. L’anthropologie culturelle est un point de vue aussi intéressant que celui de l’historien sur la réalité du monde.

UN DISCOURS POUR LA JEUNESSE

Revenons un instant sur le passage qui a déchaîné tant de passions et qui dit que « l’homme africain n’est pas assez entré dans l’histoire ». Nulle part il n’est dit que les Africains n’ont pas d’histoire. Tout le monde en a une. Mais le rapport à l’histoire n’est pas le même d’une époque à une autre, d’une civilisation à l’autre. Dans les sociétés paysannes, le temps cyclique l’emporte sur le temps linéaire, qui est celui de l’histoire. Dans les sociétés modernes, c’est l’inverse.

L’homme moderne est angoissé par une histoire dont il est l’acteur et dont il ne connaît pas la suite. Cette conception du temps qui se déploie dans la durée et dans une direction, c’est Rome et le judaïsme qui l’ont expérimentée les premiers. Puis il a fallu des millénaires pour que l’Occident invente l’idéologie du progrès. Cela ne veut pas dire que dans toutes les autres formes de civilisation il n’y a pas eu des progrès, des inventions cumulatives. Mais l’idéologie du progrès telle que nous la connaissons est propre à l’héritage des Lumières.

En 1947, Emmanuel Mounier partait à la rencontre de l’Afrique, et en revenant il écrivit : « Il semble que le temps inférieur de l’Africain soit accordé à un monde sans but, à une durée sans hâte, que son bonheur soit de se laisser couler au fil des jours et non pas de brûler les espaces et les minutes. » Raciste, Mounier ?

A propos du paysan africain, le discours parle d’imaginaire, non de faits historiques. Il ne s’agissait pas de désigner une classe sociale, mais un archétype qui imprègne encore la mentalité des fils et des petits-fils de paysans qui habitent aujourd’hui dans les villes.

L’Afrique est le berceau de l’humanité, et nul n’a oublié ni l’Egypte ni les empires du Ghana et du Mali, ni le royaume du Bénin, ni l’Ethiopie. Mais les grands Etats furent l’exception, dit Braudel, qui ajoute : « L’Afrique noire s’est ouverte mal et tardivement sur le monde extérieur. » Raciste, Braudel ?

L’homme africain est entré dans l’histoire et dans le monde, mais pas assez. Pourquoi le nier ?

Ce discours ne s’adressait pas aux élites installées, aux notables de l’Afrique. Mais à sa jeunesse qui s’apprête à féconder l’avenir. Et il lui dit : « Vous êtes les héritiers des plus vieilles traditions africaines et vous êtes les héritiers de tout ce que l’Occident a déposé dans le coeur et dans l’âme de l’Afrique », la liberté, la justice, la démocratie, l’égalité vous appartiennent aussi.

L’Afrique n’est pas en dehors du monde. D’elle aussi, il dépend que le monde de demain soit meilleur. Mais l’engagement de l’Afrique dans le monde a besoin d’une volonté africaine, car « la réalité de l’Afrique, c’est celle d’un grand continent qui a tout pour réussir et qui ne réussit pas parce qu’il n’arrive pas à se libérer de ses mythes ». Cessons de ressasser le passé et tournons-nous ensemble vers l’avenir. Cet avenir a un nom : l’Eurafrique, et l’Union pour la Méditerranée en est la première étape. Voilà ce que le président de la République a dit en substance à Dakar.

On a beaucoup parlé des critiques, moins de ceux qui ont approuvé, comme le président de l’Afrique du Sud, M. Thabo Mbeki. On n’a pas parlé du livre si sérieux, si honnête d’André Julien Mbem, jeune philosophe originaire du Cameroun. Parlera-t-on du livre si savant à paraître bientôt à Abidjan de Pierre Franklin Tavares, philosophe spécialiste de Hegel, originaire du Cap-Vert ?

L’éditorial du quotidien sénégalais Le Soleil du 9 avril dernier était intitulé : « Et si Sarkozy avait raison ? » Bara Diouf, grande figure du journalisme africain, qui fut l’ami de Cheikh Anta Diop (1923-1986, historien et anthropologue sénégalais), écrivait : « Le siècle qui frappe à notre porte exige notre entrée dans l’histoire contemporaine. »

Raciste, Bara Diouf ou mauvais connaisseur de l’Afrique ?

Toute l’Afrique n’a pas rejeté le discours de Dakar. Encore faut-il le lire avec un peu de bonne foi. On peut en discuter sans mépris, sans insultes. Est-ce trop demander ? Et si nous n’en sommes pas capables, à quoi ressemblera demain notre démocratie ?

Henri Guaino est conseiller spécial du président de la République

Voir encore:

Ebola : « Le risque n’est pas majeur dans les pays développés »
Tatiana Salvan

Libération

17 octobre 2014

INTERVIEW Selon le microbiologiste Jean-Pierre Dedet, les conditions d’une épidémie ne sont pas réunies en Occident. Mais Ebola sera bien l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines.

Avec l’annonce d’un deuxième cas d’infection par le virus Ebola aux Etats-Unis, l’Occident redoute plus que jamais qu’Ebola ne franchisse les frontières. La France vient d’annoncer la mise en place d’un dispositif de contrôle sanitaire dans les aéroports français. Mais pour Jean-Pierre Dedet, professeur émérite à l’université Montpellier I et microbiologiste, auteur de Epidémies, de la peste noire à la grippe A/H1N1 (2010), l’épidémie d’Ebola restera concentrée en Afrique.

Sur le même sujetLe Sénégal n’est plus touché par Ebola
Selon l’OMS, l’épidémie d’Ebola pourrait faire 10 000 nouveaux cas par semaine. Existe-il un véritable risque de pandémie ?

En Afrique, oui, il y a un risque d’épidémisation, mais je ne pense pas qu’elle puisse s’étendre au reste du monde. Bien sûr, il y aura des cas sporadiques en Occident, on recensera encore quelques personnes contaminées venues d’Afrique, ainsi que quelques cas d’infections survenues au contact de ces malades. Mais cela restera très rare. D’une part, les conditions du cycle de propagation naturelle du virus ne sont pas réunies comme c’est le cas en Afrique, où nous avons un parasite porteur du virus, de fortes concentrations humaines, certains comportements humains ou rites particuliers (comme toucher les morts), des conditions sanitaires défavorables, un certain type d’alimentation, etc. D’autre part, le développement de la médecine occidentale permet de mettre en place des moyens d’action pour éviter une généralisation, avec notamment l’isolement absolu du patient, un strict protocole, des équipements médicaux pointus et le développement de stratégies de détection rapide du virus. Malgré un manque au niveau des traitements à l’heure actuelle, le risque n’est donc pas majeur dans les pays développés, mais Ebola sera l’une des plus grandes épidémies africaines.

Comment situer Ebola par rapport aux autres grandes épidémies ?

Le XXe siècle a marqué le retour des épidémies : dans les années 70, sont apparues les fièvres hémorragiques (dont Ebola); dans les années 80, le VIH; dans les années 90, l’hépatite C; et dans les années 2000, le Sras, la grippe H1N1, le chikungunya, etc. Ces maladies n’ont pas toutes les mêmes caractéristiques épidémiologiques ni la même transmission vectorielle, mais elles se sont propagées à cause d’une série de facteurs, comportementaux et environnementaux. Les échanges, les migrations, les voyages intercontinentaux, mais aussi la pénétration humaine en forêt et la déforestation, qui ont amené les hommes à entrer en contact avec une faune sauvage porteuse d’agents pathogènes, ont favorisé la contamination. Et l’Afrique est un continent qui a un lot considérable d’agents infectieux.

Il ne faut d’ailleurs pas oublier qu’Ebola n’est pas le seul fléau en Afrique. Des études ont montré que ce continent concentre 70% des cas de VIH et 90% des cas de choléra. Et 90% des décès de paludisme surviennent en Afrique. Mais il y a aussi toute une conjonction qui fait que c’est un continent malade. La structure sanitaire y est déficitaire, du fait des régimes instables ou des zones de guerre. C’est aussi un territoire de migration. Et encore une fois, les comportements humains sont souvent responsables de la propagation des virus.

Les fléaux médicaux en Afrique en 2012 comparés à l’épidémie d’Ebola en 2014

L’éducation est donc essentielle pour éviter les épidémies ?

L’éducation en général, et l’éducation sanitaire en particulier, joue un rôle fondamental. De simples gestes d’hygiène permettraient de réduire les fléaux médicaux qui touchent l’Afrique. Par exemple, les diarrhées «normales» tuent chaque année des centaines de milliers d’enfants. Se laver les mains permettrait de réduire de 50% le taux de mortalité.

Peut-on comparer le virus Ebola au VIH ?

Ils ont un point commun : la transmission directe interhumaine. Mais Ebola est plus dangereux dans le sens où tous les émonctoires (l’urine, la salive, le liquide séminal…) sont vecteurs de transmission. Le simple fait de toucher le patient est dangereux, ce qui n’est pas le cas avec le sida. Néanmoins, le sida est une maladie chronique de longue durée, tandis qu’Ebola est une maladie très aiguë, avec un très fort taux de mortalité, très rapide. Avec Ebola, l’épidémisation est donc moins forte.

Cette épidémie peut influencer le mode de fonctionnement de la société africaine ?

J’espère en tout cas qu’Ebola servira de déclencheur pour les différents régimes politiques, qu’ils deviendront plus désireux d’investir l’argent dans un système de santé efficace, sans détourner les fonds. J’espère aussi que cette épidémie va faire prendre conscience aux organisations internationales qu’il faut accorder une aide majeure à l’Afrique, et lui apporter une aide logistique et humaine plus importante. On a commencé, mais c’est encore timide.

Pour ce qui est de la société elle-même, des efforts considérables d’information sont à faire. Mais passé une période d’incompréhension et la recherche de responsables (la population met notamment en cause les pouvoirs politiques), la société pourra peut-être aussi changer beaucoup de comportements.

Voir de même:

Peur
Le virus Ebola alimente les théories du complot
Pierre Haski
Rue 89
03/08/2014

Obama veut imposer une « tyrannie médicale » et des médecins apportent la maladie en Afrique. Voilà les explications qui émergent alors que l’épidémie s’amplifie, et menacent prévention et mesures de précaution.

Une épidémie d’une maladie incurable, mystérieuse, alimente toujours les théories du complot ou les thèses farfelues. Ce fut le cas du sida dans les années 80, avant que le monde devienne -hélas- familier de ce virus ; c’est aujourd’hui le cas d’Ebola, qui sévit en Afrique de l’ouest.

Le rapatriement aux Etats-Unis, samedi, d’un médecin américain contaminé par le virus Ebola, a donné un nouvel élan aux amateurs de complots, jouant avec le risque de prolifération de l’épidémie sur le sol américain.

Le Dr Kent Brantly, qui travaillait au Libéria avec les patients d’Ebola, a été contaminé et rapatrié samedi à Atlanta, où il est arrivé revêtu d’un scaphandre de protection, suffisamment fort pour descendre seul de l’ambulance. Une deuxième américaine contaminée devrait être rapatriée dans les prochains jours, dans les mêmes conditions.

« Complot eugéniste et mondialiste »
Dès samedi, l’un des « complotistes » les plus célèbres des Etats-Unis, Alex Jones, qui débusque le « globaliste » derrière chaque geste de l’administration américaine et a l’oreille du « Tea Party », s’en est ému dans une vidéo sur son site Infowars.com et sur YouTube. Il s’insurge :

« Mesdames, Messieurs, c’est sans précédent pour un gouvernement occidental d’amener une personne atteinte de quelque chose d’aussi mortel qu’Ebola dans leur propre pays. (…) C’est le signe qu’on cherche à susciter la terreur et l’effroi, afin d’imposer une tyrannie médicale encore plus forte. »

Pour ce « guerrier de l’info », comme il se décrit, qui n’a pas moins de 250 000 abonnés à son compte Twitter, le virus ne restera pas confiné à l’hôpital et s’échappera. « Il s’agit d’un gouvernement et d’un système politique qui se moquent des gens », accusant les « eugénistes “ et les ‘mondialistes’ de déployer un scénario catastrophe.

Au même moment, pourtant, les autorités américaines expliquent qu’elles ont ramené le Dr Brantly à Atlanta pour lui donner une chance de survivre, en renforçant ses défenses dans l’espoir qu’il surmonte l’attaque du virus. Le taux de mortalité de cette souche d’Ebola n’est ‘que’ de 60% environ, contre plus de 90% pour d’autres épidémies antérieures en Afrique.

Et ils le font dans l’endroit le plus adapté : Atlanta est le siège du Centre de contrôle des maladies infectieuses (CDC) aux Etats-Unis, et de l’un des seuls labos au monde spécialisés dans les virus, un laboratoire de niveau P4, le plus élevé et dans lequel la sécurité est la plus rigoureuse, avec plusieurs sas de décontamination pour s’y déplacer. L’autre labo du même type au monde se trouve … à Lyon.

‘Ebola, Ebola’
Il n’y a pas qu’aux Etats-Unis que la menace d’Ebola suscite fantasmes et peurs quasi-millénaristes : Adam Nossiter, l’envoyé spécial du New York Times racontait il y a quelques jours de Guinée –l’un des pays les plus touchés par Ebola– comment des villageois ont constitué des groupes d’autodéfense pour empêcher les équipes médicales d’approcher. ‘Partout où elles passent, on voit apparaître la maladie’, dit un jeune Guinéen interdisant l’accès de son village.

Son récit se poursuit :

‘Les travailleurs [sanitaires] et les officiels, rendus responsables par des populations en panique pour la propagation du virus, ont été menacés avec des couteaux, des pierres et des machettes, et leurs véhicules ont parfois été entourés par des foules menaçantes. Des barrages de troncs d’arbre interdisent l’accès aux équipes médicales dans les villages où l’on soupçonne la présence du virus. Des villageois malades ou morts, coupés de toute aide médicale, peuvent dès lors infecter d’autres personnes.

C’est très inhabituel, on ne nous fait pas confiance, dit Marc Poncin, coordinateur pour la Guinée de Médecins sans Frontières, le principal groupe luttant contre le virus. Nous ne pouvons pas stopper l’épidémie.’
Le journaliste ajoute que les gens s’enfuient à la vue d’une croix rouge, et crient ‘Ebola, Ebola’ à la vue d’un Occidental. Un homme en train de creuser une tombe pour un patient décédé du virus conclut : ‘nous ne pouvons rien faire, seul Dieu peut nous sauver’.

Sur le site du New Yorker, Richard Preston, auteur d’un livre sur Ebola dont nous avons cité de larges extraits récemment, raconte qu’au Libéria, les malades d’Ebola quittent la capitale, Monrovia, dont le système de santé est dépassé par l’épidémie, et retournent dans leur village d’origine pour consulter des guérisseurs ou simplement rejoindre leurs familles. Au risque de diffuser un peu plus le virus.

Le sida pour ‘décourager les amoureux’
Peurs, fantasmes, parano sont fréquents à chaque nouvelle maladie. Ce fut le cas lors de l’apparition du sida au début des années 80. A Kinshasa, durement touchée par la pandémie, la population n’a pas cru aux explications officielles sur la transmission sexuelle du virus, et avait rebaptisé le sida ‘Syndrome inventé pour décourager les amoureux’… Les églises évangélistes s’en étaient emparées pour parler de ‘punition divine’ et recruter un peu plus de brebis égarées.

Pire, en Afrique du Sud, la méfiance vis-à-vis de la médecine occidentale a gagné jusqu’au Président de l’époque, Thabo Mbeki, qu’on aurait cru plus prudent, et qui avait encouragé le recours à des remèdes traditionnels plutôt que les antirétroviraux qui commençaient à faire leur apparition et ont, depuis, fait leurs preuves. Un temps précieux, et beaucoup de vies humaines, ont été sacrifiés dans cette folie.

Avec le temps, la connaissance de la maladie et de ses modes de transmission a progressé, même s’il reste de nombreuses inégalités dans les accès aux soins.

Bien que le virus ait été identifié en 1976, il y a près de quatre décennies, les épidémies ont été très localisées, et de brève durée. Elle reste donc peu connue en dehors des spécialistes, et surtout entourée d’une réputation terrifiante : pas de remède, fort taux de mortalité, virus mutant…

Avec retard, la mobilisation internationale se met en place pour contenir l’épidémie apparue en Afrique de l’Ouest. L’information des populations n’est pas la tache la moins importante. Même s’il est probable qu’aucun argument rationnel ne pourra convaincre Alex Jones et ses disciples que l’administration Obama, malgré tous ses défauts, n’est pas en train d’importer Ebola pour quelque projet d’eugénisme au sein de la population américaine…

Voir par ailleurs:

Kissing the Corpses in Ebola Country
Ebola victims are most infectious right after death—which means that West African burial practices, where families touch the bodies, are spreading the disease like wildfire.

Abby Hagelage

The Daily beast
08.13.14

From 8 a.m. to midnight, wearing three pairs of gloves, the young men of Sierra Leone bury Ebola casualities. An activity that’s earned the Red Cross recruits an unwelcome designation: The Dead Body Management Team.

Some days, just one call to collect a newly deceased victim comes in from the Kailahun district. Some days, the team receives nine. The calls from medical professionals at isolation centers are met with relief. These bodies have been quarantined. The infection can—with copious amounts of disinfectant (bleach) and meticulous attention to detail—end there. Once cleaned and sealed in two body bags, the corpse will be driven to a fresh row of graves. In gowns, boots, goggles, and masks, the men will lower the body into a 6-foot grave below. In these burials, safety trumps tradition.

The harder phone calls that the Dead Body Management Team receives, and the more dangerous burials they perform, take place in the communities themselves. Here, they must walk a delicate line between allowing the family to perform goodbye rituals and safeguarding the living from infecting themselves. The washing, touching, and kissing of these bodies—typical in many West African burials—can be deadly. But prohibiting communities from properly honoring their dead ones—and thereby worsening their distrust in medical professionals—can be deadly, too.

Insufficient medical care, shortage of supplies, and lack of money are undoubtedly contributing to an epidemic the World Health Organization has a deemed a “national disaster.” But with a death toll now topping 1,000 in four countries, it’s the battle over dead bodies that is fueling it.

***

In the remains of a deceased victim, Ebola lives on. Tears, saliva, urine, blood—all are inundated with a lethal viral load that threatens to steal any life it touches. Fluids outside the body (and in death, there are many) are highly contagious. According to the World Health Organization, they remain so for at least three days.

Dr. Terry O’Sullivan, director of the Center for Emergency Management and Homeland Security Policy Research, spent three years volunteering in Sierra Leone. He hasn’t witnessed an Ebola outbreak directly, but has watched a hemorrhagic fever overtake the body—which he describes in vivid detail. “Those that have just died are teeming with virus, in all their fluids,” says O’Sullivan. “That is in fact the worst point because their immune systems are failed…they are leaking out of every orifice. They are extremely dangerous.” A passage in the 2004 paper Containing a Haemorrhagic Fever Epidemic published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases paints an even bleaker picture. Citing two specific studies, the authors suggest that a “high concentration of the virus is secreted on the skin of the dead.”

With fluids seeping out of every body opening, and potentially every pore, it’s no mystery why the burial rituals of West Africa pose such a danger. In a pamphlet on safety methods for treating victims of Ebola, The World Health Organization outlines proper procedures to prevent infection from spreading outward from a deceased Ebola victim. “Be aware of the family’s cultural practices and religious beliefs,” the WHO document reads. “Help the family understand why some practices cannot be done because they place the family or others at risk for exposure…explain to the family that viewing the body is not possible.”

Villagers began running from the ambulances, trying to burn down hospitals, and attacking humanitarian workers.

Telling this to the families of deceased is one thing—making sure they understand is entirely another. In Sierra Leone, a country whose literacy rate in 2013 was just over 35 percent, it’s particularly challenging. In neighboring Guinea and Liberia, two places with similar levels of poverty and illiteracy, education alone isn’t a viable solution either.

It’s a phenomenon O’Sullivan witnessed firsthand in Sierra Leone. “People have no idea how infectious diseases work. They see people go into the hospital sick and come out dead—or never come out at all,” he says. “They think if they can avoid the hospital they can survive.” This mistrust of the medical world seems to be validated when a family is prohibited from honoring the dead, participating in the funeral, or even seeing the body.

Prior Ebola outbreaks in Africa, specifically in Uganda in 2000, have yielded similar reactions among afflicted communities. Dr. Barry Hewlett and Dr. Bonnie Hewlett, the first anthropologist to be invited by WHO to join a medical intervention team, studied the Ugandan Ebola outbreak. In a book cataloging their experience—Ebola, Culture, and Politics: The Anthropology of an Emerging Disease— they explore the dangers of African burial rituals, as well as the dangers of prohibiting them.

In the Ugandan ceremonies the Hewletts witnessed, the sister of the deceased’s father is responsible for bathing, cleaning, and dressing the body in a “favorite outfit.” This task, they write, is “too emotionally painful” for the immediate family. In the event that no aunt exists, a female elder in the community takes this role on. The next step, the mourning, is where the real ceremony takes place. “Funerals are major cultural events that can last for days, depending on the status of the deceased person,” they write. As the women “wail” and the men “dance,” the community takes time to “demonstrate care and respect for the dead.” The more important the person, the longer the mourning. When the ceremony is coming to a close, a common bowl is used for ritual hand-washing, and a final touch or kiss on the face of the corpse (which is known as a “a love touch”) is bestowed on the dead. When the ceremony has concluded, the body is buried on land that directly adjoins the deceased’s house because “the family wants the spirit to be happy and not feel forgotten.”

According to the Hewletts’ analysis, these burial rituals and funerals are a critical way for the community to safely transfer the deceased into the afterlife. Prohibiting families from performing such rites is not only viewed as an affront to the deceased, but as actually putting the family in danger. “In the event of an improper burial, the deceased person’s spirit (tibo) will cause harm and illness to the family,” the Hewletts write. In Sierra Leone, O’Sullivan experienced similar sentiments when proper burials were not performed. “It is tragic. In those countries they feel very strongly about being able to say goodbye to their ancestors. To not be able to have that ritual, or treat them with the respect they traditionally give for those who passed away is very difficult,” says O’Sullivan. “Especially in concert with the fear of the disease in general.”

Worse than stopping burial rites, found the Hewletts, is keeping the body (and the burial) hidden. Barring relatives from seeing the dead in Uganda fueled hostility and fear—leading some communities to believe that medical professionals were keeping the corpses for nefarious purposes. A mass graveyard near an airfield—an attempt to remedy the problem by allowing families to see, but not touch, the graves—didn’t help. Villagers began running from the ambulances, trying to burn down hospitals, and attacking humanitarian workers. They feared the disease—but they feared the medicine even more, as well as the people delivering it.

***

In a July 28 interview with ABC News, Dr. Hilde de Clerck of Doctors Without Borders described resistance from residents in Sierra Leone, who, he says, accused him and his colleagues of bringing the disease to the country. “To control the chain of disease transmission it seems we have to earn the trust of nearly every individual in an affected family,” de Clerck said. It is, in this case, a seemingly impossible feat.

There aren’t enough health-care workers in all of West Africa to ensure that community burials are performed safely. There aren’t enough in the world to convince every family that banning such a burial isn’t the work of the devil. “It’s gotten out of control,” says O’Sullivan of this new outbreak. “So many people involved who have responded to this in the past are completely overwhelmed. They can’t get the messages out.” Until the medical community can win the trust of West Africans, the infected will miss their chance at potentially life-saving medicine.

Without it, their family members will likely face the same fate.

Voir aussi:

 As Ebola epidemic tightens grip, west Africa turns to religion for succour
Fears evangelical churches that hold thousands and services promising ‘healing’ could ignite new chains of transmission

Monica Mark, west Africa correspondent

The Guardian

17 October 2014

Every Sunday since she can remember, Annette Sanoh has attended church in Susan’s Bay, a slum of crowded tin-roofed homes in Freetown. Now as the Ebola epidemic mushrooms in the capital of Sierra Leone, Sanoh has started going to church services almost every night.

“I believe we are all in God’s hands now. Business is bad because of this Ebola problem, so rather than sit at home, I prefer to go to church and pray because I don’t know what else we can do,” said Sanoh, a market trader. At the church she attends, a small building jammed between a hairdresser’s and two homes, she first washes her hands in a bucket of chlorinated water before joining hands with fellow church members as they pray together.

“We pray Ebola will not be our portion and we pray for hope,” said Sanoh, as the disease this week reached the last remaining district that hadn’t yet recorded a case.

By any measure, West Africa is deeply religious and the region is home to some of the world’s fastest-growing Muslim and Christian populations. Posters and banners strewn across the city are constant reminders of the hope many find in spirituality amid a fearful and increasingly desperate situation. In one supermarket, a notice asking customers to pray for Ebola to end was taped on to a fridge full of butter. It urged Muslims to recite the alfathia; Christians, Our Father; and Hindus Namaste. “For non-believers, please believe in God. Amen, Amina,” it finished.

But officials have fretted about the impact of influential spiritual leaders, worrying that evangelical churches which sometimes hold thousands of faithful and services promising “healing” could ignite new chains of transmission.

As the outbreak races into its eleventh month, leaving behind almost 4,500 dead across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, experts have warned that an influx of international aid can only contain the epidemic alongside other measures in communities.

“Control of transmission of Ebola in the community, that’s going to be the key for controlling this epidemic,” said Professor Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, speaking at Oxford University on Thursday.

“Will it be possible without the vaccine? We really don’t know, because it supposes a massive behavioural change in the community; behavioural change about funeral rites, so people don’t touch dead bodies any longer, in carers, as people could be infected while transporting someone to a hospital.”

But there are signs that messages are filtering through. Some churches are playing a critical role in educating their congregations about the disease, which is spread through direct contact with body fluids of those already showing symptoms.

In Liberia, pastor Amos Teah, said once full pews were now largely empty as members feared gathering in crowds, while he has changed the way he conducts his Methodist church services.

“These days we go to church, we sing, but we no longer carry out the tradition of passing the peace. We no longer shake hands. We are even thinking about using spoons to serve communion … to drop the bread into a person’s palm, avoiding all contacts with that person. The church has placed strong emphasis on prevention,” he said.

Among other changes, women no longer wore veils to church, as they were often shared among churchgoers.

In Guinea, an 85% Muslim country, Abou Fofana said he had stopped going to mosque for another reason. “Even though I survived Ebola, nobody wants to come near me. Even my children have faced problems as a result.”

He said he still continued to pray at home. Like many survivors, he credits his faith in helping him pull through.

At the MSF centre in Sierra Leone’s forested interior of Kailahun, Malcolm Hugo, a psychologist, said he hadn’t been able to find an imam willing to visit the centre. So the church services are “mainly filled with Muslims attending,” said Hugo, one particularly bad afternoon in which several children had died.

Health experts and officials warn that the longer the epidemic is left unchecked, the greater the risk of it spreading to other countries in a region where families extend across porous borders.

However, in one piece of rare good news, the UN health agency officially declared an end on Friday to the Ebola outbreak in Senegal. The WHO commended the country on its “diligence to end the transmission of the virus,” citing Senegal’s quick and thorough response.

A case of Ebola in Senegal was confirmed on 29 August in a young man who had travelled by road to Dakar from Guinea, where he had direct contact with an Ebola patient. By 5 September laboratory samples from the patient tested negative, indicating that he had recovered from Ebola. The declaration from WHO came because Senegal made it past the 42-day mark, which is twice the maximum incubation period for Ebola, without detecting more such cases.

“Senegal’s response is a good example of what to do when faced with an imported case of Ebola,” the WHO said in a statement. “The government’s response plan included identifying and monitoring 74 close contacts of the patient, prompt testing of all suspected cases, stepped-up surveillance at the country’s many entry points and nationwide public awareness campaigns.”

“While the outbreak is now officially over, Senegal’s geographical position makes the country vulnerable to additional imported cases of Ebola virus disease,” WHO said.

Additional reporting by Wade Williams in Monrovia

Voir également:

Why foreign aid and Africa don’t mix
Robert Calderisi, Special to CNN
August 18, 2010

Editor’s note: Robert Calderisi has 30 years of professional experience in international development, including senior positions at the World Bank. He is the author of « The Trouble with Africa: Why Foreign Aid Isn’t Working. » He writes for CNN as part of Africa 50, a special coverage looking at 17 African nations marking 50 years of independence this year.

Friday, Charles Abugre of the UN Millennium Campaign writes for CNN about why aid is important for Africa and how it can be made more effective.

(CNN) — I once asked a president of the Central African Republic, Ange-Félix Patassé, to give up a personal monopoly he held on the distribution of refined oil products in his country.

He was unapologetic. « Do you expect me to lose money in the service of my people? » he replied.

That, in a nutshell, has been the problem of Africa. Very few African governments have been on the same wavelength as Western providers of aid.

Aid, by itself, has never developed anything, but where it has been allied to good public policy, sound economic management, and a strong determination to battle poverty, it has made an enormous difference in countries like India, Indonesia, and even China.

Those examples illustrate another lesson of aid. Where it works, it represents only a very small share of the total resources devoted to improving roads, schools, heath services, and other things essential for raising incomes.

Aid must not overwhelm or displace local efforts; instead, it must settle with being the junior partner.

Because of Africa’s needs, and the stubborn nature of its poverty, the continent has attracted far too much aid and far too much interfering by outsiders.

From the start, Western governments tried hard to work with public agencies, but fairly soon ran up against the obvious limitations of capacity and seriousness of African states.

Early solutions were to pour in « technical assistance, » i.e. foreign advisers who stayed on for years, or to try « enclave » or turn-key projects that would be independent of government action.

More recently, Western agencies have worked with non-government organizations or the private sector. Or, making a virtue of necessity, they have poured large amounts of their assistance directly into government budgets, citing the need for « simplicity » and respect for local « sovereignty. »

Through all of this, the development challenge was always on somebody else’s shoulders and governments have been eager receivers, rather than clear-headed managers of Western generosity.

In the last 20 years, some states — like Ghana, Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, and Mali — have broken the mould, recognized the importance of taking charge, and tried to use aid more strategically and efficiently. Some commentators would add Benin, Zambia, and Rwanda to that list.

But most African governments remain stuck in a culture of dependence or indifference. There are still too many dictators in Africa (six have been in office for more than 25 years) and many elected leaders behave no differently.

In Zambia last year, journalist Chansa Kabwela sent photographs of a woman giving birth on the street outside a major hospital (where she had been refused admission) to the president’s office, hoping he would look into why this had happened.

Instead, the president, Rupiah Banda, ordered the journalist prosecuted for promoting pornography. She was later acquitted.

Government callousness is one thing. Discouraging investors is even worse. No aid professional ever suggested that outside help was more important than private effort; on the contrary, foreign aid was intended to help lay the foundations for greater public confidence and private savings and investment.

Few economists thought that aid would create wealth, although most hoped that it would help distribute the benefits of growth more evenly. It was plain that institutions, policy, and individual effort were more important than money.

So, where — despite decades of aid — the conditions for private savings and investment are still forbidding, it is high time we ask ourselves why we are still trying to improve them.

The Blair Commission Report on Africa in 2005 reported that 70,000 trained professionals leave Africa every year, and until they — and the 40 percent of the continent’s savings that are held abroad — start coming home, we need to use aid more restrictively.

An obvious solution is to focus aid on the small number of countries that are trying seriously to fight poverty and corruption. Other countries will need to wait — or settle with only small amounts of aid — until their politics or policies or attitudes to the private sector are more promising.

We should also consider introducing incentives for countries to match outside assistance with greater progress in raising local funds.

President Obama is being criticized for increasing U.S. contributions to the international fight against HIV/AIDS by only two percent, with the result that people in Uganda are already being turned away from clinics and condemned to die.

When challenged, U.S. officials have had a fairly solid answer. Uganda has recently discovered oil and gas deposits but has gone on a spending spree, reportedly ordering fighter planes worth $300 million from Russia, according to a recent report in the New York Times.

Does a government that shows such wanton disregard for common sense or even good taste really have the moral basis for insisting on more help with AIDS?

We must not be distracted by recent news of Africa’s « spectacular » growth and its sudden attractiveness to private investment. Some basic things are changing on the continent, with real effects for the future; above all, Africans are speaking out and refusing to accept tired excuses from their governments.

But the truth is that most of Africa’s growth — based on oil and mineral exports — has not made a whit of difference to the lives of most Africans.

Political freedoms shrank on the continent last year, according to the U.S.-based Freedom House index.

A quarter of school-age children are still not enrolled, according to World Bank statistics; many of those that are, are receiving a very mediocre education. And agricultural productivity — the key to reducing poverty — is essentially stagnant.

The really good news is likely to stay local and seep out in small doses, until it eventually overwhelms the inertia and indifference of governments.

Five years ago, Kenya managed to double its tax revenues because a former businessman, appointed to head the national revenue agency, took a hatchet to the dishonest practices of many tax collectors. He had every reason to do so. Only five percent of Kenya’s budget comes from foreign aid, compared with 40 percent in neighboring countries.

This is a good example of the sometimes-perverse effects of aid, but also of the importance of imagination and individual initiative in promoting a better life for Africans.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Robert Calderisi.

Development aid to Africa
Top 10 « official development assistance » recipients in 2008:

1 Ethiopia $3.327 billion
2 Sudan $2.384 billion
3 Tanzania $2.331 billion
4 Mozambique $1.9994 billion
5 Uganda $1.657 billion
6 DR Cong $1.610 billion
7 Kenya $1.360 billion
8 Egypt $1.348 billion
9 Ghana $1.293 billion
10 Nigeria $1.290 billion

Net official development assistance to Africa in 2008: $44 billion.

Source: Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Voir encore:

Why Foreign Aid Is Hurting Africa
Money from rich countries has trapped many African nations in a cycle of corruption, slower economic growth and poverty. Cutting off the flow would be far more beneficial, says Dambisa Moyo.
Dambisa Moyo
WSJ

March 21, 2009

A month ago I visited Kibera, the largest slum in Africa. This suburb of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya, is home to more than one million people, who eke out a living in an area of about one square mile — roughly 75% the size of New York’s Central Park. It is a sea of aluminum and cardboard shacks that forgotten families call home. The idea of a slum conjures up an image of children playing amidst piles of garbage, with no running water and the rank, rife stench of sewage. Kibera does not disappoint.

What is incredibly disappointing is the fact that just a few yards from Kibera stands the headquarters of the United Nations’ agency for human settlements which, with an annual budget of millions of dollars, is mandated to « promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. » Kibera festers in Kenya, a country that has one of the highest ratios of development workers per capita. This is also the country where in 2004, British envoy Sir Edward Clay apologized for underestimating the scale of government corruption and failing to speak out earlier.

Giving alms to Africa remains one of the biggest ideas of our time — millions march for it, governments are judged by it, celebrities proselytize the need for it. Calls for more aid to Africa are growing louder, with advocates pushing for doubling the roughly $50 billion of international assistance that already goes to Africa each year.

Yet evidence overwhelmingly demonstrates that aid to Africa has made the poor poorer, and the growth slower. The insidious aid culture has left African countries more debt-laden, more inflation-prone, more vulnerable to the vagaries of the currency markets and more unattractive to higher-quality investment. It’s increased the risk of civil conflict and unrest (the fact that over 60% of sub-Saharan Africa’s population is under the age of 24 with few economic prospects is a cause for worry). Aid is an unmitigated political, economic and humanitarian disaster.

Few will deny that there is a clear moral imperative for humanitarian and charity-based aid to step in when necessary, such as during the 2004 tsunami in Asia. Nevertheless, it’s worth reminding ourselves what emergency and charity-based aid can and cannot do. Aid-supported scholarships have certainly helped send African girls to school (never mind that they won’t be able to find a job in their own countries once they have graduated). This kind of aid can provide band-aid solutions to alleviate immediate suffering, but by its very nature cannot be the platform for long-term sustainable growth.

Whatever its strengths and weaknesses, such charity-based aid is relatively small beer when compared to the sea of money that floods Africa each year in government-to-government aid or aid from large development institutions such as the World Bank.

Over the past 60 years at least $1 trillion of development-related aid has been transferred from rich countries to Africa. Yet real per-capita income today is lower than it was in the 1970s, and more than 50% of the population — over 350 million people — live on less than a dollar a day, a figure that has nearly doubled in two decades.

Even after the very aggressive debt-relief campaigns in the 1990s, African countries still pay close to $20 billion in debt repayments per annum, a stark reminder that aid is not free. In order to keep the system going, debt is repaid at the expense of African education and health care. Well-meaning calls to cancel debt mean little when the cancellation is met with the fresh infusion of aid, and the vicious cycle starts up once again.

In Zambia, former President Frederick Chiluba (with wife Regina in November 2008) has been charged with theft of state funds. AFP/Getty Images
In 2005, just weeks ahead of a G8 conference that had Africa at the top of its agenda, the International Monetary Fund published a report entitled « Aid Will Not Lift Growth in Africa. » The report cautioned that governments, donors and campaigners should be more modest in their claims that increased aid will solve Africa’s problems. Despite such comments, no serious efforts have been made to wean Africa off this debilitating drug.

The most obvious criticism of aid is its links to rampant corruption. Aid flows destined to help the average African end up supporting bloated bureaucracies in the form of the poor-country governments and donor-funded non-governmental organizations. In a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in May 2004, Jeffrey Winters, a professor at Northwestern University, argued that the World Bank had participated in the corruption of roughly $100 billion of its loan funds intended for development.

As recently as 2002, the African Union, an organization of African nations, estimated that corruption was costing the continent $150 billion a year, as international donors were apparently turning a blind eye to the simple fact that aid money was inadvertently fueling graft. With few or no strings attached, it has been all too easy for the funds to be used for anything, save the developmental purpose for which they were intended.

In Zaire — known today as the Democratic Republic of Congo — Irwin Blumenthal (whom the IMF had appointed to a post in the country’s central bank) warned in 1978 that the system was so corrupt that there was « no (repeat, no) prospect for Zaire’s creditors to get their money back. » Still, the IMF soon gave the country the largest loan it had ever given an African nation. According to corruption watchdog agency Transparency International, Mobutu Sese Seko, Zaire’s president from 1965 to 1997, is reputed to have stolen at least $5 billion from the country.

It’s scarcely better today. A month ago, Malawi’s former President Bakili Muluzi was charged with embezzling aid money worth $12 million. Zambia’s former President Frederick Chiluba (a development darling during his 1991 to 2001 tenure) remains embroiled in a court case that has revealed millions of dollars frittered away from health, education and infrastructure toward his personal cash dispenser. Yet the aid keeps on coming.

A nascent economy needs a transparent and accountable government and an efficient civil service to help meet social needs. Its people need jobs and a belief in their country’s future. A surfeit of aid has been shown to be unable to help achieve these goals.

A constant stream of « free » money is a perfect way to keep an inefficient or simply bad government in power. As aid flows in, there is nothing more for the government to do — it doesn’t need to raise taxes, and as long as it pays the army, it doesn’t have to take account of its disgruntled citizens. No matter that its citizens are disenfranchised (as with no taxation there can be no representation). All the government really needs to do is to court and cater to its foreign donors to stay in power.

Stuck in an aid world of no incentives, there is no reason for governments to seek other, better, more transparent ways of raising development finance (such as accessing the bond market, despite how hard that might be). The aid system encourages poor-country governments to pick up the phone and ask the donor agencies for next capital infusion. It is no wonder that across Africa, over 70% of the public purse comes from foreign aid.

In Ethiopia, where aid constitutes more than 90% of the government budget, a mere 2% of the country’s population has access to mobile phones. (The African country average is around 30%.) Might it not be preferable for the government to earn money by selling its mobile phone license, thereby generating much-needed development income and also providing its citizens with telephone service that could, in turn, spur economic activity?

Look what has happened in Ghana, a country where after decades of military rule brought about by a coup, a pro-market government has yielded encouraging developments. Farmers and fishermen now use mobile phones to communicate with their agents and customers across the country to find out where prices are most competitive. This translates into numerous opportunities for self-sustainability and income generation — which, with encouragement, could be easily replicated across the continent.

To advance a country’s economic prospects, governments need efficient civil service. But civil service is naturally prone to bureaucracy, and there is always the incipient danger of self-serving cronyism and the desire to bind citizens in endless, time-consuming red tape. What aid does is to make that danger a grim reality. This helps to explain why doing business across much of Africa is a nightmare. In Cameroon, it takes a potential investor around 426 days to perform 15 procedures to gain a business license. What entrepreneur wants to spend 119 days filling out forms to start a business in Angola? He’s much more likely to consider the U.S. (40 days and 19 procedures) or South Korea (17 days and 10 procedures).

Even what may appear as a benign intervention on the surface can have damning consequences. Say there is a mosquito-net maker in small-town Africa. Say he employs 10 people who together manufacture 500 nets a week. Typically, these 10 employees support upward of 15 relatives each. A Western government-inspired program generously supplies the affected region with 100,000 free mosquito nets. This promptly puts the mosquito net manufacturer out of business, and now his 10 employees can no longer support their 150 dependents. In a couple of years, most of the donated nets will be torn and useless, but now there is no mosquito net maker to go to. They’ll have to get more aid. And African governments once again get to abdicate their responsibilities.

In a similar vein has been the approach to food aid, which historically has done little to support African farmers. Under the auspices of the U.S. Food for Peace program, each year millions of dollars are used to buy American-grown food that has to then be shipped across oceans. One wonders how a system of flooding foreign markets with American food, which puts local farmers out of business, actually helps better Africa. A better strategy would be to use aid money to buy food from farmers within the country, and then distribute that food to the local citizens in need.

Then there is the issue of « Dutch disease, » a term that describes how large inflows of money can kill off a country’s export sector, by driving up home prices and thus making their goods too expensive for export. Aid has the same effect. Large dollar-denominated aid windfalls that envelop fragile developing economies cause the domestic currency to strengthen against foreign currencies. This is catastrophic for jobs in the poor country where people’s livelihoods depend on being relatively competitive in the global market.

To fight aid-induced inflation, countries have to issue bonds to soak up the subsequent glut of money swamping the economy. In 2005, for example, Uganda was forced to issue such bonds to mop up excess liquidity to the tune of $700 million. The interest payments alone on this were a staggering $110 million, to be paid annually.

The stigma associated with countries relying on aid should also not be underestimated or ignored. It is the rare investor that wants to risk money in a country that is unable to stand on its own feet and manage its own affairs in a sustainable way.

Africa remains the most unstable continent in the world, beset by civil strife and war. Since 1996, 11 countries have been embroiled in civil wars. According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, in the 1990s, Africa had more wars than the rest of the world combined. Although my country, Zambia, has not had the unfortunate experience of an outright civil war, growing up I experienced first-hand the discomfort of living under curfew (where everyone had to be in their homes between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m., which meant racing from work and school) and faced the fear of the uncertain outcomes of an attempted coup in 1991 — sadly, experiences not uncommon to many Africans.

Civil clashes are often motivated by the knowledge that by seizing the seat of power, the victor gains virtually unfettered access to the package of aid that comes with it. In the last few months alone, there have been at least three political upheavals across the continent, in Mauritania, Guinea and Guinea Bissau (each of which remains reliant on foreign aid). Madagascar’s government was just overthrown in a coup this past week. The ongoing political volatility across the continent serves as a reminder that aid-financed efforts to force-feed democracy to economies facing ever-growing poverty and difficult economic prospects remain, at best, precariously vulnerable. Long-term political success can only be achieved once a solid economic trajectory has been established.

“ The 1970s were an exciting time to be African. Many of our nations had just achieved independence, and with that came a deep sense of dignity, self-respect and hope for the future. ”

Proponents of aid are quick to argue that the $13 billion ($100 billion in today’s terms) aid of the post-World War II Marshall Plan helped pull back a broken Europe from the brink of an economic abyss, and that aid could work, and would work, if Africa had a good policy environment.

The aid advocates skirt over the point that the Marshall Plan interventions were short, sharp and finite, unlike the open-ended commitments which imbue governments with a sense of entitlement rather than encouraging innovation. And aid supporters spend little time addressing the mystery of why a country in good working order would seek aid rather than other, better forms of financing. No country has ever achieved economic success by depending on aid to the degree that many African countries do.

The good news is we know what works; what delivers growth and reduces poverty. We know that economies that rely on open-ended commitments of aid almost universally fail, and those that do not depend on aid succeed. The latter is true for economically successful countries such as China and India, and even closer to home, in South Africa and Botswana. Their strategy of development finance emphasizes the important role of entrepreneurship and markets over a staid aid-system of development that preaches hand-outs.

African countries could start by issuing bonds to raise cash. To be sure, the traditional capital markets of the U.S. and Europe remain challenging. However, African countries could explore opportunities to raise capital in more non-traditional markets such as the Middle East and China (whose foreign exchange reserves are more than $4 trillion). Moreover, the current market malaise provides an opening for African countries to focus on acquiring credit ratings (a prerequisite to accessing the bond markets), and preparing themselves for the time when the capital markets return to some semblance of normalcy.

Governments need to attract more foreign direct investment by creating attractive tax structures and reducing the red tape and complex regulations for businesses. African nations should also focus on increasing trade; China is one promising partner. And Western countries can help by cutting off the cycle of giving something for nothing. It’s time for a change.

Dambisa Moyo, a former economist at Goldman Sachs, is the author of « Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa. »

Corrections & Amplifications

In the African nations of Burkina Faso, Rwanda, Somalia, Mali, Chad, Mauritania and Sierra Leone from 1970 to 2002, over 70% of total government spending came from foreign aid, according to figures from the World Bank. This essay on foreign aid to Africa incorrectly said that 70% of government spending throughout Africa comes from foreign aid.

Voir de même:

This Is Why Americans Are Donating Less To Fight Ebola Than Other Recent Disasters
Associated Press
10/16/2014

NEW YORK (AP) — Individual Americans, rich or not, donated generously in response to many recent international disasters, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and last year’s Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. The response to the Ebola epidemic is far less robust, and experts are wondering why.

There have been some huge gifts from American billionaires — $50 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, $11.9 million from Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen’s foundation, and a $25 million gift this week from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan. Their beneficiaries included the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.

But the flow of smaller donations has been relatively modest.

The American Red Cross, for example, received a $2.8 million share of Allen’s donations. But Jana Sweeny, the charity’s director of international communications, said that’s been supplemented by only about $100,000 in gifts from other donors. By comparison, the Red Cross received more than $85 million in response to Typhoon Haiyan.

« After the typhoon, we got flooded with calls asking, ‘How do I give?' » Sweeny said. « With this (Ebola), we’re not getting those kinds of requests. »

Why the difference? For starters, it’s been evident that national governments will need to shoulder the bulk of the financial burden in combatting Ebola, particularly as its ripple effects are increasingly felt beyond the epicenter in West Africa.

Regine A. Webster of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, which advises nonprofits on disaster response strategies, said the epidemic blurred the lines in terms of the categories that guide some big donors.

« This is a confusing issue for the private donor community — is it a disaster, or a health problem? » Webster said. « Institutions and individuals have been quite slow to respond. »

Officials at InterAction, an umbrella group for U.S. relief agencies active abroad, see other intangible factors at work, including the video and photographic images emerging from West Africa. Joel Charny, InterAction’s vice president for humanitarian policy, said it was clear from the imagery out of Haiti and the Philippines that donations could help rebuild shattered homes and schools, while the images of Ebola are more frightening and less conducive to envisioning a happy ending.

« People give when they see that there’s a plausible solution, » Charny said. « They can say, ‘If I give my $50 or $200, it’s going to translate in some tangible way into relieving suffering.’ … That makes them feel good. »

« With Ebola, there’s kind of a fear factor, » he said. « Even competent agencies are feeling somewhat overwhelmed, and the nature of the disease — being so awful — makes it hard for people to engage. »

Gary Shaye, senior director for emergency operations with Save The Children, suggested that donors were moved to help after recent typhoons, tsunamis and earthquakes because of huge death tolls reported in the first wave of news reports. The Ebola death toll, in contrast, has been rising alarmingly but gradually over several months.

Like other organizations fighting Ebola, Save the Children is trying to convey to donors that it urgently needs private gifts — cherished because they can be used flexibly — regardless of how much government funding is committed.

« We need both — it’s not either/or, » said Shaye. He said Save the Children was particularly reliant on private funding to underwrite child-protection work in the three worst-hit countries — Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — where many children have been isolated and stigmatized after their parents or other relatives got Ebola.

By last count, Shaye said, Save the Children had collected about $500,000 in private gifts earmarked for the Ebola crisis.

« We’re proud that we raised $500,000 — but we’re talking about millions in needs that we will have, » he said.

Another group working on the front lines in West Africa is the Los Angeles-based International Medical Corps, which runs a treatment center in Liberia and plans to open one soon in Sierra Leone.

Rebecca Milner, a vice president of the corps, said it had been a struggle to raise awareness when Ebola-related fundraising efforts began in earnest in midsummer.

« It took a while before people began to respond, but now there’s definitely increased concern, » she said.

Thus far, Milner said, gifts and pledges earmarked for the Ebola response have totaled about $2.5 million — compared with about $6 million that her organization received in the first three months after the Haiti earthquake.

Among the groups most heartened by donor response is Doctors without Borders, which is widely credited with mounting the most extensive operations of any non-governmental organization in the Ebola-stricken region.

Thomas Kurmann, director of development for the organization’s U.S. branch, said American donors had given $7 million earmarked for the Ebola response, a portion of the roughly $40 million donated worldwide.

« It’s very good news, » Kurmann said. « There’s been significantly increased interest in the past three months. »

Doctors Without Borders said this week that 16 of its staff members have been infected with Ebola and nine have died.

A smaller nonprofit, North Carolina-based SIM USA, found itself in the headlines in August and September, when two of its American health workers were infected with Ebola in Liberia. Both survived.

SIM’s vice president for finance and operations, George Salloum, said the missionary organization — which typically gets $50 million a year in donations — received several hundred thousand dollars in gifts specifically linked to those Ebola developments.

Even as the crisis worsens, Salloum said nonprofits active in the Ebola zone need to be thinking long-term.

« At some point, we’ll be beyond the epidemic, » he said. « Then the challenge will be how to deal with the aftermath, when thousands of people have been killed. What about the elders, the children? There will be a lot of work for years. »

Support UNICEF’s efforts to combat Ebola through the fundraising widget below.

Voir enfin:

‘SNL’ Has One of the Year’s Most Surprisingly Sharp Critiques of Poverty Aid in Africa
Zak Cheney-Rice

Mic

October 15, 2014

Saturday Night Live still manages to surprise once in a while. The long-running sketch comedy show has drawn criticism for its lack of diversity and questionable joke decisions of late, but this past weekend saw its satirical gears in rare form:

The sketch features guest host Bill Hader as Charles Daniels, a soft-voiced, thick-bearded incarnation of a common late night infomercial trope, the philanthropy fund spokesperson. The clip opens with shots of an unnamed African village, where residents pass the time by gazing longingly into the camera and dolefully stirring pots of stew.

« For only 39 cents a day, » Daniels says to his viewers, « you can provide water, food and medicine for these people … That’s less than a small cup of coffee. »

« Ask for more, » whispers a villager played by Jay Pharoah. « Why you starting so low? »

So begins a three-minute interrogation around why this « cheap-ass white man » is asking for so little money — « [the] number has been decided by very educated and caring people, » Daniels claims — and more importantly, why he thinks throwing money at this problem will solve it in the first place.

The sketch ends with Daniels’ implied abduction, along with demands for a larger sum in exchange for his release. The question of where he’s getting a 39-cent cup of coffee remains unanswered.

While it’s unclear why the black performers are talking like they’re in a Good Times parody, the sketch brings up some valid political points. For one, the long-term effectiveness of foreign aid has been questioned for years, with critics at outlets ranging from CNN to the Wall Street Journal claiming it can foster a relationship of « dependence » while ultimately providing cosmetic solutions that fail to address systemic issues.

Even CARE, one of the biggest charities in the world, rejected $45 million a year in federal funding in 2007 because American food aid was so « plagued with inefficiencies » as to be detrimental, according to the New York Times (by the same token, many such organizations disagree).

SNL illustrates this perfectly when Daniels implies the villagers are ungrateful when they ask for more. « You know, for a starving village, you people have a lot of energy, » he says.

The sketch also touches on monolithic Western views of African diversity: When the villagers ask Daniels which country he thinks he’s in, he simply responds, « Africa. »

Considering SNL’s less than sterling record on racial humor, the overall pointedness of this skit is a pleasant surprise. Best-case scenario, it indicates that producer Lorne Michaels’ recent emphasis on casting and writer diversity is incrementally starting to pay dividends.


Hamas: De même que pour toutes les terres conquises par l’islam (For the Hamas, Palestine is an Islamic Waqf throughout all generations and to the Day of Resurrection as long as Heaven and earth last)

3 août, 2014
Le roi de Moab, voyant qu’il avait le dessous dans le combat, prit avec lui sept cents hommes tirant l’épée pour se frayer un passage jusqu’au roi d’Édom; mais ils ne purent pas. Il prit alors son fils premier-né, qui devait régner à sa place, et il l’offrit en holocauste sur la muraille. Et une grande indignation s’empara d’Israël, qui s’éloigna du roi de Moab et retourna dans son pays. 2 Rois 3: 26-27
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique aspire à l’accomplissement de la promesse de Dieu, quel que soit le temps nécessaire. L’Apôtre de Dieu -que Dieu lui donne bénédiction et paix- a dit : « L’Heure ne viendra pas avant que les musulmans n’aient combattu les Juifs (c’est à dire que les musulmans ne les aient tués), avant que les Juifs ne se fussent cachés derrière les pierres et les arbres et que les pierres et les arbres eussent dit : ‘Musulman, serviteur de Dieu ! Un Juif se cache derrière moi, viens et tue-le. Charte du Hamas (article 7)
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique croit que la Palestine est un Waqf islamique consacré aux générations de musulmans jusqu’au Jugement Dernier. Pas une seule parcelle ne peut en être dilapidée ou abandonnée à d’autres. Aucun pays arabe, président arabe ou roi arabe, ni tous les rois et présidents arabes réunis, ni une organisation même palestinienne n’a le droit de le faire. La Palestine est un Waqf musulman consacré aux générations de musulmans jusqu’au Jour du Jugement Dernier. Qui peut prétendre avoir le droit de représenter les générations de musulmans jusqu’au Jour du Jugement Dernier ? Tel est le statut de la terre de Palestine dans la Charia, et il en va de même pour toutes les terres conquises par l’islam et devenues terres de Waqf dès leur conquête, pour être consacrées à toutes les générations de musulmans jusqu’au Jour du Jugement Dernier. Il en est ainsi depuis que les chefs des armées islamiques ont conquis les terres de Syrie et d’Irak et ont demandé au Calife des musulmans, Omar Ibn-al Khattab, s’ils devaient partager ces terres entre les soldats ou les laisser à leurs propriétaires. Suite à des consultations et des discussions entre le Calife des musulmans, Omar Ibn-al Khattab, et les compagnons du Prophète, Allah le bénisse, il fut décidé que la terre soit laissée à ses propriétaires pour qu’ils profitent de ses fruits. Cependant, la propriété véritable et la terre même doit être consacrée aux seuls musulmans jusqu’au Jour du Jugement Dernier. Ceux qui se trouvent sur ces terres peuvent uniquement profiter de ses fruits. Ce waqf persiste tant que le Ciel et la Terre existent. Toute procédure en contradiction avec la Charia islamique en ce qui concerne la Palestine est nulle et non avenue.« C’est la vérité infaillible. Célèbre le nom d’Allah le Très-Haut » (Coran, LVI, 95-96). Charte du Hamas (article 11)
The Jews are the most despicable and contemptible nation to crawl upon the face of the Earth, because they have displayed hostility to Allah. Allah will kill the Jews in the hell of the world to come, just like they killed the believers in the hell of this world. Atallah Abu al-Subh (former Hamas minister of culture, 2011)
Right now, Israel is much more powerful than Hezbollah and Hamas. Let’s say tomorrow this was reversed. Let’s say Hamas had the firepower of Israel and Israel had the firepower of Hamas. What do you think would happen to Israel were the balance of power reversed? David Wolpe (rabbi of Los Angeles Sinai Temple)
The truth is that there is an obvious, undeniable, and hugely consequential moral difference between Israel and her enemies. The Israelis are surrounded by people who have explicitly genocidal intentions towards them. The charter of Hamas is explicitly genocidal. It looks forward to a time, based on Koranic prophesy, when the earth itself will cry out for Jewish blood, where the trees and the stones will say “O Muslim, there’s a Jew hiding behind me. Come and kill him.” This is a political document. We are talking about a government that was voted into power by a majority of Palestinians. (…) The discourse in the Muslim world about Jews is utterly shocking. Not only is there Holocaust denial—there’s Holocaust denial that then asserts that we will do it for real if given the chance. The only thing more obnoxious than denying the Holocaust is to say that itshould have happened; it didn’t happen, but if we get the chance, we will accomplish it. There are children’s shows in the Palestinian territories and elsewhere that teach five-year-olds about the glories of martyrdom and about the necessity of killing Jews. And this gets to the heart of the moral difference between Israel and her enemies. And this is something I discussed in The End of Faith. To see this moral difference, you have to ask what each side would do if they had the power to do it. What would the Jews do to the Palestinians if they could do anything they wanted? Well, we know the answer to that question, because they can do more or less anything they want. The Israeli army could kill everyone in Gaza tomorrow. So what does that mean? Well, it means that, when they drop a bomb on a beach and kill four Palestinian children, as happened last week, this is almost certainly an accident. They’re not targeting children. They could target as many children as they want. Every time a Palestinian child dies, Israel edges ever closer to becoming an international pariah. So the Israelis take great pains not to kill children and other noncombatants. (…)What do we know of the Palestinians? What would the Palestinians do to the Jews in Israel if the power imbalance were reversed? Well, they have told us what they would do. For some reason, Israel’s critics just don’t want to believe the worst about a group like Hamas, even when it declares the worst of itself. We’ve already had a Holocaust and several other genocides in the 20th century. People are capable of committing genocide. When they tell us they intend to commit genocide, we should listen. There is every reason to believe that the Palestinians would kill all the Jews in Israel if they could. Would every Palestinian support genocide? Of course not. But vast numbers of them—and of Muslims throughout the world—would. Needless to say, the Palestinians in general, not just Hamas, have a history of targeting innocent noncombatants in the most shocking ways possible. They’ve blown themselves up on buses and in restaurants. They’ve massacred teenagers. They’ve murdered Olympic athletes. They now shoot rockets indiscriminately into civilian areas. And again, the charter of their government in Gaza explicitly tells us that they want to annihilate the Jews—not just in Israel but everywhere.(…) The truth is that everything you need to know about the moral imbalance between Israel and her enemies can be understood on the topic of human shields. Who uses human shields? Well, Hamas certainly does. They shoot their rockets from residential neighborhoods, from beside schools, and hospitals, and mosques. Muslims in other recent conflicts, in Iraq and elsewhere, have also used human shields. They have laid their rifles on the shoulders of their own children and shot from behind their bodies. Consider the moral difference between using human shields and being deterred by them. That is the difference we’re talking about. The Israelis and other Western powers are deterred, however imperfectly, by the Muslim use of human shields in these conflicts, as we should be. It is morally abhorrent to kill noncombatants if you can avoid it. It’s certainly abhorrent to shoot through the bodies of children to get at your adversary. But take a moment to reflect on how contemptible this behavior is. And understand how cynical it is. The Muslims are acting on the assumption—the knowledge, in fact—that the infidels with whom they fight, the very people whom their religion does nothing but vilify, will be deterred by their use of Muslim human shields. They consider the Jews the spawn of apes and pigs—and yet they rely on the fact that they don’t want to kill Muslim noncombatants.(…) Now imagine reversing the roles here. Imagine how fatuous—indeed comical it would be—for the Israelis to attempt to use human shields to deter the Palestinians. (…) But Imagine the Israelis holding up their own women and children as human shields. Of course, that would be ridiculous. The Palestinians are trying to kill everyone. Killing women and children is part of the plan. Reversing the roles here produces a grotesque Monty Python skit. If you’re going to talk about the conflict in the Middle East, you have to acknowledge this difference. I don’t think there’s any ethical disparity to be found anywhere that is more shocking or consequential than this. And the truth is, this isn’t even the worst that jihadists do. Hamas is practically a moderate organization, compared to other jihadist groups. There are Muslims who have blown themselves up in crowds of children—again, Muslim children—just to get at the American soldiers who were handing out candy to them. They have committed suicide bombings, only to send another bomber to the hospital to await the casualities—where they then blow up all the injured along with the doctors and nurses trying to save their lives. Every day that you could read about an Israeli rocket gone astray or Israeli soldiers beating up an innocent teenager, you could have read about ISIS in Iraq crucifying people on the side of the road, Christians and Muslims. Where is the outrage in the Muslim world and on the Left over these crimes? Where are the demonstrations, 10,000 or 100,000 deep, in the capitals of Europe against ISIS?  If Israel kills a dozen Palestinians by accident, the entire Muslim world is inflamed. God forbid you burn a Koran, or write a novel vaguely critical of the faith. And yet Muslims can destroy their own societies—and seek to destroy the West—and you don’t hear a peep. (…) These incompatible religious attachments to this land have made it impossible for Muslims and Jews to negotiate like rational human beings, and they have made it impossible for them to live in peace. But the onus is still more on the side of the Muslims here. Even on their worst day, the Israelis act with greater care and compassion and self-criticism than Muslim combatants have anywhere, ever. And again, you have to ask yourself, what do these groups want? What would they accomplish if they could accomplish anything? What would the Israelis do if they could do what they want? They would live in peace with their neighbors, if they had neighbors who would live in peace with them. They would simply continue to build out their high tech sector and thrive. (…) What do groups like ISIS and al-Qaeda and even Hamas want? They want to impose their religious views on the rest of humanity. They want stifle every freedom that decent, educated, secular people care about. This is not a trivial difference. And yet judging from the level of condemnation that Israel now receives, you would think the difference ran the other way. This kind of confusion puts all of us in danger. This is the great story of our time. For the rest of our lives, and the lives of our children, we are going to be confronted by people who don’t want to live peacefully in a secular, pluralistic world, because they are desperate to get to Paradise, and they are willing to destroy the very possibility of human happiness along the way. The truth is, we are all living in Israel. It’s just that some of us haven’t realized it yet. Sam Harris
On ne manque pas d’images du conflit de Gaza. Nous avons vu les décombres, les enfants palestiniens morts, les Israéliens courir aux abris pendant les attaques de roquettes, les manœuvres israéliennes et les images fournies par l’armée israélienne des militants du Hamas sortant de tunnels pour attaquer les soldats israéliens. Nous n’avons pratiquement pas vu aucune image d’hommes armés du Hamas à Gaza. Nous savons qu’ils sont là : il y a bien quelqu’un qui doit se charger de lancer les roquettes sur Israël (plus de 2 800) et de les tirer sur les troupes israéliennes dans Gaza. Pourtant, jusqu’à maintenant, les seules images que nous avons vues (ou dont nous avons même entendu parler) sont les vidéos fournies par l’armée israélienne de terroristes du Hamas utilisant les hôpitaux, les ambulances, les mosquées, les écoles (et les tunnels) pour lancer des attaques contre des cibles israéliennes ou transporter des armes autour de Gaza. Pourquoi n’avons nous pas vu des photographies prises par des journalistes d’hommes du Hamas dans Gaza ? Nous savons que le Hamas ne veut pas que le monde voit les hommes armés palestiniens en train de lancer de roquettes ou utilisant des lieux peuplés de civils comme des bases d’opération. Mais si l’on peut voir des images des deux côtés pratiquement dans toutes les guerres, en Syrie, en Ukraine, en Irak, pourquoi Gaza fait-elle figure d’exception ? Si des journalistes sont menacés et intimidés lorsqu’ils essaient de documenter les activités du Hamas dans Gaza, leurs agences de presse devraient le dire publiquement. (…) Pour de nombreux spectateurs, le récit de cette guerre doit apparaître très clair : le puissant Israël bombarde des Palestiniens sans défense. C’est compréhensible lorsque l’on ne voit presque aucune photographie des agresseurs palestiniens. (…) Ce n’est pas un détail. L’opinion publique est un élément crucial dans ce conflit. Elle va jouer un rôle pour déterminer quand les combats cesseront, à quoi ressemblera le cessez-le-feu et qui portera en priorité la responsabilité pour la mort d’innocents. Si les grands médias suppriment les images des terroristes du Hamas utilisant des civils comme des boucliers et utilisant des écoles et des hôpitaux comme des bases d’opérations, alors les gens autour du monde auront naturellement du mal à voir les Israéliens comme autre chose que des agresseurs et les Palestiniens comme autre chose que des victimes. Times of Israel
Les menaces du Hamas ne sont pas responsables de l’ignorance et de la stupidité de la couverture des hostilités à Gaza, mais elles sont en partie responsables. Les journalistes et les médias employeurs coopèrent avec le Hamas non seulement en passant sous silence des histoires qui ne servent pas la cause du Hamas, mais aussi en ne parlant pas des conditions restrictives dans lesquelles ils travaillent. Scott Johnson
Pourtant, le sionisme, sans doute plus que toute autre idéologie contemporaine, est diabolisé. « Tous les sionistes sont des cibles légitimes partout dans le monde! » énonce une bannière récemment brandie par des manifestants anti-Israël au Danemark. « Les chiens sont admis dans cet établissement, mais pas les sionistes, en aucune circonstance », prévient une pancarte à la fenêtre d’un café belge. On a dit à un manifestant juif en Islande : « Toi porc sioniste, je vais te couper la tête. »Dans certains milieux universitaires et médiatiques, le sionisme est synonyme de colonialisme et d’impérialisme. Les critiques d’extrême droite et gauche le comparent au racisme ou, pire, au nazisme. Et cela en Occident. Au Moyen-Orient, le sionisme est l’abomination ultime – le produit d’un Holocauste que beaucoup dans la région nient avoir jamais existé, ce qui ne les empêche pas de maintenir que les sionistes l’ont bien mérité. Qu’est-ce qui, dans ​​le sionisme, suscite un tel dégoût ? Après tout, le désir d’un peuple dispersé d’avoir son propre Etat ne peut être si révulsif, surtout sachant que ce même peuple a enduré des siècles de massacres et d’expulsions, qui ont atteint leur paroxysme dans le plus grand assassinat de masse de l’histoire. Peut-être la révulsion envers le sionisme découle-t-elle de sa mixture inhabituelle d’identité nationale, de religion et de fidélité à une terre. Le Japon s’en rapproche le plus, mais malgré son passé rapace, le nationalisme japonais ne suscite pas la révulsion provoquée par le sionisme. Il est clair que l’antisémitisme, dans ses versions européenne et musulmane, joue un rôle. Fauteurs de cabales, faucheurs d’argent, conquérants du monde et assassins de bébés – toutes ces diffamations autrefois jetées à la tête des Juifs le sont aujourd’hui à celle des sionistes. Et à l’image des capitalistes antisémites qui voyaient tous les Juifs comme des communistes et des communistes pour qui le capitalisme était intrinsèquement juif, les adversaires du sionisme le décrivent comme l’Autre abominable. Mais tous ces détracteurs sont des fanatiques, et certains parmi eux sont des Juifs. Pour un nombre croissant de Juifs progressistes, le sionisme est un nationalisme militant, tandis que pour de nombreux Juifs ultra-orthodoxes, ce mouvement n’est pas suffisamment pieux – voire même hérétique. Comment un idéal si universellement vilipendé peut-il conserver sa légitimité, ou même prétendre être un succès ? Michael Oren
To remember the historical milieu compels every sincere observer to admit that there is no necessary connection between al-Miraj and sovereign rights over Jerusalem since, in the time when the Prophet… consecrated the place with his footprints on the Stone, the City was not a part of the Islamic State – whose borders were then limited to the Arabian Peninsula – but under Byzantine administration. Moreover, although radical preachers try to remove this from exegesis, the Glorious Quran expressly recognizes that Jerusalem plays for the Jewish people the same role that Mecca has for Muslims. We read in Surah al-Baqarah: “…They would not follow thy direction of prayer (qiblah), nor art thou to follow their direction of prayer; nor indeed will they follow each other’s direction of prayer….” All Quranic annotators explain that « thy qiblah » is obviously the Kaabah of Mecca, while « their qiblah  » refers to the Temple Site in Jerusalem. To quote just one of the most important of them, we read in Qadi Baydawi’s Commentary : “Verily, in their prayers Jews orientate themselves toward the Rock (al-Sakhrah), while Christians orientate themselves eastwards….” As opposed to what sectarian radicals continuously claim, the Book that is a guide for those who abide by Islam—as we have just now shown—recognizes Jerusalem as Jewish direction of prayer…. After…deep reflection about the implications of this approach, it is not difficult to understand that separation in directions of prayer is a mean[s] to decrease possible rivalries in [the] management of [the] Holy Places. For those who receive from Allah the gift of equilibrium and the attitude to reconciliation, it should not be difficult to conclude that, as no one is willing to deny Muslims… complete sovereignty over Mecca, from an Islamic point of view… there is not any sound theological reason to deny an equal right of Jews over Jerusalem. Abdul-Hadi Palazzi (“Antizionism and Antisemitism in the Contemporary Islamic Milieu)
Affirming Israel’s « right to exist » is as unacceptable as denying that right, because even posing the question of whether or not the Children of Israel (Jews) — individually, collectively or nationally — have a « right to exist » is unacceptable. Israel exists by Divine Right, confirmed in both the Bible and Qur’an. I find in the Qur’an that God granted the Land of Israel to the Children of Israel and ordered them to settle therein (Qur’an, Sura 5:21) and that before the Last Day He will bring the Children of Israel to retake possession of their Land, gathering them from different countries and nations (Qu’ran, Sura 17:104). Consequently, as a Muslim who abides by the Qur’an, I believe that opposing the existence of the State of Israel means opposing a Divine decree. Every time Arabs fought against Israel they suffered humiliating defeats. In opposing the will of God by making war on Israel, Arabs were in effect making war on God Himself. They ignored the Qur’an, and God punished them. Now, having learned nothing from defeat after defeat, Arabs want to obtain through terror what they were unable to obtain through war: the destruction of the State of Israel. The result is quite predictable: as they have been defeated in the past, the Arabs will be defeated again. In 1919, Emir Feisal (leader of the Hashemite family, i.e., the leader of the family of the Prophet Muhammad) reached an Agreement with Chaim Weizmann for the creation of a Jewish State and an Arab Kingdom having the Jordan river as a border between them. Emir Feisal wrote, « We feel that the Arabs and Jews are cousins in race, having suffered similar oppressions at the hands of powers stronger than themselves, and by a happy coincidence have been able to take the first step towards the attainment of their national ideals together. The Arabs, especially the educated among us, look with the deepest sympathy on the Zionist movement. » In Feisal’s time, none claimed that accepting the creation of the State of Israel and befriending Zionism was against Islam. Even the Arab leaders who opposed the Feisal-Weizmann Agreement never resorted to an Islamic argument to condemn it. Unfortunately that Agreement was never implemented, since the British opposed the creation of the Arab Kingdom and chose to give sovereignty over Arabia to Ibn Sa’ud’s marauders, i.e., to the forefathers of the House of Sa’ud. When the Saudis started ruling an oil rich Kingdom, they also started investing a regular part of their wealth in spreading Wahhabism worldwide. Wahhabism is a totalitarian cult which stands for terror, massacre of civilians and for permanent war against Jews, Christians and non-Wahhabi Muslims. The influence of Wahhabism in the contemporary Arab world is such that many Arab Muslims are wrongly convinced that, in order to be a good Muslim, one must hate Israel and hope for its destruction. (…) The Bible says that God gave the Land of Israel as a heritage to the descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and gave the rest of the world as a heritage to other peoples. As confirmed by the Qur’an and Islamic tradition, Abraham himself bequeathed to his descendants from Isaac the Land of Israel, and bequeathed to his descendants from Ishmael other lands, such as the Arabian peninsula. Now descendants of Ishmael, the Arabs, have a gigantic territory extending from Morocco to Iraq. The descendants of Isaac, the Jews, on the contrary, only have a tiny, narrow strip of land. However, Arab dictators are not satisfied with their huge territory. They want more. They also want the little heritage of the Children of Israel, and resort to terror in order to get it. Sheikh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi (Director of the Cultural Institute of the Italian Islamic Community)
To win a war, one must identify who the enemy is and neutralize the enemy’s chain of command. World War Two was won when the German army was destroyed, Berlin was captured and Hitler removed from power. To win the War on Terror, it is necessary to understand that al-Qa’ida is a Saudi organization, created by the House of Sa’ud, funded with petro-dollar profits by the House of Sa’ud and used by the House of Sa’ud for acts of mass terror primarily against the West, and the rest of the world, as well. Consequently, to really win the War on Terror it is necessary for the U.S. to invade Saudi Arabia, capture King Abdallah and the other 1,500 princes who constitute the House of Sa’ud, to freeze their assets, to remove them from power, and to send them to Guantanamo for life imprisonment. Then it is necessary to replace the Saudi-Wahhabi terror-funding regime with a moderate, non-Wahhabi and pro-West regime, such as a Hashemite Sunni Muslim constitutional monarchy. Unless all this is done, the War on Terror will never be won. It is possible to destroy al-Qa’ida, to capture or execute Bin Laden, al-Zarqawi, al-Zawahiri, etc., but this will not end the War. After some years, Saudi princes will again start funding many similar terror organizations. The Saudi regime can only survive by increasing its support for terror. Saddam’s regime was one of the worst criminal dictatorships which existed in this world, and destroying it was surely a praiseworthy task for which, as a Muslim, I am thankful to President Bush, to the governments who joined the Coalition and to soldiers who fought in the field. Destroying the Taliban regime in Afghanistan and the regime of Saddam Hussein in Iraq were surely praiseworthy tasks, but I regret that focusing on these secondary enemies was — for the White House — a way to obscure the role of the world’s main enemy: the Saudis. (…)  I am extremely disappointed with him. I hoped that — after Saudi terrorists attacked the U.S. on 9/11 — this would necessarily cause a radical revision in U.S.-Saudi relations. The first action a U.S. President had to do after such a criminal attack as 9/11 was to immediately outlaw Saudi-controlled institutions inside the U.S. and acknowledge that viewing Saudis as « friends » was a mortal sin representing sixty years of failed U.S. foreign and economic policy. U.S. governmental agencies have plenty of evidence about the role of the House of Sa’ud in funding the worldwide terror network. U.S. citizens can even read in newspapers that some days before the 9/11 attack Muhammad Atta received a check from the wife of the former Saudi Ambassador to Washington, Prince Bandar, but unbelievably this caused no consequences. Let us consider plain facts: the wife of a foreign ambassador pays terrorists for attacks which murder thousands of U.S. citizens, and the U.S. government not only does not declare war on that foreign country, in this case Saudi Arabia, but does not even terminate diplomatic relations with that country. On the contrary, then-Crown Prince Abdallah, the creator (together with the new Saudi ambassador to the United States, former Saudi ambassador to the United Kingdom, and Father of 9/11, Prince Turki al-Feisal) of al-Qa’ida, is immediately invited to Bush’s ranch as a honored guest, and Bush tells him, « You are our ally in the War on Terror »! Can one image FDR inviting Hitler to the United States and telling him, « You are our ally in the war against Fascism in Europe »? Something very similar happened after 9/11. As a matter of fact, the Saudis supported Bush’s electoral campaign for his first term in office, and asked him in exchange to be the first U.S. President to promote the creation of a Palestinian State. Once he was elected, Bush refused to abide by the agreement, and the consequence was 9/11. « We paid for your election, and now you must do want we want from you », this was the message behind the 9/11 attack. Bush immediately started doing what the Saudis wanted from him: compelling Israel to withdraw from Judea, Samaria and Gaza, in order to permit the creation of a PLO state. Western media speak of a « Road Map, » while Arab media call it by its real name: « Abdallah’s Plan. » One hears about a U.S. President who allegedly leads a « War on Terror » and promotes the spread of « democracy » and « freedom » in the Islamic world, but the reality shows a U.S. president who — after a Saudi terror attack against the U.S. — abides by a Saudi diktat, hides the role of the Saudi regime behind al-Qa’ida and wants Israel, the only democratic state in the Middle East, cut to pieces to facilitate the creation of another dictatorial regime, lead by Arafat deputy Abu Mazen, the terrorist who organized the mass murder of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics. Theoretically, Bush proclaims his intention to punish terror and to spread democracy, but the Road Map is the exact opposite of all this: it means punishing the victims of terror and rewarding terrorists, compelling democracy to withdraw in order to create a new dictatorial Arab regime. For the U.S. there is only one single trustworthy ally in the entire Middle East: Israel. Now Bush is punishing America’s ally Israel to reward those who heartily supported « our brother Saddam », those who demonstrate by burning Stars and Strips flags and those who call America « the imperialist power controlled by Zionism ». In doing so, Bush seriously risks becoming the most anti-Israeli and anti-Jewish President in the history of the U.S. Sheikh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi (Director of the Cultural Institute of the Italian Islamic Community)
The failure of the Ottoman Empire to maintain and reform its financial and political policies in the face of changes in the international order in the nineteenth century led to the British occupation of Egypt in 1882 and was capped by its calamitous decision to ally itself with Germany in the First World War, when the Empire was ultimately consigned to oblivion. Some Muslims confronted modern challenges to traditional Islam by focusing on the distant past, the Golden Age of the Rightly Guided Caliphs (Rashidun), or the Salafs, (ancestors). Those who seek to emulate these ancestors are called Salafis, and their movement is often referred to in Arabic as the Salafiyyah, and its first major ideologue was the Egyptian Rashid Rida. Despite the lack of a political consensus among Palestinian Arabs about what form of government ought to be constituted following the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, officials administering the major Palestinian Islamic institutions in Jerusalem under the British Mandate to the present day have adhered to the ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood inspired by Rida and articulated by the Hajj Amin al-Husseini and Hassan al-Banna in the 1930s. This continuity was masked throughout the periods of Hashemite and Israeli rule as the world’s focus was on the emergence of the secular nationalist Palestinian Liberation Organization and its associated rivals. From a minority position that emerged following the First World War in the Middle East, the claim that Palestine is waqf has been widely accepted in the Muslim discourse following the failures of the secularists to win the battle against Israel by the mid-1990s.
However, taking the larger view, which includes not only the municipality of Jerusalem, but the issue of settlements and Israeli “heritage sites” in East Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza, and the entire course of the conflict, it is not only the Jerusalem municipality or Israel’s policies regarding the Palestinians which is to blame for the current impasse. The Palestinians’ continued willingness to support violent action against Israel, and their continued hope for a one state solution, has resulted, contrary to all reason, to support for HAMAS. Emboldened by its defeat of FATAH in Gaza in 2007, and backed by an extraordinarily aggressive Iran, the maximalists again are threatening to lead the Palestinian remnant to their complete destruction. All attempts to convince the Palestinians to abandon jihadist ideology have failed, despite the fact that the Arab world is ready to accommodate Israel in the current Middle Eastern state system. Recent calls for a bi-national, secular state instead of a two-state solution are distractions from the real issues at hand. Improving the living conditions of the Palestinian people, fostering the development of municipal and national government in Gaza and the West Bank, and fighting against Islamist opportunism are goals that can be achieved under the shadow of the Iranian threat. Only on the micro-level can political progress be made. The conflict has to become localized. Only by rejecting the regionalization of the political issues facing the Palestinian and Israeli conflict can the international threats on the macro-level be challenged. A paradigm shift is needed to thwart the Islamist threat to Israel. Below are concrete steps towards localizing the conflict and to reinvigorate the peace process that could break the cycle of despair now characterizing the region within the parameters of the Beillin-Abu Mazen plan of 1995. Immediate Steps Within the Realm of Realpolitik and Reason: Localize Conflict Management and Resolution 1. Establish embassies in West and East Jerusalem All states having diplomatic relations with Israel should immediately establish embassies in Israel and Palestine. Arab League states establish embassies in East and West Jerusalem. Use these embassies to kick start economic development and housing in various neighborhoods. 2. Latin Patriarchate, Greek Orthodox Patriarchate, and other Christian landowners in Palestine/Israel to cooperate by developing local community development boards. 3) UNESCO overseas restoration and preservation of Islamic monuments and archeological sites. Turkey to cooperate with Israel and Palestine with historical preservation projects. 4) Educational programs for Palestinian and Israeli students focusing on holy sites throughout the land. Educational institutions currently training tour guides to spearhead these efforts, emphasizing change and continuity over time. 5) Truth and Reconciliation commissions to document and memorialize history. Institutions of higher learning to cooperate with education ministries. 6) UNRWA to close refugee camps throughout the Middle East. Repatriate and reimburse Arab and Jewish refugees according to their wishes—return, compensation, or memorials—on a case-by-case basis. Judith Mendelsohn Rood

Attention: une abomination peut en cacher une autre !

Attaques d’écoles, attaques d’hôpitaux, massacres de femmes, massacres d’handicapés, massacres d’enfants …

Alors que ce qui devrait être la révélation ultime d’une perfidie et d’un détournement systématique (jusqu’au recours quasi-archaïque au sacrifice d’enfants !) des valeurs civilisées que l’opinion occidentale n’arrive même pas à imaginer …

Est en train de transformer sur la base d’une information tout aussi systématiquement tronquée par l’intimidation et les menaces constantes sur les journalistes

La seule véritable démocratie du Moyen-Orient en l’abomination des abominations …

Retour, avec une intéressante analyse de  Judith Mendelsohn Rood, sur le véritable programme d’une organisation …

Qui funeste et monstrueux fruit comme on le sait d’un pacte faustien entre Israël et les Saoudiens …

Se révèle être à la fois explicitement guerrière et terroriste …

Et maximaliste et totalitariste …

Ne réclamant rien de moins, au-delà de quelques trêves purement tactiques, que la suppression pure et simple de toute présence juive en Palestine …

HAMAS in the Context of the Historic Islamicization of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict
Judith Mendelsohn Rood

Academia

Judith Mendelsohn Rood, Ph.D. Department of History, Government, and Social Science Biola University

Abstract: Secular Palestinian nationalists and scholars have studied the emergence of the Islamic Resistance Movement, HAMAS, but few have paid attention to its characterization of Palestine as an Islamic waqf. Following Hamas’ successful ousting of Fatah from Gaza in 2006, Hamas has been gaining the upper hand in the West Bank and Jerusalem as well because of its continuation of armed resistance against Israel. Hamas’ political success must be understood as a success of the Muslim Brotherhood to repudiate the secular nationalist Palestinian movement. Should HAMAS’s position on land tenure in the Palestinian Authority, defined by the unfounded claim that all land in Palestine is waqf, new problems arise for the development of the secular Palestinian state and is already posing problems for individual municipalities on the West Bank. The ideologically driven Israeli policy in Jerusalem is again matched by ideological Islamist agenda. Introduction Palestinian scholar Nur Masalha has characterized HAMAS’s claim that Palestine is an Islamic waqf as “the main innovative idea” that the Islamic Resistance Movement has contributed to the Arab-Israel Conflict. However, to the contrary, the claim that all Palestine is waqf  has been the official position of the Muslim Palestinian political establishment since before the days of the British Mandate. This claim, however, does not fit with the theory or practice of Islamic land tenure during any other period in Muslim history.

I first presented a version of this paper on July 31, 2008 at William Carey International University. In July 2009 and March 2010 I interviewed a number of Bethlehem area residents about land tenure issues facing their municipalities. I wish to thank them for their insights and their help, but, because of the sensitivity of these situations, I will have to let them remain anonymous. Any mistakes are my own and no one else is responsible for them. I welcome comments and corrections: judith.rood@biola.edu.

The HAMAS charter refers to the land of Palestine as “waqf ” that is, set aside as an eternal charitable endowment for the Muslim community. This is exactly the concept that the infamous mufti of Jerusalem, al-Hajj Amin al-Husseini, used to oppose the establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine at the time of the British Mandate, a policy that directly led to the Palestinian catastrophe of 1948. Thus, the HAMAS position that the land of Palestine is an irrevocable waqf is the same position held by the mufti  during the Mandate Period to outlaw Palestinian land sales to Jews, by the Jordanians from 1947-1967, by Palestinian secular nationalist groups, and by the Palestinian Authority today. Land sales to Jews are still defined as treason, and accused collaborators are punishable by death, a penalty often imposed extrajudicially. Moreover, this was the position of the Muslim effendiyat  (elite) of Jerusalem in the 19th century (they actually recognized that all of Palestine was not waqf, but consisted mostly of military land grants). The Ottoman authorities explicitly rejected their claim before the rise of political Zionism in order to encourage the growth of commerce in the region of Jerusalem. However, now that HAMAS has become the Islamic Republic of Iran’s newest proxy, the claim is more dangerous than ever before. In this article, we will dissect the issue by defining the geographical, legal, and economic meanings of the terms used by HAMAS in order to disprove them strictly on the grounds of Islamic law and government during the Ottoman period. The 1988 Hamas Charter asserts in Article 11: The Islamic Resistance Movement believes that the land of Palestine is an Islamic Waqf consecrated for future Moslem generations until Judgment Day. It, or any part of it, should not be squandered: it, or any part of it, should not be given up. Neither a single Arab country nor all Arab countries, neither any king or president, nor all the kings and presidents, neither any organization nor all of them, be they Palestinian or Arab, possess the right to do that. Palestine is an Islamic Waqf land consecrated for Moslem generations until Judgment Day. This being so, who could claim to have the right to represent Moslem generations till Judgment Day?

The failure of the Ottoman Empire to maintain and reform its financial and political policies in the face of changes in the international order in the nineteenth century led to the British occupation of Egypt in 1882 and was capped by its calamitous decision to ally itself with Germany in the First World War, when the Empire was ultimately consigned to oblivion. Some Muslims confronted modern challenges to traditional Islam by focusing on the distant past, the Golden Age of the Rightly Guided Caliphs (Rashidun), or the Salafs, (ancestors). Those who seek to emulate these ancestors are called Salafis, and their movement is often referred to in Arabic as the Salafiyyah, and its first major ideologue was the Egyptian Rashid Rida. Despite the lack of a political consensus among Palestinian Arabs about what form of government ought to be constituted following the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, officials administering the major Palestinian Islamic institutions in Jerusalem under the British Mandate to the present day have adhered to the ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood inspired by Rida and articulated by the Hajj Amin al-Husseini and Hassan al-Banna in the 1930s. This continuity was masked throughout the periods of Hashemite and Israeli rule as the world’s focus was on the emergence of the secular nationalist Palestinian Liberation Organization and its associated rivals. From a minority position that emerged following the First World War in the Middle East, the claim that Palestine is waqf  has been widely accepted  in the Muslim discourse following the failures of the secularists to win the battle against Israel by the mid-1990s.

The Muslim link to Palestine is through Jerusalem, based upon the identity of the Dome of the Rock with the Night Journey and Ascension to Heaven of Muhammad, described in the Quran as happening only at the indeterminate “Furthest Mosque,” which traditionally has been identified with Jerusalem. The reason for the journey to the “Furthest Mosque” was for Muhammad to ascend to heaven to meet with Moses and the biblical prophets on the site of the Temple, where the
Sakinah (Arabic) or Shechina (Hebrew), (the Glory of God) had once rested. To the consternation of well-educated Muslims worldwide, officials in charge of the Islamic institutions in Jerusalem serving the Palestinian National Authority, established May 4, 1994, took the position of HAMAS even further, stating that the Temple of Solomon itself was not located in Jerusalem. Ikramah Sabri, the then mufti  of Jerusalem, said that “There is no evidence that Solomon’s Temple was in Jerusalem; probably it was in Bethlehem or in some other place.”

He was also quoted as saying: « There is not [even] the smallest indication of the existence of a Jewish temple on this place in the past. In the whole city, there is not even a single stone indicating Jewish history. » This  assertion was made despite the existence of a well-known pamphlet for tourists published in 1935 by the Islamic authorities themselves, pointing out that it is “beyond dispute” that the Dome of the Rock sits on the site of Solomon’s Temple. The issue was so provocative that the Shaykh of Al-Azhar, the head of Islam’s most venerable and greatest religious university, in an article entitled “Does Solomon’s Temple Exist Under the Current Al-Aksa Mosque in Jerusalem?” published in Al-Ahram, November 2, 2000, felt compelled to explain its importance to his people. Yasser Arafat echoed this claim repeatedly until his death, and FATAH officials have continued to do so to this day, in total agreement with HAMAS, in order to deny any Jewish claims to the holy site. In July, 2009 Avi Diskin, head of the Shin Bet (Israel Security Agency), told the Israeli cabinet that “Egyptian cleric Sheikh Youssef al-Qaradawi of the Muslim Brotherhood « had allocated some $25 million for the purchase of property and to build Hamas charitable institutions that would expand the group’s reach in Jerusalem. » This activity points to the importance of properly understanding the evidence in the Islamic law records relating to the historic role of the Islamic institutions in administering Islamic awaqf in practical and political terms in order to prove that such claims cannot be substantiated according to Islamic law.

I. The Conquest of the Arab Provinces and Ottoman Empire Land Tenure

According to Hamas’ charter, the Islamic claim to eternal sovereignty over “Palestine” resides in the very fact of the Islamic conquest. This is the law governing the land of Palestine in the Islamic Sharia (law) and the same goes for any land the Moslems have conquered by force, because during the times of (Islamic) conquests, the Moslems consecrated these lands to Moslem generations till the Day of Judgment. It happened like this: When the leaders of the Islamic armies conquered Syria and Iraq, they sent to the Caliph of the Moslems, Umar bin-el-Khatab, asking for his advice concerning the conquered land – whether they should divide it among the soldiers, or leave it for its owners, or what? After consultations and discussions between the Caliph of the Moslems, Omar bin-el-Khatab and companions of the Prophet, Allah bless him and grant him salvation, it was decided that the land should be left with its owners who could benefit by its fruit. As for the real ownership of the land and the land itself, it should be consecrated for Moslem generations till Judgment Day. Those who are on the land, are there only to benefit from its fruit. This Waqf remains as long as earth and heaven remain. Any procedure in contradiction to Islamic Sharia, where Palestine is concerned, is null and void. This understanding, however, is incorrect and cannot be justified according to Islamic law as it was practiced “in Palestine” under the Ottomans, and before them the Mamluks and the Ayyubids, stretching back to the conquests of Salah al-Din in 1187 and even to the peaceful submission to the third Caliph, Umar, of Jerusalem in 636 by the Patriarch Sophronious. One of the hallmarks of Salafi teaching, which is at the heart of the Muslim Brotherhood, is that since the previous regimes which have ruled the Muslim world were not truly Islamic, the history of their governance and laws cannot be held to have correctly followed the Shariah, and therefore cannot be used to determine proper Islamic policies. This willful amnesia was repudiated by the Ottomans during the Wahhabist rebellions in Arabia in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, but since the end of the First World War there has been no Muslim authority powerful enough to challenge the Salafists today, as we have learned since 9/11.

The Ottomans followed a well-articulated Sunni system of imperial land tenure based on the Levitical concept that asserts that God is the owner of the land, and the state and its subjects are but its possessors, who are to use of it justly for the benefit of its subjects. As such, the sovereign had the right to dispose of the land—to utilize it for its peoples’ benefit—as he saw fit within the administrative laws of the empire. The right of usufruct, as the scholars name it, is earned by properly using the property—keeping it productive—and ensuring that the state can tax its produce so that it will be able to sustain the safety and prosperity of its subjects. The root of Ottoman identification of Jerusalem with Mecca and Medina lay both in their status as the three holy cities of Islam and in their juridical status following the original Muslim conquest of Syria. At an assembly in the Syrian military camp at Jabiya in 637, the Caliph ‘Umar declared the lands which surrendered unconditionally to his armies as fay, (lands that would pay tribute to the central government, and which were to be held as a perpetual trust for all Muslims). Thus, Syria and Iraq were regarded as lands subject to the kharaj  (land tax assessed upon non-Muslim landholders). According to the Jabiya agreement, revenue from the conquered territories was to be collected and given to the central government, and those who had participated in the campaigns of expansion would be enrolled in the diwan  (imperial) registers. Those so enrolled would be entitled to fixed stipends and land grants. The lands were thus not divided and parceled out among the military, but instead were controlled directly by the central government. Muslims would not settle these lands and pay the ushr (land tax assessed on Muslim proprietors, i.e., the tithe): rather, the original inhabitants would remain on their property, but would pay the kharaj. Under Islamic law, fay lands were thus held by the state, but its use was left in the possession of their inhabitants, who paid tribute from the revenues of the land to the central treasury of the state. Over the course of time the population increasingly became Muslim. The distinction between Hijazi and Syrian Muslims blurred, and the Muslims of Syria began, in effect, to pay the kharaj  along with the non-Muslims because they lived on conquered lands worked by non-Muslims. When the Mamluk territories, encompassing the later Ottoman provinces of Sidon, Damascus, Aleppo, Baghdad, Basra, Mosul, Tripoli (Libyan), Bengazi, the Hijaz, and Yemen, were conquered by the Ottomans, they were exempted from paying the normal miri  (imperial land) taxes because of their status as kharaj  land, unlike the Hijaz and Basra, which were categorizied as provinces paying the ushr  tax.

The Ottomans, after their conquest of the Arab provinces and the creation of the Eyalet (Province) of Damascus during the years 1517-1520, recognized existing practices regarding the taxation of arable land in the Province of Damascus. In keeping with the Hanafi school of jurisprudence, upon their conquest of the Arab provinces, the Ottomans declared these conquered territories as belonging to the bayt mal al-muslimin  (the common treasury of the state), to be used for the benefit of all Muslims, and by extension, the dhimmis, or protected minorities living among them. As such, under the Ottomans, the conquered lands of Syria continued to be considered kharaj  lands whose usufruct could be granted or leased out in the name of the bayt al-mal  by the Sultan as imam (leader), of the Muslim community. The Ottomans organized the systems administering awqaf, timars  (military land grants), and iltizams/malikanes (tax farms) on the varying types of land that they conquered. The Ottomans also had a well-articulated system for administering trade, and all other forms of production and property, based upon the sixteenth century Siyasetname  (Administrative Law Code) of Sulayman the Magnificent. Devised by the brilliant Ebu Su’ud Effendi, the Shaykh al-Islam  (Chief Jurisconsult of the Empire) based upon the Shari’ah and the Qanun (administrative law), this code stipulated that land could be disposed of (in the legal sense of disposition or use) in three ways: it could be assigned as a grant in return for military service, it could be leased directly to cultivators, or it could be held in perpetual trust for the Muslim subjects of the empire as waqf. Many parcels of land throughout the Ottoman Empire’s Arab provinces were divided and subdivided into fractions, some of which were assigned as military estates and some of which were assigned as waqf, while other portions may have been private property or shared pasture land. The land tenure system was designed to prevent the permanent alienation of land from the state, with one single exception: the assignment of land by the Sultan to an individual as milk (private property). This property always would revert ultimately to the state upon the death of the owner and his descendants. During much of the Ottoman period, the city of Jerusalem was administered as a part of the Province of Damascus following the pattern of the classical timar  system—some land in Jerusalem’s hinterlands was granted to military officers in return for their service to the Sultan. Other lands, recognized as property held as waqf  by the Greek Orthodox Church (and a few others as well) under previous Muslim dynasties (the Ayyubids and the Mamluks), were integrated into the Ottoman administration. The city was the capital of the sanjaq  of Jabal al-Quds  (the administrative district of the mountains of Jerusalem). Other sanjaqs  of the southern part of the Provinces of Sidon and Damascus—Jabal Nablus, Gaza, Jaffa, Ramla, Lydda, Acre, Hebron, Sidon, Jenin, Tulkarem, Karak—were all tied to Jerusalem through the legal system, evidenced by documents regarding cases from these towns scattered throughout the Ottoman Islamic court registers. The sanjaq  of Jerusalem and the mountainous lands of the sanjaq of Nablus (Jabal Nablus) were distinguished geographically from what is called in the court registers « the land of Palestine » (ard filastin) encompassing the towns of Gaza, Ramla, and Lydda (Lod).

This distinction tallies with the description of Palestine given by Volney in the late eighteenth century, who described it as a geographical unit including all of the land « between theMediterranean to the West and the chain of mountains to the East, and two lines, one drawnto the South, by Khan Younes, and the other to the North, between Kaisaria [Caesarea] andthe rivulet of Yafa [Jaffa]. » He noted that Palestine was « almost entirely a level plain, without either river or rivulet in summer, but watered by several torrents in winter » and thatit was « a district independent of every pashalic [sanjaq ], » which occasionally had « governorsof its own, who reside at Gaza under the title of Pashas; but it is usually, as at present,divided into three appanages, or melkana, viz. Yafa, Loudd [Lydda/Lod] and Gaza.” Thus, the term ard filastin, « the land of Palestine, » was used during the Ottoman period to refer specifically to a geographical area in agricultural use and divided into taxfarms, whether administered as independent sanjaqs or attached to adjacent sanjaqsHistorically this land was controlled directly by the central government in Istanbul by leasing it to Ottoman officers. In the period before the invasion, ‘Abdullah Pasha, governor of Sidon, obtained the lease. The important point here is that a significant portion of the richagricultural lands identified in the Islamic court records dating from the Ottoman period as“Palestine” were not attached to the imperial awqaf of Jerusalem, and thus were not administered by the notables of the city representing the Ottoman government, but directlyby the Ottoman government in Istanbul. To the south lay Hebron, sometimes nominally apart of the sanjaq of Jerusalem, but in fact a rebellious and nearly autonomous town with apowerful and militant leadership of its own.In Jerusalem, the Ottomans administered Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of theRock together with the Waqf of the Two Noble Sanctuaries of Mecca and Medina (al- Haramayn al-Sharifayn ). This admininstrative feature explains the relative unimportance of Jerusalem in the Ottoman Empire. Since the three cities were organized for purposes ofrevenue as one institution, and since the Ottomans placed a higher degree of importance on Mecca and Medina, Jerusalem was overshadowed in an institutional sense. Nevertheless, its rank as the third holiest city did confer status and important privileges to the ulama (learned authorities) who served as administrators of the imperial awqaf  there. One of the most important posts in the city was the shaykh al-haram, (the superintendent of the Dome of theRock and Al-Aqsa). Moreover, al-Aqsa had its own waqf, as did other mosques, tombs,schools, hospices, etc., which received revenues from many shops, agricultural lands, andother income-producing urban and rural properties throughout Bilad al-Sham which were dedicated and assigned to them. In the sixteenth century, the wife of Sulayman the Magnificent, originally a Christian from somewhere in the Russian Empire, endowed the Khasseki Sultan imaret (foundation, waqf ) with Greek Orthodox church properties in the vicinity of Bethlehem, Lydda andRamla. The Palestinian National Authority still recognizes this fact, and the Christian tenantsand sharecroppers who have resided on these lands still are not the legal landowners. Thefinancial support of the Holy Cities, and the annual hajj pilgrimage, obviously were not solelya Palestinian responsibility. Financial obligations were imposed not only on towns and villages in the administrative districts of Jerusalem, Nablus, and Hebron, but also on othercities throughout the empire, including Damascus, Aleppo and cities in Anatolia and theBalkans. The Waqf of Sayyidna Ibrahim al-Khalil (Abraham, the Beloved Friend of God, as heis known to Muslims) located in Hebron, and known in the West as the Tomb of thePatriarchs, held claim to the revenues of many southern Palestinian villages and agriculturallands and was administered as a part of the other important imperial awqaf. Peasants livingon lands dedicated to the support of these awqaf were among those exempted from paying the miri (imperial land tax, or kharaj )—instead, they paid to support the Hajj and theHaramayn awqaf. For example, taxes (payable in kind) were assessed on land held as awqaf by the Greek Orthodox church in Bethlehem and its neighboring villages throughout thedistrict of Jerusalem. Such lands—and this means most of the arable lands in Bethlehem, for example— are still categorized in this manner to this day. This fact has the Christians livingin these regions are literally caught between a rock and a hard place today—their village lands are still categorized as waqf with double ownership: the Greek Orthodox Church, which is the owner of the use of the property and the property itself, and the KhassekiSultan Waqf, which claims a share of the produce of the land. This complicated situation hasallowed the Israelis to confiscate what they call abandoned state lands in the West Bank, which in the past were administered by the Porte, and by Hamas, which now claims allproperty is waqf, belonging to the Muslim community.

The sharecroppers and tenants who worked these lands never received the “tapu” registration required for private land under the Ottoman Land Law of 1858 because these lands were waqf. Moreover, unworked land lapsed after three years into the category of mawat, (waste lands), which the Israelis also claim to have the right to confiscate, as againstthe HAMAS claim that all land in Palestine belongs to the Muslim community as waqf, no matter its condition. Under Ottoman law, to the contrary, a tenant who brought dead landsinto cultivation could claim it as mulk, or freehold land. And if there was a time of politicalinstability, peasants could leave the region until calm was restored within three years withoutlosing their claim to land that they had improved. None of these laws is still in effect today.Some two-thirds of the actual sum of the jizya (per capital poll tax on non-Muslim dhimmis ) revenues collected in the district of Jerusalem in the first half of the nineteenth century ended up in the hands of the provincial governor of Damascus, who at the time also served as the amir al ! hajj, the commander of the hajj caravan from that city. It followed thatthe Porte would entrust this official with the collection and disbursement of the  jizya. Inother words, under the Ottomans, taxes paid by Jews and Christians in Jerusalem and itsenvirons actually were sent outside of their territories to support the pilgrimage caravan tothe Muslim Holy Cities in the Hijaz and the Haramayn Waqf  Jerusalem, governed within the framework of Ottoman provincial administration,derived its status, then, from Muslim land law, but was not identified with Palestine underOttoman rule. During the period of Sultan Mahmud II’s reforms in the 1820s, theOttomans explicitly identified the Muslim sanctuary in the city of Jerusalem, and itsimportant imperial awqaf, with the exempted Sharifate (the Office of the Descendants of theProphet) of Mecca and Medina (known to the Ottomans and other Muslims as the Haramayn (the Two Sanctuaries). Unlike current Palestinian usage of the term, during the Ottoman period « haramayn  » did not refer to the al-Aqsa Mosque and Dome of the Rock, or to thebuildings of the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem and the Tomb of Ibrahim al-Khalil (Cave ofMachpelah) in Hebron, each of which had their own awqaf in addition to becoming attached to the Haramayn waqf during the centralization of religious institutions under a new ministryby the Ottomans in the nineteenth century. The term traditionally had a specific meaning to Muslims, including the Ottomans: itreferred only to the Holy Cities of the Hijaz. Jerusalem was called « thalith al-haramayn, » (the third after the Two Holy Places). When, near the end of his life in 1566, Sulayman theMagnificent dedicated additional revenues and produce from throughout Bilad al-Sham (theSyrian Provinces of the Ottoman Empire) in support of the Khasseki Sultan Waqf (The Endowment of His Beloved Wife), for example, one of the titles he used to describe himself was « khadim al-Haramayn  » “Servant of the Two Holy Cities,” referring to the Holy Cities of  Mecca and Medina.

Indeed, this relationship was manifested in the special fiscal relationship of Jerusalem with the Haramayn that was central to Ottoman administration of the city, particularly during the reform period of Mahmud II, all the way up to the Turkish defeat in the First World War in 1917 and the abolition of the Ottoman Caliphate on March 3, 1924. Therefore, what was actually “waqf” were some lands scattered, throughout the empire: some of which belonged to the Greek Orthodox Church, which had to pay the jizya and kharaj taxes on lands it leased to peasants to work. These individuals had to pay taxes, including a land tax as a portion of the produce to support the waqf which funded the Hajj Pilgrimage and the four Muslim sanctuaries of Mecca, Medina, Jerusalem, and Hebron. “Palestine” therefore was most definitely NOT a waqf under Islamic or Ottoman law. It was governed completely separately under the military land grant system and its lands were leased as iltizam/malikane (tax-farms).

II. Awqaf Under Ottoman Control

Under Islamic law, a waqf is a legal entity, comprising land or property whose revenues are set aside to benefit the entire Muslim community and its non-Muslim inhabitants who were considered as having joined the ummah by agreeing to accept Islamic rule. It has long been thought that this stipulation meant that such trusts were endowed for charitable purposes, and that it was the charitable purpose of such awqaf which made them valid and sound under Islamic and Ottoman law. However, that is not the case. A valid Islamic waqf, the waqf sahih, came to mean an endowment that is made from lands that pay the ushr or kharaj tax. The meaning of the waqf in the Ottoman context is that such lands can never be permanently alienated from the central treasury of the Islamic state— bayt mal al- muslimin. Property and land so endowed thus became in essence inalienable, removed from legal transfer, as church property is in the West. Since the ownership of such property ultimately belongs to God, only the use of the property, and the produce and revenues that it yields can be allotted to the beneficiaries of the waqf. The logic of this arrangement is based on the Islamic notion of the common good of the people residing in a just state, whose resources are exploited and protected for the benefit of all Muslims. In the mid-1820s, Sultan Mahmud II began to implement reforms in waqf administration throughout the empire. He sought to reassert direct state control over all awqaf in the empire, based upon the formal recognition of the previously uncodified, but inherent distinction between canonically valid and invalid awqaf. This distinction was always inherent in the Ottoman system: Mahmud formalized it in order to reassert control of all miri—state lands in the empire. From this period onward, under Ottoman law, there were two officially recognized forms of awqaf: waqf sahih (the valid waqf) and the waqf ghayr sahih (invalid waqf). Valid awqaf were made from lands paying the kharaj and the ushr, and thus were located in Syria, Iraq, and the Hijaz. Invalid endowments, however, reassigned revenues due to the treasury ostensibly for some religious or charitable purpose or a specific purpose by which awqaf could legitimately be established. There were three types of the « invalid » awqaf accepted by the Ottomans until 1825. The first type allowed the revenues of land to be made waqf, while the substance of the land, and its right of use and possession, were kept by the treasury; the second, the right of use is given as waqf, while the substance and revenues remain with the treasury; and the third type assigned both possession and revenue to the waqf, while the substance remains with the treasury. Under Ottoman administrative law after 1826, all awqaf not falling under the category of sahih were deemed invalid, since they were established upon land that had been alienated at some point from imperial lands. It is often thought that charitable and religious trusts were valid because they were established for ostensibly religious or charitable purposes. However, this is a misplaced assumption that has caused great confusion in the interpretation of the institution of the waqf in the Ottoman period. What is important is not the purpose of the waqf, nor the type of possession, but the nature of the land in the Ottoman system of land tenure. These reforms reiterated that the lands of Syria, including the sanjaq of Jerusalem, Nablus, and Sidon were not waqf.

That this was the clear situation is the Ottoman response to a request made on 28 May 28, 1837 recorded in the registers of the Islamic court in Jerusalem. The governing council (majlis) of Jerusalem asserted in a petition asking the Sultan to bar a group of Ashkenazi Jews from conducting trade in the city because “the lands of this region are miri and waqf.” The Muslim authorities of the city clearly understood that the land in the region was state land, and that some of it had been set aside as waqf. This request the Porte denied. Indeed, in other cases, the Porte ruled that foreigners could purchase waqf property in order to restore it to productivity and usefulness. When the Ottoman Empire disintegrated and the Turks surrendered and withdrew from its Arab provinces, the Muslim community no longer had a Muslim sovereign whose legitimacy they accepted as the ultimate authority to decide political questions. When the Ottoman Caliphate was abolished, the problem of sovereignty thus became the basic political issue facing Muslims: should Islamic control be restored over the former Arab provinces, and if so, how should it be constituted? The Turkish defeat led to the de facto separation of the Palestinian, Syrian and Hijazi elements of the Haramayn Waqf. Thereafter, the term in Palestinian usage came to mean first, Jerusalem and Hebron, referring to the two sanctuaries—Al-Aqsa and Sayyidna Khalil. After 1948, when Hebron went under Hashemite sovereignty, the term “Haramayn” came to refer to the Al-Aqsa Mosque and the Dome of the Rock.

III. Enter The Muslim Brotherhood 
The Muslim Brotherhood is a modern ideological movement that was founded inEgypt in 1928. Ideologically it was shaped by the anti-colonialism and anti-imperialism inEgypt and the Middle East generally, and by the Arab-Jewish conflict in mandatory Palestine specifically. The Muslim Brotherhood has long been the most important of the Sunniopposition groups in the Arab world. Its aim is to reestablish the Caliphate and to governaccording to the Shariah. While legal in Transjordan and then Jordan, it has been banned inEgypt and Syria, where it threatens to overthrow the current regimes. Violent splintergroups of the Brotherhood have arisen worldwide. Rashid Rida, Hassan al-Banna, andSayyid Qutb are the chief ideologues of the movement. They sought to create a vanguard tooppose the secularization of Islamic society, which they thought was accelerated through theintroduction of imperialism, capitalism, Zionism, socialism, and communism in the periodleading up to the First World War. The Salafi Movement, and therefore the Muslim Brotherhood rejects all Muslimregimes since the death of ‘Ali as illegitimate and un-Islamic, and of all of these, considersthe Ottoman Empire the most illegitimate. The Wahhabi doctrine has been at the heart ofSaudi Arabian identity since its first irruption in 1740 when they rejected the legitimacy ofthe Ottoman Empire. The Arabs remember Turkish rule as a time of oppression andsubjugation. Arab nationalist animosity regarding the historic legacy of the Ottomans burnshot to this day: from this perspective, the Ottoman defeat was at once a judgment on the Turks and a challenge to the Arabs, who struggled between the various ideological options available to them in the period between the world wars and thereafter. The entire twentiethcentury framed the failures of all of their ideological movements to solve the politicaldilemmas posed to the Arabs by the fall of the Ottoman Empire. The Saudis and the Hashemite Jordanians competed for most of the last centuryover which dynasty could legitimately claim to be the rightful guardian of the Islamic HolyCities: Mecca, Medina, and Jerusalem. The impact of this competition was to furtherfragment the Arab Muslim political consensus over the fate of the lands entrusted by theLeague of Nations to the British in the form of a mandate to govern the region until itsinhabitants were ready for self-governance. When King Hussein ultimately relinquished hisclaims to the West Bank and Jerusalem in 1988, leaving the PLO to administer their Islamicinstitutions, Yasser Arafat actually had to make dual appointments of key Islamic positions.Both Jordanian- and Saudi-approved officials initially served the Palestinian National Authority, since the PLO needed to assuage both powers in order to continue to receivetheir financial—and political support. Only when it became clear that Arafat had thrown inhis lot with the Iranians during the Karina incident in the midst of the Al-Aqsa Intifada didboth Saudi Arabia and Jordan abandon the PA. Since Arafat’s death, both Saudi Arabia and Jordan have been cooperating with the PA in order to attempt to rein in HAMAS and keep Iran out. They have not succeeded.
IV. The Islamicization of the Palestinian Resistance 
The British, who invented a status quo in Palestine by creating de novo an Islamic administration in Palestine by placing in the office of the “mufti” Hajj Amin al-Hussayni, who engineered the policies that generated the dominant, and most radical, Arab response toZionism. His fingerprints are all over the Islamic administration in Jerusalem even today. The fact that the mufti’s religious polemic led to the Nakba, the catastrophic Arab defeat in 1948, was precisely the reason that the Palestinian liberation movement reframed its opposition to Israel in terms of secular Arab nationalism. The Islamicization of the Palestinian resistance to Zionism began with the British creation of the office of “Grand Mufti” in 1918 and the appointment of Hajj Amin as muftiin 1922. Traditionally, a mufti is a religious authority, or jurisconsult, who issues decisionsrelating to Islamic law. Under the British Mandate, for the first time the mufti became thehighest Muslim official in Palestine. He was also named president of the newly createdSupreme Muslim Council, becoming the officially recognized religious and political leader ofthe Palestinian Arabs. The fact that the mufti and his policies were opposed by the majorityof the Palestinian Arabs for many different reasons, including those who took exception to his interpretation of Islam and Zionism, has emerged in Palestinian and Zionist historiography only recently. Hajj Amin, whose influence on Palestinian political culture remains profound to thisday, was deeply influenced by Rashid Rida, the leading Islamist teacher when he was a youngman. As a soldier in the Ottoman army he was stationed in Smyrna where he witnessed the Turkish extermination of the Armenians, an event that left him deeply impressed by Turkishracial nationalism. He traveled to Damascus to support Faisal, who had declared an Arabstate in Syria only to be expelled by France. On Amin’s return to Palestine in 1921 he soonbecame involved in riots against the Balfour Declaration and Jewish immigration. Hebecame a fugitive from British justice for his radical politics, but then was neverthelesspardoned, and placed in control of all former Ottoman awqaf properties and the Islamiccourt bureaucracy in Jerusalem and throughout Palestine by Herbert Samuel, the High Commissioner of the British Mandate. The mufti, however, had had no Islamic religioustraining or certification as a member of the ulama, the Muslim officials trained and authorized to make religious decisions in the Islamic world. At first, the mufti may have been hopeful that the British would treat the Arabs in Palestine fairly. While he was working on building an Arab Islamic university in the Mamilla district in West Jerusalem adjacent to the site of a Muslim cemetery in the late ‘20s, he worked with Jewish architects and construction crews to build the Palace Hotel, which he envisioned as a business whose profits would fund the university. The cemetery actually extended further than was then known, as the builders discovered when they began excavating to lay the foundation of the new hotel. The mufti sought to change the purpose of the waqf, endowed by Salah al-Din after his siege of the city in 1187 in order to build the campus, including the hotel. Thus, despite the fact that he worked closely with Jews while he was leading the Arab Higher Committee’s building program, early on his attitude towards them changed. He also rejected and dissolved the secular-nationalist Moslem-Christian Associations and began emphasizing the idea that the Palestine was waqf   —the possession of the Muslim ummah in perpetuity. In the absence of Muslim sovereignty during the Mandate, he merged the idea of waqf, the kind of property that the Muslim authorities had administered before 1917, with the idea of state land (timar), a factor in 1837 but no longer.

Amin began collaborating with Hassan al-Banna, considered the father of the MuslimBrotherhood, in 1935. The mufti thus articulated the idea that Palestine itself is a “waqf” sometime between 1929, when the Palace Hotel opened, and 1935, when they founded theMuslim Brotherhood in support of the Arab Higher Committee’s opposition to Zionism. Hajj Amin was able to rally a force of about two thousand Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood volunteers who fought in the Negev against the nascent Israeli state, and to field a Palestinian militia under the leadership of Qassam al-Ahmad, who was killed at Qastel and who has become the eponymous inspiration for the armed brigade of Hamas today. Following the Mandate Period, the administration of Muslim institutions in Palestine shifted to the Transjordanian Ministry of Religious Foundations. Transjordan had de facto sovereignty over al-Haram al-Sharif  (aka the Temple Mount) and paid the salaries of the Muslim officials employed in the Islamic court. The Muslim Brotherhood became the channel for Salafi ideas during this time. Outlawed for decades in Egypt and Syria, after1948 clandestine cells operated in Muslim towns and villages in the West Bank and Gaza under Jordanian rule, even when the cells in Egypt and Syria were practically wiped out. However, as a result of the 1948 war, Transjordan took possession of the Temple Mount and the administration of waqf properties and the Islamic courts in the West Bank as protector and guardian of the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem and Haram al-Khalil in Hebron in 1950. Thus the Hashemite dynasty administered the Islamic institutions in Jerusalem until1988, when King Hussein relinquished his sovereign claim to the Palestinian National Authority. In 1964, President Gamal abd al-Nasser, Egypt, created the Palestinian Liberation Organization to fight a guerilla war against Israel. The PLO’s Muslim leadership included 

members of the Muslim Brotherhood, but the majority were secular nationalists, many of whom were nominal Christians. For the next thirty years, the PLO waged battle ostensibly with the support of the majority of all Palestinians, and, although the corruption and authoritarian nature of Arafat’s rule became well-known, they were willing to overlook his flaws in order to present a unified front against Israel, to share in his increasing power and international status, and to hold onto some sense of dignity. Egypt took over the Gaza Stripin 1948 using what Nasser claimed was the “State of Palestine” to infiltrate groups of Palestinian fighters into Israel until his ignominious defeat in 1967. In the 1970s and early 80s, Israel permitted Saudi Arabia to fund an alternative group of Muslim administrators and officials, which eventually led to the establishment of the Islamic Resistance Movement, HAMAS, as the Gazan branch of the Muslim Brotherhood.

 HAMAS emerged as an alternative to the failed policies of the Palestinian LiberationOrganization, FATAH in the late 1980s. For the employees of the court, like manyPalestinian Muslims, many of whom were sympathetic to, if not members of the MuslimBrotherhood, this was an exciting development, an opportunity for those who had remainedunder Israeli occupation to regain some of the power that the “outsiders” –the PLO—hadasserted over them, the “insiders” who had steadfastly endured under the Israeli“occupation.” Discussions surrounding the disposition of Saudi Arabian charity from the PLO via SAMED—the “Steadfastness Fund” which provided social services to the Palestinian poor, widows, and orphans, and the sick—to the nascent HAMAS organization were intense. SAMED: Palestinian Martyrs Works Society – established in 1970 to provide vocational training to the children of Palestinian martyrs; played an important role – in the1970s and 1980s, and especially during the First Intifada – in the economic and social welfare infrastructure of the Palestinian communities. The emergence of HAMAS in the mid-1980s resulted from a Faustian bargain the Israelis made with the Saudis, allowing them to build mosques and provide social servicesthrough funds and personnel as a counterbalance to the PLO. Some people even suspectthat an Israeli agent helped to name the movement—pronounced in Hebrew as “

KHamas,” which means “terror” –to make the message clear. Dividing the Palestinians along ideological lines certainly has been advantageous to those Israelis and Palestinians who oppose negotiating a settlement. The homicide bombings and their inevitable reprisals have made Palestinians and Israelis pay a heavy price for this political decision. The resulting polarization has hastened the re-Islamicization of Palestinian society. It has also prevented the PLO from achieving any tangible political goals and reignited virulent anti-Semitism.Popular Palestinian frustration with the corrupt and ineffective PLO, exiled into seeming oblivion in Tunis in 1982, particularly in the years before the First Intifada of the Stones (1987-2002), enabled HAMAS to emerge in 1986 as the most robust political rival to the PLO.

On July 28, 1988 King Hussein of Jordan relinquished the Hashemite claim to Jerusalem, as well as the right to govern the West Bank or the Palestinians. The Islamic court employees were now to be paid by the PLO, preparing the way for the Palestinian National Authority, led by the PLO, to take over the administration of Islamic institutions in Jerusalem. Weakened by the war in Lebanon, its Tunisian exile, and the fall of the SovietUnion in 1989 the PLO committed itself to the peace process just as HAMAS began to emerge as a political force. Meanwhile, during the Iraq War of 1990, Arafat had thrown his support behind Saddam Hussein, thereby incurring the wrath of Saudi Arabia. After a short period of time, during which there were two parallel groups of Muslim officials in the PNA, one Jordanian-trained and one Saudi-trained, the Palestinians chose the Saudis in order to placate them. These developments solidified the position of HAMAS in Palestinian Islamic institutions, and explain the intricate connections between FATAH/PNA and HAMAS during the al- Aqsa Intifada in the early 2000s. What the Israelis did not expect was the cooptation of the Islamists by the PLO, which lasted until the death of Arafat. The Al-Aqsa Intifada of 2000 was characterized by a vicious cycle of suicide bombings and Israeli reprisals, which, along with the corruption and tyranny of Arafat, destroyed law and order in the territories. With his passing, the time had come for HAMAS to challenge its “brother” resistance movement by leveraging Iranian support via Syria. The resulting complete breakdown of civil society in Palestine was the tragic legacy of the Oslo Peace Process. Eventually, to the horror of Palestinian moderates who supported a two-state agreement with Israel, including many members of the PLO, an overwhelming majority democratically elected HAMAS to power in Gaza January 6, 2006. Under the shadow of an increasingly belligerent Iran, a belated, and failed, Saudi attempt to forge a moderate coalition of the PLO and HAMAS was followed by the brutal expulsion of the PLO from Gaza on June 15, 2007. HAMAS is now completely under the control of Tehran, according to former Palestinian Foreign Minister Ziyad Abu Amr, the Palestinian scholar-diplomat who failed to convince HAMAS to recognize Israel and engage in diplomacy under the aegis of Saudi Arabia.

 The ideology that has driven Israeli policy in Jerusalem and the West Bank for more than four decades, especially the suppression of the emergence of municipal self-government in the Arab villages of East Jerusalem and the neglect of the Arab inhabitants in the Occupied Territories, has undermined moderate Palestinians who sought a negotiated peace. The Second Intifada resulted in the breakdown of Palestinian society, including its legal,political, and social institutions. The violence of the Israeli response has radicalized the Palestinians even more, because the deaths of many innocent victims—family members, friends, and neighbors—who now include everyone in Gaza— are indelibly imprinted inPalestinian minds. The re-Islamicization of the conflict, enabled by the belief that their only alternative is armed struggle is almost universal among both Muslim and Christian Palestinians that I spoke with during my most recent trip to Bethlehem. The first, theIntifada of the Stones, began as a non-violent tax revolt in Bethlehem soon turned violent when Islamists took control of the narrative. The catastrophic Islamist Al-Aqsa Intifada,characterized by the collaboration of the PLO with HAMAS, has just barely been quelled on the West Bank, where the PNA is achieving a semblance of law and order. However, the foreboding calls for “Days of Rage” called for by members of the Palestinian cabinet illustrate how easily the current campaign of non-violence could easily dissolve into another armed uprising. However, there is another dimension to this situation.
Since the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948 and the “Nakba” (“Catastrophe”) in which 600,000 Christian and Muslim Arabs lost their homes, the Palestinian national movement was basically secular. It is still politically incorrect to focus on sectarian identities in discussing Palestinian politics, primarily because Palestinian Christians desire to be understood as in fraternal solidarity with Muslim Palestinians against Zionism. The ahistorical claim that Palestine is waqf  however, now represents a very real threat to the historically Christian communities on the West Bank and in Jerusalem. In March 2010, Palestinian activists are resurrecting the 1970s/80s concept of “sumud” (“solidarity”) to frame the third, ostensibly non-violent, “Al-Quds” (“Jerusalem”) Intifada, which has been called in the wake of Israeli settlement projects in East Jerusalem. As Asma Afsarrudin, Associate Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at the University of Notre Dame has rightly asserted, …although the system of dhimma (literally, protection) extended to Jews and Christians was considered sufficiently humane in pre-Modern Muslim societies, today it would rightly be considered as plainly discriminatory and unjust within the modern state system, which defines citizenship not by faith but on the basis of birthplace and residence. This view, however, is under direct attack by HAMAS, which seeks to establish an Islamic state governed by Islamic law. Following the April 2, 2002 takeover of the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem by the al-Aqsa Martyr’s Brigade/Tanzim and the punitive Israeli attacks on that town during the duration of the Al-Aqsa Intifada, the position of moderates in the West Bank became extremely tenuous. With the takeover of HAMAS in Gaza, the situation deteriorated completely. And, as Benny Morris argues, the maximalist Muslim position, that all Palestine is waqf, is at its heart the same jihadist position that has characterized Arab opposition to Israel all along.

V. Alternative Interpretations

War between Muslims and Jews is not inevitable. Muslim moderates are challenging the ideologically-driven Islamist apologetic against Israel. The most important one is Imam Abdul-Hadi Palazzi, Secretary-General of the Italian Muslim Association and Director of the Institute of the Italian Islamic Community, who has been calling for a revitalization of traditional Sunni Islam. He has taken aim at the historical amnesia of the Islamist movement.

In his response to the 2001 statement made by the mufti of Jerusalem denying Jewish ties to the Haram al-Sharif, Palazzi wrote that Sabri “is representative of those [Muslims] who repudiate “… the Jewish heritage [of Islam] as a whole, with the clear attempt even to remove it from historical memory.” Muslims are so ignorant of their own history that they are “really inclined to take these words for granted, notwithstanding the fact that they contradict both historical evidence and Islamic sources.” He argues against the Salafi claim that Palestine is an Islamic waqf by revisiting the issues surrounding the Night Journey. To remember the historical milieu compels every sincere observer to admit that there is no necessary connection between al-Miraj and sovereign rights over Jerusalem since, in the time when the Prophet… consecrated the place with his footprints on the Stone, the City was not a part of the Islamic State – whose borders were then limited to the Arabian Peninsula – but under Byzantine administration. Moreover, although radical preachers try to remove this from exegesis, the Glorious Quran expressly recognizes that Jerusalem plays for the Jewish people the same role that Mecca has for Muslims. We read in Surah al-Baqarah: “…They would not follow thy direction of prayer (qiblah), nor art thou to follow their direction of prayer; nor indeed will they follow each other’s direction of prayer….” All Quranic annotators explain that « thy qiblah » is obviously the Kaabah of Mecca, while « their qiblah » refers to the Temple Site in Jerusalem. To quote just one of the most important of them, we read in Qadi Baydawi’s Commentary: “Verily, in their prayers Jews orientate themselves toward the Rock (al-Sakhrah), while Christians orientate themselves eastwards….” Palazzi concludes that the Quran reveals the Jewish connection with Jerusalem. As opposed to what sectarian radicals continuously claim, the Book that is a guide for those who abide by Islam—as we have just now shown—recognizes Jerusalem as Jewish direction of prayer…. After…deep reflection about the implications of this approach, it is not difficult to understand that separation in directions of prayer is a mean[s] to decrease possible rivalries in [the] management of [the] Holy Places. For those who receive from Allah the gift of equilibrium and the attitude to reconciliation, it should not be difficult to conclude that, as no one is willing to deny Muslims…complete sovereignty over Mecca, from an Islamic point of view… there is not any sound theological reason to deny an equal right of Jews over Jerusalem. Other Muslims are challenging the HAMAS/Muslim Brotherhood’s doctrines on Israel to show that the Qur’an recognizes that God has given the Jews Jerusalem as an eternal bequest.

There is an alternative Muslim narrative regarding the Jews and the Muslims of these small settler enclaves is to proclaim Jewish superiority everywhere, while disrupting the tissue of co-existence that depends on leaving Palestinians spaces of their own. Israelis often protest Palestinian complaints that Israel really doesn’t want peace. Wahrman helps us to see why the Palestinians believe this. In every case the government and the municipality – currently run by a right-wing mayor, Nir Barkat, who seems all too eager to stoke any fire that comes his way – put forth arguments that supposedly justify the invasion. Some are legal arguments about ownership, sometimes going back eighty years (as in the case of Sheikh Jarrah) and sometimes based on a recent purchase (as in the case of the Shepherd Hotel). Some are historical arguments, mobilizing traditional Jewish associations of those particular spots – partly true, partly invented or stretched – to buttress a claim from times immemorial. But the goal, the methods, and the consequences are always the same: an intrusive encroachment into Palestinian space, eyesore houses emblazoned with Israeli flags, aggressive settlers that often seek confrontation with the neighboring Palestinians, and a permanent disruptive presence of Israeli military and police that inevitably follow the settlers. That the legal argument is but a veneer is demonstrated by the fact that ever since the incongruous high-rise intrusion into the Palestinian village of Silwan, named by the settlers “Yehonatan House,” was declared by Israeli courts illegal and due for immediate demolition, Jerusalem’s mayor has openly defied this ruling. Wahrman writes, “In terms of sheer damage to co-existence in a complicated city, therefore, twenty units in Sheikh Jarrah sow more immediate hatred than 1600 units in Ramat Shlomo.” And he is right. The propoganda value of such policies is great. Last fall, the Holy Land Christian Ecumenical Foundation invited a 16-year old Muslim girl whose entire family had been evicted from their home and was now living in the street to speak at a conference on Arab-Jewish relations. They young girl described in great detail how she and her family lived their lives day-to-day, trying to go to school and work while living on the street. Anecdote upon anecdote builds up the dossier against Israel’s infringements upon the human rights of the Palestinian people.

Wahrman argues against the assertions of Ambassador Harrop and authors Chesin, Hutman and Melamed, writing, To present such aggressive acts as a continuation of the policies of Israeli governments over 43 years is simply untrue. Until recently, Israeli governments carefully avoided such conflicts, and thus allowed Jewish-Arab coexistence in the Holy City to remain surprisingly resilient in the face of many challenges during the first generation after 1967. Efforts to disrupt this pattern began by individuals and small groups, often with private American funding. Their intensification over the last decade and a half has largely flown under the radar, despite being a development with momentous consequences (much greater, say, than those of the settlement ‘outposts’ that have received so much attention). Their protestations of innocence notwithstanding, the support for this game-changing policy from Netanyahu’s government together with the zealous mayor of Jerusalem is unprecedented. Wahrman finds the current Israeli government to blame for the deterioration of Israeli-Palestinian relations in Jerusalem. Netanyahu’s government is deliberately undermining this balance and rapidly changing the urban circumstances, thus rendering a compromise less and less likely. As it turns out, counter to Netanyahu’s claims, these actions are not in the Israeli vaunted “Consensus.” Even at this juncture when the left in Israel is unprecedently [sic] weak, many Israelis (42% according to a recent poll) oppose these new Israeli policies and support a complete freeze of Israeli construction in East Jerusalem. The U.S. should not let manipulative rhetoric about the eternal city and 3000 years of history obfuscate the actual intersection of historical and geographic facts, nor stand in the way of the policy conclusions that must be drawn from them. However, taking the larger view, which includes not only the municipality of Jerusalem, but the issue of settlements and Israeli “heritage sites” in East Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza, and the entire course of the conflict, it is not only the Jerusalem municipality or Israel’s policies regarding the Palestinians which is to blame for the current impasse. The Palestinians’ continued willingness to support violent action against Israel, and their continued hope for a one state solution, has resulted, contrary to all reason, to support for HAMAS. Emboldened by its defeat of FATAH in Gaza in 2007, and backed by an extraordinarily aggressive Iran, the maximalists again are threatening to lead the Palestinian remnant to their complete destruction. All attempts to convince the Palestinians to abandon jihadist ideology have failed, despite the fact that the Arab world is ready to accommodate Israel in the current Middle Eastern state system.

Recent calls for a bi-national, secular state instead of a two-state solution are distractions from the real issues at hand. Improving the living conditions of the Palestinian people, fostering the development of municipal and national government in Gaza and the West Bank, and fighting against Islamist opportunism are goals that can be achieved under the shadow of the Iranian threat. Only on the micro-level can political progress be made. The conflict has to become localized. Only by rejecting the regionalization of the political issues facing the Palestinian and Israeli conflict can the international threats on the macro-level be challenged. The general squalor of the Muslim and Christian Quarters (including the Armenian Quarter) stands in contrast to the beautifully restored Jewish Quarter. The municipality should work with organizations seeking to preserve these monuments as a show of good faith before the radicals turn the city into a battleground. Perhaps Turkey, Egypt, Syria, and Jordan, as part of a reconceptualized peace process, could work to restore the neglected Muslim neighborhoods and monuments of Jerusalem in a bid to fend off Hamas and Islamic Jihad as they seek to cash in on Muslim anger over this neglect. Israel and her international allies could urge UNESCO to move on Jordan’s nomination of the Old City of Jerusalem as a World Heritage site, and invite international investment in the restoration of neglected treasures. Building a few playgrounds might prevent the march to making Jerusalem a battlefield once again. In 2009, the Palestinian academic, intellectual, and cultural communities attempted to celebrate Jerusalem’s Arab identity, but Israel frustrated these of these small settler enclaves is to proclaim Jewish superiority everywhere, while disrupting the tissue of co-existence that depends on leaving Palestinians spaces of their own. Israelis often protest Palestinian complaints that Israel really doesn’t want peace. Wahrman helps us to see why the Palestinians believe this. In every case the government and the municipality – currently run by a right-wing mayor, Nir Barkat, who seems all too eager to stoke any fire that comes his way – put forth arguments that supposedly justify the invasion. Some are legal arguments about ownership, sometimes going back eighty years (as in the case of Sheikh Jarrah) and sometimes based on a recent purchase (as in the case of the Shepherd Hotel). Some are historical arguments, mobilizing traditional Jewish associations of those particular spots – partly true, partly invented or stretched – to buttress a claim from times immemorial. But the goal, the methods, and the consequences are always the same: an intrusive encroachment into Palestinian space, eyesore houses emblazoned with Israeli flags, aggressive settlers that often seek confrontation with the neighboring Palestinians, and a permanent disruptive presence of Israeli military and police that inevitably follow the settlers. That the legal argument is but a veneer is demonstrated by the fact that ever since the incongruous high-rise intrusion into the Palestinian village of Silwan, named by the settlers “Yehonatan House,” was declared by Israeli courts illegal and due for immediate demolition, Jerusalem’s mayor has openly defied this ruling. Wahrman writes, “In terms of sheer damage to co-existence in a complicated city, therefore, twenty units in Sheikh Jarrah sow more immediate hatred than 1600 units in Ramat Shlomo.” And he is right. The propoganda value of such policies is great. Last fall, the Holy Land Christian Ecumenical Foundation invited a 16-year old Muslim girl whose entire family had been evicted from their home and was now living in the street to speak at a conference on Arab-Jewish relations. They young girl described in great detail how she and her family lived their lives day-to-day, trying to go to school and work while living on the street. Anecdote upon anecdote builds up the dossier against Israel’s infringements upon the human rights of the Palestinian people.

A paradigm shift is needed to thwart the Islamist threat to Israel. Below are concrete steps towards localizing the conflict and to reinvigorate the peace process that could break the cycle of despair now characterizing the region within the parameters of the Beillin-Abu Mazen plan of 1995.

Immediate Steps Within the Realm of Realpolitik and Reason: Localize Conflict Management and Resolution 1. Establish embassies in West and East Jerusalem All states having diplomatic relations with Israel should immediately establish embassies in Israel and Palestine. Arab League states establish embassies in East and West Jerusalem. Use these embassies to kick start economic development and housing in various neighborhoods. 2. Latin Patriarchate, Greek Orthodox Patriarchate, and other Christian landowners in Palestine/Israel to cooperate by developing local community development boards. 3) UNESCO overseas restoration and preservation of Islamic monuments and archeological sites. Turkey to cooperate with Israel and Palestine with historical preservation projects. 4) Educational programs for Palestinian and Israeli students focusing on holy sites throughout the land. Educational institutions currently training tour guides to spearhead these efforts, emphasizing change and continuity over time. 5) Truth and Reconciliation commissions to document and memorialize history. Institutions of higher learning to cooperate with education ministries. 6) UNRWA to close refugee camps throughout the Middle East. Repatriate and reimburse Arab and Jewish refugees according to their wishes—return, compensation, or memorials—on a case-by-case basis

Voir aussi:

The Anti-Terror, Pro-Israel Sheikh
FrontPageMagazine.com
Jamie Glazov

September 12, 2005

Frontpage Interview’s guest today is Sheikh Prof. Abdul Hadi Palazzi, Director of the Cultural Institute of the Italian Islamic Community and a vocal critic of militant Islam.

FP: Hello Sheikh Palazzi, welcome to Frontpage Interview. It is an honor to speak with you.

Palazzi: The honor is mine.

FP: One doesn’t find many prominent Muslim clerics today who openly denounce suicide bombings, let alone suicide bombings against Israelis. Yet you are quite vocal about supporting Israel’s right to exist. Tell us why, as a Muslim, you have come to this disposition and why you have received so much criticism from certain elements of the Muslim community for it.

Palazzi: As a scholar of Islamic Law, I believe that Islam permits wars under certain conditions (i.e., it permits some soldiers to fight against other soldiers when ordered to do so by the State), but strictly forbids taking military initiatives by individuals, groups or factions (which is referred as « fitnah », i.e., sedition), strictly forbids targeting civilians and strictly forbids committing suicide. Consequently, as a Muslim scholar, I must necessarily condemn suicide bombing as a matter of principle, irrespective of who the victims are. I am obliged to say that a suicide bomber is by no means a martyr of Islam, but a criminal who dies while committing acts which Islam views as capital crimes.

Regarding Israel, I beg your pardon but may I ask you to please consider refraining from speaking of Israel’s « right to exist. » Affirming Israel’s « right to exist » is as unacceptable as denying that right, because even posing the question of whether or not the Children of Israel (Jews) — individually, collectively or nationally — have a « right to exist » is unacceptable. Israel exists by Divine Right, confirmed in both the Bible and Qur’an.

I find in the Qur’an that God granted the Land of Israel to the Children of Israel and ordered them to settle therein (Qur’an, Sura 5:21) and that before the Last Day He will bring the Children of Israel to retake possession of their Land, gathering them from different countries and nations (Qu’ran, Sura 17:104). Consequently, as a Muslim who abides by the Qur’an, I believe that opposing the existence of the State of Israel means opposing a Divine decree.

Every time Arabs fought against Israel they suffered humiliating defeats. In opposing the will of God by making war on Israel, Arabs were in effect making war on God Himself. They ignored the Qur’an, and God punished them. Now, having learned nothing from defeat after defeat, Arabs want to obtain through terror what they were unable to obtain through war: the destruction of the State of Israel. The result is quite predictable: as they have been defeated in the past, the Arabs will be defeated again.

In 1919, Emir Feisal (leader of the Hashemite family, i.e., the leader of the family of the Prophet Muhammad) reached an Agreement with Chaim Weizmann for the creation of a Jewish State and an Arab Kingdom having the Jordan river as a border between them. Emir Feisal wrote, « We feel that the Arabs and Jews are cousins in race, having suffered similar oppressions at the hands of powers stronger than themselves, and by a happy coincidence have been able to take the first step towards the attainment of their national ideals together. The Arabs, especially the educated among us, look with the deepest sympathy on the Zionist movement. »

In Feisal’s time, none claimed that accepting the creation of the State of Israel and befriending Zionism was against Islam. Even the Arab leaders who opposed the Feisal-Weizmann Agreement never resorted to an Islamic argument to condemn it. Unfortunately that Agreement was never implemented, since the British opposed the creation of the Arab Kingdom and chose to give sovereignty over Arabia to Ibn Sa’ud’s marauders, i.e., to the forefathers of the House of Sa’ud.

When the Saudis started ruling an oil rich kingdom, they also started investing a regular part of their wealth in spreading Wahhabism worldwide. Wahhabism is a totalitarian cult which stands for terror, massacre of civilians and for permanent war against Jews, Christians and non-Wahhabi Muslims. The influence of Wahhabism in the contemporary Arab world is such that many Arab Muslims are wrongly convinced that, in order to be a good Muslim, one must hate Israel and hope for its destruction.

Incidentally, in countries where Wahhabism did not spread, this idea is not rooted. Most Muslims in Turkey, India, Indonesia, or the former Soviet Union do not believe at all that a good Muslim must necessarily be anti-Israel. To give some relevant examples, the leading Muslim scholar and former President of Indonesia, Shaykh Abdurrahman Wahid, is on friendly terms with Israel and also visited leaders of Jewish organizations in the United States. The Mufti of Sierra Leone, Sheikh Ahmed Sillah, is also a friend of Israel, as is the Mufti of European Russia, Sheikh Salman Farid.

An organization called « Muslims for Israel » was recently founded in Canada. Voicing pro-Israeli points of view obviously causes negative reactions from Wahhabi groups and Muslims influenced by Wahhabism. However, while those people verbally attack and circulate the most astonishing fabrications about me, I also receive encouragement and support from pro-Israel Muslims living in different parts of the world.

While visiting Israel, I was welcomed by a delegation of heads of Arab villages in the Jerusalem area. They were telling me how much they like living in Israel, and how much they fear being transferred to PLO rule. Many of the Arab inhabitants of Gush Katif today share the same feeling. They say, « Israelis give us jobs and an opportunity to live in peace. What kind of future awaits us under PLO? » I am sure that, were they free to speak and able to see the reality beyond propaganda, many more Arab Muslims would support my positions.

Irshad Manji, a pro-Israeli Muslim journalist from Canada, tells that some Muslims support her openly, yet many more Muslims tell her, « We are with you, but are afraid to tell it. » The same happens to me in Italy, or when I visit Israel. As one knows, being anti-Israeli has become « politically correct » among Arabs. People are afraid to oppose what is « politically correct » even when they live in a democracy. What can one expect from those who live under totalitarian regimes and who have no access to a free press, but to governmental propaganda only? The world should give pro-Israeli Muslims a chance. We owe this to the memory of Anwar Sadat, martyred by those same Wahhabi terrorists who today spread terror everywhere.

In 1996, the Islam-Israel Fellowship of the Root & Branch Association was co-founded by myself and Dr. Asher Eder to promote cooperation between the State of Israel and Muslim nations, and between Jews and Muslims in Israel and abroad, to build a better world based upon a proper Jewish understanding of the Tanakh (Bible) and Jewish Tradition, and upon a proper Muslim understanding of the Qur’an (Koran) and Islamic Tradition. I recommend to FrontPage readers « Peace is Possible between Ishmael and Israel according to the Qur’an and the Tanach (Bible) » by Dr. Eder, with a Foreward by myself, which may be found at [www.rb.org.il ]. I also welcome your readers to visit my website at [ http://www.amislam.com ].

FP: Thank you Sheikh Palazzi. Tell us, if you believe in the life of the soul after death, where does the soul of the suicide bomber go?

Palazzi: Everyone who dies while committing capital sins such as suicide and murder will enter hellfire, except for the one who repents before death catches him. As for the one who dies without repenting for a capital sin — while having a correct doctrinal belief and believing that his sin was a sin — he will dwell in hellfire until his sin is expiated, or even less because of the eventual intercession of Prophets and pious people. However, those who die without repenting for a capital sin and without even believing it is a capital sin, will be denied entrance to heaven, and will dwell in hellfire as long as God wishes. However, God’s mercy is such that it completely prevails over his wrath, to the point where hellfire ultimately becomes an abode of relief.

In Islam, both murder and suicide are capital sins about whose nature no Muslim can either doubt or claim ignorance. Every Muslim must know that committing suicide and murder are forbidden in Islam, exactly as every Muslim knows that daily prayers are five, that the month of fasting is Ramadan, that the destination of pilgrimage is Mecca, etc.

Consequently, the one who dies as a suicide bomber and who does so while wrongly believing that his action is in accordance with Islam, actually dies without having correct doctrinal faith and without any opportunity of repentance, and consequently will permanently dwell in hellfire and will never be admitted to heaven. Denying that suicide and murder are capital sins in Islam represents a lack of correct doctrinal faith according to the Shari’a.

FP: Kindly relate to us your experience at the University of California in Santa Barbara on March 4, 2004, when you came on campus and denounced terrorism. Many Muslim students from the Muslim Students Association at UCSB tried to shout you down. What happened and what do you make of it?

Palazzi: In reality, those who opposed my visit at UCSB were a small group of students, mostly related to the local Muslim Student Association (MSA; i.e., to the student branch of the Wahhabi Muslim Brotherhood). I invited them to be involved in the debate, to explain the reasons why they opposed my visit and/or the contents of my speech.

However, they were not in the least interested in real debate and discussion. They only shouted some slogans and left the hall. Other Muslim students, not related to the MSA, on the contrary appreciated my visit, and together with non-Muslim students went on asking me questions privately even after the public debate was over. Apart from that small group of vociferous opponents, both Muslim and non-Muslim students at UCSB were friendly and interested in thoughtful discussion of issues.

FP: Can you illuminate for us the humane and tolerant side of Islam?

Palazzi: In contrast to Wahhabism, which is a religion of terror, coercion and violence, Sunni Islam is a religion of peace and tolerance. A Muslim is called to be a loyal citizen of the country in which he lives, on the condition that the State does not deny his basic religious freedom and does not compel him to accept another religion by force. If the government is in other respects tyrannical, corrupt, oppressive, etc., a Muslim may seek redress through established legal channels, without resort to sedition or violence. If he thinks government oppression is unbearable, he must migrate elsewhere. This is the case regardless of whether or not Muslims are a majority or a minority, or the ruler is a Muslim or a non-Muslim.

Sunni Islam recognized different forms of efforts to support Islam (jihad), and acknowledges a military form of jihad. In the Sunni understanding, military jihad can only be undertaken by an Islamic State. Muslims may not initiate armed conflicts on their own initiative, but only after the head of an Islamic State has formally declared war against another state which oppresses Muslims or denies their religion freedom. Islamic sources foresaw that the Islamic State (Caliphate) would cease to exist, and that Muslims and non-Muslims alike would be ruled for a period of history by secular states alone.

According to Sunni belief, the Caliphate will be restored in messianic times, by Imam al-Mahdi, and not by politicians or military leaders. As long as Imam al-Mahdi is not present, no restoration of the Caliphate is possible, and without a Caliphate military jihad is impossible. The only legitimate jihad in our time is not-military jihad, i.e., competing with non-Muslims in good deeds, such as creating a better world and establishing enduring peace.

Wahhabis simply take words used in Islamic Law and apply them against Islamic Law itself. In Islamic Law, terrorism is a sin, and suicide another sin. Wahhabis call « jihad » acts of suicide terrorism and « martyrs » those who die while committing them. With regard to murder and suicide, the conflicting positions of Sunni Islam and Wahhabism are fundamental and irreconcilable.

FP: Tell us a bit about your upbringing and your own intellectual and spiritual journey? Who were some mentors/figures who influenced you? Has your philosophy and outlook always been the same or has it changed over the years? Tell us about a matter about which you have changed your mind or have had second thoughts over the years.

Palazzi: I was born in Rome into a non-observant Muslim family, having no special interest in religion. At that time, there existed in Italy no Muslim organization and no religious facilities. Apart from some Arabic words and some knowledge of major Islamic holidays, I received no formal religious education. Even so, since my youth I was interested in spirituality and metaphysics, and this led me to study philosophy at the State University of Rome.

During that period, I felt a need to rediscover my Islamic roots. After completing my secular education I moved to Cairo, wherein I studied at al-Azhar Islamic University. In Cairo, I had the opportunity to study under the best teachers. At that time, al-Azhar was not, as it is today, a nest of Wahhabi and neo-Salafi fanatics and extremists, but was still a center of traditional Islamic learning.

While living in Cairo, I also had the opportunity to study Sufism, the mystical tradition of Islam, under my main teachers, Sheikh Ismail al-Azhari and Sheikh Hussein al-Khalwati. I also benefited from the opportunity to study under the then Mufti of Egypt, the late Sheikh Muhammad al-Mutawali as-Sha’rawi, the one who convinced Sadat to make peace with Israel and who went with him to Jerusalem to pray in the al-Aqsa mosque.

When I came back to Rome, I met other Muslims sharing my attitude, and together we established the organization which today is called the Italian Muslim Assembly. While a teenager, I studied different ideologies and philosophies, and was to a certain extent influenced by them. However, after my stay in Cairo, I considered my basic period of intellectual and spiritual formation completed. My spiritual philosophy has remained more or less the same until today.

FP: What did you think about Pope John Paul II? What do you think of the new Pope?

Palazzi: I think the late Pope John Paul II was a contradictory personality. He made some decisions which were extremely progressive (interfaith meetings, visits to mosques and synagogues, etc.), but his individual theology was nevertheless extremely conservative and from a certain point of view naive. He publicly asked forgiveness for crimes committed by the Church against Jews, but afterwards canonized some very controversial personalities, such as his predecessor Pius IX (one of the most implacable enemies of democracy in the history of humanity), and even pro-Nazi Croatian Cardinal Stepinac.

John Paul II took no steps to censor priests and bishops who scandalously cooperated with mass-murderers such as Saddam Hussein or Yasser Arafat, and refused to take a clear position about bishops involved in covering up the scandal of pedophile priests. He approved the war in Kosovo to free the oppressed population from Milosevic, but had no courage to support the war for the liberation of Iraq from Saddam Hussein. The refusal of John Paul II to « bless » the international Coalition fighting for the liberation of Iraq is something I as a Muslim can hardly forgive, as I cannot forget Catholic organizations marching together with Communists and neo-Nazis « against Bush’s war » and objectively in support of Saddam’s regime.

On themes such as birth control and embryology John Paul II’s mentality was totally obscurantist and medieval. He compared abortion to massacres committed by Nazis and Communists. He promoted dialogue between the Church and non-Catholic religions, but permitted Cardinal Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI) to silence theological debate and dissent within the Catholic Church itself.

From a political point of view, John Paul II supported a direct and constant interference of the Church in the affairs of European States, especially Italy. Many Italians, even practicing Catholic Italians, were disappointed by the idea of a foreign (in this case Polish) pope who interfered with the dialectic of majority rule and minority opposition in our country, and considered it a gross infringement of our national sovereignty.

To conclude, I must say that the pontificate of John Paul II was characterized by light and darkness. Positive elements were counter-balanced by many negative ones.

As for Benedict XVI, taking into consideration the documents he signed when he was President of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (formerly known as the « Sacred Congregation of the Universal Inquisition »), he seems to be even more conservative than was John Paul II, and even less inclined to tolerate theological pluralism inside the Catholic Church. In one these documents, the « Dominus Jesus » Declaration, the then Cardinal Ratzinger explained that « interfaith dialogue must be understood as a part of the missionary activity of the Catholic Church. » The same document openly says that non-Catholic religions are « seriously defective » from a theological and ethical point of view.

All this is not encouraging at all. We have a Pope, Benedict XVI, who simply rejects the notion of pluralism. He does not see the Catholic Church as an element of society which must co-exist with other elements on a basis of equality and dignity, but sees the Catholic Church as the master which must educate society.

According to the approach of Benedict XVI, religions do not represent different spiritual perspectives, each of which can make its unique contribution to help us partially understand the mystery of God. Benedict thinks the truth about God is already known, and the Pope (i.e., himself) is the only authorized interpreter of that truth. Catholics and non-Catholics alike must simply be educated by the one (i.e., himself) who represents that truth on earth.

Dialogue is not seen as an end in itself, but only as a tool to bring non-Catholic religions more in line with Catholicism. With regard to the attitudes of past Popes such as John XXIII and Paul VI, Benedict XVI seriously risks nullifying the results of the Second Vatican Council and returning Catholic theology to what it was at the time of the Counter Reformation.

Ratzinger, therefore, is a Pope who preaches a totalitarian understanding of religion, and incidentally is also the first Pope to have participated in a Nazi German youth movement. Perhaps this past will not affect relations with Jews, but Benedict recently chose not to mention Israel by name in a public statement of solidarity with nations that recently suffered terrorist attacks. When the Israeli government protested this omission, the reaction of the Press Office of the Holy See was arrogant, condescending, and dismissive, adding insult (a sin of commission) to the original injury (a sin of omission), especially when one considers that the omission was committed by a Bavarian Pope who was both a member of a Nazi German youth movement and a soldier in the Nazi German Wehrmacht.

FP: You are, of course, right about some of these things. I guess I will just say that Pope John Paul II was an incredible human being who provided crucial and meaningful spiritual leadership during a tumultuous time. His job was not to run a popularity contest. I think in some ways he was a very holy man and brought much light to a dark world. He was firm in several areas where it was necessary to be firm. And, of course, he played a tremendous role in the crumbling of an evil empire.

The hype that the media went on about Benedict XVI being in the Nazi German youth movement is also a vicious and dirty cheap shot. Pope XVI was never a Nazi and everyone knows it. All German boys at that time were forced to become members of the Hitler Youth – and so was he. This Pope has made it clear years ago how his faith showed him the evil of Nazism and anti-Semitism.

Palazzi: Although « all German boys at that time were forced to become members of the hitler youth, » the young Joseph Ratzinger nevertheless volunteered for a combat unit of the Hitler Youth. This circumstance is confirmed by the Vatican press office. Of course, we are dealing with a teenager living in a period when Nazi indoctrination was systematic, but at least during that period Joseph Ratzinger was a convinced Nazi who chose to join a military unit fighting against the Allies. I do not doubt that his faith showed him the evil of Nazism and anti-Semitism, but this happened after World War Two was over, not before.

FP: Well, Sheikh Palazzi, the evidence suggests that the Pope volunteering for a combat unit is simply untrue and that is why the Pope evaded people who were trying to force him to « volunteer » for a combat unit by declaring his intent to become a priest. There is no trace to the assertion that the Vatican Press Office confirmed the opposite. Ratzinger received a dispensation from the Hitler Youth because of his religious studies and he deserted the German army. He never attended any Hitler Youth meetings and his seminary professor secured the paper « proving » his attendance on his behalf.

And it is this upon this falsehood that you frame your further assertion that Ratzinger was at that time a « convinced Nazi » — which is, with all due respect, simply a historical falsehood and a personal slander. His own word, and those of all who knew him and his family, says otherwise: that he and his whole family were anti-Nazis. There is no trace of Nazism in anything Ratzinger has ever done since the war, and it seems that many people are just trying to smear him and his theological conservatism – quite an unworthy thing to do.

In any case, let’s get back to the terror war. What is the best way for the West to fight it? What do you think of the American liberation of Iraq?

Palazzi: To win a war, one must identify who the enemy is and neutralize the enemy’s chain of command. World War Two was won when the German army was destroyed, Berlin was captured and Hitler removed from power. To win the War on Terror, it is necessary to understand that al-Qa’ida is a Saudi organization, created by the House of Sa’ud, funded with petro-dollar profits by the House of Sa’ud and used by the House of Sa’ud for acts of mass terror primarily against the West, and the rest of the world, as well.

Consequently, to really win the War on Terror it is necessary for the U.S. to invade Saudi Arabia, capture King Abdallah and the other 1,500 princes who constitute the House of Sa’ud, to freeze their assets, to remove them from power, and to send them to Guantanamo for life imprisonment.

Then it is necessary to replace the Saudi-Wahhabi terror-funding regime with a moderate, non-Wahhabi and pro-West regime, such as a Hashemite Sunni Muslim constitutional monarchy.

Unless all this is done, the War on Terror will never be won. It is possible to destroy al-Qa’ida, to capture or execute Bin Laden, al-Zarqawi, al-Zawahiri, etc., but this will not end the War. After some years, Saudi princes will again start funding many similar terror organizations. The Saudi regime can only survive by increasing its support for terror.

Saddam’s regime was one of the worst criminal dictatorships which existed in this world, and destroying it was surely a praiseworthy task for which, as a Muslim, I am thankful to President Bush, to the governments who joined the Coalition and to soldiers who fought in the field. Destroying the Taliban regime in Afghanistan and the regime of Saddam Hussein in Iraq were surely praiseworthy tasks, but I regret that focusing on these secondary enemies was — for the White House — a way to obscure the role of the world’s main enemy: the Saudis.

FP: What do you think of President Bush?

Palazzi: I am extremely disappointed with him. I hoped that — after Saudi terrorists attacked the U.S. on 9/11 — this would necessarily cause a radical revision in U.S.-Saudi relations. The first action a U.S. President had to do after such a criminal attack as 9/11 was to immediately outlaw Saudi-controlled institutions inside the U.S. and acknowledge that viewing Saudis as « friends » was a mortal sin representing sixty years of failed U.S. foreign and economic policy.

U.S. governmental agencies have plenty of evidence about the role of the House of Sa’ud in funding the worldwide terror network. U.S. citizens can even read in newspapers that some days before the 9/11 attack Muhammad Atta received a check from the wife of the former Saudi Ambassador to Washington, Prince Bandar, but unbelievably this caused no consequences. Let us consider plain facts: the wife of a foreign ambassador pays terrorists for attacks which murder thousands of U.S. citizens, and the U.S. government not only does not declare war on that foreign country, in this case Saudi Arabia, but does not even terminate diplomatic relations with that country.

On the contrary, then-Crown Prince Abdallah, the creator (together with the new Saudi ambassador to the United States, former Saudi ambassador to the United Kingdom, and Father of 9/11, Prince Turki al-Feisal) of al-Qa’ida, is immediately invited to Bush’s ranch as a honored guest, and Bush tells him, « You are our ally in the War on Terror »! Can one image FDR inviting Hitler to the United States and telling him, « You are our ally in the war against Fascism in Europe »?

Something very similar happened after 9/11. As a matter of fact, the Saudis supported Bush’s electoral campaign for his first term in office, and asked him in exchange to be the first U.S. President to promote the creation of a Palestinian State. Once he was elected, Bush refused to abide by the agreement, and the consequence was 9/11.

« We paid for your election, and now you must do want we want from you », this was the message behind the 9/11 attack. Bush immediately started doing what the Saudis wanted from him: compelling Israel to withdraw from Judea, Samaria and Gaza, in order to permit the creation of a PLO state. Western media speak of a « Road Map, » while Arab media call it by its real name: « Abdallah’s Plan. »

One hears about a U.S. President who allegedly leads a « War on Terror » and promotes the spread of « democracy » and « freedom » in the Islamic world, but the reality shows a U.S. president who — after a Saudi terror attack against the U.S. — abides by a Saudi diktat, hides the role of the Saudi regime behind al-Qa’ida and wants Israel, the only democratic state in the Middle East, cut to pieces to facilitate the creation of another dictatorial regime, lead by Arafat deputy Abu Mazen, the terrorist who organized the mass murder of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics.

Theoretically, Bush proclaims his intention to punish terror and to spread democracy, but the Road Map is the exact opposite of all this: it means punishing the victims of terror and rewarding terrorists, compelling democracy to withdraw in order to create a new dictatorial Arab regime. For the U.S. there is only one single trustworthy ally in the entire Middle East: Israel.

Now Bush is punishing America’s ally Israel to reward those who heartily supported « our brother Saddam », those who demonstrate by burning Stars and Strips flags and those who call America « the imperialist power controlled by Zionism ». In doing so, Bush seriously risks becoming the most anti-Israeli and anti-Jewish President in the history of the U.S.

Let us look at the impending victims of Bush’s foreign policy, at the inhabitants of Gush Katif. What is their crime? What did they do to merit deportation from their homes and the theft of their farms and businesses? They live in peace, work hard and provide jobs for thousands of Gaza Arabs. To please the Saudis, Bush wants a Judenrein Gaza, with the Jews of Gush Katif deported from their homes, their houses destroyed and even the remains of their relatives exhumed and buried elsewhere.

Were one to proclaim « Jews, for the only reason of their being Jews, must be deported from New York and forcibly resettled in New Jersey », the whole world would shout and say this is racist deportation, ethnic cleansing, violation of basic human rights, etc. Now, by supporting the infamous anti-Israeli Saudi Plan, Bush is applying the same identical principle: he accepts the idea that Jews, for the only fault of being Jews, must be deported from their homes in Judea, Samaria and Gaza, and resettled elsewhere.

Throughout history, Jews were frequently deported from country to country by Romans, Popes, Czars, Nazis, etc. Now, thanks to Bush’s policy, Jews will also be deported from Israel, and deported not by anti-Semitic regimes, but by Jews and others wearing Israeli uniforms. It is the norm for Arab dictators to conceive a political project based on ethnic cleansing and deportation of Jews, but it is simply unbelievable that a U.S. President approves such a project and compels Israel to accept it.

I am shocked to realize that a U.S. President supports ethnic cleansing of Jews from parts of the Land of Israel, and that most American Jewish organizational leaders either keep silent or even approve of this deportation plan. With the few praiseworthy exceptions of the Zionist Organization of America (Morton Klein), Americans for a Safe Israel (Herb Zweibon and Helen Freedman), National Council of Young Israel (Pesach Lerner) and a few other groups, most Jewish organizations in the U.S. collaborate with Bush’s plans against their own brothers and sisters in Israel.

The implications of the Road Map are staggering: A Jew is not like other human beings, he can be deported from place to place, according to the cynical oil drenched dictates of political opportunism. Deporting Jews and cutting Israel into pieces was the original goal of Arab dictators supported by the Soviet Union.

The U.S. has consistently opposed this racist policy and supported Israel against terrorists who wanted to destroy it. Now Bush is granting those same terrorists a victory: what was not accomplished by terror will be accomplished by the Israeli Defence Forces with the support of the United States. Saudis are able to compel a U.S. President to betray U.S. allies and to force the creation of an entity (« Palestine ») controlled by terrorists.

President Bush claims to be a Born Again Christian and also claims to read the Bible every day. The Bible says that God gave the Land of Israel as a heritage to the descendants of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and gave the rest of the world as a heritage to other peoples. As confirmed by the Qur’an and Islamic tradition, Abraham himself bequeathed to his descendants from Isaac the Land of Israel, and bequeathed to his descendants from Ishmael other lands, such as the Arabian peninsula.

Now descendants of Ishmael, the Arabs, have a gigantic territory extending from Morocco to Iraq. The descendants of Isaac, the Jews, on the contrary, only have a tiny, narrow strip of land. However, Arab dictators are not satisfied with their huge territory. They want more. They also want the little heritage of the Children of Israel, and resort to terror in order to get it.

U.S. Presidents have always opposed this attempt to steal from the Jewish People what God granted them. Now we have a U.S. President who claims to honor the Bible, and yet wants to give Arab dictators what belongs to the Jewish People. By doing so, Bush is not only rewarding terror, encouraging further terror and showing the world that terror works, but he is also opposing God’s will. I pray that the citizens of the U.S. will be spared the full consequences of this anti-Israel, anti-Jewish and anti-God foreign policy.

FP: There is indeed a tragedy inherent in the Israelis not being defended the way they should be. And the disengagement from Gaza truly comes with many dangerous risks. But there are several very shrewd strategic reasons involved in this move and they are in Israel’s interests. We shouldn’t forget that. Bush and Sharon are making wise and calculated steps in their own context. It is more complicated than simply seeing this as a great malicious betrayal. But we’ll have to debate this another time.

Let us turn to your personal interests for a moment. What are some of your favorite books?

Palazzi: Books I prefer reading are those dealing with spirituality. I am especially interested in the study of similarities between Sufism and Kabbalah, and consequently I consider « al-Futuhat al-Makkiyyah » by Ibn ‘Arabi and the « Zohar » as my basic sources. I am also interested in the study of non-monotheistic mysticism, and consequently appreciate the Upanishad, the Vedantasutra and the Purana of the Hindu tradition, the Buddhist Canon and the Greek Philokalia. I am also interested in the history of Middle East. Books such as « Battle Ground » by Shmuel Katz and « The Secret War Against the Jews » by John Loftus are among my favorites.

FP: Do you listen to music? If so, tell us what music you like.

Palazzi: Because of my academic interests in ethnomusicology and ritual dance, I frequently listen to Medieval music, be it Arabic-Andalusi, Maghrebi, Persian, European or Byzantine. Then I am also fond of symphonic music, and my favorite composers are Bruckner, Mahler and Stravinsky. I also like jazz, especially from New Orleans.

FP: Why do you think Islamic extremists demonize music? For instance, the Taliban illegalized all music, Khomeini illegalized many forms of “Western music” etc. What is it about music that they see so threatening? Isn’t music a divine gift? Also, do you think dancing is anti-Islamic?

Palazzi: Khomeini was not so extreme about music as are the Taliban (who follow an Indian version of Saudi Wahhabism known as Deobandism) or the Saudis. Khomeini never demonized music in principle. He rather imposed his personal preferences regarding which music was acceptable and which was not. Khomeini deemed traditional Islamic music and Western classical music to be acceptable, and modern Western popular music to be unacceptable. The Taliban, on the contrary, even banned Sufi music and traditional Islamic chants, and the Saudis go on doing the same until today.

Some Muslim scholars of the past restricted the range of acceptable music to a minimum, but Imam al-Ghazali, a leading authority in the Shafi’i school of jurisprudence to which I belong, preferred to emphasize the positive value of music. A chapter of al-Ghazali’s book in Persian, « The Alchemy of Happiness », is entitled « Concerning Music and Dancing as Aids to the Religious Life ».

al-Ghazali writes: « The heart of man has been so constituted by the Almighty that, like a flint, it contains a hidden fire which is evoked by music and harmony, and renders man beside himself with ecstasy. These harmonies are echoes of that higher world of beauty which we call the world of spirits; they remind man of his relationship to that world, and produce in him an emotion so deep and strange that he himself is powerless to explain it. The effect of music and dancing is deeper in proportion as the natures on which they act are simple and prone to motion; they fan into a flame whatever love is already dormant in the heart, whether it be earthly and sensual, or divine and spiritual ».

While other scholars tried to classify musical instruments and musical styles as permissible or forbidden on the basis of their personal preferences, Imam al-Ghazali on the contrary classified music according to the effects it produces on the soul: music which promotes illicit and immoral desires must be avoided, while music which echoes spiritual harmony and awakens contemplation should be encouraged. The latter kind of music is surely a divine gift. Till today Sufi musicians play traditional songs and mystical melodies in order to increase love for God and to cause listeners to join in ecstatic dancing.

FP: So do you ever dance to your favorite music?

Palazzi: I not only regularly dance according to the teachings of the Mevlevi school as they were received by the Naqshbandi and Qadiri Sufi Orders, but I also teach my students, with the authorization of my Sheikhs, what in the West is known as the ritual dance of the Whirling Dervishes. In Arabic, this same dance is called Sama’, meaning « listening ». The ritualized techniques of Sufi dance are necessary since an ordinary person lacks spontaneity. For those who reach a certain spiritual level, technique itself is not necessary anymore: listening to traditional Mevlevi music, especially to the sound of flute and drum, is enough to lead to spontaneous dance out of love for God.

During the last years, I have led seminars and arranged performances of the ritual dance of the Whirling Dervishes in cultural centers, universities and dancing schools. Students at dancing schools have some technical advantages over participants who never attended such schools, but in many cases the dance students were less spontaneous and more concerned with external appearances. These dance students were educated to perform for the public in performances which must please audiences. In Dergas, Sufi dancing halls, students dance exclusively for the Beloved One, and to be united with Him. That is the basic difference.

FP: Do you think that veiling of women in Islam should me mandatory or voluntary?

Palazzi: Wearing or not wearing a veil should be the choice of a Muslim woman alone. No one has the right to compel her to wear or not wear a veil. As with prayer, fasting and all the other religious practices, veiling has meaning when it is spontaneous and reflects one’s will to please God by choosing to observe a religious precept. Forcing people to observe religious precepts does not result in an increase in faith, but rather an increase in hypocrisy. One does not pray, fast or wear a veil as an expression of freely chosen faith to submit to what one believes to be commanded by God, but only due to human coercion.

Consequently, I strongly condemn those regimes, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, which force women who do not want to wear the veil to do so; and regimes, such as Turkey and France, which prevent women who do want to wear the veil from doing so. My ideal of religious freedom is that, if a woman wants to veil, she must be free to do so, and the State must defend her right to veil; while if a woman does not want to veil, she must be free to do so, and the State must defend her right not to do so.

Voir encore:

What Would Hamas Do If It Could Do Whatever It Wanted?
Understanding what the Muslim Brotherhood’s Gaza branch wants by studying its theology, strategy, and history
Jeffrey Goldberg

The Atlantic

AUG 4 2014

In the spring of 2009, Roger Cohen, the New York Times columnist, surprised some of his readers by claiming that Iran’s remaining Jews were “living, working and worshiping in relative tranquility.”

Cohen wrote: “Perhaps I have a bias toward facts over words, but I say the reality of Iranian civility toward Jews tells us more about Iran—its sophistication and culture—than all the inflammatory rhetoric.”

Perhaps.

In this, and other, columns, Cohen appeared to be trying to convince his fellow Jews that they had less to fear from the Iran of Khamenei and (at the time) Ahmadinejad than they thought. To me, the column was a whitewash. It seemed (and seems) reasonable to worry about the intentions of those Iranian leaders who deny or minimize the Holocaust while hoping to annihilate the Jewish state, and who have funded and trained groups—Hezbollah and Hamas—that have as their goal the killing of Jews.

It is a dereliction of responsibility not to try to understand the goals and beliefs of Islamist totalitarian movements.
Cohen’s most acid critics came from within the Persian Jewish exile community. The vast majority of Iran’s Jews fled the country after the Khomeini revolution; many found refuge in Los Angeles. David Wolpe, the rabbi of Sinai Temple there, invited Cohen to speak to his congregants, about half of whom are Persian exiles, shortly after the column appeared. Cohen, to his credit, accepted the invitation. The encounter between Cohen and an audience of several hundred (mainly Jews, but also Bahais, members of a faith persecuted with great intensity by the Iranian regime) was tense but mainly civil (you can watch it here). For me, the most interesting moment came not in a discussion about the dubious health of Iran’s remnant Jewish population, but after Wolpe asked Cohen about the intentions of Iran and its allies toward Jews living outside Iran.

“Right now,” Wolpe said, “Israel is much more powerful than Hezbollah and Hamas. Let’s say tomorrow this was reversed. Let’s say Hamas had the firepower of Israel and Israel had the firepower of Hamas. What do you think would happen to Israel were the balance of power reversed?”

“I don’t know what would happen tomorrow,” Cohen answered. This response brought a measure of derisive laughter from the incredulous audience. “And it doesn’t matter that I don’t know because it’s not going to happen tomorrow or in one or two years.” Wolpe quickly told Cohen that he himself knows exactly what would happen if the power balance between Hamas and Israel were to be reversed. (Later, Wolpe told me that he thought Cohen could not have been so naïve as to misunderstand the nature of Hamas and Hezbollah, but instead was simply caught short by the question.)

At the time, Cohen suggested that he was uninterested in grappling with the nature of Hamas and its goals. “I reject the thinking behind your question,” he said. “It’s not useful to go there.”

“Going there,” however, is necessary, not only to understand why Israelis fear Hamas, but also to understand that the narrative advanced by Hamas apologists concerning the group’s beliefs and goals is false. “Going there” also does not require enormous imagination, or a well-developed predisposition toward paranoia. It is, in my opinion, a dereliction of responsibility on the part of progressives not to try to understand the goals and beliefs of Islamist totalitarian movements.

(This post, you should know, is not a commentary on the particulars of the war between Israel and Hamas, a war in which Hamas baited Israel and Israel took the bait. Each time Israel kills an innocent Palestinian in its attempt to neutralize Hamas’s rockets, it represents a victory for Hamas, which has made plain its goal of getting Israel to kill innocent Gazans. Suffice it to say that Israel cannot afford many more “victories” of the sort it is seeking in Gaza right now. I supported a ceasefire early in this war precisely because I believed that the Israeli government had not thought through its strategic goals, or the methods for achieving those goals.)

While it is true that Hamas is expert at getting innocent Palestinians killed, it has made it very plain, in word and deed, that it would rather kill Jews. The following blood-freezing statement is from the group’s charter: “The Islamic Resistance Movement aspires to the realization of Allah’s promise, no matter how long that should take. The Prophet, Allah bless him and grant him salvation, has said: ‘The day of judgment will not come until Muslims fight the Jews (killing the Jews), when the Jews will hide behind stones and trees. The stones and trees will say ‘O Muslims, O Abdulla, there is a Jew behind me, come and kill him.”

This is a frank and open call for genocide, embedded in one of the most thoroughly anti-Semitic documents you’ll read this side of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Not many people seem to know that Hamas’s founding document is genocidal. Sometimes, the reasons for this lack of knowledge are benign; other times, as the New Yorker’s Philip Gourevitch argues in his recent dismantling of Rashid Khalidi’s apologia for Hamas, this ignorance is a direct byproduct of a decision to mask evidence of Hamas’s innate theocratic fascism.

The historian of totalitarianism Jeffrey Herf, in an article on the American Interest website, places the Hamas charter in context:

[T]he Hamas Covenant of 1988 notably replaced the Marxist-Leninist conspiracy theory of world politics with the classic anti-Semitic tropes of Nazism and European fascism, which the Islamists had absorbed when they collaborated with the Nazis during World War II. That influence is apparent in Article 22, which asserts that “supportive forces behind the enemy” have amassed great wealth: « With their money, they took control of the world media, news agencies, the press, publishing houses, broadcasting stations, and others. With their money they stirred revolutions in various parts of the world with the purpose of achieving their interests and reaping the fruit therein. With their money, they took control of the world media. They were behind the French Revolution, the Communist revolution and most of the revolutions we heard and hear about here and there. With their money, they formed secret societies, such as Freemason, Rotary Clubs, the Lions and others in different parts of the world for the purpose of sabotaging societies and achieving Zionist interests. With their money they were able to control imperialistic countries and instigate them to colonize many countries in order to enable them to exploit their resources and spread corruption there. »

The above paragraph of Article 22 could have been taken, almost word for word, from Nazi Germany’s anti-Jewish propaganda texts and broadcasts.
The question Roger Cohen refused to answer at Sinai Temple was addressed in a recent post by Sam Harris, the atheist intellectual, who is opposed, as a matter of ideology, to the existence of Israel as a Jewish state (or to any country organized around a religion), but who for practical reasons supports its continued existence as a haven for an especially persecuted people, and also as a not-particularly religious redoubt in a region of the world deeply affected by religious fundamentalism. Referring not only to the Hamas charter, Harris writes that, “The discourse in the Muslim world about Jews is utterly shocking.”

Not only is there Holocaust denial—there’s Holocaust denial that then asserts that we will do it for real if given the chance. The only thing more obnoxious than denying the Holocaust is to say that it should have happened; it didn’t happen, but if we get the chance, we will accomplish it. There are children’s shows in the Palestinian territories and elsewhere that teach five-year-olds about the glories of martyrdom and about the necessity of killing Jews.

And this gets to the heart of the moral difference between Israel and her enemies. …

What do we know of the Palestinians? What would the Palestinians do to the Jews in Israel if the power imbalance were reversed? Well, they have told us what they would do. For some reason, Israel’s critics just don’t want to believe the worst about a group like Hamas, even when it declares the worst of itself. We’ve already had a Holocaust and several other genocides in the 20th century. People are capable of committing genocide. When they tell us they intend to commit genocide, we should listen. There is every reason to believe that the Palestinians would kill all the Jews in Israel if they could. Would every Palestinian support genocide? Of course not. But vast numbers of them—and of Muslims throughout the world—would. Needless to say, the Palestinians in general, not just Hamas, have a history of targeting innocent noncombatants in the most shocking ways possible. They’ve blown themselves up on buses and in restaurants. They’ve massacred teenagers. They’ve murdered Olympic athletes. They now shoot rockets indiscriminately into civilian areas.
The first time I witnessed Hamas’s hatred of Jews manifest itself in large-scale, fatal violence was in late July of 1997, when two of the group’s suicide bombers detonated themselves in an open-air market in West Jerusalem. The attack took 16 lives, and injured 178. I happened to be only a few blocks from the market at the time of the attack, and arrived shortly after the paramedics and firefighters. Over the next hours, a scene unfolded that I would see again and again: screaming relatives; members of the Orthodox burial society scraping flesh off walls; the ground covered in blood and viscera. I remember another Hamas attack, on a bus in downtown Jerusalem, in which body parts of children were blown into the street by the force of the blast. At yet another bombing, I was with rescue workers as they recovered a human arm stuck high up in a tree.

After each of these attacks, Hamas leaders issued blood-curdling statements claiming credit, and promising more death. “The Jews will lose because they crave life but a true Muslim loves death,” a former Hamas leader, Abdel-Aziz Rantisi, told me in an interview in 2002. In the same interview he made the following imperishable statement: “People always talk about what the Germans did to the Jews, but the true question is, ‘What did the Jews do to the Germans?’”

I will always remember this interview not only because Rantisi’s Judeophobia was breathtaking, but because just as I was leaving his apartment in Gaza City, a friend from Jerusalem called to tell me that she had just heard a massive explosion outside her office at the Hebrew University (not far, by the way, of an attack earlier today). A cafeteria had just been bombed, my friend told me. This was another Hamas operation, one which killed nine people, including a young woman of exceptional promise named Marla Bennett, a 24-year-old American student who wrote shortly before her death, “My friends and family in San Diego ask me to come home, it is dangerous here. I appreciate their concern. But there is nowhere else in the world I would rather be right now. I have a front-row seat for the history of the Jewish people.”

Hamas is an organization devoted to ending Jewish history. This is what so many Jews understand, and what so many non-Jews don’t. The novelist Amos Oz, who has led Israel’s left-wing peace camp for decades, said in an interview last week that he doesn’t see a prospect for compromise between Israel and Hamas. « I have been a man of compromise all my life, » Oz said. « But even a man of compromise cannot approach Hamas and say: ‘Maybe we meet halfway and Israel only exists on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.' »

In the years since it adopted its charter, Hamas leaders and spokesmen have reinforced its message again and again. Mahmoud Zahar said in 2006 that the group « will not change a single word in its covenant. » To underscore the point, in 2010 Zahhar said, « Our ultimate plan is [to have] Palestine in its entirety. I say this loud and clear so that nobody will accuse me of employing political tactics. We will not recognize the Israeli enemy. »

In 2011, the former Hamas minister of culture, Atallah Abu al-Subh, said that « the Jews are the most despicable and contemptible nation to crawl upon the face of the Earth, because they have displayed hostility to Allah. Allah will kill the Jews in the hell of the world to come, just like they killed the believers in the hell of this world. » Just last week, a top Hamas official, Osama Hamdan, accused Jews of using Christian blood to make matzo. This is not a group, in other words, that is seeking the sort of peace that Amos Oz—or, for that matter, the Palestinian Authority president, Mahmoud Abbas—is seeking. People wonder why Israelis have such a visceral reaction to Hamas. The answer is easy. Israel is a small country, and most of its citizens know someone who was murdered by Hamas in its extended suicide-bombing campaigns; and most people also understand that if Hamas had its way, it would kill them as well.

Voir par ailleurs:

In Defense of Zionism
The often reviled ideology that gave rise to Israel has been an astonishing historical success.
Michael B. Oren
WSJ
Aug. 1, 2014

They come from every corner of the country—investment bankers, farmers, computer geeks, jazz drummers, botany professors, car mechanics—leaving their jobs and their families. They put on uniforms that are invariably too tight or too baggy, sign out their gear and guns. Then, scrambling onto military vehicles, 70,000 reservists—women and men—join the young conscripts of what is proportionally the world’s largest citizen army. They all know that some of them will return maimed or not at all. And yet, without hesitation or (for the most part) complaint, proudly responding to the call-up, Israelis stand ready to defend their nation. They risk their lives for an idea.

The idea is Zionism. It is the belief that the Jewish people should have their own sovereign state in the Land of Israel. Though founded less than 150 years ago, the Zionist movement sprung from a 4,000-year-long bond between the Jewish people and its historic homeland, an attachment sustained throughout 20 centuries of exile. This is why Zionism achieved its goals and remains relevant and rigorous today. It is why citizens of Israel—the state that Zionism created—willingly take up arms. They believe their idea is worth fighting for.

Yet Zionism, arguably more than any other contemporary ideology, is demonized. « All Zionists are legitimate targets everywhere in the world! » declared a banner recently paraded by anti-Israel protesters in Denmark. « Dogs are allowed in this establishment but Zionists are not under any circumstances, » warned a sign in the window of a Belgian cafe. A Jewish demonstrator in Iceland was accosted and told, « You Zionist pig, I’m going to behead you. »

In certain academic and media circles, Zionism is synonymous with colonialism and imperialism. Critics on the radical right and left have likened it to racism or, worse, Nazism. And that is in the West. In the Middle East, Zionism is the ultimate abomination—the product of a Holocaust that many in the region deny ever happened while maintaining nevertheless that the Zionists deserved it.

What is it about Zionism that elicits such loathing? After all, the longing of a dispersed people for a state of their own cannot possibly be so repugnant, especially after that people endured centuries of massacres and expulsions, culminating in history’s largest mass murder. Perhaps revulsion toward Zionism stems from its unusual blend of national identity, religion and loyalty to a land. Japan offers the closest parallel, but despite its rapacious past, Japanese nationalism doesn’t evoke the abhorrence aroused by Zionism.

Clearly anti-Semitism, of both the European and Muslim varieties, plays a role. Cabals, money grubbing, plots to take over the world and murder babies—all the libels historically leveled at Jews are regularly hurled at Zionists. And like the anti-Semitic capitalists who saw all Jews as communists and the communists who painted capitalism as inherently Jewish, the opponents of Zionism portray it as the abominable Other.

But not all of Zionism’s critics are bigoted, and not a few of them are Jewish. For a growing number of progressive Jews, Zionism is too militantly nationalist, while for many ultra-Orthodox Jews, the movement is insufficiently pious—even heretical. How can an idea so universally reviled retain its legitimacy, much less lay claim to success?

The answer is simple: Zionism worked. The chances were infinitesimal that a scattered national group could be assembled from some 70 countries into a sliver-sized territory shorn of resources and rich in adversaries and somehow survive, much less prosper. The odds that those immigrants would forge a national identity capable of producing a vibrant literature, pace-setting arts and six of the world’s leading universities approximated zero.

Elsewhere in the world, indigenous languages are dying out, forests are being decimated, and the populations of industrialized nations are plummeting. Yet Zionism revived the Hebrew language, which is now more widely spoken than Danish and Finnish and will soon surpass Swedish. Zionist organizations planted hundreds of forests, enabling the land of Israel to enter the 21st century with more trees than it had at the end of the 19th. And the family values that Zionism fostered have produced the fastest natural growth rate in the modernized world and history’s largest Jewish community. The average secular couple in Israel has at least three children, each a reaffirmation of confidence in Zionism’s future.

Indeed, by just about any international criteria, Israel is not only successful but flourishing. The population is annually rated among the happiest, healthiest and most educated in the world. Life expectancy in Israel, reflecting its superb universal health-care system, significantly exceeds America’s and that of most European countries. Unemployment is low, the economy robust. A global leader in innovation, Israel is home to R&D centers of some 300 high-tech companies, including Apple, Intel and Motorola. The beaches are teeming, the rock music is awesome, and the food is off the Zagat charts.

The democratic ideals integral to Zionist thought have withstood pressures that have precipitated coups and revolutions in numerous other nations. Today, Israel is one of the few states—along with Great Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the U.S.—that has never known a second of nondemocratic governance.

These accomplishments would be sufficiently astonishing if attained in North America or Northern Europe. But Zionism has prospered in the supremely inhospitable—indeed, lethal—environment of the Middle East. Two hours’ drive east of the bustling nightclubs of Tel Aviv—less than the distance between New York and Philadelphia—is Jordan, home to more than a half million refugees from Syria’s civil war. Traveling north from Tel Aviv for four hours would bring that driver to war-ravaged Damascus or, heading east, to the carnage in western Iraq. Turning south, in the time it takes to reach San Francisco from Los Angeles, the traveler would find himself in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

In a region reeling with ethnic strife and religious bloodshed, Zionism has engendered a multiethnic, multiracial and religiously diverse society. Arabs serve in the Israel Defense Forces, in the Knesset and on the Supreme Court. While Christian communities of the Middle East are steadily eradicated, Israel’s continues to grow. Israeli Arab Christians are, in fact, on average better educated and more affluent than Israeli Jews.

In view of these monumental achievements, one might think that Zionism would be admired rather than deplored. But Zionism stands accused of thwarting the national aspirations of Palestine’s indigenous inhabitants, of oppressing and dispossessing them.

Never mind that the Jews were natives of the land—its Arabic place names reveal Hebrew palimpsests—millennia before the Palestinians or the rise of Palestinian nationalism. Never mind that in 1937, 1947, 2000 and 2008, the Palestinians received offers to divide the land and rejected them, usually with violence. And never mind that the majority of Zionism’s adherents today still stand ready to share their patrimony in return for recognition of Jewish statehood and peace.

The response to date has been, at best, a refusal to remain at the negotiating table or, at worst, war. But Israelis refuse to relinquish the hope of resuming negotiations with President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority. To live in peace and security with our Palestinian neighbors remains the Zionist dream.

Still, for all of its triumphs, its resilience and openness to peace, Zionism fell short of some of its original goals. The agrarian, egalitarian society created by Zionist pioneers has been replaced by a dynamic, largely capitalist economy with yawning gaps between rich and poor. Mostly secular at its inception, Zionism has also spawned a rapidly expanding religious sector, some elements of which eschew the Jewish state.

About a fifth of Israel’s population is non-Jewish, and though some communities (such as the Druse) are intensely patriotic and often serve in the army, others are much less so, and some even call for Israel’s dissolution. And there is the issue of Judea and Samaria—what most of the world calls the West Bank—an area twice used to launch wars of national destruction against Israel but which, since its capture in 1967, has proved painfully divisive.

Many Zionists insist that these territories represent the cradle of Jewish civilization and must, by right, be settled. But others warn that continued rule over the West Bank’s Palestinian population erodes Israel’s moral foundation and will eventually force it to choose between being Jewish and remaining democratic.

Yet the most searing of Zionism’s unfulfilled visions was that of a state in which Jews could be free from the fear of annihilation. The army imagined by Theodor Herzl, Zionism’s founding father, marched in parades and saluted flag-waving crowds. The Israel Defense Forces, by contrast, with no time for marching, much less saluting, has remained in active combat mode since its founding in 1948. With the exception of Vladimir Jabotinsky, the ideological forbear of today’s Likud Party, none of Zionism’s early thinkers anticipated circumstances in which Jews would be permanently at arms. Few envisaged a state that would face multiple existential threats on a daily basis just because it is Jewish.

Confronted with such monumental threats, Israelis might be expected to flee abroad and prospective immigrants discouraged. But Israel has one of the lower emigration rates among developed countries while Jews continue to make aliyah—literally, in Hebrew, « to ascend »—to Israel. Surveys show that Israelis remain stubbornly optimistic about their country’s future. And Jews keep on arriving, especially from Europe, where their security is swiftly eroding. Last week, thousands of Parisians went on an anti-Semitic rant, looting Jewish shops and attempting to ransack synagogues.

American Jews face no comparable threat, and yet numbers of them continue to make aliyah. They come not in search of refuge but to take up the Zionist challenge—to be, as the Israeli national anthem pledges, « a free people in our land, the Land of Zion and Jerusalem. » American Jews have held every high office, from prime minister to Supreme Court chief justice to head of Israel’s equivalent of the Fed, and are disproportionately prominent in Israel’s civil society.

Hundreds of young Americans serve as « Lone Soldiers, » without families in the country, and volunteer for front-line combat units. One of them, Max Steinberg from Los Angeles, fell in the first days of the current Gaza fighting. His funeral, on Mount Herzl in Jerusalem, was attended by 30,000 people, most of them strangers, who came out of respect for this intrepid and selfless Zionist.

I also paid my respects to Max, whose Zionist journey was much like mine. After working on a kibbutz—a communal farm—I made aliyah and trained as a paratrooper. I participated in several wars, and my children have served as well, sometimes in battle. Our family has taken shelter from Iraqi Scuds and Hamas M-75s, and a suicide bomber killed one of our closest relatives.

Despite these trials, my Zionist life has been immensely fulfilling. And the reason wasn’t Zionism’s successes—not the Nobel Prizes gleaned by Israeli scholars, not the Israeli cures for chronic diseases or the breakthroughs in alternative energy. The reason—paradoxically, perhaps—was Zionism’s failures.

Failure is the price of sovereignty. Statehood means making hard and often agonizing choices—whether to attack Hamas in Palestinian neighborhoods, for example, or to suffer rocket strikes on our own territory. It requires reconciling our desire to be enlightened with our longing to remain alive. Most onerously, sovereignty involves assuming responsibility. Zionism, in my definition, means Jewish responsibility. It means taking responsibility for our infrastructure, our defense, our society and the soul of our state. It is easy to claim responsibility for victories; setbacks are far harder to embrace.

But that is precisely the lure of Zionism. Growing up in America, I felt grateful to be born in a time when Jews could assume sovereign responsibilities. Statehood is messy, but I regarded that mess as a blessing denied to my forefathers for 2,000 years. I still feel privileged today, even as Israel grapples with circumstances that are at once perilous, painful and unjust. Fighting terrorists who shoot at us from behind their own children, our children in uniform continue to be killed and wounded while much of the world brands them as war criminals.

Zionism, nevertheless, will prevail. Deriving its energy from a people that refuses to disappear and its ethos from historically tested ideas, the Zionist project will thrive. We will be vilified, we will find ourselves increasingly alone, but we will defend the homes that Zionism inspired us to build.

The Israeli media have just reported the call-up of an additional 16,000 reservists. Even as I write, they too are mobilizing for active duty—aware of the dangers, grateful for the honor and ready to bear responsibility.

Mr. Oren was Israel’s ambassador to the U.S. from 2009 to 2013. He holds the chair in international diplomacy at IDC Herzliya in Israel and is a fellow at the Atlantic Council. His books include « Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East » and « Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East, 1776 to the Present. »

Pour la défense du sionisme
L’idéologie souvent honnie qui a donné naissance à Israël est un succès historique étonnant.
Michael B. Oren

Wall Street Journal

Traduction française JSSNews

Ils sont venus de tous les coins du pays – banquiers, agriculteurs, informaticiens, batteurs de jazz, professeurs de botanique, mécaniciens – ils ont quitté leurs emplois et de leurs familles. Ils ont endossé leurs uniformes, toujours trop serrés ou trop amples, ont signé pour leur équipement et leur fusil. Ensuite, entassés dans des véhicules militaires, 70 000 réservistes – femmes et hommes – ont rejoint les jeunes conscrits de la plus grande armée de citoyens du monde. Ils savent tous que certains d’entre eux reviendront estropiés ou ne reviendront pas du tout. Et pourtant, sans hésitation ni plainte, répondant fièrement à l’appel, les Israéliens se dressent, prêts à défendre leur nation. A risquer leur vie pour un idéal.

Cet idéal est le sionisme. C’est la conviction que le peuple juif est en droit d’avoir son propre État souverain sur la terre d’Israël. Bien que fondé il y a moins de 150 ans, le mouvement sioniste est né de 4 000 longues années de lien entre le peuple juif et sa patrie historique, un attachement qui a perduré pendant 20 siècles d’exil. C’est pourquoi le sionisme a atteint ses objectifs et qu’il demeure plus que jamais actuel et fort. C’est pourquoi les citoyens d’Israël – l’Etat créé par le sionisme – prennent volontiers les armes. Car ils sont convaincus que leur idéal vaut la peine de se battre.

Pourtant, le sionisme, sans doute plus que toute autre idéologie contemporaine, est diabolisé. « Tous les sionistes sont des cibles légitimes partout dans le monde! » énonce une bannière récemment brandie par des manifestants anti-Israël au Danemark. « Les chiens sont admis dans cet établissement, mais pas les sionistes, en aucune circonstance », prévient une pancarte à la fenêtre d’un café belge. On a dit à un manifestant juif en Islande : « Toi porc sioniste, je vais te couper la tête. »

Dans certains milieux universitaires et médiatiques, le sionisme est synonyme de colonialisme et d’impérialisme. Les critiques d’extrême droite et gauche le comparent au racisme ou, pire, au nazisme. Et cela en Occident. Au Moyen-Orient, le sionisme est l’abomination ultime – le produit d’un Holocauste que beaucoup dans la région nient avoir jamais existé, ce qui ne les empêche pas de maintenir que les sionistes l’ont bien mérité.

Qu’est-ce qui, dans ​​le sionisme, suscite un tel dégoût ? Après tout, le désir d’un peuple dispersé d’avoir son propre Etat ne peut être si révulsif, surtout sachant que ce même peuple a enduré des siècles de massacres et d’expulsions, qui ont atteint leur paroxysme dans le plus grand assassinat de masse de l’histoire. Peut-être la révulsion envers le sionisme découle-t-elle de sa mixture inhabituelle d’identité nationale, de religion et de fidélité à une terre. Le Japon s’en rapproche le plus, mais malgré son passé rapace, le nationalisme japonais ne suscite pas la révulsion provoquée par le sionisme.

Il est clair que l’antisémitisme, dans ses versions européenne et musulmane, joue un rôle. Fauteurs de cabales, faucheurs d’argent, conquérants du monde et assassins de bébés – toutes ces diffamations autrefois jetées à la tête des Juifs le sont aujourd’hui à celle des sionistes. Et à l’image des capitalistes antisémites qui voyaient tous les Juifs comme des communistes et des communistes pour qui le capitalisme était intrinsèquement juif, les adversaires du sionisme le décrivent comme l’Autre abominable.

Mais tous ces détracteurs sont des fanatiques, et certains parmi eux sont des Juifs. Pour un nombre croissant de Juifs progressistes, le sionisme est un nationalisme militant, tandis que pour de nombreux Juifs ultra-orthodoxes, ce mouvement n’est pas suffisamment pieux – voire même hérétique. Comment un idéal si universellement vilipendé peut-il conserver sa légitimité, ou même prétendre être un succès ?

La réponse est simple : le sionisme a fonctionné. Les chances étaient infimes qu’un groupe dispersé à travers le monde puisse rassembler des membres de quelque 70 pays dans un territoire de la taille d’un ruban, dénué de ressources et riche en adversaires, survivre, et même prospérer. Les chances que ces immigrants se forgent une identité nationale, soient capables de produire une littérature palpitante, des arts de référence et six des plus grandes universités mondiales, étaient proches de zéro.

Ailleurs dans le monde, les langues autochtones sont en voie de disparition, les forêts sont décimées, et les populations des pays industrialisés vieillissent. Pourtant, le sionisme a fait revivre la langue hébraïque, qui est aujourd’hui plus largement parlée que le danois et le finnois et dépassera bientôt le suédois. Les organisations sionistes ont planté des centaines de forêts, faisant entrer la terre d’Israël dans le 21ème siècle avec plus d’arbres qu’à la fin du 19ème. Et les valeurs familiales que le sionisme défend produisent le taux d’accroissement naturel le plus rapide du monde moderne et la plus grande communauté juive de l’histoire. Le couple laïc moyen en Israël a au moins trois enfants, chacun étant une preuve vivante que le sionisme est confiant en l’avenir.

En effet, dans presque tous les critères internationaux, Israël n’est pas seulement victorieux, mais florissant. Sa population est chaque année classée parmi les plus heureuses, les plus saines et les plus éduquées du monde. L’espérance de vie en Israël, qui reflète son excellent système de santé universel, dépasse largement celle des Etats-Unis et de la plupart des pays européens. Le chômage est faible, l’économie robuste. Chef de file mondial en matière d’innovation, Israël est le foyer de centres R & D de 300 entreprises de haute technologie, y compris Apple, Intel et Motorola. Les plages sont prises d’assaut, la musique rock géniale et la nourriture exquise.

Les idéaux démocratiques inhérents à la pensée sioniste ont résisté aux pressions qui ont déclenché coups d’Etat et révolutions dans de nombreux autres pays. Aujourd’hui, Israël est l’un des rares Etats – avec la Grande-Bretagne, le Canada, la Nouvelle-Zélande et les Etats-Unis – n’ayant pas connu une seconde de gouvernance non démocratique.

Ces réalisations seraient suffisamment étonnantes si elles avaient eu lieu en Amérique du Nord ou en Europe du Nord. Mais le sionisme a prospéré dans l’environnement extrêmement inhospitalier –même meurtrier – du Moyen-Orient. A deux heures de route à l’est des boîtes de nuit animées de Tel Aviv – à une distance inférieure de celle entre New York et Philadelphie – se trouve la Jordanie, qui a accueilli plus d’un demi-million de réfugiés de la guerre civile syrienne. A quatre heures de route depuis le nord de Tel-Aviv, vous êtes à Damas, ravagé par la guerre, et vers l’est, dans le carnage de l’ouest de l’Irak. Vers le sud, dans la distance de San Francisco à Los Angeles, vous vous trouvez à la place Tahrir du Caire.

Dans une région envahie de conflits ethniques et de massacres religieux, le sionisme a engendré une société multiethnique, multiraciale et pluriconfessionnelle. Les Arabes servent dans les Forces de défense israéliennes, à la Knesset et à la Cour suprême. Alors que les communautés chrétiennes du Moyen-Orient sont régulièrement éradiquées, celles d’Israël continuent de croître. Les Arabes chrétiens sont, en fait, en moyenne plus instruits et plus riches que les Juifs israéliens.

Compte tenu de ces réalisations monumentales, on pourrait penser que le sionisme serait admiré plutôt que critiqué. Mais le sionisme accusés d’obstruer les aspirations nationales des habitants autochtones de la Palestine, de les opprimer et de les déposséder.

Peu importe que les Juifs peuplaient cette terre – ses noms de lieux arabes révèlent des origines hébraïques – des millénaires avant les Palestiniens ou la montée du nationalisme palestinien. Peu importe que, en 1937, 1947, 2000 et 2008, les Palestiniens aient reçu des propositions de diviser la terre et les ont rejetées, généralement avec violence. Et peu importe que la majorité des partisans du sionisme soient aujourd’hui encore prêts à partager leur patrimoine en contrepartie de la reconnaissance d’un Etat juif et de la paix.

La réponse à ce jour a été, au mieux, un refus de rester à la table de négociation ou, au pire, la guerre. Mais les Israéliens refusent de renoncer à l’espoir d’une reprise des négociations avec le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas. Vivre en paix et en sécurité avec nos voisins palestiniens reste le rêve sioniste.

Pourtant, malgré ses triomphes, sa capacité de résistance et son ouverture à la paix, le sionisme n’a pas réalisé certains de ses objectifs initiaux. La société égalitaire agraire créée par les pionniers sionistes a été remplacée par une économie dynamique, en grande partie capitaliste, creusant le fossé entre les riches et les pauvres. Partiellement laïc à ses débuts, le sionisme a également donné naissance à un secteur religieux en pleine expansion, dont certains éléments rejettent l’Etat juif.

Environ un cinquième de la population d’Israël est non-juive, et même si certaines communautés (comme les Druzes) sont intensément patriotiques et servent souvent dans l’armée, d’autres le sont beaucoup moins, et certaines appellent même à la dissolution d’Israël. Et il y a la question de la Judée-Samarie – généralement appelée la Cisjordanie – autrefois lieu de déclenchement de guerres de destruction nationale contre Israël, mais qui, depuis son annexion en 1967, divise le peuple.

Nombre de sionistes maintiennent que ces territoires représentent le berceau de la civilisation juive et doivent, de droit, être peuplés. Mais d’autres avertissent que ce contrôle de la population palestinienne de Cisjordanie érode le fondement moral d’Israël et finira par forcer à faire un choix entre être juif et rester démocratique.

Pourtant, la vision du sionisme qui ne s’est douloureusement pas réalisée est celle que les Juifs puissent être libérés de la peur d’être anéantis. L’armée imaginée par Théodore Herzl, fondateur du sionisme, devait parader dans les défilés et saluer la foule agitant des drapeaux. Les Forces de défense israéliennes, en revanche, n’ont pas le temps de défiler, encore moins de saluer, consacrées depuis leur fondation en 1948 à défendre leur pays sans relâche. A l’exception de Vladimir Jabotinsky, le père du Likoud, aucun des pionniers du sionisme n’avait prévu que les nouveaux Juifs devraient toujours être prêts à prendre les armes. Ils n’avaient pas envisagé que cet Etat serait constamment en butte à de multiples menaces existentielles, pour la simple raison qu’il est juif.

Face à de telles menaces monumentales, on devait voir les Israéliens fuir à l’étranger et les immigrants potentiels baisser les bras. Israël connaît un des taux d’émigration les plus faibles parmi les pays développés et les Juifs continuent à faire leur aliya, littéralement, en hébreu, « monter » à Israël. Les enquêtes montrent que les Israéliens restent obstinément optimistes quant à l’avenir de leur pays. Et les Juifs continuent d’affluer, en particulier d’Europe, où leur sécurité s’est rapidement détériorée. La semaine dernière, des milliers de Parisiens ont manifesté aux sons d’une diatribe antisémite, pillé des magasins juifs et tenté de saccager des synagogues.

Les Juifs américains ne connaissent pas de menace comparable, et pourtant nombre d’entre eux continuent à faire leur aliya. Ils ne viennent pas à la recherche d’un refuge, mais pour relever le défi sioniste, évoqué dans l’hymne national israélien, « être un peuple libre sur notre terre, la terre de Sion et de Jérusalem. »

Des centaines de jeunes Américains sont des « soldats seuls », sans aucune famille dans le pays, et se portent volontaires aux premières lignes des unités combattantes. L’un d’eux, Max Steinberg de Los Angeles, est tombé aux premiers jours des combats à Gaza. Ses funérailles, au Mont Herzl à Jérusalem, ont réuni 30 000 personnes, la plupart d’entre eux des étrangers, venus par respect pour ce sioniste intrépide et altruiste.

J’ai aussi rendu hommage à Max, dont l’épopée sioniste ressemble beaucoup à la mienne. Après avoir travaillé dans un kibboutz, j’ai fait mon aliya, et suivi une formation de parachutiste. J’ai participé à plusieurs guerres, et mes enfants ont servi dans les rangs de l’armée, et parfois combattu. Notre famille s’est abritée des Scuds irakiens et des M-75 du Hamas, et un terroriste suicide a assassiné l’un de nos proches parents.

Malgré ces épreuves, ma vie sioniste est extrêmement enrichissante. Et non grâce aux succès de cette idéologie – les prix Nobel remportés par des chercheurs israéliens, les remèdes israéliens aux maladies chroniques ou les percées dans les énergies alternatives. Mais, paradoxalement, grâce à ses échecs.

L’échec est le prix de la souveraineté. Gouverner signifie faire des choix difficiles et souvent angoissants – attaquer le Hamas dans les zones peuplées, par exemple, ou de subir des tirs de roquettes sur notre propre territoire. Il faut concilier entre notre désir d’être éclairé et celui de rester en vie. Souvent en payant le prix, la souveraineté implique d’assumer ses responsabilités. Le sionisme, pour moi, est une responsabilité juive. Il signifie endosser la responsabilité de notre infrastructure, de notre défense, de notre société et de l’âme de notre Etat​​. Il est facile de s’attribuer les victoires ; beaucoup plus difficile d’assumer les échecs.

Mais c’est précisément l’attrait du sionisme. En grandissant en Amérique, j’étais reconnaissant d’être né à une époque où les Juifs peuvent assumer des responsabilités souveraines. Gouverner est chaotique, mais ce chaos est une bénédiction refusée à mes ancêtres depuis 2 000 ans. Et je ressens toujours ce privilège aujourd’hui, même si Israël est face à une situation à la fois périlleuse, douloureuse et injuste. Même s’il lutte contre des terroristes qui tirent en se cachant derrière leurs propres enfants, même si nos enfants en uniformes sont tués et blessés, tandis que le monde les traite de criminels de guerre.

Le sionisme, néanmoins, vaincra. Tirant son énergie d’un peuple qui refuse de disparaître et sa philosophie d’idéaux qui ont fait leurs preuves historiquement, le projet sioniste prospérera. Nous serons honnis, nous nous retrouverons de plus en plus seuls, mais nous défendrons les maisons que ce sionisme nous a poussés à construire.

Par M. Oren – Wall Street Journal – Traduction JSSNews

M. Oren était l’ambassadeur d’Israël aux États-Unis de 2009 à 2013. Il est titulaire de la chaire de diplomatie internationale au IDC Herzliya en Israël et est membre du Conseil de l’Atlantique. Parmi ses livres, “Six Days of War: June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East”, et “Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East, 1776 to the Present.”

Voir enfin:

Les images manquantes de la guerre contre le Hamas

En coopérant à la censure médiatique du Hamas sur ses combattants, la presse internationale ne relate qu’une partie de l’histoire

Uriel Heilman

Times of Israel

1 août 2014

On ne manque pas d’images du conflit de Gaza.

Nous avons vu les décombres, les enfants palestiniens morts, les Israéliens courir aux abris pendant les attaques de roquettes, les manœuvres israéliennes et les images fournies par l’armée israélienne des militants du Hamas sortant de tunnels pour attaquer les soldats israéliens.

Nous n’avons pratiquement pas vu aucune image d’hommes armés du Hamas à Gaza.

Nous savons qu’ils sont là : il y a bien quelqu’un qui doit se charger de lancer les roquettes sur Israël (plus de 2 800) et de les tirer sur les troupes israéliennes dans Gaza. Pourtant, jusqu’à maintenant, les seules images que nous avons vues (ou dont nous avons même entendu parler) sont les vidéos fournies par l’armée israélienne de terroristes du Hamas utilisant les hôpitaux, les ambulances, les mosquées, les écoles (et les tunnels) pour lancer des attaques contre des cibles israéliennes ou transporter des armes autour de Gaza.

Pourquoi n’avons nous pas vu des photographies prises par des journalistes d’hommes du Hamas dans Gaza ?

Nous savons que le Hamas ne veut pas que le monde voit les hommes armés palestiniens en train de lancer de roquettes ou utilisant des lieux peuplés de civils comme des bases d’opération. Mais si l’on peut voir des images des deux côtés pratiquement dans toutes les guerres, en Syrie, en Ukraine, en Irak, pourquoi Gaza fait-elle figure d’exception ?

Si des journalistes sont menacés et intimidés lorsqu’ils essaient de documenter les activités du Hamas dans Gaza, leurs agences de presse devraient le dire publiquement. Elles ne le font pas.

Mardi, le New York Times a publié un article du photographe Sergeï Ponomarev sur ses journées à Gaza. Voici ce que Ponomarev écrit :

C’était une guerre de routine. On part tôt le matin pour voir des maisons détruites la veille. Ensuite on va aux funérailles, ensuite aux hôpitaux parce que plus de personnes blessées arrivent et dans la soirée on retourne voir plus de maisons détruites.

C’était la même chose chaque jour, en passant simplement de Rafah à Khan Younis.

Y-a-t-il des tentatives de documenter les activités du Hamas ?

Si, comme moi, vous vous demandez si le New York Times a envoyé un autre photographe pour couvrir cet aspect de l’histoire : le New York Times n’a pas publié de photos de combattants du Hamas à Gaza, point final. En regardant les trois dernières séries de reportages photographiques du journal sur le conflit, sur un total de 37 images, il n’y en a pas une seule sur un combattant du Hamas.

Dans la série de reportage photo du L.A Times, sur plus de 75 photographies du conflit, il n’y a pas non plus une seule image de combattants du Hamas, selon le Comité américain pour la Précision du reportage au Moyen Orient.

Pour de nombreux spectateurs, le récit de cette guerre doit apparaître très clair : le puissant Israël bombarde des Palestiniens sans défense. C’est compréhensible lorsque l’on ne voit presque aucune photographie des agresseurs palestiniens.

Dans un article du Washington Post de William Booth datant du 15 juillet, l’utilisation du Hamas de l’hôpital Al-Shifa dans la ville de Gaza comme une base opératoire est mentionnée, mais on consacre seulement une demi-phrase dans le huitième paragraphe de l’article.

Le ministre a été refoulé avant qu’il ne puisse atteindre l’hôpital qui est devenu de facto un quartier général pour les dirigeants du Hamas, comme on peut le voir dans les couloirs et les bureaux.

Comme l’a noté Tablet, c’est ce que l’on appelle noyer le poisson.

Dans la même logique, une agence de presse palestinienne a annoncé cette semaine que le Hamas a exécuté des dizaines de Palestiniens suspectés d’avoir collaboré avec Israël la semaine dernière. Le JTA a repris cette information, mais elle n’a pas été mentionnée par les grandes agences de presse.

Soit les journalistes et les rédacteurs de chef ne sont pas intéressés à raconter cette partie de l’histoire qui montre ce que le Hamas fait dans Gaza soit ils n’en sont pas capables. Arrêtons-nous sur cette dernière possibilité.

On a beaucoup parlé du côté des soutiens d’Israël d’une décision de Nick Casy du Wall Street Journal d’effacer un tweet au sujet du mode d’utilisation du Hamas de l’hôpital Shifa comme une base d’opérations. On peut supposer que Casy a effacé le tweet à cause des menaces du Hamas soit sur sa personne ou sur sa capacité à continuer à couvrir le conflit.

Un article du Times of Israel suggérait déjà cela plus tôt dans la
semaine :

Plusieurs journalistes occidentaux travaillant actuellement à Gaza ont été harcelés et menacés par le Hamas pour avoir documenté des cas de l’implication par le groupe terroriste de civils dans sa guerre contre Israël, ont déclaré des officiels israéliens en exprimant leur indignation que certains média internationaux se laissent apparemment intimider sans même évoquer ce type d’incidents.

Le Times of Israel a confirmé plusieurs incidents au cours desquels des journalistes ont été interrogés et menacés. Cela incluait des cas où des photographes qui avaient pris des photos de terroristes du Hamas dans des circonstances compromettantes, des hommes armés préparant des tirs de roquettes dans des structures civiles, et/ou des combattants en habits civils, et qui avaient été approchés par des hommes du Hamas, menacés physiquement et on leur avait pris leurs équipements. Un autre cas impliquant un journaliste français avait tout d’abord été annoncé par le journaliste impliqué, mais le récit avait ensuite été retiré d’Internet.

Après avoir quitté Gaza, la journaliste indépendante Gabriele Barbati, dans une série de tweets condamnant le Hamas pour un incident récent avec des victimes civiles, avait soutenu les déclarations que le Hamas menaçait des journalistes :

Sorti de #Gaza loin des représailles du #Hamas : tir de roquette manqué a tué des enfants hier à Shati. Témoin : des militants se sont précipités pour enlever les débris (29 juillet).

Pourquoi peut-on seulement lire des articles sur l’intimidation dans des médias juifs ou israéliens, ou sur des blogs, mais pas dans les grands médias occidentaux ?

Sur son blog Powerline, l’avocat Scott Johnson demande aux agences de presse de remédier à cela :

Les menaces du Hamas ne sont pas responsables de l’ignorance et de la stupidité de la couverture des hostilités à Gaza, mais elles sont en partie responsables. Les journalistes et les médias employeurs coopèrent avec le Hamas non seulement en passant sous silence des histoires qui ne servent pas la cause du Hamas, mais aussi en ne parlant pas des conditions restrictives dans lesquelles ils travaillent.

Ce n’est pas un détail. L’opinion publique est un élément crucial dans ce conflit. Elle va jouer un rôle pour déterminer quand les combats cesseront, à quoi ressemblera le cessez-le-feu et qui portera en priorité la responsabilité pour la mort d’innocents.

Si les grands médias suppriment les images des terroristes du Hamas utilisant des civils comme des boucliers et utilisant des écoles et des hôpitaux comme des bases d’opérations, alors les gens autour du monde auront naturellement du mal à voir les Israéliens comme autre chose que des agresseurs et les Palestiniens comme autre chose que des victimes.

Ils n’ont pourtant qu’une partie de l’histoire. Et d’où je viens, une demi-vérité est considérée comme un mensonge.


Israël: Le seul pays dont les voisins font de l’anéantissement un objectif national explicite (And the only nation on earth that inhabits the same land, bears the same name, speaks the same language, and worships the same God that it did 3,000 years ago – on a territory smaller than Vermont)

24 juillet, 2014
http://peripluscd.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/merneptah-stele_cairo.jpg?w=450
Mesha stele
Tel Dan stele

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/t1.0-9/p350x350/10502389_4458367994364_7788663956708256369_n.jpg

Israël est détruit, sa semence même n’est plus. Amenhotep III (Stèle de Mérenptah, 1209 or 1208 Av. JC)
Je me suis réjoui contre lui et contre sa maison. Israël a été ruiné à jamais. Mesha (roi de Moab, Stèle de Mesha, 850 av. J.-C.)
J’ai tué Jéhoram, fils d’Achab roi d’Israël et j’ai tué Ahziahu, fils de Jéoram roi de la Maison de David. Et j’ai changé leurs villes en ruine et leur terre en désert. Hazaël (stèle de Tel Dan, c. 835 av. JC)
Le roi de Moab, voyant qu’il avait le dessous dans le combat, prit avec lui sept cents hommes tirant l’épée pour se frayer un passage jusqu’au roi d’Édom; mais ils ne purent pas. Il prit alors son fils premier-né, qui devait régner à sa place, et il l’offrit en holocauste sur la muraille. Et une grande indignation s’empara d’Israël, qui s’éloigna du roi de Moab et retourna dans son pays. 2 Rois 3: 26-27
Je les planterai dans leur pays et ils ne seront plus arrachés du pays que je leur ai donné, dit L’Éternel, ton Dieu. Amos (9: 15)
Quel est ton pays, et de quel peuple es-tu? (…) Je suis Hébreu, et je crains l’Éternel, le Dieu des cieux, qui a fait la mer et la terre. Jonas 1-8-9
La petite nation est celle dont l’existence peut être à n’importe quel moment mise en question, qui peut disparaître, et qui le sait. Un Français, un Russe, un Anglais n’ont pas l’habitude de se poser des questions sur la survie de leur nation. Leurs hymnes ne parlent que de grandeur et d’éternité. Or, l’hymne polonais commence par le vers : La Pologne n’a pas encore péri. Milan Kundera
L’Etat d’Israël est né du même processus légitime qui a créé les autres nouveaux États de la région, la conséquence du démantèlement de l’Empire Ottoman après la Première guerre mondiale. En conformité avec la pratique traditionnelle des États victorieux, les puissances alliées de France et d’Angleterre ont créé le Liban, la Syrie, l’Irak et Jordan et bien sûr Israël, pour consolider et protéger leurs intérêts nationaux. Ce droit légitime de réécrire la carte peut avoir été mal fait et à courte vue – des régions contenant beaucoup de différentes sectes et groupes ethniques étaient de mauvais candidats pour devenir des Etats-nation, comme l’histoire de l’Irak et le Liban le montre, alors que des candidats de premier plan pour l’identité nationale, comme les Kurdes, ont été écartés. Mais le droit de le faire a été accordé par la victoire des alliés et la défaite des puissances centrales, le prix vieux comme le monde de que doivent payer ceux qui déclenchent une guerre et la perdent. De même, en Europe, l’Autriche-Hongrie a été démantelée, et les nouveaux États de l’Autriche, de la Hongrie, de la Yougoslavie et de la Tchécoslovaquie ont été créés. Et l’agresseur par excellence qu’est l’Allemagne se vit infliger une perte importante de territoire, laissant environ 10 millions d’Allemands bloqués à l’extérieur de la patrie. le droit d’Israël à son pays est aussi légitime que ceux de la Jordanie, de la Syrie et du Liban. Bruce Thornton
Israël est l’incarnation pure et simple de la continuité juive : c’est la seule nation au monde qui habite la même terre, porte le même nom, parle la même langue et vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans. En creusant le sol, on peut trouver des poteries du temps de David, des pièces de l’époque de Bar Kochba, et des parchemins vieux de 2000 ans, écrits de manière étonnamment semblable à celle qui, aujourd’hui, vante les crèmes glacées de la confiserie du coin. Charles Krauthammer

Mais qui aujourd’hui se souvient encore de Moab ?

Alors que sous la furie combinée des roquettes palestiniennes (gracieusement fournies, via l’Egypte et le Soudan et le financement du Qatar, par l’Iran qui brusquement semblent inquiéter l’Occident) et des critiques occidentales

En cette drôle de guerre où le plus fort doit s’excuser de trop bien protéger sa population pendant que le plus faible fait la une des médias pour l’avoir sacrifiée

Un peuple annoncé « détruit à jamais » à trois reprises par un pharaon, un roi moabite et un roi syrien au XIIIe puis au IXe siècles AVANT Jésus-Christ …

Voit à nouveau son droit à défendre son existence contesté …

Comment ne pas repenser à ce magnifique texte que le célèbre éditorialiste américain Charles Krauthammer avait écrit pour le cinquantenaire …

De la (re)création, à l’instar des autres Etats de la région suite au démembrement de l’Empire ottoman, de l’Etat d »un peuple annoncé, comme nous le rappelions ici même pour son « 60e anniversaire », « détruit à jamais » à trois reprises par un pharaon, un roi moabite et un roi syrien au XIIIe puis au IXe siècles AVANT Jésus-Christ …

Rappelant, à tous nos ignorants donneurs de leçons, que sur un territoire plus petit que l’infinitésimalissime état américain du Vermont (ou de la Lorraine ou la Sicile) …

« Le seul pays au monde dont les voisins font de l’anéantissement un objectif national explicite »  …

Est aussi « la seule nation au monde à habiter la même terre, porter le même nom, parler la même langue et vénérer le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans » !

Extraits:

Israël n’est pas uniquement une petite nation. Israël est la seule petite nation – la seule, point ! – dont les voisins déclarent publiquement que son existence même est un affront au droit, à la morale et à la religion, et qui font de son anéantissement un objectif national explicite. Et cet objectif n’est pas une simple déclaration d’intention. L’Iran, la Libye, et l’Iraq mènent une politique étrangère qui vise au meurtre des Israéliens et à la destruction de leur État. Ils choisissent leurs alliés (Hamas, Hezbollah) et développent leurs armements (bombes-suicide, gaz toxiques, anthrax, missiles nucléaires) conformément à cette politique. Des pays aussi éloignés que la Malaisie n’autorisent pas la présence d’un représentant d’Israël sur leur sol, allant jusqu’à interdire la projection du film « La Liste de Schindler », de peur qu’il n’engendre de la « sympathie pour Sion ».

D’autres sont plus circonspects dans leurs déclarations. La destruction n’est plus l’objectif unanime de la Ligue Arabe, comme cela a été le cas pendant les trente années qui ont précédé Camp David. La Syrie, par exemple, ne le dit plus de façon explicite. Cependant, la Syrie détruirait Israël demain, si elle en avait les moyens. (Sa retenue actuelle sur le sujet est largement due à son besoin de liens avec les Etats-Unis d’après la guerre froide). Même l’Égypte, première à avoir fait la paix avec Israël et prétendu modèle de « faiseur de paix », s’est dotée d’une grande armée équipée de matériel américain, qui effectue des exercices militaires très clairement conçus pour combattre Israël. Son exercice « géant », Badr 96, par exemple, le plus grand mené depuis la guerre de 1973, simulait des traversées du canal de Suez.

Et même l’OLP, obligée de reconnaître ostensiblement l’existence d’Israël dans les accords d’Oslo de 1993, est toujours régie par une charte nationale qui, dans au moins quatorze passages, appelle à l’éradication d’Israël. Le fait qu’après cinq ans [rappelons que Krauthammer écrit ceci en 1998] et quatre promesses spécifiques d’amender cette charte, elle reste intacte, est un signe qui montre à quel point le rêve de faire disparaître Israël reste profondément ancré dans l’inconscient collectif arabe.

Le monde islamique, berceau de la grande tradition juive séfarade et patrie d’un tiers de la population juive mondiale, est aujourd’hui pratiquement Judenrein. Aucun pays du monde islamique ne compte aujourd’hui plus de 20 000 Juifs. Après la Turquie, qui en compte 19 000, et l’Iran, où l’on en dénombre 14 000, le pays ayant la plus grande communauté juive dans le monde islamique est le Maroc, avec 6 100 Juifs – il y en a davantage à Omaha, dans le Nebraska. Ces communautés ne figurent pas dans les projections. Il n’y a d’ailleurs rien à projeter. Il n’est même pas besoin de les comptabiliser, il faut juste s’en souvenir. Leur expression même a disparu. Le yiddish et le ladino, langues respectives et distinctives des diasporas européennes et sépharades, ainsi que les communautés qui les ont inventées, ont quasiment disparu.

Israël est l’incarnation pure et simple de la continuité juive : c’est la seule nation au monde qui habite la même terre, porte le même nom, parle la même langue et vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans. En creusant le sol, on peut trouver des poteries du temps de David, des pièces de l’époque de Bar Kochba, et des parchemins vieux de 2000 ans, écrits de manière étonnamment semblable à celle qui, aujourd’hui, vante les crèmes glacées de la confiserie du coin.

Soit, appelez ces gens comme vous le voulez. Après tout, « Juif » est une dénomination plutôt récente de ce peuple. Ils furent d’abord des « Hébreux », puis des « Israélites ». « Juif » (qui vient du royaume de Juda, un des deux États qui ont succédé au royaume de David et de Salomon) est l’appellation post-exilique pour « Israélite ». C’est un nouveau venu dans l’histoire.

Comment qualifier un Israélien qui ne respecte pas les règles alimentaires, ne va pas à la synagogue, et considère le Shabbat comme le jour où l’on va faire un tour en voiture à la plage – ce qui, soit dit en passant, est une assez bonne description de la plupart des Premiers ministres d’Israël ? Cela n’a aucune importance. Installez un peuple juif dans un pays qui se fige le jour de Kippour, parle le langage de la Bible, vit au rythme (lunaire) du calendrier hébraïque, construit ses villes avec les pierres de ses ancêtres, produit une littérature et une poésie hébraïques, une éducation et un enseignement juifs qui n’ont pas d’égal dans le monde – et vous aurez la continuité. Les Israéliens pourraient s’appeler autrement. Peut-être un jour réserverons-nous le terme de « Juifs » à l’expérience d’exil d’il y a 2000 ans, et les appellerons-nous « Hébreux » [c'est le terme qu'utilise la langue italienne : "ebrei" - Note de Menahem Macina]. Ce terme a une belle connotation historique, c’est le nom que Joseph et Jonas ont donné en réponse a la question : « Qui êtes-vous ? »

Certains ne sont pas d’accord avec l’idée qu’Israël est porteur de la continuité du peuple juif, à cause de la multitude de désaccords et de fractures entre Israéliens : Orthodoxes contre Laïcs, Ashkénazes contre Sépharades, Russes contre Sabras, etc. Israël est aujourd’hui engagé dans d’amers débats à propos de la légitimité du judaïsme conservateur et réformiste, ainsi que de l’empiétement de l’orthodoxie sur la vie sociale et civique du pays.

Et alors, qu’y a-t-il là de nouveau ? Israël est tout simplement en train de revenir à la norme juive. Il existe des divisions tout aussi sérieuses au sein de la Diaspora, tout comme il en existait au sein du dernier État juif : « Avant la suprématie des Pharisiens et l’émergence d’une orthodoxie rabbinique, après la chute du second Temple», écrit l’universitaire Frank Cross, «le judaïsme était plus complexe et varié que nous le supposions ». Les Manuscrits de la Mer Morte, explique Hershel Shanks, «attestent de la variété – mal perçue jusqu’à ce jour – du judaïsme de la fin de la période du Second Temple, à tel point que les universitaires évoquent souvent, non pas le judaïsme, mais les judaïsmes. »

Le second État juif était caractérisé par des rixes entre sectaires juifs : Pharisiens, Sadducéens, Esséniens, apocalypticiens de tous bords, sectes aujourd’hui oubliées par l’histoire, sans parler des premiers chrétiens. Ceux qui s’inquiètent des tensions entre laïcs et religieux en Israël devraient méditer sur la lutte, qui dura plusieurs siècles, entre les Hellénistes et les Traditionalistes, durant la période du deuxième État juif. La révolte des Macchabées, entre 167 et 164 avant J.-C., célébrée aujourd’hui à Hanoukka, était, entre autres, une guerre civile entre Juifs.

Certes, il est peu probable qu’Israël produise une identité juive unique. Mais ce n’est pas nécessaire. Le monolithisme relatif du judaïsme rabbinique au Moyen-Âge est l’exception. Fracture et division sont les réalités du quotidien, à l’ère moderne, tout comme elles l’étaient dans le premier et le second États juifs. Ainsi, durant la période du premier Temple, le peuple d’Israël était divisé en deux États [le royaume de Juda, au sud, et celui d'Israël, au nord – note du réviseur de la version française], qui étaient en conflit quasi permanent. Les divisions actuelles au sein d’Israël ne supportent pas la comparaison.

La position centrale d’Israël est plus qu’une question de démographie. Elle représente une nouvelle stratégie, hardie et dangereuse pour la survie du peuple juif. Pendant deux millénaires, le peuple juif a survécu grâce à la dispersion et à l’isolement. Après le premier exil, en 586 avant J.-C., et le second, en 70, puis en 132, les Juifs se sont d’abord installés en Mésopotamie et autour du bassin Méditerranéen, puis en Europe de l’Est et du Nord, et, finalement, au Nouveau Monde, à l’Ouest, avec des communautés situées presque aux quatre coins du monde, jusqu’en Inde et en Chine.

Tout au long de cette période, le peuple juif a survécu à l’énorme pression de la persécution, des massacres et des conversions forcées, non seulement par sa foi et son courage, mais aussi grâce à sa dispersion géographique. Décimés ici, ils survivaient ailleurs. Les milliers de villes et de villages juifs répartis dans toute l’Europe, le monde islamique et le Nouveau Monde, constituaient une sorte d’assurance démographique. Même si de nombreux Juifs ont été massacrés lors de la première Croisade, le long du Rhin, même si de nombreux villages ont été détruits au cours des pogroms de 1648-1649, en Ukraine, il y en avait encore des milliers d’autres répartis sur toute la planète pour continuer. Cette dispersion a contribué à la faiblesse et la vulnérabilité des communautés juives prises séparément. Paradoxalement, pourtant, elle a constitué un facteur d’endurance et de force pour le peuple juif dans son ensemble. Aucun tyran ne pouvait réunir une force suffisante pour menacer la survie du peuple juif partout dans le monde.

Jusqu’à Hitler. Les nazis sont parvenus à détruire presque tout ce qu’il y avait de juif, des Pyrénées aux portes de Stalingrad, une civilisation entière, vieille de mille ans. Il y avait neuf millions de Juifs en Europe lorsque Hitler accéda au pouvoir. Il a exterminé les deux tiers d’entre eux. Cinquante ans plus tard, les Juifs ne s’en sont pas encore remis. Il y avait seize millions de Juifs dans le monde, en 1939. Aujourd’hui, ils sont treize millions.

Toutefois, les conséquences de l’Holocauste n’ont pas été que démographiques. Elles ont été psychologiques, bien sûr, et aussi idéologiques. La preuve avait été faite, une fois pour toutes, du danger catastrophique de l’impuissance. La solution était l’autodéfense, ce qui supposait une re-centration démographique dans un lieu doté de souveraineté, d’armement, et constituant un véritable État.

Avant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, il y avait un véritable débat, au sein du monde juif, à propos du sionisme. Les juifs réformistes, par exemple, avaient été antisionistes durant des décennies. L’Holocauste a permis de clore ce débat. A part certains extrêmes – la droite ultra-orthodoxe et l’extrême gauche – le sionisme est devenu la solution reconnue à l’impuissance et à la vulnérabilité juives. Au milieu des ruines, les Juifs ont pris la décision collective de dire que leur futur reposait sur l’autodéfense et la territorialité, le rassemblement des exilés en un endroit où ils pourraient enfin acquérir les moyens de se défendre eux-mêmes.

C’était la bonne décision, la seule décision possible. Mais ô combien périlleuse ! Quel curieux choix que celui de ce lieu pour l’ultime bataille : un point sur la carte, un petit morceau de quasi-désert, une fine bande d’habitat juif, à l’abri de barrières naturelles on ne peut plus fragiles (et auxquelles le monde exige qu’Israël renonce). Une attaque de tanks suffisamment déterminée peut la couper en deux. Un petit arsenal de Scuds à tête nucléaire peut la détruire intégralement.

Pour détruire le peuple juif, Hitler devait conquérir le monde. Tout ce qu’il faudrait aujourd’hui, c’est conquérir un territoire plus petit que le Vermont [aux Etats-Unis]. La terrible ironie est qu’en résolvant leur problème d’impuissance, les Juifs ont mis tous leurs oeufs dans le même panier, un petit panier au bord de la Méditerranée. Et, de son sort, dépend le sort de tous les Juifs.

Nous présumons que l’histoire juive est cyclique : exil babylonien en 586 av. J.-C., suivi par le retour, en 538 av. J.-C., exil romain en 135, suivi par le retour, légèrement différé en 1948. C’est oublier la part linéaire de l’histoire juive : il y a eu une autre destruction, un siècle et demi avant la chute du premier Temple. Elle restera irréparable. En 722 av. J.-C., les Assyriens firent la conquête de l’autre État juif, le plus grand, le royaume du nord d’Israël (la Judée, dont descendent les juifs modernes, constituait le royaume du Sud). Il s’agit de l’Israël des Dix Tribus, exilées et perdues pour toujours.

Leur mystère est si tenace que, lorsque les explorateurs Lewis et Clark partirent pour leur expédition [vers les vastes Plaines de l'Ouest américain], une des nombreuses questions préparées à leur intention par le Dr Benjamin Rush, à la demande du président Jefferson lui-même, fut la suivante : Quel lien existe-t-il entre leurs cérémonies [celles des Indiens] et celles des Juifs ? – « Jefferson et Lewis avaient longuement parlé de ces tribus », explique Stephen Ambrose. «Ils conjecturaient que les tribus perdues d’Israël pouvaient être quelque part dans les Plaines. »

Hélas, ce n’était pas le cas. Les Dix Tribus se sont dissoutes dans l’histoire. En cela, elles sont représentatives de la norme historique. Tout peuple conquis de cette façon et exilé disparaît avec le temps. Seuls les Juifs ont défié cette norme, à deux reprises.

Mais je crains que ce ne soit plus jamais le cas.

Charles Krauthammer

En fin de compte: Sion, Israël et le destin des Juifs

Charles  Krauthammer

The Weekly Standard

11 mai 1998

Traduction française de Nathalie Lerner, révisée par Menahem Macina.

1. Un petit État

Milan Kundera a défini un jour un petit État comme étant « un État dont l’existence même pourrait être remise en question à tout instant; un petit État peut disparaître, et il le sait » [1] Les États-Unis ne sont pas un ‘petit État’. Le Japon non plus. Ni même la France. Ces nations peuvent subir des défaites. Elles peuvent même être envahies. Mais elles ne peuvent pas disparaître. La Tchécoslovaquie de Kundera pouvait disparaître, et ce fut même le cas, en une occasion [2]. La Tchécoslovaquie d’avant-guerre est une petite nation paradigmatique: une démocratie libérale créée sur les cendres de la guerre par un monde déterminé à laisser les petites nations vivre librement; menacée par la convoitise et la taille importante d’un voisin en expansion; fatalement compromise par une lassitude grandissante de la part de l’Ouest à propos d’«une querelle dans un pays lointain – un pays dont nous ignorons tout»; laissée morcelée et sans défense, succombant finalement à la conquête. Quand Hitler est entré dans Prague, en mars 1939, il a déclaré : « La Tchécoslovaquie a cessé d’exister».

Israël est également une petite nation. Cela ne signifie pas que son destin soit de disparaître. Mais que ce pourrait l’être. Qui plus est, par sa vulnérabilité face à l’anéantissement, Israël n’est pas uniquement une petite nation. Israël est la seule petite nation – la seule, point ! – dont les voisins déclarent publiquement que son existence même est un affront au droit, à la morale et à la religion, et qui font de son anéantissement un objectif national explicite. Et cet objectif n’est pas une simple déclaration d’intention. L’Iran, la Libye, et l’Iraq mènent une politique étrangère qui vise au meurtre des Israéliens et à la destruction de leur État. Ils choisissent leurs alliés (Hamas, Hezbollah) et développent leurs armements (bombes-suicide, gaz toxiques, anthrax, missiles nucléaires) conformément à cette politique. Des pays aussi éloignés que la Malaisie n’autorisent pas la présence d’un représentant d’Israël sur leur sol, allant jusqu’à interdire la projection du film « La Liste de Schindler », de peur qu’il n’engendre de la « sympathie pour Sion ».

D’autres sont plus circonspects dans leurs déclarations. La destruction n’est plus l’objectif unanime de la Ligue arabe, comme cela a été le cas pendant les trente années qui ont précédé Camp David. La Syrie, par exemple, ne le dit plus de façon explicite. Cependant, la Syrie détruirait Israël demain, si elle en avait les moyens. (Sa retenue actuelle sur le sujet est largement due à son besoin de liens avec les Etats-Unis d’après la guerre froide). Même l’Égypte, première à avoir fait la paix avec Israël et prétendu modèle de « faiseur de paix », s’est dotée d’une grande armée équipée de matériel américain, qui effectue des exercices militaires très clairement conçus pour combattre Israël. Son exercice « géant », Badr 96, par exemple, le plus grand mené depuis la guerre de 1973, simulait des traversées du canal de Suez.

Et même l’OLP, obligée de reconnaître ostensiblement l’existence d’Israël dans les accords d’Oslo de 1993, est toujours régie par une charte nationale qui, dans au moins quatorze passages, appelle à l’éradication d’Israël. Le fait qu’après cinq ans [rappelons que Krauthammer écrit ceci en 1998] et quatre promesses spécifiques d’amender cette charte, elle reste intacte, est un signe qui montre à quel point le rêve de faire disparaître Israël reste profondément ancré dans l’inconscient collectif arabe [4].

« Comme l’a dit l’imam (Khomeiny), Israël doit être rayé de la carte… ».

« Les dirigeants de la nation musulmane qui reconnaîtront Israël brûleront dans les flammes de la colère de leur propre peuple ».

(Le Président iranien, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, lors d’un discours prononcé le 26 octobre 2005 devant un public de quatre mille étudiants radicaux, à l’occasion d’une conférence intitulée « Le monde sans le sionisme ».)

2. Les enjeux

La perspective de la disparition d’Israël pose problème à cette génération. Pendant 50 ans, Israël « a fait partie des meubles ». La plupart des gens ne se souviennent pas d’avoir vécu dans un monde où Israël n’existerait pas. Pourtant ce sentiment de « permanence » a plus d’une fois été mis à rude épreuve – pendant les premiers jours de la guerre du Kippour, lorsqu’il semblait qu’Israël allait être envahi, ou encore durant les quelques semaines de mai et début juin 1967, quand Nasser instaura un blocus du détroit de Tiran et fit déferler 100 000 soldats dans le Sinaï pour rejeter les Juifs à la mer.

Pourtant, la victoire étourdissante d’Israël, en 1967, sa supériorité en armes conventionnelles, son succès dans chaque guerre durant laquelle son existence était en jeu, ont engendré l’autosatisfaction. L’idée même de la non-permanence d’Israël paraissait ridicule. Israël, écrivait un intellectuel de la diaspora, « est fondamentalement indestructible. Yitzhak Rabin le savait. Les dirigeants arabes sur le Mont Herzl (lors de l’enterrement de Rabin) le savaient. Seuls les saints de la droite, voleurs de terres et dégainant à toute occasion, l’ignorent. Ils sont animés par l’espoir de la catastrophe, l’exaltation d’assister à la fin ».

L’exaltation n’était pas exactement la sensation éprouvée par les Israéliens lorsque, pendant la guerre du Golfe, ils durent s’enfermer dans des pièces hermétiquement isolées et porter des masques à gaz pour se protéger d’une destruction de masse – et ce pour une guerre dans laquelle Israël n’était même pas impliqué. Il y eut alors une vague de peur, de terreur, d’impuissance, ces sentiments juifs ancestraux que la mode post-sioniste d’aujourd’hui juge anachroniques, si ce n’est réactionnaires. Mais la volonté ne change pas la réalité. La guerre du Golfe a rappelé, même aux plus optimistes, qu’à l’époque des armes chimiques, des missiles, et des bombes nucléaires, époque dans laquelle aucun pays n’est à l’abri d’armes de destruction de masse, Israël, avec sa population compacte et son territoire réduit, est particulièrement exposé à l’anéantissement.Israël n’est pas au bord du gouffre. Il n’est pas au bord du précipice. Nous ne sommes ni en 1948, ni en 1967 ou 1973. Et il le sait.

Il peut sembler étrange de commencer une étude sur la signification d’Israël et de l’avenir des Juifs en envisageant sa fin. Mais cela contribue à concentrer l’esprit. Et cela permet de mettre les enjeux en évidence. Les enjeux ne pourraient pas être plus élevés. J’affirme que l’existence et la survie du peuple juif sont directement liées à l’existence et à la survie d’Israël. Ou encore, pour exprimer cette thèse sur un mode négatif, que la fin d’Israël signifierait la fin du peuple juif. Le peuple juif a survécu à la destruction et à l’exil des Babyloniens, en 586 avant l’ère chrétienne. Il a survécu à la destruction et à l’exil des Romains, en 70 de notre ère, et pour la dernière fois en 132. Mais il ne pourrait survivre à une autre destruction, ni à un autre exil. Ce troisième État – l’Israël moderne -, né il y a de cela [63] ans, est le dernier.

Le retour à Sion est maintenant le principal drame du peuple Juif. Ce qui a commencé comme une expérience constitue dorénavant le coeur même du peuple juif – son centre culturel, spirituel, et psychologique, et cet État est devenu également son centre démographique. Israël est la clé de voûte. C’est sur lui que reposent les espoirs – l’unique espoir même – de continuité et de survie des Juifs.

3. La Diaspora moribonde

En 1950, il y avait 5 millions de Juifs aux États-Unis. En 1990, leur nombre dépassait à peine les 5,5 millions. Durant ces décennies, la population globale des États-Unis a augmenté de 65%. Celle des Juifs stagne. En fait, durant le dernier demi-siècle, le pourcentage de Juifs au sein de la population américaine est passé de 3 à 2. Et aujourd’hui, se précise un déclin, non pas relatif mais absolu. Ce qui a maintenu la population juive et son niveau actuel a été tout d’abord le « Baby boom » d’après-guerre, puis l’arrivée de 400 000 Juifs, principalement de l’Union soviétique.

Mais le « baby boom » est terminé. Et l’immigration russe touche à sa fin. Le nombre de Juifs qui se trouvent aux États-Unis n’est pas illimité. Si nous laissons de côté ces anomalies historiques, la population juive américaine est moins importante aujourd’hui que ce qu’elle était en 1950. Elle sera certainement encore plus faible dans l’avenir. En fait, elle est aujourd’hui vouée à un déclin catastrophique. Steve Bayme, directeur du Jewish Communal Affairs, prévoit carrément que, d’ici 20 ans, la population juive aura baissé jusqu’à 4 millions, une perte d’environ 30%. Et qu’en sera-t-il dans 20 ans ? Une projection de quelques décennies de plus annonce un avenir encore plus effrayant.

Comment une communauté peut-elle se décimer dans des conditions aussi favorables que celles des États-Unis ? – La raison est simple : fertilité basse et phénomène endémique de mariages mixtes. Le taux de fertilité, chez les Juifs américains, est de 1,6 enfants par femme. Le taux de remplacement (c’est à dire le taux nécessaire pour que la population reste constante) est de 2,1. Le taux courant est donc inférieur de 20% à ce qui serait nécessaire pour une progression nulle. Ainsi le taux de fertilité, à lui seul, entraînerait une baisse de 20% à chaque génération. En trois générations, la population diminuerait de moitié.

 Le faible taux de natalité ne découle pas d’une aversion particulière des femmes juives à l’égard des enfants. C’est tout simplement un cas flagrant du phénomène bien connu du déclin du taux de naissance, proportionnel à l’augmentation du niveau d’éducation et du niveau socio-économique. Des femmes éduquées, à la carrière brillante, ont tendance à se marier tard et à avoir moins de bébés. Ajoutons maintenant un second facteur : les mariages mixtes. Aux États-Unis, aujourd’hui, les Juifs se marient plus avec des chrétiens qu’avec des Juifs. Le taux de mariages mixtes est de 52%. (un calcul plus conservateur donne 47%, mais l’effet démographique reste fondamentalement le même). En 1970 le taux était de 8%.

Plus important encore pour la continuité juive est l’identité finale des enfants nés de ces mariages. Or, seul un sur quatre est élevé dans la tradition juive. Ainsi, deux tiers des mariages juifs produisent des enfants dont les trois-quarts sont perdus pour le peuple juif. À lui seul, le taux de mariages mixtes causerait un déclin de 25% de la population juive à chaque génération [...] A ce rythme, la moitié des Juifs disparaîtraient en deux générations.

Combinez maintenant les effets de la fertilité et des mariages mixtes et faites la supposition, très optimiste, que chaque enfant élevé dans la tradition juive grandira en conservant son identité juive (c’est-à-dire avec un coefficient zéro de perte). Vous commencez avec 100 Juifs américains ; il vous en reste 60. En une génération, plus d’un tiers aura disparu. En deux générations seulement, 2 sur 3 se seront volatilisés.

On peut parvenir à la même conclusion par un autre raisonnement (en ne prenant pas du tout en compte les mariages mixtes). Un sondage du Los Angeles Times, effectué auprès des Juifs américains, en mars 1998, posait une question simple : élevez-vous vos enfants dans la tradition juive ? Seuls 70% ont répondu par l’affirmative. Une population dont le taux de remplacement biologique est de 80% et le taux de remplacement culturel de 70% est vouée à l’extinction. Selon ce calcul, 100 Juifs élèvent 56 enfants juifs. En deux générations, 7 Juifs sur 10 disparaîtront.

Les tendances démographiques dans le reste de la Diaspora ne sont pas plus encourageantes. En Europe de l’Ouest, la fertilité et les mariages mixtes sont le reflet de ceux des Etats-Unis. Prenons le cas de l’Angleterre. Durant la dernière génération, la communauté juive anglaise s’est comportée comme une sorte de cobaye expérimental : une communauté de la diaspora vivant dans une société ouverte, mais, contrairement à celle des États-Unis, sans être artificiellement alimentée par l’immigration. Que s’est-il passé ? Durant le dernier quart de siècle, le nombre de Juifs anglais a diminué de plus de 25%.

Durant la même période, la population juive de France n’a que légèrement diminué. Cependant la raison de cette stabilité relative est un facteur « unique » : l’afflux de la communauté juive d’Afrique du Nord. Cet apport est terminé. En France, aujourd’hui, seule une minorité de Juifs âgés de 20 et 44 ans, vivent dans une famille conventionnelle avec deux parents juifs. La France, elle aussi, suivra le chemin des autres pays.

« La dissolution de la communauté juive d’Europe », observe Bernard Wasserstein [5], « ne se situe pas dans un lointain futur hypothétique. Le processus est en train de se dérouler sous nos yeux et est déjà largement avancé ». D’après les tendances actuelles, « le nombre de Juifs en Europe en l’an 2000 ne dépasserait pas le million – le chiffre le plus bas depuis la fin du Moyen-Age ». En 1900, ils étaient 8 millions.

Ailleurs, la situation est encore plus décourageante. Le reste de ce qui fut un jour la Diaspora est maintenant soit un musée, soit un cimetière. L’Europe de l’Est a été vidée de ses Juifs. En 1939, la Pologne comptait 3,2 millions de Juifs. Il en reste aujourd’hui 35 000. La situation est à peu près identique dans les autres capitales d’Europe de l’Est.

Le monde islamique, berceau de la grande tradition juive séfarade et patrie d’un tiers de la population juive mondiale, est aujourd’hui pratiquement Judenrein. Aucun pays du monde islamique ne compte aujourd’hui plus de 20 000 Juifs. Après la Turquie, qui en compte 19 000, et l’Iran, où l’on en dénombre 14 000, le pays ayant la plus grande communauté juive dans le monde islamique est le Maroc, avec 6 100 Juifs – il y en a davantage à Omaha, dans le Nebraska. Ces communautés ne figurent pas dans les projections. Il n’y a d’ailleurs rien à projeter. Il n’est même pas besoin de les comptabiliser, il faut juste s’en souvenir. Leur expression même a disparu. Le yiddish et le ladino, langues respectives et distinctives des diasporas européennes et sépharades, ainsi que les communautés qui les ont inventées, ont quasiment disparu.

4. La dynamique de l’assimilation

N’est-il pas risqué de supposer que les tendances actuelles vont perdurer ? Non. Rien ne fera renaître les communautés juives d’Europe de l’est et du monde islamique. Et rien ne stoppera le déclin rapide, par le biais de l’assimilation, de la communauté juive de l’Ouest. Au contraire. En effectuant une projection plutôt classique des tendances actuelles – à supposer, comme je l’ai fait, que les taux restent fixes – il est risqué de supposer que l’assimilation ne va pas s’accélérer. Il n’y a rien, à l’horizon, qui soit susceptible d’inverser le processus d’assimilation des Juifs dans la culture occidentale. L’attirance des Juifs pour une culture plus vaste et le niveau d’acceptation des Juifs par cette culture sont sans précédent dans l’histoire.

Tout ceci est clair. Chaque génération devenant de plus en plus intégrée, les liens avec la tradition s’affaiblissent (comme on peut le mesurer par le taux de présence à la synagogue et le nombre d’enfants qui reçoivent une quelconque éducation juive). Cette dilution de l’identité, à son tour, entraîne une tendance plus forte aux mariages mixtes et à l’assimilation. Et d’ailleurs, pourquoi pas ? Qu’abandonnent-ils en définitive ? La boucle est bouclée et se renforce.

Examinons deux éléments culturels. Avant la naissance de la télévision – il y a de cela un demi-siècle -, la vie des Juifs en Amérique était représentée par les Goldberg : des Juifs aux bonnes manières, résolument ethniques, à l’accent marqué, socialement différents. 40 ans plus tard, les Goldberg ont engendré Seinfeld, le divertissement le plus populaire en Amérique aujourd’hui. Le personnage de Seinfeld n’a de juif que le nom. Il peut lui arriver d’évoquer son identité juive sans s’excuser et sans aucune gêne, mais – ce qui est plus important – sans que cela porte à conséquence. La chose n’a pas le moindre impact sur sa vie.

Une assimilation de cette nature n’est pas absolument sans précédent. D’une certaine manière, elle présente un parallèle avec le modèle d’Europe de l’Ouest, après l’émancipation des Juifs, à la fin du XVIIIe siècle et au début du XIXe. C’est la Révolution française qui constitue le tournant radical en conférant aux Juifs les droits civiques. Quand ils ont commencé à quitter le ghetto, ils ont tout d’abord rencontré une résistance à leur intégration et à leur ascension sociale. Ils étaient encore exclus des professions libérales, de l’éducation supérieure, et de la majeure partie des secteurs de la société. Mais, alors que ces barrières avaient lentement commencé à s’éroder et que les Juifs s’élevaient socialement, ils adoptèrent, de manière remarquable, la culture européenne, et, la plupart (ou beaucoup) adhérèrent au christianisme. Dans son Histoire du sionisme, Walter Laqueur cite l’opinion de Gabriel Riesser, un avocat, éloquent et courageux, de l’émancipation, au milieu du XIXe siècle, qui disait qu’un Juif qui préfère à l’Allemagne la nation et l’État inexistants d’Israël doit être placé sous la protection de la police, non parce qu’il est dangereux mais parce que, à l’évidence, il est fou.

Moïse Mendelssohn (1729-1786) était un précurseur. Cultivé, cosmopolite, bien que fermement Juif, il constituait la quintessence de l’émancipation précoce. Ainsi, son histoire est devenue emblématique de la progression historique rapide de l’émancipation vers l’assimilation : quatre de ses six enfants, ainsi que huit de ses neuf petits-enfants furent baptisés.

A cette époque, plus religieuse et plus chrétienne, l’assimilation prit la forme du baptême, ce que Henrich Heine qualifiait de « ticket d’entrée » dans la société européenne. En cette fin de XXe siècle [rappelons que l'auteur écrit cette article en 1998], nettement plus laïque, l’assimilation signifie simplement renoncer à un nom « pittoresque », aux rites, ainsi qu’à la totalité de l’accoutrement et des autres signes distinctifs du passé juif. Aujourd’hui, l’assimilation est entièrement passive. Ainsi, à part une visite au palais de justice pour transformer, disons, les « shmates [fripes] Ralph Lifshitz » en « polos Ralph Lauren » [6], l’assimilation est caractérisée par une absence d’action plutôt que par l’adoption volontaire d’une autre croyance. Contrairement aux enfants de Mendelssohn, Seinfeld n’a pas besoin d’être baptisé.

Bien sûr, nous savons, aujourd’hui, qu’en Europe, l’émancipation par l’assimilation s’est révélée être un leurre. La montée de l’antisémitisme, en particulier l’antisémitisme racial de la fin du XIXe siècle, qui a atteint son apogée dans le nazisme, a détourné les Juifs de la conviction que l’assimilation leur fournissait un moyen d’échapper au handicap et aux dangers d’être Juif. La saga de la famille de Madeleine Albright est emblématique. De ses quatre grand-parents juifs, parfaitement intégrés, parents d’enfants dont certains s’étaient convertis et avaient effacé leur passé de Juif, trois sont morts dans les camps de concentration nazis, parce que Juifs.

 Cependant, le contexte américain est différent. Il n’existe pas, dans l’histoire américaine, d’antisémitisme qui ressemble, même de loin, à celui qui existe dans l’histoire de l’Europe. La tradition américaine de tolérance remonte à 200 ans, à l’époque même de la fondation du pays. La lettre de Washington à la synagogue de Newport s’engage non pas à la tolérance – la tolérance témoigne de l’absence de persécution, accordée au pécheur comme une faveur, par le dominant – mais à l’égalité [7]. Cette situation n’a aucun équivalent dans l’histoire de l’Europe. Dans un tel pays, l’assimilation semble donc une solution raisonnable au problème de l’identité juive. Le fait d’unir son destin à celui d’une grande nation, humaine et généreuse, qui s’attache à promouvoir la dignité humaine et l’égalité, peut difficilement être considéré comme le pire des choix.Et pourtant, alors que l’assimilation peut être une solution pour les Juifs en tant qu’individus, elle constitue clairement un désastre pour les Juifs en tant que collectivité détentrice d’une mémoire, d’une langue, d’une tradition, d’une liturgie, d’une histoire, d’une foi, d’un patrimoine qui, en conséquence, disparaîtront. Quelle que soit la valeur qu’on attribue à l’assimilation, on ne peut en nier la réalité. Les tendances, tant démographiques que culturelles, sont puissantes. Et l’avenir de la diaspora, non seulement dans les anciennes contrées perdues de la Diaspora, non seulement dans son ancien centre européen, mais également dans son nouveau centre vital américain, sera fait de diminution, de déclin, puis de disparition. Cela ne se fera pas du jour au lendemain. Mais il y faudra moins de deux ou trois générations, un laps de temps à peine plus éloigné de notre quotidien que celui de la création de l’État d’Israël, il y a 50 ans.

5. Israël: l’exception

Israël est différent. En Israël la grande tentation du modernisme – l’assimilation – n’existe tout simplement pas. Israël est l’incarnation pure et simple de la continuité juive : c’est la seule nation au monde qui habite la même terre, porte le même nom, parle la même langue et vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans. En creusant le sol, on peut trouver des poteries du temps de David, des pièces de l’époque de Bar Kochba, et des parchemins vieux de 2000 ans, écrits de manière étonnamment semblable à celle qui, aujourd’hui, vante les crèmes glacées de la confiserie du coin.

Pourtant, comme la plus grande partie des Israéliens sont laïques, certains Juifs orthodoxes (ultra-religieux) contestent la prétention d’Israël de perpétuer une authentique histoire du peuple juif. Il en est de même pour certains Juifs laïques. Un critique français (le sociologue Georges Friedmann) a jadis qualifié les Israéliens de « goys parlant hébreu ». En fait, il y eut même une époque où il était à la mode, au sein d’un groupe d’intellectuels laïques israéliens, de se qualifier de « Cananéens » [8], c’est-à-dire des gens enracinés dans le pays, mais reniant totalement les traditions religieuses dont ils sont issus.

Malgré les apparences, ce ne sont pas des Arabes, mais des gardes juifs en 1905.
Ils étaient nombreux, alors, à s’identifier aux autochtones et à croire dur comme fer qu’ils partageraient le même destin. Leur sincère désir d’osmose ethnique était tel qu’ils s’habillaient à l’arabe, et souvent parlaient l’arabe.

Soit, appelez ces gens comme vous le voulez. Après tout, « Juif » est une dénomination plutôt récente de ce peuple. Ils furent d’abord des « Hébreux », puis des « Israélites ». « Juif » (qui vient du royaume de Juda, un des deux États qui ont succédé au royaume de David et de Salomon) est l’appellation post-exilique pour « Israélite ». C’est un nouveau venu dans l’histoire.

Comment qualifier un Israélien qui ne respecte pas les règles alimentaires, ne va pas à la synagogue, et considère le Shabbat comme le jour où l’on va faire un tour en voiture à la plage – ce qui, soit dit en passant, est une assez bonne description de la plupart des Premiers ministres d’Israël ? Cela n’a aucune importance. Installez un peuple juif dans un pays qui se fige le jour de Kippour, parle le langage de la Bible, vit au rythme (lunaire) du calendrier hébraïque, construit ses villes avec les pierres de ses ancêtres, produit une littérature et une poésie hébraïques, une éducation et un enseignement juifs qui n’ont pas d’égal dans le monde – et vous aurez la continuité. Les Israéliens pourraient s’appeler autrement. Peut-être un jour réserverons-nous le terme de « Juifs » à l’expérience d’exil d’il y a 2000 ans, et les appellerons-nous « Hébreux » [c'est le terme qu'utilise la langue italienne : "ebrei" - Note de Menahem Macina]. Ce terme a une belle connotation historique, c’est le nom que Joseph et Jonas ont donné en réponse a la question : « Qui êtes-vous ? » [Cf. Gn 40, 15 ; Jon 1, 9, ce terme figure environ une quarantaine de fois dans l'Ancien Testament – Note de M. Macina].

 Au sein du milieu culturel de l’Israël moderne, l’assimilation n’est pas vraiment le problème. Bien sûr, les Israéliens mangent au McDo et regardent les rediffusions du feuilleton ‘Dallas’. Tout comme le font les Russes, les Chinois, ou les Danois. Dire qu’il existe une forte influence occidentale (lisez : américaine) sur la culture israélienne ne signifie rien de plus que de dire qu’Israël subit la pression de la globalisation, comme n’importe quel autre pays. Mais cela ne change en rien sa particularité culturelle, prouvée par les grandes difficultés qu’éprouvent les immigrants à s’adapter à Israël.Dans le contexte israélien, l’assimilation signifie le rattachement des Juifs russes et roumains, ouzbeks et irakiens, algériens et argentins, à une culture distinctement hébraïque. C’est donc exactement l’opposé de ce que cela signifie dans la Diaspora : cela signifie l’abandon des langues, coutumes et traditions étrangères. Cela signifie l’abandon de Noël et de Pâques pour les remplacer par Hanouka et Pessah. Cela signifie l’abandon de la mémoire ancestrale des steppes et des pampas du monde pour les collines de Galilée et la pierre de Jérusalem, et la désolation de la Mer Morte. Voilà ce que ces nouveaux Israéliens apprennent. C’est ce qui sera transmis à leurs enfants. C’est pour cela que leur survie en tant que Juifs est assurée. Quelqu’un mettrait-il en doute le fait que le million de Russes qui ont immigré en Israël auraient été perdus pour le peuple juif s’ils étaient restés en Russie, et que, maintenant, ils ne sont plus perdus ?

Certains ne sont pas d’accord avec l’idée qu’Israël est porteur de la continuité du peuple juif, à cause de la multitude de désaccords et de fractures entre Israéliens : Orthodoxes contre Laïcs, Ashkénazes contre Sépharades, Russes contre Sabras, etc. Israël est aujourd’hui engagé dans d’amers débats à propos de la légitimité du judaïsme conservateur et réformiste, ainsi que de l’empiétement de l’orthodoxie sur la vie sociale et civique du pays.

Et alors, qu’y a-t-il là de nouveau ? Israël est tout simplement en train de revenir à la norme juive. Il existe des divisions tout aussi sérieuses au sein de la Diaspora, tout comme il en existait au sein du dernier État juif : « Avant la suprématie des Pharisiens et l’émergence d’une orthodoxie rabbinique, après la chute du second Temple», écrit l’universitaire Frank Cross, «le judaïsme était plus complexe et varié que nous le supposions ». Les Manuscrits de la Mer Morte, explique Hershel Shanks, «attestent de la variété – mal perçue jusqu’à ce jour – du judaïsme de la fin de la période du Second Temple, à tel point que les universitaires évoquent souvent, non pas le judaïsme, mais les judaïsmes. »

Le second État juif était caractérisé par des rixes entre sectaires juifs : Pharisiens, Sadducéens, Esséniens, apocalypticiens de tous bords, sectes aujourd’hui oubliées par l’histoire, sans parler des premiers chrétiens. Ceux qui s’inquiètent des tensions entre laïcs et religieux en Israël devraient méditer sur la lutte, qui dura plusieurs siècles, entre les Hellénistes et les Traditionalistes, durant la période du deuxième État juif. La révolte des Macchabées, entre 167 et 164 avant J.-C., célébrée aujourd’hui à Hanoukka, était, entre autres, une guerre civile entre Juifs.

Certes, il est peu probable qu’Israël produise une identité juive unique. Mais ce n’est pas nécessaire. Le monolithisme relatif du judaïsme rabbinique au Moyen-Âge est l’exception. Fracture et division sont les réalités du quotidien, à l’ère moderne, tout comme elles l’étaient dans le premier et le second États juifs. Ainsi, durant la période du premier Temple, le peuple d’Israël était divisé en deux États [le royaume de Juda, au sud, et celui d'Israël, au nord – note du réviseur de la version française], qui étaient en conflit quasi permanent. Les divisions actuelles au sein d’Israël ne supportent pas la comparaison.

Quelles que soient l’identité, ou les identités finalement adoptées par les Israéliens, le fait est que, pour eux, le problème majeur de la communauté juive de la Diaspora – le suicide par assimilation – n’existe tout simplement pas. Béni par la sécurité de son identité, Israël se développe. Et le résultat en est qu’Israël n’est plus seulement le centre culturel du monde juif, il en devient rapidement aussi le centre démographique. Le taux de natalité relativement élevé entraîne une augmentation naturelle de la population. Ajoutez à cela un taux net stable d’immigration (près d’un million depuis la fin des années 80), et les chiffres, en Israël, progressent inexorablement, même si la diaspora diminue. D’ici une décennie, Israël dépassera les Etats-Unis en tant que communauté juive la plus importante du monde. D’ici la fin de notre vie, la majorité des Juifs du monde vivront en Israël. Cela ne s’était pas produit depuis bien avant l’ère chrétienne.

Il y a de cela un siècle, l’Europe était le centre de la vie juive. Plus de 80% de la population juive du monde y vivait. La Deuxième Guerre mondiale a détruit la communauté juive européenne et dispersé les survivants vers le Nouveau Monde (principalement les États-Unis), et vers Israël. Aujourd’hui, nous avons un univers juif bipolaire, avec deux centres de gravité de taille approximativement égale. C’est une étape transitoire, pourtant. Une étoile est en train de s’affaiblir, et l’autre de s’allumer.

Bientôt et inévitablement, la face du peuple juif aura été à nouveau transformée, pour devenir un système mono-planétaire avec une Diaspora faiblissante en orbite. Ce sera un retour à l’ancienne norme : le peuple juif sera concentré – non seulement spirituellement, mais aussi physiquement – dans sa patrie historique.

6. La Fin de la Dispersion

Les conséquences de cette transformation sont énormes. La position centrale d’Israël est plus qu’une question de démographie. Elle représente une nouvelle stratégie, hardie et dangereuse pour la survie du peuple juif. Pendant deux millénaires, le peuple juif a survécu grâce à la dispersion et à l’isolement. Après le premier exil, en 586 avant J.-C., et le second, en 70, puis en 132, les Juifs se sont d’abord installés en Mésopotamie et autour du bassin Méditerranéen, puis en Europe de l’Est et du Nord, et, finalement, au Nouveau Monde, à l’Ouest, avec des communautés situées presque aux quatre coins du monde, jusqu’en Inde et en Chine.

Tout au long de cette période, le peuple juif a survécu à l’énorme pression de la persécution, des massacres et des conversions forcées, non seulement par sa foi et son courage, mais aussi grâce à sa dispersion géographique. Décimés ici, ils survivaient ailleurs. Les milliers de villes et de villages juifs répartis dans toute l’Europe, le monde islamique et le Nouveau Monde, constituaient une sorte d’assurance démographique. Même si de nombreux Juifs ont été massacrés lors de la première Croisade, le long du Rhin, même si de nombreux villages ont été détruits au cours des pogroms de 1648-1649, en Ukraine, il y en avait encore des milliers d’autres répartis sur toute la planète pour continuer. Cette dispersion a contribué à la faiblesse et la vulnérabilité des communautés juives prises séparément. Paradoxalement, pourtant, elle a constitué un facteur d’endurance et de force pour le peuple juif dans son ensemble. Aucun tyran ne pouvait réunir une force suffisante pour menacer la survie du peuple juif partout dans le monde.

Jusqu’à Hitler. Les nazis sont parvenus à détruire presque tout ce qu’il y avait de juif, des Pyrénées aux portes de Stalingrad, une civilisation entière, vieille de mille ans. Il y avait neuf millions de Juifs en Europe lorsque Hitler accéda au pouvoir. Il a exterminé les deux tiers d’entre eux. Cinquante ans plus tard, les Juifs ne s’en sont pas encore remis. Il y avait seize millions de Juifs dans le monde, en 1939. Aujourd’hui, ils sont treize millions [Attention : chiffres de la fin des années 1990].

Toutefois, les conséquences de l’Holocauste n’ont pas été que démographiques. Elles ont été psychologiques, bien sûr, et aussi idéologiques. La preuve avait été faite, une fois pour toutes, du danger catastrophique de l’impuissance. La solution était l’autodéfense, ce qui supposait une re-centration démographique dans un lieu doté de souveraineté, d’armement, et constituant un véritable État.

Avant la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, il y avait un véritable débat, au sein du monde juif, à propos du sionisme. Les juifs réformistes, par exemple, avaient été antisionistes durant des décennies. L’Holocauste a permis de clore ce débat. A part certains extrêmes – la droite ultra-orthodoxe et l’extrême gauche – le sionisme est devenu la solution reconnue à l’impuissance et à la vulnérabilité juives. Au milieu des ruines, les Juifs ont pris la décision collective de dire que leur futur reposait sur l’autodéfense et la territorialité, le rassemblement des exilés en un endroit où ils pourraient enfin acquérir les moyens de se défendre eux-mêmes.

C’était la bonne décision, la seule décision possible. Mais ô combien périlleuse ! Quel curieux choix que celui de ce lieu pour l’ultime bataille : un point sur la carte, un petit morceau de quasi-désert, une fine bande d’habitat juif, à l’abri de barrières naturelles on ne peut plus fragiles (et auxquelles le monde exige qu’Israël renonce). Une attaque de tanks suffisamment déterminée peut la couper en deux. Un petit arsenal de Scuds à tête nucléaire peut la détruire intégralement.

Pour détruire le peuple juif, Hitler devait conquérir le monde. Tout ce qu’il faudrait aujourd’hui, c’est conquérir un territoire plus petit que le Vermont [aux Etats-Unis]. La terrible ironie est qu’en résolvant leur problème d’impuissance, les Juifs ont mis tous leurs oeufs dans le même panier, un petit panier au bord de la Méditerranée. Et, de son sort, dépend le sort de tous les Juifs.

7. Envisager l’impensable

Et si le troisième État Juif trouvait la mort, tout comme les deux premiers ? Ce scénario n’est pas si aberrant : un État Palestinien est né, s’arme, conclut des alliances avec, supposons, l’Iraq et la Syrie. La guerre éclate entre la Palestine et Israël (au sujet des frontières, ou de l’eau, ou du terrorisme). La Syrie et l’Iraq attaquent de l’extérieur. L’Égypte et l’Arabie Saoudite entrent dans la bataille. Le front subit des attaques de guérilla de la part de la Palestine. Les armes chimiques et biologiques pleuvent de Syrie, d’Iraq et d’Iran. Israël est envahi.
Pourquoi serait-ce la fin ? Le peuple juif ne peut-il pas survivre, ainsi qu’il l’a fait lorsque sa patrie a été détruite et son indépendance politique anéantie, comme ce fut le cas, à deux reprises, auparavant ? Pourquoi pas un nouvel exil, une nouvelle Diaspora, un nouveau cycle de l’histoire juive ?

Tout d’abord parce que les conditions culturelles de l’exil seraient largement différentes. Les premiers exils se sont produits à une époque où l’identité était quasiment synonyme de religion. Une expulsion, deux millénaires plus tard, dans un monde devenu laïc, n’est en rien comparable. Mais il y a plus important encore : pourquoi garder une telle identité ? Outre la dislocation, viendrait l’abattement pur et simple. Un tel événement anéantirait l’esprit. Aucun peuple ne pourrait y survivre. Pas même les Juifs. Il s’agit d’un peuple qui a miraculeusement survécu à deux précédentes destructions et à deux millénaires de persécution, dans l’espoir d’un retour définitif et d’une restauration. Israël EST cet espoir. Le voir détruit, avoir, une fois encore, des Isaïe et des Jérémie qui pleurent sur les veuves de Sion, au milieu des ruines de Jérusalem, excéderait ce qu’un peuple peut supporter.

Surtout après l’Holocauste, la pire calamité de l’histoire juive. Y avoir survécu est déjà suffisamment miraculeux en soi. Survivre ensuite à la destruction de ce qui est né pour le sauver – celle du nouvel État juif – reviendrait à attribuer à la nation juive et à la survie des Juifs un pouvoir surnaturel. Certes, des Juifs et des communautés dispersées survivraient. Les plus dévots, qui étaient déjà une minorité, perpétueraient – telle une tribu exotique – un anachronisme pittoresque, de style Amish, vestige, dispersé et à plaindre, d’un vestige. Mais les Juifs, en tant que peuple, auraient disparu de l’histoire.

Nous présumons que l’histoire juive est cyclique : exil babylonien en 586 av. J.-C., suivi par le retour, en 538 av. J.-C., exil romain en 135, suivi par le retour, légèrement différé en 1948. C’est oublier la part linéaire de l’histoire juive : il y a eu une autre destruction, un siècle et demi avant la chute du premier Temple. Elle restera irréparable. En 722 av. J.-C., les Assyriens firent la conquête de l’autre État juif, le plus grand, le royaume du nord d’Israël (la Judée, dont descendent les juifs modernes, constituait le royaume du Sud). Il s’agit de l’Israël des Dix Tribus, exilées et perdues pour toujours.

Leur mystère est si tenace que, lorsque les explorateurs Lewis et Clark partirent pour leur expédition [vers les vastes Plaines de l'Ouest américain], une des nombreuses questions préparées à leur intention par le Dr Benjamin Rush, à la demande du président Jefferson lui-même, fut la suivante : Quel lien existe-t-il entre leurs cérémonies [celles des Indiens] et celles des Juifs ? – « Jefferson et Lewis avaient longuement parlé de ces tribus », explique Stephen Ambrose. «Ils conjecturaient que les tribus perdues d’Israël pouvaient être quelque part dans les Plaines. »

Hélas, ce n’était pas le cas. Les Dix Tribus se sont dissoutes dans l’histoire. En cela, elles sont représentatives de la norme historique. Tout peuple conquis de cette façon et exilé disparaît avec le temps. Seuls les Juifs ont défié cette norme, à deux reprises.

Mais je crains que ce ne soit plus jamais le cas.

—————————–

Notes de Menahem Macina

[1] Phrase souvent citée hors contexte et sans référence. « La petite nation est celle dont l’existence peut être à n’importe quel moment mise en question, qui peut disparaître, et qui le sait. Un Français, un Russe, un Anglais n’ont pas l’habitude de se poser des questions sur la survie de leur nation. Leurs hymnes ne parlent que de grandeur et d’éternité. Or, l’hymne polonais commence par le vers : La Pologne n’a pas encore péri ». (Milan Kundera, « L’Occident kidnappé – ou la tragédie de l’Europe centrale », dans Le Débat 27, 1983, pp. 3-22).

[2] Le 15 mars 1939, les troupes allemandes envahissaient la Tchécolovaquie. L’occupation de ce pays était la conséquence directe des accords de Munich, signés le 30 septembre 1938, par Hitler, Chamberlain et Daladier. Par ces accords, un tiers du territoire du pays était cédé à l’Allemagne nazie. Voir l’Encyclopédie multimédia de la Shoah, Adolf Hitler passe ses troupes en revue dans le château de Prague le jour de l’occupation de la ville. Prague, Tchécoslovaquie, 15 mars 1939. Czechoslovak News Agency.

[3] D’après le propos de Neuville Chamberlain, en 1938. Sources : National Broadcast, London, September 27, 1938 ; Chamberlain, In Search of Peace, p. 174 (1939).

[4] Nous venons d’en avoir la preuve [remarque rédigée en 2006]. Si pessimiste qu’il soit, Krauthammer n’avait certainement pas imaginé, même dans ses pires cauchemars, qu’un président iranien irait jusqu’à proclamer publiquement, à la face des nations, son intention d’effacer Israël de la carte du monde, et qu’il en aurait les moyens, puisqu’il est en train de se doter de l’arme nucléaire. On peut lire cet appel au génocide dans la « Version française intégrale du discours antisioniste du Président iranien ».

[5] Une Diaspora en voie de disparition : Les Juifs en Europe depuis 1945, Calmann-Lévy, 2000.

[6] Voir le site NNDB, où Ralph Lipshitz explique, avec franchise, pourquoi il a changé son nom en Ralph Lauren, devenu depuis un célèbre créateur de vêtements de mode.

[7] Voir : « The letter from George Washington in response to Moses Seixas ».

[8] C’est le poète israélien, Yonatan Ratosh (1908-1981) qui fonda le groupe des « Cananéens », qui visait à un rapprochement judéo-arabe en Palestine. Selon Stephen Plaut, « il y a toujours eu une forte tendance « cananéenne » dans la société israélienne, particulièrement au sein de son élite intellectuelle, qui insistait sur le fait que les Israéliens représentaient une nouvelle nationalité « post-juive », et constituait ainsi essentiellement un groupe ethnique totalement non juif. (les « Cananéens » étaient un mouvement d’Israéliens, qui, dans les années 50 et par la suite, ont tenté de détacher l’israélité de la judéité et de créer une nouvelle « nationalité » non confessionnelle d' »Israéliens » de langue hébraïque, qui pourrait inclure également les Arabes.) En tant que tels, ces nouveaux « Israéliens » cananéisés » croyaient avoir peu de choses en commun avec les Juifs et encore moins avec l’histoire de la Diaspora. Maints Juifs israéliens « cananéisés » insistaient sur le fait qu’ils avaient bien plus de choses en commun avec les Druzes et les bédouins du pays, qu’avec tous les Juifs orthodoxes de Brooklyn. » (Voir son article « L’antisémitisme juif ».)

At Last, Zion
Charles Krauthammer
The Weekly Standard
May 11, 1998

I. A SMALL NATION

Milan Kundera once defined a small nation as « one whose very existence may be put in question at any moment; a small nation can disappear, and it knows it. »

The United States is not a small nation. Neither is Japan. Or France. These nations may suffer defeats. They may even be occupied. But they cannot disappear. Kundera’s Czechoslovakia could — and once did. Prewar Czechoslovakia is the paradigmatic small nation: a liberal democracy created in the ashes of war by a world determined to let little nations live free; threatened by the covetousness and sheer mass of a rising neighbor; compromised fatally by a West grown weary « of a quarrel in a far-away country between people of whom we know nothing »; left truncated and defenseless, succumbing finally to conquest. When Hitler entered Prague in March 1939, he declared, « Czechoslovakia has ceased to exist. »

Israel too is a small country. This is not to say that extinction is its fate. Only that it can be.

Moreover, in its vulnerability to extinction, Israel is not just any small country. It is the only small country — the only period, period — whose neighbors publicly declare its very existence an affront to law, morality, and religion and make its extinction an explicit, paramount national goal. Nor is the goal merely declarative. Iran, Libya, and Iraq conduct foreign policies designed for the killing of Israelis and the destruction of their state. They choose their allies (Hamas, Hezbollah) and develop their weapons (suicide bombs, poison gas, anthrax, nuclear missiles) accordingly. Countries as far away as Malaysia will not allow a representative of Israel on their soil nor even permit the showing of Schindler’s List lest it engender sympathy for Zion.

Others are more circumspect in their declarations. No longer is the destruction of Israel the unanimous goal of the Arab League, as it was for the thirty years before Camp David. Syria, for example, no longer explicitly enunciates it. Yet Syria would destroy Israel tomorrow if it had the power. (Its current reticence on the subject is largely due to its post-Cold War need for the American connection.)

Even Egypt, first to make peace with Israel and the presumed model for peacemaking, has built a vast U.S.-equipped army that conducts military exercises obviously designed for fighting Israel. Its huge « Badr ’96 » exercises, for example, Egypt’s largest since the 1973 war, featured simulated crossings of the Suez Canal.

And even the PLO, which was forced into ostensible recognition of Israel in the Oslo Agreements of 1993, is still ruled by a national charter that calls in at least fourteen places for Israel’s eradication. The fact that after five years and four specific promises to amend the charter it remains unamended is a sign of how deeply engraved the dream of eradicating Israel remains in the Arab consciousness.

II. THE STAKES

The contemplation of Israel’s disappearance is very difficult for this generation. For fifty years, Israel has been a fixture. Most people cannot remember living in a world without Israel.

Nonetheless, this feeling of permanence has more than once been rudely interrupted — during the first few days of the Yom Kippur War when it seemed as if Israel might be overrun, or those few weeks in May and early June 1967 when Nasser blockaded the Straits of Tiran and marched 100,000 troops into Sinai to drive the Jews into the sea.

Yet Israel’s stunning victory in 1967, its superiority in conventional weaponry, its success in every war in which its existence was at stake, has bred complacency. Some ridicule the very idea of Israel’s impermanence. Israel, wrote one Diaspora intellectual, « is fundamentally indestructible. Yitzhak Rabin knew this. The Arab leaders on Mount Herzl [at Rabin's funeral] knew this. Only the land-grabbing, trigger-happy saints of the right do not know this. They are animated by the imagination of catastrophe, by the thrill of attending the end. »

Thrill was not exactly the feeling Israelis had when during the Gulf War they entered sealed rooms and donned gas masks to protect themselves from mass death — in a war in which Israel was not even engaged. The feeling was fear, dread, helplessness — old existential Jewish feelings that post- Zionist fashion today deems anachronistic, if not reactionary. But wish does not overthrow reality. The Gulf War reminded even the most wishful that in an age of nerve gas, missiles, and nukes, an age in which no country is completely safe from weapons of mass destruction, Israel with its compact population and tiny area is particularly vulnerable to extinction.

Israel is not on the edge. It is not on the brink. This is not ’48 or ’67 or ’73. But Israel is a small country. It can disappear. And it knows it.

It may seem odd to begin an examination of the meaning of Israel and the future of the Jews by contemplating the end. But it does concentrate the mind. And it underscores the stakes. The stakes could not be higher. It is my contention that on Israel — on its existence and survival — hangs the very existence and survival of the Jewish people. Or, to put the thesis in the negative, that the end of Israel means the end of the Jewish people. They survived destruction and exile at the hands of Babylon in 586 B.C. They survived destruction and exile at the hands of Rome in 70 A.D., and finally in 132 A.D. They cannot survive another destruction and exile. The Third Commonwealth — modern Israel, born just 50 years ago — is the last.

The return to Zion is now the principal drama of Jewish history. What began as an experiment has become the very heart of the Jewish people — its cultural, spiritual, and psychological center, soon to become its demographic center as well. Israel is the hinge. Upon it rest the hopes — the only hope – – for Jewish continuity and survival.

III. THE DYING DIASPORA

In 1950, there were 5 million Jews in the United States. In 1990, the number was a slightly higher 5.5 million. In the intervening decades, overall U.S. population rose 65 percent. The Jews essentially tread water. In fact, in the last half-century Jews have shrunk from 3 percent to 2 percent of the American population. And now they are headed for not just relative but absolute decline. What sustained the Jewish population at its current level was, first, the postwar baby boom, then the influx of 400,000 Jews, mostly from the Soviet Union.

Well, the baby boom is over. And Russian immigration is drying up. There are only so many Jews where they came from. Take away these historical anomalies, and the American Jewish population would be smaller today than today. In fact, it is now headed for catastrophic decline. Steven Bayme, director of Jewish Communal Affairs at the American Jewish Committee, flatly predicts that in twenty years the Jewish population will be down to four million, a loss of nearly 30 percent. In twenty years! Projecting just a few decades further yields an even more chilling future.

How does a community decimate itself in the benign conditions of the United States? Easy: low fertility and endemic intermarriage.

The fertility rate among American Jews is 1.6 children per woman. The replacement rate (the rate required for the population to remain constant) is 2.1. The current rate is thus 20 percent below what is needed for zero growth. Thus fertility rates alone would cause a 20 percent decline in every generation. In three generations, the population would be cut in half.

The low birth rate does not stem from some peculiar aversion of Jewish women to children. It is merely a striking case of the well-known and universal phenomenon of birth rates declining with rising education and socio- economic class. Educated, successful working women tend to marry late and have fewer babies.

Add now a second factor, intermarriage. In the United States today more Jews marry Christians than marry Jews. The intermarriage rate is 52 percent. (A more conservative calculation yields 47 percent; the demographic effect is basically the same.) In 1970, the rate was 8 percent.

Most important for Jewish continuity, however, is the ultimate identity of the children born to these marriages. Only about one in four is raised Jewish. Thus two-thirds of Jewish marriages are producing children three-quarters of whom are lost to the Jewish people. Intermarriage rates alone would cause a 25 percent decline in population in every generation. (Math available upon request.) In two generations, half the Jews would disappear.

Now combine the effects of fertility and intermarriage and make the overly optimistic assumption that every child raised Jewish will grow up to retain his Jewish identity (i.e., a zero dropout rate). You can start with 100 American Jews; you end up with 60. In one generation, more than a third have disappeared. In just two generations, two out of every three will vanish.

One can reach this same conclusion by a different route (bypassing the intermarriage rates entirely). A Los Angeles Times poll of American Jews conducted in March 1998 asked a simple question: Are you raising your children as Jews? Only 70 percent said yes. A population in which the biological replacement rate is 80 percent and the cultural replacement rate is 70 percent is headed for extinction. By this calculation, every 100 Jews are raising 56 Jewish children. In just two generations, 7 out of every 10 Jews will vanish.

The demographic trends in the rest of the Diaspora are equally unencouraging. In Western Europe, fertility and intermarriage rates mirror those of the United States. Take Britain. Over the last generation, British Jewry has acted as a kind of controlled experiment: a Diaspora community living in an open society, but, unlike that in the United States, not artificially sustained by immigration. What happened? Over the last quarter- century, the number of British Jews declined by over 25 percent.

Over the same interval, France’s Jewish population declined only slightly. The reason for this relative stability, however, is a one-time factor: the influx of North African Jewry. That influx is over. In France today only a minority of Jews between the ages of twenty and forty-four live in a conventional family with two Jewish parents. France, too, will go the way of the rest.

« The dissolution of European Jewry, » observes Bernard Wasserstein in Vanishing Diaspora: The Jews in Europe since 1945, « is not situated at some point in the hypothetical future. The process is taking place before our eyes and is already far advanced. » Under present trends, « the number of Jews in Europe by the year 2000 would then be not much more than one million — the lowest figure since the last Middle Ages. »

In 1990, there were eight million.

The story elsewhere is even more dispiriting. The rest of what was once the Diaspora is now either a museum or a graveyard. Eastern Europe has been effectively emptied of its Jews. In 1939, Poland had 3.2 million Jews. Today it is home to 3,500. The story is much the same in the other capitals of Eastern Europe.

The Islamic world, cradle to the great Sephardic Jewish tradition and home to one-third of world Jewry three centuries ago, is now practically Judenrein. Not a single country in the Islamic world is home to more than 20,000 Jews. After Turkey with 19,000 and Iran with 14,000, the country with the largest Jewish community in the entire Islamic world is Morocco with 6, 100. There are more Jews in Omaha, Nebraska.

These communities do not figure in projections. There is nothing to project. They are fit subjects not for counting but for remembering. Their very sound has vanished. Yiddish and Ladino, the distinctive languages of the European and Sephardic Diasporas, like the communities that invented them, are nearly extinct.

IV. THE DYNAMICS OF ASSIMILATION

Is it not risky to assume that current trends will continue? No. Nothing will revive the Jewish communities of Eastern Europe and the Islamic world. And nothing will stop the rapid decline by assimilation of Western Jewry. On the contrary. Projecting current trends — assuming, as I have done, that rates remain constant — is rather conservative: It is risky to assume that assimilation will not accelerate. There is nothing on the horizon to reverse the integration of Jews into Western culture. The attraction of Jews to the larger culture and the level of acceptance of Jews by the larger culture are historically unprecedented. If anything, the trends augur an intensification of assimilation.

It stands to reason. As each generation becomes progressively more assimilated, the ties to tradition grow weaker (as measured, for example, by synagogue attendance and number of children receiving some kind of Jewish education). This dilution of identity, in turn, leads to a greater tendency to intermarriage and assimilation. Why not? What, after all, are they giving up? The circle is complete and self-reinforcing.

Consider two cultural artifacts. With the birth of television a half- century ago, Jewish life in America was represented by The Goldbergs: urban Jews, decidedly ethnic, heavily accented, socially distinct. Forty years later The Goldbergs begat Seinfeld, the most popular entertainment in America today. The Seinfeld character is nominally Jewish. He might cite his Jewish identity on occasion without apology or self- consciousness — but, even more important, without consequence. It has not the slightest influence on any aspect of his life.

Assimilation of this sort is not entirely unprecedented. In some ways, it parallels the pattern in Western Europe after the emancipation of the Jews in the late 18th and 19th centuries. The French Revolution marks the turning point in the granting of civil rights to Jews. As they began to emerge from the ghetto, at first they found resistance to their integration and advancement. They were still excluded from the professions, higher education, and much of society. But as these barriers began gradually to erode and Jews advanced socially, Jews began a remarkable embrace of European culture and, for many, Christianity. In A History of Zionism, Walter Laqueur notes the view of Gabriel Riesser, an eloquent and courageous mid-19th-century advocate of emancipation, that a Jew who preferred the non-existent state and nation of Israel to Germany should be put under police protection not because he was dangerous but because he was obviously insane.

Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) was a harbinger. Cultured, cosmopolitan, though firmly Jewish, he was the quintessence of early emancipation. Yet his story became emblematic of the rapid historical progression from emancipation to assimilation: Four of his six children and eight of his nine grandchildren were baptized.

In that more religious, more Christian age, assimilation took the form of baptism, what Henrich Heine called the admission ticket to European society. In the far more secular late-20th century, assimilation merely means giving up the quaint name, the rituals, and the other accouterments and identifiers of one’s Jewish past. Assimilation today is totally passive. Indeed, apart from the trip to the county courthouse to transform, say, (shmattes by) Ralph Lifshitz into (Polo by) Ralph Lauren, it is marked by an absence of actions rather than the active embrace of some other faith. Unlike Mendelssohn’s children, Seinfeld required no baptism.

We now know, of course, that in Europe, emancipation through assimilation proved a cruel hoax. The rise of anti-Semitism, particularly late-19th- century racial anti-Semitism culminating in Nazism, disabused Jews of the notion that assimilation provided escape from the liabilities and dangers of being Jewish. The saga of the family of Madeleine Albright is emblematic. Of her four Jewish grandparents — highly assimilated, with children some of whom actually converted and erased their Jewish past — three went to their deaths in Nazi concentration camps as Jews.

Nonetheless, the American context is different. There is no American history of anti-Semitism remotely resembling Europe’s. The American tradition of tolerance goes back 200 years to the very founding of the country. Washington’s letter to the synagogue in Newport pledges not tolerance — tolerance bespeaks non-persecution bestowed as a favor by the dominant upon the deviant — but equality. It finds no parallel in the history of Europe. In such a country, assimilation seems a reasonable solution to one’s Jewish problem. One could do worse than merge one’s destiny with that of a great and humane nation dedicated to the proposition of human dignity and equality.

Nonetheless, while assimilation may be a solution for individual Jews, it clearly is a disaster for Jews as a collective with a memory, a language, a tradition, a liturgy, a history, a faith, a patrimony that will all perish as a result.

Whatever value one might assign to assimilation, one cannot deny its reality. The trends, demographic and cultural, are stark. Not just in the long-lost outlands of the Diaspora, not just in its erstwhile European center, but even in its new American heartland, the future will be one of diminution, decline, and virtual disappearance. This will not occur overnight. But it will occur soon — in but two or three generations, a time not much further removed from ours today than the founding of Israel fifty years ago.

V. ISRAELI EXCEPTIONALISM

Israel is different. In Israel the great temptation of modernity — assimilation — simply does not exist. Israel is the very embodiment of Jewish continuity: It is the only nation on earth that inhabits the same land, bears the same name, speaks the same language, and worships the same God that it did 3,000 years ago. You dig the soil and you find pottery from Davidic times, coins from Bar Kokhba, and 2,000-year-old scrolls written in a script remarkably like the one that today advertises ice cream at the corner candy store.

Because most Israelis are secular, however, some ultra-religious Jews dispute Israel’s claim to carry on an authentically Jewish history. So do some secular Jews. A French critic (sociologist Georges Friedmann) once called Israelis « Hebrew-speaking gentiles. » In fact, there was once a fashion among a group of militantly secular Israeli intellectuals to call themselves  » Canaanites, » i.e., people rooted in the land but entirely denying the religious tradition from which they came.

Well then, call these people what you will. « Jews, » after all, is a relatively recent name for this people. They started out as Hebrews, then became Israelites. « Jew » (derived from the Kingdom of Judah, one of the two successor states to the Davidic and Solomonic Kingdom of Israel) is the post- exilic term for Israelite. It is a latecomer to history.

What to call the Israeli who does not observe the dietary laws, has no use for the synagogue, and regards the Sabbath as the day for a drive to the beach — a fair description, by the way, of most of the prime ministers of Israel? It does not matter. Plant a Jewish people in a country that comes to a standstill on Yom Kippur; speaks the language of the Bible; moves to the rhythms of the Hebrew (lunar) calendar; builds cities with the stones of its ancestors; produces Hebrew poetry and literature, Jewish scholarship and learning unmatched anywhere in the world — and you have continuity.

Israelis could use a new name. Perhaps we will one day relegate the word Jew to the 2,000-year exilic experience and once again call these people Hebrews. The term has a nice historical echo, being the name by which Joseph and Jonah answered the question: « Who are you? »

In the cultural milieu of modern Israel, assimilation is hardly the problem. Of course Israelis eat McDonald’s and watch Dallas reruns. But so do Russians and Chinese and Danes. To say that there are heavy Western (read: American) influences on Israeli culture is to say nothing more than that Israel is as subject to the pressures of globalization as any other country. But that hardly denies its cultural distinctiveness, a fact testified to by the great difficulty immigrants have in adapting to Israel.

In the Israeli context, assimilation means the reattachment of Russian and Romanian, Uzbeki and Iraqi, Algerian and Argentinian Jews to a distinctively Hebraic culture. It means the exact opposite of what it means in the Diaspora: It means giving up alien languages, customs, and traditions. It means giving up Christmas and Easter for Hanukkah and Passover. It means giving up ancestral memories of the steppes and the pampas and the savannas of the world for Galilean hills and Jerusalem stone and Dead Sea desolation. That is what these new Israelis learn. That is what is transmitted to their children. That is why their survival as Jews is secure. Does anyone doubt that the near- million Soviet immigrants to Israel would have been largely lost to the Jewish people had they remained in Russia — and that now they will not be lost?

Some object to the idea of Israel as carrier of Jewish continuity because of the myriad splits and fractures among Israelis: Orthodox versus secular, Ashkenazi versus Sephardi, Russian versus sabra, and so on. Israel is now engaged in bitter debates over the legitimacy of conservative and reform Judaism and the encroachment of Orthodoxy upon the civic and social life of the country.

So what’s new? Israel is simply recapitulating the Jewish norm. There are equally serious divisions in the Diaspora, as there were within the last Jewish Commonwealth: « Before the ascendancy of the Pharisees and the emergence of Rabbinic orthodoxy after the fall of the Second Temple, » writes Harvard Near East scholar Frank Cross, « Judaism was more complex and variegated than we had supposed. » The Dead Sea Scrolls, explains Hershel Shanks, « emphasize a hitherto unappreciated variety in Judaism of the late Second Temple period, so much so that scholars often speak not simply of Judaism but of Judaisms. »

The Second Commonwealth was a riot of Jewish sectarianism: Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, apocalyptics of every stripe, sects now lost to history, to say nothing of the early Christians. Those concerned about the secular- religious tensions in Israel might contemplate the centuries-long struggle between Hellenizers and traditionalists during the Second Commonwealth. The Maccabean revolt of 167-4 B.C., now celebrated as Hanukkah, was, among other things, a religious civil war among Jews.

Yes, it is unlikely that Israel will produce a single Jewish identity. But that is unnecessary. The relative monolith of Rabbinic Judaism in the Middle Ages is the exception. Fracture and division is a fact of life during the modern era, as during the First and Second Commonwealths. Indeed, during the period of the First Temple, the people of Israel were actually split into two often warring states. The current divisions within Israel pale in comparison.

Whatever identity or identities are ultimately adopted by Israelis, the fact remains that for them the central problem of Diaspora Jewry — suicide by assimilation — simply does not exist. Blessed with this security of identity, Israel is growing. As a result, Israel is not just the cultural center of the Jewish world, it is rapidly becoming its demographic center as well. The relatively high birth rate yields a natural increase in population. Add a steady net rate of immigration (nearly a million since the late 1980s), and Israel’s numbers rise inexorably even as the Diaspora declines.

Within a decade Israel will pass the United States as the most populous Jewish community on the globe. Within our lifetime a majority of the world’s Jews will be living in Israel. That has not happened since well before Christ.

A century ago, Europe was the center of Jewish life. More than 80 percent of world Jewry lived there. The Second World War destroyed European Jewry and dispersed the survivors to the New World (mainly the United States) and to Israel. Today, 80 percent of world Jewry lives either in the United States or in Israel. Today we have a bipolar Jewish universe with two centers of gravity of approximately equal size. It is a transitional stage, however. One star is gradually dimming, the other brightening.

Soon an inevitably the cosmology of the Jewish people will have been transformed again, turned into a single-star system with a dwindling Diaspora orbiting around. It will be a return to the ancient norm: The Jewish people will be centered — not just spiritually but physically — in their ancient homeland.

VI. THE END OF DISPERSION

The consequences of this transformation are enormous. Israel’s centrality is more than just a question of demography. It represents a bold and dangerous new strategy for Jewish survival.

For two millennia, the Jewish people survived by means of dispersion and isolation. Following the first exile in 586 B.C. and the second exile in 70 A. D. and 132 A.D., Jews spread first throughout Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean Basin, then to northern and eastern Europe and eventually west to the New World, with communities in practically every corner of the earth, even unto India and China.

Throughout this time, the Jewish people survived the immense pressures of persecution, massacre, and forced conversion not just by faith and courage, but by geographic dispersion. Decimated here, they would survive there. The thousands of Jewish villages and towns spread across the face of Europe, the Islamic world, and the New World provided a kind of demographic insurance. However many Jews were massacred in the First Crusade along the Rhine, however many villages were destroyed in the 1648-1649 pogroms in Ukraine, there were always thousands of others spread around the globe to carry on.

This dispersion made for weakness and vulnerability for individual Jewish communities. Paradoxically, however, it made for endurance and strength for the Jewish people as a whole. No tyrant could amass enough power to threaten Jewish survival everywhere.

Until Hitler. The Nazis managed to destroy most everything Jewish from the Pyrenees to the gates of Stalingrad, an entire civilization a thousand years old. There were nine million Jews in Europe when Hitler came to power. He killed two-thirds of them. Fifty years later, the Jews have yet to recover. There were sixteen million Jews in the world in 1939. Today, there are thirteen million.

The effect of the Holocaust was not just demographic, however. It was psychological, indeed ideological, as well. It demonstrated once and for all the catastrophic danger of powerlessness. The solution was self-defense, and that meant a demographic reconcentration in a place endowed with sovereignty, statehood, and arms.

Before World War II there was great debate in the Jewish world over Zionism. Reform Judaism, for example, was for decades anti-Zionist. The Holocaust resolved that debate. Except for those at the extremes — the ultra-Orthodox right and far left — Zionism became the accepted solution to Jewish powerlessness and vulnerability. Amid the ruins, Jews made a collective decision that their future lay in self-defense and territoriality, in the ingathering of the exiles to a place where they could finally acquire the means to defend themselves.

It was the right decision, the only possible decision. But oh so perilous. What a choice of place to make one’s final stand: a dot on the map, a tiny patch of near-desert, a thin ribbon of Jewish habitation behind the flimsiest of natural barriers (which the world demands that Israel relinquish). One determined tank thrust can tear it in half. One small battery of nuclear- tipped Scuds can obliterate it entirely.

To destroy the Jewish people, Hitler needed to conquer the world. All that is needed today is to conquer a territory smaller than Vermont. The terrible irony is that in solving the problem of powerlessness, the Jews have necessarily put all their eggs in one basket, a small basket hard by the waters of the Mediterranean. And on its fate hinges everything Jewish.

VII. THINKING THE UNTHINKABLE

What if the Third Jewish Commonwealth meets the fate of the first two? The scenario is not that far-fetched: A Palestinian state is born, arms itself, concludes alliances with, say, Iraq and Syria. War breaks out between Palestine and Israel (over borders or water or terrorism). Syria and Iraq attack from without. Egypt and Saudi Arabia join the battle. The home front comes under guerilla attack from Palestine. Chemical and biological weapons rain down from Syria, Iraq, and Iran. Israel is overrun.

Why is this the end? Can the Jewish people not survive as they did when their homeland was destroyed and their political independence extinguished twice before? Why not a new exile, a new Diaspora, a new cycle of Jewish history?

First, because the cultural conditions of exile would be vastly different. The first exiles occurred at a time when identity was nearly coterminous with religion. An expulsion two millennia later into a secularized world affords no footing for a reestablished Jewish identity.

But more important: Why retain such an identity? Beyond the dislocation would be the sheer demoralization. Such an event would simply break the spirit. No people could survive it. Not even the Jews. This is a people that miraculously survived two previous destructions and two millennia of persecution in the hope of ultimate return and restoration. Israel is that hope. To see it destroyed, to have Isaiahs and Jeremiahs lamenting the widows of Zion once again amid the ruins of Jerusalem is more than one people could bear.

Particularly coming after the Holocaust, the worst calamity in Jewish history. To have survived it is miracle enough. Then to survive the destruction of that which arose to redeem it — the new Jewish state — is to attribute to Jewish nationhood and survival supernatural power.

Some Jews and some scattered communities would, of course, survive. The most devout, already a minority, would carry on — as an exotic tribe, a picturesque Amish-like anachronism, a dispersed and pitied remnant of a remnant. But the Jews as a people would have retired from history.

We assume that Jewish history is cyclical: Babylonian exile in 586 B.C., followed by return in 538 B.C. Roman exile in 135 A.D., followed by return, somewhat delayed, in 1948. We forget a linear part of Jewish history: There was one other destruction, a century and a half before the fall of the First Temple. It went unrepaired. In 722 B.C., the Assyrians conquered the other, larger Jewish state, the northern kingdom of Israel. (Judah, from which modern Jews are descended, was the southern kingdom.) This is the Israel of the Ten Tribes, exiled and lost forever.

So enduring is their mystery that when Lewis and Clark set off on their expedition, one of the many questions prepared for them by Dr. Benjamin Rush at Jefferson’s behest was this: « What Affinity between their [the Indians'] religious Ceremonies & those of the Jews? » « Jefferson and Lewis had talked at length about these tribes, » explains Stephen Ambrose. « They speculated that the lost tribes of Israel could be out there on the Plains. »

Alas, not. The Ten Tribes had melted away into history. As such, they represent the historical norm. Every other people so conquered and exiled has in time disappeared. Only the Jews defied the norm. Twice. But never, I fear, again.


Incidents de la synagogue de la Roquette: Attention, un piège peut en cacher un autre (Was supposed attack of Parisian synagogue no more than a turf war between Jewish and Muslim youth groups ?)

19 juillet, 2014
http://www.marianne.net/fredericploquin/photo/art/default/984092-1166609.jpg?v=1405337750http://scd.rfi.fr/sites/filesrfi/dynimagecache/0/0/3500/1977/1024/578/sites/images.rfi.fr/files/aef_image/2014-07-16T195530Z_1424722331_GM1EA7H0AO701_RTRMADP_3_FRANCE-PALESTINIANS-ISRAEL_0.JPGhttp://jssnews.com/content/assets/2014/07/Screen-Shot-2014-07-15-at-10.51.32-AM.pnghttp://www.cercledesvolontaires.fr/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/manifestation-palestine-19-juillet-2014.jpghttp://www.truthrevolt.org/sites/default/files/styles/content_full_width/public/field/image/articles/hamas_rockets.jpg?itok=qnRDYJV1Synagogue blocked up by pro-Hamas demonstrators (Rue de la roquette, Paris, Jul. 13, 2014)Pro-Hamas barricade  (Rue Popincourt, Paris, Jul. 13 2014)
La vérité est la première victime de la guerre. Eschyle
Cet ensemble d’éléments n’est pas un entassement circonstanciel de comportements et de discours. J’y trouve une rationalité qui est celle de l’idéologie qui domine aujourd’hui dans les pays démocratiques : le postmodernisme. Sa cible essentielle est, au recto, l’Etat-nation démocratique, l’identité nationale, la souveraineté du sujet collectif, avec pour verso la célébration de tout ce qui est extérieur à l’Occident et à la démocratie. C’est une utopie de la « démocratie » qui est l’ennemie du régime démocratique. Dans le monde illusoire que cette idéologie construit, la « communauté internationale », le « Tribunal international » doivent se substituer aux Etats. Et, d’ailleurs, il n’y aurait plus d’Etats mais des individus, des « citoyens du monde », de sorte qu’il n’y aurait plus de « guerres » mais des « différends », plus d’armées mais à la rigueur des « polices », plus de responsabilité mais des co-responsabilités, plus de coupable mais une culpabilité partagée, il n’y a plus de réalité mais des récits sur la réalité, etc. Les droits de l’homme, ou leur usage instrumentalisé, l’emportent alors sur les droits du citoyen, le pouvoir judiciaire s’impose au pouvoir politique, la loi n’est plus l’œuvre du peuple mais l’invention des juges, etc. C’est cette même idéologie qui, dans le monde et notamment en Europe, ouvre grandes les portes à l’islamisme. Shlomo Trigano
Les conflits au Moyen-Orient ont des répercussions de plus en plus importantes en France depuis le début des années 1980. L’attentat contre la synagogue de la rue Copernic a eu lieu en octobre 1980, il y a bientôt 34 ans… Ensuite il y a eu l’attentat contre le restaurant Goldenberg en août 1982, c’est-à-dire au moment où la guerre du Liban faisait rage. La nouveauté depuis les années 1990-2000 c’est que ce sont les Français d’origine maghrébine qui cherchent à en découdre et non plus des commandos envoyés par un acteur extérieur (OLP, Iran etc.). La raison principale est que la haine d’Israël et des Juifs est devenue un composant majeur de l’identité des Français d’origine arabe et africaine, c’est le ciment de la «beuritude». La haine d’Israël et des Juifs est devenue un composant majeur de l’identité des Français d’origine arabe et africaine, c’est le ciment de la «beuritude». Il s’agit sans doute d’une haine des Juifs et d’Israël et non pas d’une prise de position politique. C’est tout à fait légitime et parfois justifié de critiquer la politique israélienne mais la comparaison avec les autres conflits dans la région ne laisse pas de place au doute. Si il s’agissait là d’une véritable identification avec les victimes des bombardements de Gaza, alors on pourrait s’étonner que la crise syrienne avec ses 160 000 victimes n’ait pas déchainé une telle mobilisation et de telles passions! Je crois que ces manifestations trahissent un besoin profond de se définir comme adversaire d’Israël et des Juifs. (…) Le débat est ouvert et devrait le rester aussi longtemps qu’on échange des arguments rationnels. Or hurler «Israël assassin» et dénoncer un «génocide» à Gaza ne tombent pas dans cette catégorie. (…) Le communautarisme monte en France parce que trop de Français pensent que la décolonisation n’est pas terminée et que la France leur est redevable. Trop de musulmans vivent dans un sentiment d’humiliation séculaire et le rêve d’une vengeance qui restaurera leur honneur. L’Islam radical, qui n’a pas grand-chose avoir avec les enseignements et la vie de Mohamed, ainsi que la haine d’Israël, des Juifs et, plus largement de l’Occident et des «croisés» en sont les expressions. De ce point de vue, la logique qui a guidé le choix des victimes de Mohamad Merah est plein d’enseignements: des militaires français «bourreaux» des «frères» et ensuite des enfants juifs, l’incarnation du mal. Il y a une suite dans ces idées folles et la haine des Juifs n’est que la partie émergée de l’iceberg. (…) Malheureusement les forces en présence sont plus puissantes que nos élites politiques. Le monde entier est entré dans une phase «multi», portée par les échanges de plus en plus nombreux – voyage, internet -, l’homogénéité croissante de notre planète – partout les mêmes modes, les mêmes produits, les mêmes films, les mêmes magasins -, le rythme très rapide du changement et la précarisation galopante. Au milieu de ce tourbillon les valeurs républicaines traditionnelles ne font plus le poids surtout que l’Etat ne suit pas derrière avec les récompenses: croissance, emploi, sécurité, perspectives d’avenir. Notre civilisation est en crise et le modèle français n’y échappe pas. Dans ce contexte, quand l’avenir est plus une menace qu’une promesse, les appartenances jadis secondaires – religion, ethnie, communauté d’origine – remplissent le vide. Gil Mihaely
Dans toute la France, ce sont aujourd’hui des milliers de manifestant-e-s qui sont descendus dans la rue pour exiger l’arrêt de l’intervention militaire de l’État d’Israël dans la bande de Gaza, pour crier leur révolte face au plus de 300 morts palestiniens depuis le début de cette intervention. En interdisant dans plusieurs villes et notamment à Paris, les manifestations de solidarité avec la Palestine, Hollande et le gouvernement Valls ont enclenché une épreuve de force qu’ils ont finalement perdue. Depuis l’Afrique où il organise l’aventure militaire de l’impérialisme français, Hollande avait joué les gros bras « ceux qui veulent à tout prix manifester en prendront la responsabilité ». C’est ce qu’ont fait aujourd’hui des milliers de manifestant-e-s qui sont descendus dans la rue pour exiger l’arrêt de l’intervention militaire de l’État d’Israël dans la bande de Gaza, pour crier leur révolte face au plus de 300 morts palestiniens depuis le début de cette intervention. Et pour faire respecter le droit démocratique à exprimer collectivement la solidarité. En particulier à Paris, plusieurs milliers de manifestants, malgré l’impressionnant quadrillage policier, ont défié l’interdiction du gouvernement. C’est un succès au vu des multiples menaces de la préfecture et du gouvernement. En fin de manifestation, des échauffourées ont eu lieu entre des manifestants et les forces de l’ordre. Comment aurait-il pu en être autrement au vu de dispositif policier et de la volonté du gouvernement de museler toute opposition à son soutien à la guerre menée par l’Etat d’Israël. Le NPA condamne les violences policières qui se sont déroulées ce soir à Barbès et affirme que le succès de cette journée ne restera pas sans lendemain. Dès mercredi, une nouvelle manifestation aura lieu à l’appel du collectif national pour une paix juste et durable. La lutte pour les droits du peuple palestinien continue. Le NPA appelle l’ensemble des forces de gauche et démocratiques, syndicales, associatives et politiques, à exprimer leur refus de la répression et leur solidarité active avec la lutte du peuple palestinien. NPA
On va vous trancher la gorge. On a provoqué la LDJ, mais ils ont pas de couilles. Ils sont planqués derrière la police, la Ligue des Danseuses Juives … On est venu jusque devant leur synagogue. Ils sont cachés derrière la police, ces bâtards ! Alors, on est venu vous chercher, la LDJ. … On est là, on vous attend, nous. Les chiens ! Chiens de sionistes ! Il sont là, les Algériens, les Tunisiens, les Marocains ! Ils sont là, bandes de bâtards ! Allez, venez ! Commentaire d’une vidéo (tournée lors de la manifestation devant la synagogue d’Asnières, 13.07.14)
C’était un peu la Kristallnacht et on a échappé de peu à un véritable pogrom. Roger Cukierman (président du Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France, Crif)
Jamais un tel événement ne s’était produit en France depuis le Moyen-Age. Arno Klarsfeld (ancien avocat des Fils et filles des déportés juifs de France)
Ces comparaisons historiques me semblent malvenues pour apprécier la situation. Les pogroms ou la Nuit de cristal, ce sont des mouvements de violence tolérés voire encouragés par les pouvoirs en place. En France, les autorités publiques réagissent, et absolument rien n’indique qu’une majorité de la population valide cela. L’émotion est très forte, mais elle n’est pas uniquement liée à ce qui s’est passé dimanche, elle est le produit de ces dernières années, avec les actes de Mohamed Merah et Mehdi Nemmouche, l’affaire Dieudonné, la manifestation Jour de colère (où des +Mort aux Juifs!+ ont été lancés, ndlr)… Il y a le sentiment, dans une partie de la communauté juive, qu’une lame de fond antisémite s’est installée. Samuel Ghiles-Meilhac (sociologue)
On constate une montée des actes antisémites le plus souvent en lien avec l’aggravation du conflit israélo-palestinien. Un «antisémitisme de contact», actif là où les deux communautés (juive et musulmane) sont présentes, et s’en prenant à ce qui est visible dans l’espace public: synagogues, mezouzahs sur les portes, hommes portant la kippa… On a le sentiment que, pour les rares cas où les agresseurs sont identifiés, les actes sont non seulement imputables à l’extrême-droite mais à des jeunes issus de l’immigration et qui se font une identité de substitution en s’identifiant aux victimes palestiniennes. Nonna Mayer (politologue)
Quand bien même il ne se serait rien passé rue de la Roquette, je considère qu’à partir du moment où, dans les rues de Paris, des manifestants brandissent le drapeau noir de l’Etat islamique au Levant ou des mini-roquettes, même en carton-pâte, il y a quelque chose qui ne colle pas. Jean-Yves Camus (directeur de l’observatoire des radicalités politiques, présent sur place)
Ils sont environ 7 000 à défiler dans les rues de Paris, ce dimanche 13 juillet, entre Barbès et la Bastille, pour dire leur solidarité avec les Palestiniens. Le parcours a été négocié par les responsables du NPA (Nouveau parti anticapitaliste), l’organisation héritière de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire. Pourquoi avoir exigé un parcours qui s’achève à proximité du quartier du Marais, connu pour abriter plusieurs lieux de culte juif ? Le fait est que les responsables de la Préfecture de police l’ont validé. Parmi les manifestants, de nombreuses femmes, souvent voilées, mais surtout des jeunes venus de la banlieue francilienne. Les premiers slogans ciblent Israël, mais aussi la « complicité française ». Très vite, les « Allah Akbar » (Dieu est grand) dominent, donnant une tonalité fortement religieuse au cortège. La préfecture de police ne s’attendait pas à une telle mobilisation, mais ses responsables ont vu large au niveau du maintien de l’ordre, puisque cinq « forces mobiles », gendarmes et CRS confondues, ont été mobilisées. C’est à priori suffisant pour sécuriser tous les lieux juifs le long du parcours. Aucune dégradation, aucun incident n’est signalé en marge du cortège, jusqu’à l’arrivée à proximité de la Bastille. Un premier mouvement de foule est observé à la hauteur de la rue des Tournelles, qui abrite une synagogue. Les gendarmes bloquent la voie et parviennent sans difficulté à refouler les assaillants vers le boulevard Beaumarchais. Place de la Bastille, la dispersion commence, accélérée par une ondée, lorsque des jeunes décident de s’en prendre aux forces de l’ordre. De petites grappes s’engouffrent vers les rues adjacentes. Se donnent-ils le mot ? Ils sont entre 200 et 300 à marcher en direction de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette… où se tient un rassemblement pour la paix en Israël, en présence du grand rabbin. Les organisateurs affirment avoir alerté le commissariat de police, mais l’information n’est apparemment pas remontée jusqu’à la Préfecture de police. Détail important : s’ils avaient su, les responsables du maintien de l’ordre auraient forcément barré l’accès à la rue. Les choses se compliquent très vite, car les manifestants ne sont pas les seuls à vouloir en découdre. Une petite centaine de membres de la LDJ (ligue de défense juive) sont positionnés devant la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette, casques de moto sur la tête et outils (armes blanches) à portée de main. Loin de rester passive, la petite troupe monte au contact des manifestants, comme ils l’ont déjà fait lors d’une manifestation pro-palestinienne organisée Place Saint-Michel quelques jours auparavant. On frôle la bagarre générale, mais la police parvient à s’interposer. Les assaillants refluent vers le boulevard, tandis que les militants juifs reviennent vers la synagogue. Frédéric Ploquin (Marianne)
Le président de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette est très clair, depuis le début, son objectif a été « de remettre les choses dans leur contexte et dans leur mesure ». Et ce qui suit est éloquent. « Pas un seul projectile lancé sur la synagogue ». « A aucun moment, nous n’avons été physiquement en danger », précise-t-il. Alors d’où vient cette rumeur ? Serge Benhaïm pense à une « confusion » entre les événements survenus près d’une synagogue à Aulnay-sous-Bois, et ceux de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette. iTELE
Pour lui [Erwan Simon], « il n’y a pas d’attaque de synagogue,  jamais ». L’affrontement entre bandes n’a jamais visé le lieu de culte et estime qu’il résulte d’une réponse « à des provocations racistes d’un groupuscule d’extrême-droite et nationaliste ». iTELE
Hier, en fin de manifestation, nous nous sommes postés sur la place de la Bastille côté rue de la Roquette en prévision d’une attaque de la Ligue de défense juive suite aux mises en garde de la police. Après l’agression ayant ciblé un rassemblement de soutien à la Palestine mercredi dernier à Saint-Michel, la milice sioniste avait promis, via ses réseaux sociaux de ‘s’en prendre à toutes les manifestations pro-palestiniennes’. Nous étions une vingtaine, tous identifiés et membres du service d’ordre. Suite à la fermeture du métro Bastille, plusieurs manifestants ont décidé de s’orienter vers le métro Voltaire. Nous leur avons conseillé de prendre plutôt la direction de Ledru-Rollin mais certains ne nous ont pas écoutés. À peine arrivés au milieu de la rue de la Roquette, ces personnes (essentiellement des familles), identifiées par leurs keffiehs et drapeaux, se sont faites accueillir par des insultes et des projectiles provenant du rassemblement sioniste derrière deux lignes de CRS. Deux personnes sont revenues nous prévenir. Nous avons donc décidé d’aller ramener ceux qui stagnaient encore à proximité de la synagogue de la Roquette afin d’éviter tout débordement. Nous y sommes allés discrètement pour éviter que les centaines de jeunes, déjà échaudés par les précédentes provocations ne nous suivent. Ce qui serait devenu incontrôlable. Arrivés à une cinquantaine de mètres du rassemblement, une femme, la quarantaine, nous traite de ‘sales pro palos’, hurle ‘Israël vaincra’, s’empare d’une chaise d’une terrasse de café et la jette sur notre ami T. Elle s’enfuit ensuite en courant vers le rassemblement de la LDJ et passe, sans difficultés, les deux lignes de CRS. Nous ne répondons pas à la provocation et continuons à avancer. Nous nous retrouvons alors sous une pluie de projectiles (tessons de bouteille, bouts de bois, casques etc.). Surexcitée, la cinquantaine de militants de la LDJ ‘mime’ de forcer le barrage de police en agitant des drapeaux israéliens. Une première altercation a lieu. La police les laisse faire. En revanche, les CRS nous matraquent et nous gazent. Un autre groupe de CRS arrive en provenance de la place. Encerclés par la police nous n’avons d’autre alternative que de prendre les rues adjacentes qui débouchent à nouveau vers le lieu des échauffourées. Les CRS continuent de tirer des gaz. Abdelkrim Branine (journaliste, Beur FM)
Sabrina précise qu’à l’approche de la place de la Bastille (« à quelques centaines de mètres »), des gérants de la manifestation commençaient à informer que « ça commençait à un petit peu dégénérer », les organisateurs « suppliant » les manifestants de « ne pas répondre aux provocations ». A l’arrivée place de la Bastille, elle décrit une bande de jeunes brandissant des drapeaux israéliens et un slogan, que l’on entend également dans cette vidéo Youtube, « Palestine, on t’encule! ». Sabrina précise à nouveau qu’à ce moment, les organisateurs redoublent d’efforts pour demander aux manifestants « de ne pas faire attention », de ne pas « calculer » ces provocations. Elle cite certaines phrases de ces organisateurs : « ils veulent nous provoquer, ils attendent que ça dégénère, on ne leur donnera pas ce plaisir, ne faites pas attention à eux ». Sabrina décrie une scène un peu chaotique, « ça courait dans tous les sens, des chaises, des tables, des bouts de bois, des femmes avec leurs enfants en train de leur couvrir la tête ». Venue pour « défendre une cause, le peuple palestinien », Sabrina Benalia regrette de s’être vue taxée de « participante à une manifestation antisémite ». C’est le sentiment qu’elle décrit avoir ressenti dans le traitement médiatique qu’elle a constaté le soir-même, en rentrant chez elle. (…) Sabrina dresse un constat amer des échauffourées du côté des manifestants pro-palestiniens. « Des jeunes qui ont cédé à la tentation de répondre à une provocation, c’est dommage, on a passé 3h30 de manifestation, et malheureusement on en vient à parler de 10 à 15 minutes où ça a dégénéré ». Elle ne cache pas s’être dit « qu’encore une fois, on va dire que c’est les Arabes, c’est les musulmans ». Elle avoue avoir « traité de cons ceux qui répondaient à la provocation », que ça allait « être une évidence », « toujours le même disque ». Sabrina, comme Erwan et le président de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette Serge Benhaïm, dénonce la rumeur, la synagogue n’a pas été « assiégée », pour elle, « c’est un piège ». ITELE

Attention: un piège peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où, entre l’implantation délibérée de ses attaques comme de ses armes au milieu de sa population et le bidonnage non moins délibéré des images comme des chiffres, le bilan des victimes civiles de la nouvelle guerre des roquettes déclenchée par le Hamas ne peut que s’alourdir …

Et qu’avec la montée inexorable du décalage victimes palestiniennes-victimes israéliennes et l’incursion terrestre israélienne à Gaza même, la quasi-totalité des médias et de l’opinion mondiale n’a à nouveau pas de mots assez durs pour dénoncer le seul Etat juif …

Comment, avec le beau travail de la chaine en continu iTELE et contrairement aux outrances verbales de certains (allant jusqu’à parler, oubliant les risques inhérents aux propos précipités,  de « tentative de pogrom »), ne pas voir dans les incidents de la synagogue de la Roquette qui avaient tant ému l’opinion mondiale et notamment juive …

Autre chose qu’une contre-baston face à d’autres bastons et provocations entre groupes rivaux de jeunes musulmans et de jeunes juifs …

Dont la manifestation pro-palestinienne qui les avait précédés n’aurait alors été que le prétexte ?

Mais comment en même temps ne pas s’étonner, quelques semaines de surcroit après l’horrible forfait d’une bande de supporters du Beitar en Israël même,  de l’apparente naïveté de responsables communautaires juifs voire de forces publiques se laissant piéger par l’offre de « protection » de groupes de jeunes juifs à la réputation aussi sulfureuse que la Ligue de Défense Juive ?

Ou, le Parti anticapilatliste en tête,  de certains organisateurs, manifestants et observateurs qualifiant de bon enfant et ne voyant aucun problème à appeler à nouveau, même illégalement,  à la tenue d’une manifestation sur la voie publique …

Incluant, sans parler de l’évidente victimisation de la vérité (les roquettes et missiles partent et visent bien des zones résidentielles), mini-roquettes en carton mâché, drapeaux noirs des égorgeurs de Syrie et d’Irak, quenelles ou cris de « Allah akbar ! » voire de « Mort aux juifs ! » ?

Incidents rue de la Roquette: Serge Benhaim dément toute attaque de la synagogue

​Ceci est le second témoignage que nous avons recueilli, celui du président de la Synagogue Don Isaac Abravanel, située Rue de la Roquette, là où ont eu lieu les affrontements entre la Ligue de Défense Juive et les manifestants pro-palestiniens, en marge de la manifestation en soutien à la Palestine dimanche 13 juillet dernier, à Paris. Encore une fois, nous avons fait le choix de vous livrer cet entretien sans aucun montage et aucune coupure, vous entendrez donc les questions de notre journaliste Julien Nény ainsi que les réponses de Serge Benhaïm dans leur intégralité.

La synagogue, théâtre d’un rassemblement « pour la paix en Israël »

Serge Benhaïm confirme avoir décidé de faire une « prière pour la paix en Israël », en convoquant les fidèles par différents moyens, notamment celui de la page Facebook de la synagogue. Il indique qu’à chaque fois qu’une manifestation est organisée, les forces de polices sont prévenus, une pratique habituelle afin d’assurer la sécurité du lieu de culte et des fidèles qui s’y rendent.

« Aucun problème » pour maintenir cette manifestation, selon les forces de l’ordre

Lorsque le président de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette a averti les forces de l’ordre (le commissariat local) de la tenue de cette « prière pour la paix », la police l’a informé en retour de la tenue du rassemblement pro-Palestine ce même jour avec pour terminus la place de la Bastille. Serge Benhaïm nous confie que les forces de l’ordre lui ont dit qu’il n’y avait « aucun problème », que c’était « hyper couvert, hyper sécurisé », la raison pour laquelle le président de la synagogue a pris la décision de ne pas annuler le rassemblement prévu à la synagogue Don Abravanel à 17h30 ce dimanche 13 juillet.

Les forces de l’ordre là pour « contrer les manifestants »

Serge Benhaïm contextualise l’intervention des forces de l’ordre, 4 policiers côté Bastille, 2 policiers postés devant la porte de la synagogue. Des policiers qui auraient ensuite demandé du renfort selon ses dires. Resté devant la synagogue, il indique avoir constaté que les grenades lacrymogènes lancées par les forces de l’ordre ont « stoppé l’élan des premiers manifestants » et que cela a « sécurisé le bas de la rue de la Roquette » (côté Bastille, ndlr).

Quel a été le rôle de la Ligue de Défense Juive dans le déroulement des échauffourées?

Le président de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette précise que les fidèles sont toujours restés à l’intérieur du lieu de culte. En revanche, à l’extérieur, il estime à une quarantaine le nombre de jeunes présents, venue « au cas où il y aurait un problème ». Il décrit leur répartition de la façon suivante : 10 personnes de la SCPJ et une trentaine d’individus appartenant à la Ligue de Défense Juive. Selon lui, ces derniers n’ont « jamais bougé de la synagogue et n’étaient pas en contact avec les manifestants ». Il estime les mouvements de la LDJ à une « oscillation de 150 mètres sur la gauche à 150 mètres sur la droite » de la synagogue. Enfin, il assure « qu’à aucun moment », les jeunes de la LDJ « n’ont été à la recherche du contact ni vers la Bastille, ni vers Voltaire ».

La LDJ « briefée par les forces de l’ordre » sur place

Serge Benhaïm assure qu’il « n’a pas de contacts avec la LDJ », même s’il reconnait que le groupuscule a « une renommée un peu sulfureuse ». Il affirme s’être adressé aux forces de l’ordre pour leur demander de s’adresser à eux (la LDJ, ndlr). Il indique que les forces de l’ordre ont parlé avec la Ligue de Défense Juive en ces termes : « les gars, je veux pas de problèmes, vous restez ici ». Il estime d’ailleurs que ce contact entre les forces de l’ordre et la LDJ qui a permis de s’assurer que la LDJ reste « toujours derrière le cordon de police quand il y en a eu un ». Le président de la synagogue, « témoin de première ligne » selon ses termes, précise que lorsque les forces de l’ordre se sont déployées, « la Ligue de Défense Juive est passée derrière le rideau des forces de l’ordre ». Selon lui, il n’y a « pas eu de provocation » de la part de la LDJ. Il confirme néanmoins qu’il y a bien eu un « face-à-face ouvert entre les jeunes de la manifestation pro-Palestine et les gars de la LDJ » mais cet affrontement a été « une surprise ». Sur l’utilisation d’armes par la LDJ, le président de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette confirme également que la LDJ a « cassé des chaises et des tables, pour aller livrer ce face-à-face » qu’il ne « cautionne pas ».

La LDJ a-t-elle été la première à provoquer les manifestants pro-palestiniens?

A cette question, Serge Benhaïm s’inscrit en faux. Selon lui, « pas de contact visuel entre le devant de la synagogue et la place de la Bastille ». Il estime que cette version des faits est « erronée » et qu’il n’y a pas eu d’appel aspirant de la LDJ pour faire venir les manifestants pro-palestiniens vers la rue de la Roquette.

La Ligue de Défense Juive doit-elle être dissoute?

Serge Benhaïm estime que si les gens de la Ligue de Défense Juive sont des « électrons libres et incontrôlés », comme n’importe quel mouvement, il faut « absolument » décider de sa dissolution. Selon ses termes, « ce n’est pas parce qu’ils sont juifs qu’ils ont l’autorisation d’être incontrôlables, ou incontrôlés ». Plus tard dans l’interview, il revient sur les tweets de provocation postés sur Twitter par certains utilisateurs affiliés à la Ligue de Défense Juive. Encore une fois, « il ne cautionne pas » et estime qu’il « n’autorisera personne à venir mettre en danger une communauté venue prier, même si c’est la LDJ, même si ce sont des juifs, même s’il devait prendre des positions très frontales avec eux ». Sur l’implication de la LDJ dans l’allumage de la mèche de ces affrontements, le président de la synagogue s’essaye à une métaphore qui montre la complexité de la situation : « je sais qu’une bombe peut exploser avec un détonateur qui pèse 13 grammes. Est-ce que ce sont les 13 grammes qui font exploser la bombe, ou est-ce le fait d’avoir une bombe ? ». Il déplore enfin « des tonnes de provocations entre juifs et musulmans, tous les jours, toutes les minutes sur Internet ».

La synagogue rue de la Roquette a-t-elle vraiment été « assiégée »?

Le président de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette est très clair, depuis le début, son objectif a été « de remettre les choses dans leur contexte et dans leur mesure ». Et ce qui suit est éloquent. « Pas un seul projectile lancé sur la synagogue ». « A aucun moment, nous n’avons été physiquement en danger », précise-t-il. Alors d’où vient cette rumeur ? Serge Benhaïm pense à une « confusion » entre les événements survenus près d’une synagogue à Aulnay-sous-Bois, et ceux de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette.

« S’appliquer à faire baisser la mousse de l’ébullition »

En conclusion de son entretien, Serge Benhaïm, en réaction aux propos de Roger Cukierman sur notre antenne, estime qu’il « faut voir le demi-verre plein ». « Grâce à Dieu, il n’y a pas eu de dégâts graves, pas de dégâts humains, à part des blessés légers ». A l’évocation d’un « pogrom », le président de la synagogue estime qu’on pourrait « faire grossir cet événement à la catastrophe », mais qu’il faudrait « surtout s’appliquer à faire baisser la mousse de l’ébullition et revenir aux relations qui étaient celles d’avant », avec la communauté musulmane.

Voir aussi:

Incidents rue de la Roquette: « ça a été un piège »

Dernier de nos témoignages, celui de Sabrina Benalia, 22 ans. Elle a participé à la manifestation du dimanche 13 juillet dernier, avec son mari et sa petite sœur. Elle revient pour nous sur le déroulé de cette manifestation et les incidents survenus rue de la Roquette dont elle a été témoin. Là encore, nous avons décidé de ne pas monter cette interview et de vous la livrer de façon brute, dans la longueur.

Une ambiance « sereine », une « cohésion » au sein de la manifestation pro-Palestine

Sabrina Benalia revient pour nous sur la raison de sa participation à cette manifestation, défendre « la cause palestinienne », manifester contre ce qu’elle « n’appelle pas forcément une guerre », mais plutôt un « génocide ». Coutumière des manifestations selon ses dires, Sabrina indique que cette fois-ci, elle a ressenti une « cohésion » et souligne la présence d’une association, l’UFJP, qui selon elle, matérialise le plus cette cohésion. Selon d’autres participants à la manifestation cités par Sabrina, la présence de l’UFJP représente « la paix », défendue dans cette manifestation.

Que s’est-il passé à l’approche de la place de la Bastille ?

Sabrina précise qu’à l’approche de la place de la Bastille (« à quelques centaines de mètres »), des gérants de la manifestation commençaient à informer que « ça commençait à un petit peu dégénérer », les organisateurs « suppliant » les manifestants de « ne pas répondre aux provocations ». A l’arrivée place de la Bastille, elle décrit une bande de jeunes brandissant des drapeaux israéliens et un slogan, que l’on entend également dans cette vidéo Youtube, « Palestine, on t’encule! ». Sabrina précise à nouveau qu’à ce moment, les organisateurs redoublent d’efforts pour demander aux manifestants « de ne pas faire attention », de ne pas « calculer » ces provocations. Elle cite certaines phrases de ces organisateurs : « ils veulent nous provoquer, ils attendent que ça dégénère, on ne leur donnera pas ce plaisir, ne faites pas attention à eux ».

Rue de la Roquette : « ça a été un piège »

Sabrina décrie une scène un peu chaotique, « ça courait dans tous les sens, des chaises, des tables, des bouts de bois, des femmes avec leurs enfants en train de leur couvrir la tête ». Venue pour « défendre une cause, le peuple palestinien », Sabrina Benalia regrette de s’être vue taxée de « participante à une manifestation antisémite ». C’est le sentiment qu’elle décrit avoir ressenti dans le traitement médiatique qu’elle a constaté le soir-même, en rentrant chez elle.

Les manifestants pro-palestiniens ont « répondu à la provocation »

Sabrina évalue à « 4 ou 5 les manifestants pro-palestiniens » présents dans les échauffourées, rejoints par plusieurs autres manifestants qui ont « répondu à la provocation » des membres de la Ligue de Défense Juive, qu’elle estime à « plusieurs dizaines ». Elle décrit avoir entendu des insultes à plusieurs reprises, « Palestine, on t’encule! ». Du côté du cortège, elle admet avoir entendu un seul slogan pouvant s’apparenter à cela, « Israël assassin ». Elle indique ne jamais avoir entendu « mort aux juifs », lors de sa présence dans cette manifestation et en tant que témoin des échauffourées en fin de soirée. Elle « ne pense pas qu’on puisse se permettre de dire « mort aux juifs », alors que même l’UFJP était présente » dans le cortège de la manifestation pro-Palestine de dimanche dernier.

« On voit clairement des policiers défendre les pro-israéliens »

A l’évocation des éléments déclencheurs des échauffourées rue de la Roquette, Sabrina raconte : « sur ma droite, un barrage de policiers et derrière la LDJ avec le drapeau israélien », aux cris de « Palestine, on t’encule! ». « A aucun moment », la police ne va leur demander de cesser ou les arrêter, selon elle.

Elle évoque également cette vidéo publiée depuis quelques jours sur différentes plateformes, où l’on voit « un jeune de la LDJ faire tomber une barre de fer et un policier de la BAC la ramasser et lui redonner ». Des « images enregistrées » qui ne mentent pas pour Sabrina, « on aurait dit des amis », « on voit clairement des policiers s’attaquer aux pro-palestiniens et défendre les pro-israéliens ».

« Encore une fois, on va dire que c’est les Arabes, les musulmans »

Sabrina dresse un constat amer des échauffourées du côté des manifestants pro-palestiniens. « Des jeunes qui ont cédé à la tentation de répondre à une provocation, c’est dommage, on a passé 3h30 de manifestation, et malheureusement on en vient à parler de 10 à 15 minutes où ça a dégénéré ».

Elle ne cache pas s’être dit « qu’encore une fois, on va dire que c’est les Arabes, c’est les musulmans ». Elle avoue avoir « traité de cons ceux qui répondaient à la provocation », que ça allait « être une évidence », « toujours le même disque ».

« Pourquoi s’en prendre encore une fois à des gens qui n’ont rien fait ? »

Sabrina, comme Erwan et le président de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette Serge Benhaïm, dénonce la rumeur, la synagogue n’a pas été « assiégée », pour elle, « c’est un piège ». Elle défend son point de vue en ces termes : « pourquoi s’en prendre encore une fois à des gens qui n’ont rien fait ? On vient défendre justement des innocents en Palestine, on va pas venir s’attaquer à des innocents en France ».

Manifestation de samedi à Paris: « je souhaite du fond du cœur que ça ne dégénère pas »

A la question de sa présence à la manifestation de samedi à Paris, qui a été – à l’heure où nous écrivons ces lignes – interdite par la préfecture de police de Paris, Sabrina est formelle : « bien sûr, je serai présente avec ma famille, j’espère et je souhaite du fond du cœur que ça ne dégénère pas ». Elle pointe une nouvelle fois les « menaces » de la LDJ sur sa page Facebook et estime qu’il « faut arrêter d’accuser les personnes qui sont là pour demander la paix pour le peuple palestinien ».

A noter que nous avons contacté la Ligue de Défense Juive suite aux différentes mises en cause présentes dans ce témoignage, elle n’a pas souhaité nous répondre.

Voir également:

Incidents rue de la Roquette: la police est « responsable »

En relation avec notre enquête au sujet des incidents rue de la Roquette, la rédaction d’i>TELE s’est mobilisée afin d’aller à la rencontre de différents protagonistes qui ont participé à la manifestation pro-Palestine du dimanche 13 juillet dernier, ou de témoins des affrontements qui ont eu lieu rue de la Roquette, aux abords de la synagogue Don Isaac Abravanel. Premier de nos témoignages, celui d’Erwan Simon, qui fait partie du groupe de personne qui ont géré l’organisation de la manifestation qui a réuni 30.000 personnes pour soutenir la population de Gaza, de Barbès à la place de la Bastille.

« Mort aux Arabes, Israël vaincra »

Erwan, placé en tête de cortège, raconte l’arrivée au terme de la manifestation, place de la Bastille, il décrit sur la droite – comme Sabrina – un cortège de policiers derrière lequel se réfugient des individus « casqués », criant « mort aux Arabes, Israël vaincra ». Il fait appel à son expérience des manifestations pro-Palestine depuis des années pour affirmer que « ça ressemble très fortement à la Ligue de Défense Juive », sur « ce type d’action » et « ce type de racisme ».

La police est « responsable », elle a « laissé passer des gens » rue de la roquette

Erwan Simon « était au courant » de l’appel à manifester de la LDJ rue de la Roquette. Il confirme que le service d’ordre de la manifestation pro-Palestine a « demandé à ne pas aller là-bas » (rue de la Roquette, ndlr).

En tant qu’organisateur de la manifestation, il se défend: « vous dites clairement à la police, c’est fini (la manifestation, ndlr) il est 17h30, à ce moment-là, il est de la responsabilité de la police » de maintenir l’ordre. Une question lourde de sens lorsqu’on a regardé la vidéo des altercations : « pourquoi la police n’intervient pas, alors qu’il y a des centaines de policiers partout autour de Bastille ? »

Le discours de la paix de la LDJ « ne marche pas »

Erwan « n’accepte pas » cette « bagarre entre supporters, en train de se battre comme si on était là-bas ». Il estime se battre avec « la justice, le droit ». Il comprend néanmoins « que des gens soient en colère », la LDJ « depuis plus de 10 ans agresse, tape, brûle des lieux, casse des bras », il recense à ce sujet une « vingtaine d’événements » qui mettent en cause les agissements du groupuscule.

Pour lui, « le discours de paix » de la LDJ « ne marche pas », même s’il convient que la colère des manifestants pro-palestiniens qui ont été à l’affrontement ne doit pas « s’exprimer de cette façon ».

Des manifestants pro-palestiniens aux cris de « mort aux juifs » ?

Erwan est formel, il n’a « rien entendu de tel ». En revanche, il a entendu à plusieurs reprises les slogans « mort aux Arabes ». Il estime que les manifestants pro-palestiniens qui ont été à l’affrontement avec la LDJ étaient proches d’une centaine de personnes (« 80 à 100″) mais rappelle qu’il y avait « des centaines de familles dans la rue qui tentaient de rejoindre le métro ».

La synagogue a-t-elle été « assiégée » ?

Erwan pointe une nouvelle fois le rôle de la LDJ dans cette information « totalement erronée » selon lui. La synagogue est « prise par la Ligue de Défense Juive » qui « empêche les gens de sortir, qui leur fait peur ». Pour lui, « il n’y a pas d’attaque de synagogue, jamais ». L’affrontement entre bandes n’a jamais visé le lieu de culte et estime qu’il résulte d’une réponse « à des provocations racistes d’un groupuscule d’extrême-droite et nationaliste ».

« Quelles ont été les consignes du ministère de l’Intérieur ? »

Cette question résonne dans la bouche d’Erwan Simon, « derrière la LDJ, des rangs de policiers », « des gens ont eu des propos racistes et n’ont pas été arrêtés ». Pourquoi le gouvernement français « ne donne pas d’instructions claires pour empêcher tous les racismes » ?

Pour Erwan, « il n’y a pas de forces de l’ordre pro-Israël » comme l’estime Sabrina que nous avons également interrogée, les forces de l’ordre « font le travail qu’on leur demande ». Une question subsiste : « quelles ont été les consignes reçues de la part du ministère de l’Intérieur ? »

Interdiction de la manifestation de samedi à Paris : « on marche sur la tête »

Avant de parler de troubles à l’ordre public, « ce serait bien de les faire arrêter en faisant interdire la Ligue de Défense Juive », selon Erwan. Pour l’un des organisateurs de la manifestation pro-Palestine de dimanche dernier, « on marche sur la tête ». « On a le droit d’aller manifester dans la rue, les forces de l’ordre doivent assurer la protection des gens qui manifestent, c’est la question du droit, notre droit à manifester, l’un des principes de base ».

A noter que nous avons contacté la Ligue de Défense Juive suite aux différentes mises en cause présentes dans ce témoignage, elle n’a pas souhaité nous répondre.

Voir encore:

Affrontements rue de la Roquette : la vérité est toujours la première victime d’un conflit

iTELE
16-07-2014

LE PLUS. Le 13 juillet dernier, à Paris, des heurts ont éclaté entre militants pro-israéliens et pro-palestiniens, en marge d’une manifestation de soutien au peuple de Palestine. Des violences que les médias se sont empressées de dramatiser, estime le journaliste et écrivain Jacques-Marie Bourget. Il s’étonne du traitement médiatique de ces événements, et appelle les médias à plus de retenue.

Édité par Sébastien Billard

Capture d’écran d’une vidéo des affrontements entre pro-israéliens et pro-palestiniens, rue de la Roquette à Paris, le 13 juillet 2014.

Quand un journal aussi sérieux que le quotidien britannique « The Independent » titre « Conflit Israël-Gaza : Des synagogues attaquées quand une manifestation pro-palestinienne à Paris tourne à la violence », c’est qu’il y a danger. Danger pour deux vertus qui n’en sont qu’une : la vérité et l’exercice des libertés.

Sur cette seule base, celle d’un texte publié dans un journal qui fait autorité, tous les confrères du monde peuvent « sourcer » sans conteste leurs papiers sur ce sujet. Et faire naître dans l’esprit de leurs lecteurs des images de barbares antisémites commettant en France les attaques les plus graves.

La machine à mensonges en marche

Comment ce fait-il que « The Independent », véritable institution du journalisme international, publie une information si capitale qu’elle laisse à penser qu’être juif en France serait vivre entre « la valise et le cercueil » ? C’est simple, comme beaucoup de médias, le quotidien anglais a été victime de la rapidité lapidaire d’internet.

Faut-il rappeler la piteuse histoire de Timisoara en Roumanie, à l’heure de la chute de Ceausescu où, en chœur, la presse a rapporté des « massacres » alors que les victimes étaient mortes d’accident ou de maladie…

Comme un boomerang, sur leurs téléphones portables, les envoyés spéciaux recevaient de leurs rédacteurs en chef le buzz internet : « La ‘toile’ est remplie d’infos sur ce massacre. Qu’est-ce que tu attends pour nous envoyer ton papier ? » La machine à mensonges était en marche.

À propos des « hordes à l’assaut de deux synagogues parisiennes », la fumée des lacrymogènes n’était pas encore au ciel que des sites larguaient leurs bombes d’oxygène sur le feu.

Presqu’au hasard, prenons Slate :

« Des centaines de types hurlant ‘Allahou Akbar’ en chargeant contre des policiers. Une synagogue assiégée. Des menaces et des insultes antisémites lancées à des passants terrorisés. »

Ou encore Des Infos.com :

« Alors que des hordes antisémites attaquent des synagogues à Paris ou en Île-de-France sous couvert d’une prétendue solidarité avec les Palestiniens… »

Dreuze Info n’est pas le plus en retrait et publie en instantané des textes aujourd’hui introuvables sur le site :

« Alerte info : attaque violente de deux synagogues à Paris – des Juifs retenus en otage. »

Alarme qui sera bientôt suivi d’un constat à propos du rôle joué par la Ligue de défense juive (LDJ) :

« La LDJ, tant critiquée par la gauche juive, en protégeant la synagogue a sauvé de nombreuses vies. »

Une dramatisation excessive des faits

À lire cela à Hong Kong ou Miami, Paris et la rue de la Roquette, où se trouve une des synagogues « attaquées », sont en guerre. Cette information immédiate, qui tourne le dos à la vérité froide et apaisée, a le pire pour objectif : une dramatisation qui finira par marquer l’histoire, peut importe la réalité.

Selon cette « information/slogan », reprise par des milliers de tweets et SMS qui rajoutent au passage leur couche de fantasmes, c’est en France que se joue la vengeance de Gaza. Pourtant, comme toujours, la vérité est la première victime de ce conflit. Elle dépasse la fiction mais par le bas, décrivant des faits qui n’ont jamais existé.

Laissons la parole à Frédéric Ploquin, inconnu pour une quelconque passion pour la cause palestinienne, il est journaliste à « Marianne », un hebdomadaire qui n’est pas « La France Juive » de Drumont. Ploquin rapporte :

« Place de la Bastille, la dispersion commence, accélérée par une ondée, lorsque des jeunes décident de s’en prendre aux forces de l’ordre. De petites grappes s’engouffrent vers les rues adjacentes. Se donnent-ils le mot ? Ils sont entre 200 et 300 à marcher en direction de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette… où se tient un rassemblement pour la paix en Israël, en présence du grand rabbin.

Les organisateurs affirment avoir alerté le commissariat de police, mais l’information n’est apparemment pas remontée jusqu’à la Préfecture de police. Détail important : s’ils avaient su, les responsables du maintien de l’ordre auraient forcément barré l’accès à la rue.

Les choses se compliquent très vite, car les manifestants ne sont pas les seuls à vouloir en découdre. Une petite centaine de membres de la LDJ (Ligue de défense juive) sont positionnés devant la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette, casques de moto sur la tête et outils (armes blanches) à portée de main.

Loin de rester passive, la petite troupe monte au contact des manifestants, comme ils l’ont déjà fait lors d’une manifestation pro-palestinienne organisée Place Saint-Michel quelques jours auparavant. On frôle la bagarre générale, mais la police parvient à s’interposer. Les assaillants refluent vers le boulevard, tandis que les militants juifs reviennent vers la synagogue. »

Passons au compte rendu publié sur son site par RTL :

« Selon la préfecture de police, ces heurts étaient dus à de petits groupes de jeunes gens qui ont été ‘facilement contenus’. Il y a eu six interpellations. Un certain nombre de manifestants pro-palestiniens ont toutefois tenté de se rendre vers des synagogues voisines, rue de la Roquette et rue des Tournelles, a-t-on dit à l’AFP de source policière. Des CRS sont intervenus pour les repousser et mettre fin à un « début d’échauffourée » avec des membres de la communauté juive devant la synagogue de la Roquette, ce qui a permis d’éviter toute intrusion dans les lieux de culte, a-t-on ajouté. »

Une réalité plus complexe que celle qui a été rapportée

Cet appel à « contre » manifester lancé par la LDJ, celui évoqué par Frédéric Ploquin, ne fait aucun doute, on le trouve sur Twitter et, le 9 juillet, lors d’une manifestation pro-palestinienne à Saint Michel, la faible troupe présente a bien été attaquée par la LDJ.

Dans l’affaire de la rue de la Roquette, il faut se demander pourquoi les « forces de l’ordre » n’ont pas été plus préventives en barrant la rue de la Roquette afin d’éviter les affrontements ?

Rapporté par Abdelkrim Branine, pilier de Beur FM et journaliste connu pour sa rigueur, voici le témoignage d’un membre du service d’ordre de la manif « pro Palestine » :

« Hier, en fin de manifestation, nous nous sommes postés sur la place de la Bastille côté rue de la Roquette en prévision d’une attaque de la Ligue de défense juive suite aux mises en garde de la police. Après l’agression ayant ciblé un rassemblement de soutien à la Palestine mercredi dernier à Saint-Michel, la milice sioniste avait promis, via ses réseaux sociaux de ‘s’en prendre à toutes les manifestations pro-palestiniennes’. Nous étions une vingtaine, tous identifiés et membres du service d’ordre.

Suite à la fermeture du métro Bastille, plusieurs manifestants ont décidé de s’orienter vers le métro Voltaire. Nous leur avons conseillé de prendre plutôt la direction de Ledru-Rollin mais certains ne nous ont pas écoutés. À peine arrivés au milieu de la rue de la Roquette, ces personnes (essentiellement des familles), identifiées par leurs keffiehs et drapeaux, se sont faites accueillir par des insultes et des projectiles provenant du rassemblement sioniste derrière deux lignes de CRS.

Deux personnes sont revenues nous prévenir. Nous avons donc décidé d’aller ramener ceux qui stagnaient encore à proximité de la synagogue de la Roquette afin d’éviter tout débordement. Nous y sommes allés discrètement pour éviter que les centaines de jeunes, déjà échaudés par les précédentes provocations ne nous suivent. Ce qui serait devenu incontrôlable.

Arrivés à une cinquantaine de mètres du rassemblement, une femme, la quarantaine, nous traite de ‘sales pro palos’, hurle ‘Israël vaincra’, s’empare d’une chaise d’une terrasse de café et la jette sur notre ami T. Elle s’enfuit ensuite en courant vers le rassemblement de la LDJ et passe, sans difficultés, les deux lignes de CRS. Nous ne répondons pas à la provocation et continuons à avancer. Nous nous retrouvons alors sous une pluie de projectiles (tessons de bouteille, bouts de bois, casques etc.).

Surexcitée, la cinquantaine de militants de la LDJ ‘mime’ de forcer le barrage de police en agitant des drapeaux israéliens. Une première altercation a lieu. La police les laisse faire. En revanche, les CRS nous matraquent et nous gazent. Un autre groupe de CRS arrive en provenance de la place. Encerclés par la police nous n’avons d’autre alternative que de prendre les rues adjacentes qui débouchent à nouveau vers le lieu des échauffourées. Les CRS continuent de tirer des gaz. »

Poursuivons avec un autre point de vue, qui n’est pas forcément faussé au seul prétexte qu’il est donné par un témoin lié au site Saphirnews.com ayant appelé au soutien des palestiniens de Gaza :

« Le traquenard est bien ficelé : ceux de la LDJ  finissent par se réfugier dans la synagogue, faisant ainsi croire que ces ‘hordes de jeunes’, qui n’étaient pour la plupart pas au courant qu’ils se laissaient amener vers le lieu de culte, sont venus s’en prendre aux ‘juifs’. C’est sur les réseaux sociaux que les mensonges de la LDJ prennent forme. Sous forme de tweets alarmistes, elle déclare que ’60 juifs à mains nues’ ont fait face à ‘300 casseurs armés’, dans un autre post, ‘de haches, de couteaux, de lacrymos, de battes de baseball criant ‘Mort aux juifs’. »

Pour finir, voilà ce qu’a vu et vécu Michèle Sibony, membre de l’Union juive française pour la paix :

« Alors je vais vous dire ce que j’ai vu, moi, pauvre juive infidèle (mais il n’y a de Dieu que Dieu) dans cette manif : sur le boulevard Beaumarchais, à peu près à la hauteur de Chemin vert, quatre ou cinq types de la Ligue de défense juive montés sur un banc, complètement entourés et protégés par deux rangs serrés de CRS qui jetaient projectiles et insultes sur la foule, et les services d’ordre, et les responsables calmant les manifestants : ne vous énervez pas ne répondez pas aux provocations, c’est ce qu’ils attendent… et bien sûr lors de la dispersion il y a eu des courses et des bagarres à l’entrée de la rue de la Roquette… comme prévu si j’ose dire. Et surtout j’ai aussi entendu la foule des manifestants crier depuis Barbès jusqu’à la Bastille : ‘médias français montrez la vérité’, ‘le peuple français veut la vérité. Et j’étais fière aujourd’hui de ce peuple là, de mon peuple. »

Hélas, le gouvernement choisit la voie liberticide

Moralité, vieille loi de presse perdue de vue : avant que l’encre ne coule et que les titres annoncés sur les écrans et leurs « bandes passantes » provoquent leurs déchirures, il serait mieux d’écouter et de réfléchir. De s’informer.

Aujourd’hui, alors que de multiples vidéos viennent conforter la version donnée par les différentes témoins que nous venons de citer, ni Hollande ni Valls n’en tiennent compte. Veulent-ils dire que les hommes et femmes qui s’indignent du sort fait à la Palestine sont des menteurs ? Certes, parfois, il ne sont pas « français de souche », voire musulmans…

Hollande et Valls ont préféré prendre le sombre chemin, la voie liberticide désignée par Estrosi, le « motodidacte » maire de Nice. Des manifestations pro-palestiniennes pourront être interdites en cas de « risques avérés ». C’est comme une deuxième mort.

Voir enfin:

Frédéric Ploquin

Marianne

14 Juillet 2014

Plusieurs manifestations pro-palestiennes ont eu lieu dimanche 13 juillet en France. A Paris, deux synagogues ont été prises pour cible. Voici les faits.

NICOLAS MESSYASZ/SIPA
NICOLAS MESSYASZ/SIPA

Ils sont environ 7 000 à défiler dans les rues de Paris, ce dimanche 13 juillet, entre Barbès et la Bastille, pour dire leur solidarité avec les Palestiniens. Le parcours a été négocié par les responsables du NPA (Nouveau parti anticapitaliste), l’organisation héritière de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire. Pourquoi avoir exigé un parcours qui s’achève à proximité du quartier du Marais, connu pour abriter plusieurs lieux de culte juif ? Le fait est que les responsables de la Préfecture de police l’ont validé.

Parmi les manifestants, de nombreuses femmes, souvent voilées, mais surtout des jeunes venus de la banlieue francilienne. Les premiers slogans ciblent Israël, mais aussi la « complicité française ». Très vite, les « Allah Akbar » (Dieu est grand) dominent, donnant une tonalité fortement religieuse au cortège.
La préfecture de police ne s’attendait pas à une telle mobilisation, mais ses responsables ont vu large au niveau du maintien de l’ordre, puisque cinq « forces mobiles », gendarmes et CRS confondues, ont été mobilisées. C’est à priori suffisant pour sécuriser tous les lieux juifs le long du parcours.

Aucune dégradation, aucun incident n’est signalé en marge du cortège, jusqu’à l’arrivée à proximité de la Bastille. Un premier mouvement de foule est observé à la hauteur de la rue des Tournelles, qui abrite une synagogue. Les gendarmes bloquent la voie et parviennent sans difficulté à refouler les assaillants vers le boulevard Beaumarchais.

Place de la Bastille, la dispersion commence, accélérée par une ondée, lorsque des jeunes décident de s’en prendre aux forces de l’ordre. De petites grappes s’engouffrent vers les rues adjacentes. Se donnent-ils le mot ? Ils sont entre 200 et 300 à marcher en direction de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette… où se tient un rassemblement pour la paix en Israël, en présence du grand rabbin. Les organisateurs affirment avoir alerté le commissariat de police, mais l’information n’est apparemment pas remontée jusqu’à la Préfecture de police. Détail important : s’ils avaient su, les responsables du maintien de l’ordre auraient forcément barré l’accès à la rue.

Les choses se compliquent très vite, car les manifestants ne sont pas les seuls à vouloir en découdre. Une petite centaine de membres de la LDJ (ligue de défense juive) sont positionnés devant la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette, casques de moto sur la tête et outils (armes blanches) à portée de main. Loin de rester passive, la petite troupe monte au contact des manifestants, comme ils l’ont déjà fait lors d’une manifestation pro-palestinienne organisée Place Saint-Michel quelques jours auparavant. On frôle la bagarre générale, mais la police parvient à s’interposer. Les assaillants refluent vers le boulevard, tandis que les militants juifs reviennent vers la synagogue.

Durant le week-end, des manifestations similaires ont été organisées dans plusieurs grandes villes. Selon la police, ils étaient 2 300 à Lille, 1 200 à Marseille et autour de 400 à  Bordeaux. Aucun incident n’a été signalé.

Voir aussi:

Antisémitisme: la France confrontée à une hausse des actes, pas des opinions
Libération/AFP
19 juillet 2014

Les incidents près de synagogues parisiennes sont-ils le signe d’une montée de l’antisémitisme en France? Des experts répondent avec prudence, relevant que si une hausse des actes antisémites est observée, ce n’est pas le cas des opinions.

Plusieurs personnalités de la première communauté juive d’Europe ont exprimé leur émotion après un week-end agité: échauffourées rue de la Roquette à Paris, jet de cocktail Molotov contre une synagogue à Aulnay-sous-Bois, insultes devant une autre à Asnières…

«C’était un peu la Kristallnacht (la Nuit de cristal de 1938 en Allemagne, NDLR) et on a échappé de peu à un véritable pogrom», a estimé le président du Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France (Crif), Roger Cukierman. «Jamais un tel événement ne s’était produit en France depuis le Moyen-Age», a écrit Arno Klarsfeld, ancien avocat des Fils et filles des déportés juifs de France, évoquant les «centaines d’individus» ayant «tenté de prendre d’assaut» la synagogue de la Roquette.

«Ces comparaisons historiques me semblent malvenues pour apprécier la situation», tempère le sociologue Samuel Ghiles-Meilhac auprès de l’AFP. «Les pogroms ou la Nuit de cristal, ce sont des mouvements de violence tolérés voire encouragés par les pouvoirs en place. En France, les autorités publiques réagissent, et absolument rien n’indique qu’une majorité de la population valide cela.»

«L’émotion est très forte, mais elle n’est pas uniquement liée à ce qui s’est passé dimanche, elle est le produit de ces dernières années, avec les actes de Mohamed Merah et Mehdi Nemmouche, l’affaire Dieudonné, la manifestation Jour de colère (où des +Mort aux Juifs!+ ont été lancés, ndlr)… Il y a le sentiment, dans une partie de la communauté juive, qu’une lame de fond antisémite s’est installée», ajoute le chercheur.

Directeur de l’observatoire des radicalités politiques, Jean-Yves Camus a assisté aux heurts près de la Bastille. «Quand bien même il ne se serait rien passé rue de la Roquette, je considère qu’à partir du moment où, dans les rues de Paris, des manifestants brandissent le drapeau noir de l’Etat islamique au Levant ou des mini-roquettes, même en carton-pâte, il y a quelque chose qui ne colle pas.»

Selon le politologue, lors de l’opération de l’armée israélienne Plomb durci en 2009, «des manifestations avaient déjà dérapé», attirant «beaucoup plus de monde».

«La mobilisation régresse en ampleur. Les radicaux sont d’autant plus visibles que, dans la manifestation, le rapport numérique est en leur faveur», note le chercheur.

- «Antisémitisme de contact» -

Les actes antisémites se maintiennent à un niveau élevé depuis 2000 et la seconde Intifada: le Service de protection de la communauté juive (SPCJ), qui en avait relevé 423 en 2013 selon les plaintes comptabilisées par le ministère de l’Intérieur, a noté une nouvelle hausse au premier trimestre 2014, avec 169 actions violentes et menaces recensées, soit 44% de plus que sur la même période de l’an dernier.

Selon le SCPJ, organisation communautaire qui travaille en lien avec les pouvoirs publics, les Juifs sont victimes de 40% des violences physiques racistes en France, alors qu’ils représentent moins de 1% de sa population.

«On constate une montée des actes antisémites le plus souvent en lien avec l’aggravation du conflit israélo-palestinien», commente la politologue Nonna Mayer. Un «antisémitisme de contact», actif là où les deux communautés (juive et musulmane) sont présentes, et s’en prenant à ce qui est visible dans l’espace public: synagogues, mezouzahs sur les portes, hommes portant la kippa…

Que sait-on des auteurs? «On a le sentiment que, pour les rares cas où les agresseurs sont identifiés, les actes sont non seulement imputables à l’extrême-droite mais à des jeunes issus de l’immigration et qui se font une identité de substitution en s’identifiant aux victimes palestiniennes», répond Nonna Mayer, qui invite cependant à ne pas «disserter doctement sur l’antisémitisme chez les jeunes issus de l’immigration» à partir de cas «extrêmement minoritaires».

Ne pas confondre actes et opinions: l’examen de ces dernières montre qu’«il n’y a absolument pas de progression de l’antisémitisme, plutôt la persistance de deux stéréotypes traditionnels, le pouvoir des Juifs et leur rapport à l’argent», constate la sociologue.

«Tous nos sondages montrent que c’est la minorité juive qui est de loin la mieux acceptée, qui a la meilleure image», poursuit-elle. A la différence des populations arabo-musulmanes et roms qui, selon le dernier rapport sur le racisme de la Commission nationale consultativedes droits de l’homme (CCNDH), «sont les cibles privilégiées» de l’actuelle «recrudescence de l’intolérance».

«Les Juifs ne sont victimes d’aucune discrimination sociale en France, ils sont parfaitement intégrés. Et en même temps, comme minorité, ils sont la cible d’une fixation haineuse», tente de résumer Samuel Ghiles-Meilhac, devant une «conjonction de phénomènes dont on n’a pas les cadres d’analyse».

AFP

Voir de même:

Pascal Boniface : «Critiquer la politique d’Israël, ce n’est pas être antisémite»
Alexandre Devecchio
Le Figaro
18/07/2014

FIGAROVOX/GRAND ENTRETIEN- Alors que la préfecture de police de Paris a interdit une manifestation pro-palestienne prévue ce samedi, Pascal Boniface, auteur de la France malade du conflit israélo-palestinien, a accordé un grand entretien à FigaroVox.

Pascal Boniface est directeur de l’IRIS, auteur de Géopolitique du sport. Son dernier livre, La France malade du conflit israélo-palestinien, vient de paraître.

FigaroVox: Après les incidents violents qui ont émaillé les manifestations pro-israélienne dimanche 13 juillet, la préfecture de police a engagé une procédure informelle pour interdire une manifestation de soutien à Gaza prévue samedi. La société Française devient-elle la victime collatérale du conflit du Proche-Orient?

Pascal BONIFACE: La société française ne devient pas la victime collatérale du conflit du Proche-Orient, elle l’est depuis longtemps. La reprise des violences entre Israéliens et Palestiniens a provoqué une poussée de fièvre en France, mais que la France soit malade du conflit israélo-palestinien, n’est hélas pas une nouveauté. Aucun conflit extérieur ne suscite de telles passions, de mises en cause si importantes des individus qui prennent des positions qui déplaisent. Des amis de longue date, qui ne partageant pas le même point de vue sur le conflit et ses conséquences en France, peuvent se brouiller. On ne voit ça pour aucun autre conflit.

Quel est votre point de vue sur l’interdiction des manifestations? Celle-ci ne risque-t-elle pas d’être contre-productive?

Si le but est de ne pas opposer les communautés, interdire les manifestations produit l’effet inverse. Ceux qui veulent manifester peuvent avoir le sentiment que le gouvernement répond aux désirs des institutions communautaires juives. Par ailleurs, il y a une atteinte au droit de manifester. Où placer les limites? Faudra-t-il par la suite interdire les nombreuses et variées manifestations de soutien à Israël? Faudra-t-il interdire les articles critiques sur l’action du gouvernement israélien parce qu’ils seraient censés contribuer à alimenter l’antisémitisme? Le risque est de radicaliser une partie de ceux qui se sentent solidaires des Palestiniens.

La société française ne devient pas la victime collatérale du conflit du Proche-Orient, elle l’est depuis longtemps.

Selon vous, la confusion entre antisémitisme, antisionisme et critique du gouvernement israélien contribue à l’importation de ce conflit en France. Quelle différence faites-vous entre ces différentes notions?

Cette confusion est entretenue par les institutions communautaires et certains intellectuels juifs. L’antisémitisme c’est la haine des juifs, l’antisionisme c’est l’opposition à l’existence de l’État d’Israël. Mais cela n’a rien à voir avec la critique de l’action du gouvernement israélien ou alors des O.N.G. israéliennes, des personnalités comme Abraham Burg, des journalistes comme Gideon Lévy sont antisémites. Lorsque l’on critique la politique de Poutine on n’est pas accusé de faire du racisme anti-russes. Brandir l’accusation infamante d’antisémitisme dès que l’on émet une critique à l’égard du gouvernement israélien a pour fonction de protéger ce dernier. L’immense majorité de ceux qui se déclarent solidaires des Palestiniens combattent l’antisémitisme et toutes les formes de racisme, et se prononcent pour la solution des deux États, donc en faveur de l’existence d’Israël.

Vous-même en taxant le HCI d’islamophobie pour ses prises de positions, notamment contre le port du foulard islamique à l’université, n’opérez-vous pas une confusion dangereuse entre critique légitime du communautarisme et racisme antimusulman?

Lorsque l’été dernier le HCI a proposé d’interdire le port du foulard dans les universités, j’ai en effet estimé qu’il préconisait une mesure visant exclusivement les musulmans (on ne parlait pas des signes religieux en général) qui pouvait rallumer une guerre au moment où une majorité s’accordait pour dire qu’il fallait en rester à la loi de 2004 qui ne concerne pas l’enseignement supérieur.

L’immense majorité de ceux qui se déclarent solidaires des Palestiniens combattent l’antisémitisme et le racisme, et se prononcent pour la solution des deux États donc en faveur de l’existence d’Israël

Selon vous, de nombreux Français non-juifs, en particuliers les musulmans, ont le sentiment qu’il y a un «deux poids, deux mesures» dans la lutte contre le racisme et que les actes antisémites font l’objet d’un traitement médiatique plus conséquent que les autres actes racistes. Le risque de votre démarche n’est-il pas de verser dans la concurrence victimaire et de nourrir le ressentiment d’une certaine jeunesse de banlieue à l’égard des Juifs et de la France plus généralement?

Réclamer la fin du «deux poids, deux mesures» dans la lutte contre l’antisémitisme et le racisme anti-musulmans, qu’il s’agisse des médias ou des responsables politiques ne revient pas à nourrir le ressentiment d’une certaine jeunesse de banlieue, mais au contraire à le combattre. Dénoncer une injustice ou une inégalité de traitement est justement la meilleure façon de combattre la concurrence victimaire. Si chacun est placé sur un pied d’égalité, si tous les enfants de la République sont traités de la même façon il n’y a plus de concurrence victimaire et moins d’espace politique pour le ressentiment.

Avez-vous des exemples précis de «deux poids, deux mesures» …

De nombreuses agressions ont eu lieu contre des femmes voilées, qui n’ont pas suscité la mobilisation,qui aurait eu lieu si des hommes portant la kippa avaient été agressés. Il est vrai que présenter, comme le font certains journalistes, le port du voile comme faisant partie d’un complot pour mettre à genoux la République, a contribué à créer un climat malsain…

Quelques lignes dans Libération du 22 Février 2011, on apprend que la voiture et la moto de Dounia Bouzar, anthropologue spécialiste de l’islam, ont été vandalisées. On pouvait lire sur l’un des véhicules «non aux minarets». Un texte était également glissé: «Pour que Colombey les deux églises ne devienne pas Colombey les deux mosquées. Viendra le moment où les islamo-collabos devront rendre des comptes.» Imaginons que la même mésaventure soit arrivée à BHL ou Finkielkraut, cela aurait fait la Une de tous les journaux et toute la classe politique aurait manifesté sa solidarité.

Selon vous, il faut évoquer tous les racismes. Quel est votre point de vue sur le racisme anti-blanc?

Il peut y avoir des arabes ou des noirs qui soient racistes à l’égard de ceux qui sont différents d’eux. Il peut donc y avoir des blancs victimes de racisme. Mais il n’y a pas un racisme anti-blanc puissant, structuré, s’appuyant sur de nombreux textes, se développant sur les réseaux sociaux, relayé par la presse, soutenu par des déclarations d’hommes politiques, etc. Les blancs en France ne font pas l’objet de discriminations.

Vous avez eu beaucoup de difficultés pour faire éditer votre livre. Certains sujets restent-ils tabous en France? Pourquoi?

Nombreux sont ceux qui ont payé un prix fort pour avoir osé critiquer le gouvernement israélien.

Le conflit israélo-palestinien déclenchant les passions, beaucoup de gens veulent se tenir à l’abri à partir du moment où la critiques politiques du gouvernement israélien est très rapidement assimilée à de l’antisémitisme. Beaucoup de gens ne veulent pas prendre le risque d’être étiquetés de façon si infamante.

La presse française est pourtant loin d’être complaisante à l’égard du gouvernement israelien …

Je ne connais pas d’autres sujets qui paraissent aussi risqués pour les responsables politiques et les médias. Je ne connais pas de cas où des responsables politiques , des journalistes, des universitaires, qui se seraient signalés par un engagement profond, voire inconditionnel, à l’égard d’Israël, en aurait subi des sanctions personnelles ou professionnelles. Nombreux sont ceux qui ont payé un prix fort pour avoir osé critiquer le gouvernement israélien. Il est d’ailleurs assez paradoxal qu’en France, il soit moins risqué pour quiconque de critiquer les autorités nationales que celle d’un pays étranger, en l’occurrence Israël. Je connais beaucoup de personnes qui disent être entièrement d’accord avec mes analyses mais ne veulent pas le déclarer publiquement de peur de représailles. Je pense qu’à terme cette stratégie est très dangereuse même si elle peut s’avérer favorable à court terme à la protection du gouvernement israélien.

Voir par ailleurs:

L’incendie du centre juif était une banale vengeance
La destruction d’un centre social juif à Paris il y a dix jours n’était pas un acte antisémite. Un suspect, ancien gardien du local, de confession juive, était toujours en garde à vue hier soir. Il aurait saccagé les lieux par dépit après son éviction

Christophe Dubois et Geoffroy Tomasovitch

le Parisien

31.08.2004
L’AFFAIRE avait soulevé l’indignation de l’ensemble de la classe politique et des instances religieuses, de Paris à Tel-Aviv. Elle avait relancé le débat sur la montée de l’antisémitisme en France… Finalement, la destruction d’un centre social juif, cible d’un incendie volontaire la nuit du 21 au 22 août derniers dans le XIe arrondissement de Paris, aurait pour origine une banale vengeance personnelle.
C’est désormais la piste privilégiée avec, au coeur de l’enquête, un ancien employé du centre dont les responsables avaient la ferme intention de se séparer.

Des indices matériels

Hier, Raphaël B., un juif séfarade de 52 ans, s’est présenté spontanément à la brigade criminelle à Paris. Natif de Casablanca au Maroc, ce gardien occasionnel du local de la rue Popincourt se savait recherché par la police judiciaire. La brigade criminelle avait resserré ses investigations « à partir de l’enquête de voisinage, des analyses des faits et des témoignages des individus qui fréquentent le centre». Depuis vendredi dernier, une fiche de recherche avait été établie à son nom. Ce sont finalement des membres du centre social qui l’ont convaincu de se présenter au quai des Orfèvres. Raphaël B., qui venait de perdre son appartement, entretenait des relations ombrageuses avec les gestionnaires du centre. Au point que ces derniers avaient décidé de se séparer de lui. Le quinquagénaire, présenté comme un « peu simplet » et « plus ou moins sans domicile fixe », n’aurait pas supporté cette idée, assouvissant sa vengeance en s’attaquant au local de la rue Popincourt souillé par des inscriptions antisémites puis dévasté par le feu.

Selon une source policière, le suspect, « pas causant du tout », n’a pas reconnu l’incendie lors de ses premières heures de garde à vue. Cependant, des indices matériels semblent le désigner. Les policiers ont retrouvé à son domicile, un logement mis à sa disposition par le centre, les clés de la porte de service. Elle avait été retrouvée ouverte par les sapeurs-pompiers à leur arrivée, contrairement à la porte principale. Seules quatre ou cinq personnes possédaient ce trousseau. Toujours chez Raphaël B., les enquêteurs ont mis la main sur deux feutres, un rouge et un noir, qui pourraient correspondre à ceux qui ont servi à maculer le mur du centre social de croix gammées dessinées à l’envers et d’inscriptions antisémites truffées de fautes d’orthographe. Des analyses scientifiques devraient permettre de confirmer formellement ce point.Un « contexte tendu »

Selon nos informations, l’homme a fini par admettre du bout des lèvres être l’auteur de ces inscriptions. Enfin, les policiers disposent d’un autre élément à charge : ils ont localisé l’endroit où le suspect aurait acheté le liquide – de l’essence automobile – utilisé pour allumer le feu.

Le tournant pris par l’enquête semble définitivement contredire la thèse d’un acte antisémite, avancée publiquement par certains, haut et fort et un peu hâtivement. « Les collègues de la Crim n’en ont que plus de mérite. Il n’est pas facile de travailler dans un contexte aussi tendu», relève un policier parisien.

Plusieurs affaires récentes se sont ainsi « dégonflées » après avoir été présentées comme des actes antisémites. Tout le monde se rappelle l’indignation générale soulevée en juillet dernier par le récit de Marie Leblanc, cette jeune femme qui se disait victime d’une sauvage agression dans le RER D. La mythomane avait rapidement avoué aux policiers avoir tout inventé. Quelques jours plus tôt, l’agression à coups de couteau d’un lycéen juif à Epinay (Seine-Saint-Denis) avait provoqué des réactions d’une pareille ampleur. Or, l’auteur, un déséquilibré, ne s’en prenait qu’à ceux ayant le malheur de croiser son chemin…

« Tout cela ne doit pas jeter de discrédit sur la lutte contre l’antisémitisme », a mis en garde hier l’Union des étudiants juifs de France. Car le phénomène est bien réel et en hausse : le ministère de la Justice a déjà recensé 298 actes antisémites depuis début 2004.

Voir encore:

Incendie du centre juif: l’employé inculpé

la Libre Belgique

03 septembre 2004

DIX JOURS APRÈS L’INCENDIE DU CENTRE SOCIAL JUIF DE LA RUE POPINCOURT dans le XIe arrondissement de Paris, Raphaël Benmoha, un homme de confession juive âgé de 52 ans, a été mis en examen mercredi soir par un juge d’instruction parisien et écroué pour avoir mis le feu à l’immeuble. Raphaël Benmoha, qui a nié les faits tout au long des 48 heures de garde à vue à la brigade criminelle, est désormais poursuivi pour «destruction de biens appartenant à autrui par l’effet d’un incendie de nature à créer un danger pour des personnes», a-t-on indiqué de sources judiciaires. Les expertises ont conforté les policiers dans leurs certitudes quant à la culpabilité du suspect. Ce dernier se serait notamment inspiré d’un épisode de la série télévisée de France 2, «PJ», tourné l’an dernier au centre de la rue Popincourt. Cet épisode, qui n’a pas été diffusé dans un contexte tendu à la demande de la communauté juive, montre un feu dans le centre social juif provoqué par un employé licencié.


Algérie: Non à la judaïsation ! (What about the other nakbas? : while salafists protest proposed reopening of the few remaining Algerian synagogues)

17 juillet, 2014
http://scd.rfi.fr/sites/filesrfi/imagecache/rfi_16x9_1024_578/sites/images.rfi.fr/files/aef_image/000_PAR2005052589558_0.jpg

Une ancienne synagogue, à Tlemcen, en Algérie, aujourd’hui transformée en école d’arts martiaux

http://jssnews.com/content/assets/2014/07/roquette.jpg

Une ancienne synagogue, à Paris, en France, aujourd’hui transformée en ambassade

http://sonofeliyahu.com/Images/Jewish%20Population.jpg
http://static.dreuz.info/wp-content/uploads/BsnTYzPCAAAebRp-500x351.jpghttps://pbs.twimg.com/media/Bsq5OXZCEAAfS8J.jpg:largeVous aimerez l’étranger, car vous avez été étrangers dans le pays d’Égypte. Deutéronome 10: 19
On admet généralement que toutes les civilisations ou cultures devraient être traitées comme si elles étaient identiques. Dans le même sens, il s’agirait de nier des choses qui paraissent pourtant évidentes dans la supériorité du judaïque et du chrétien sur le plan de la victime. Mais c’est dans la loi juive qu’il est dit: tu accueilleras l’étranger car tu as été toi-même exilé, humilié, etc. Et ça, c’est unique. Je pense qu’on n’en trouvera jamais l’équivalent mythique. On a donc le droit de dire qu’il apparaît là une attitude nouvelle qui est une réflexion sur soi. On est alors quand même très loin des peuples pour qui les limites de l’humanité s’arrêtent aux limites de la tribu. (…)  Mais il faut distinguer deux choses. Il y a d’abord le texte chrétien qui pénètre lentement dans la conscience des hommes. Et puis il y a la façon dont les hommes l’interprètent. De ce point de vue, il est évident que le Moyen Age n’interprétait pas le christianisme comme nous. Mais nous ne pouvons pas leur en faire le reproche. Pas plus que nous pouvons faire le reproche aux Polynésiens d’avoir été cannibales. Parce que cela fait partie d’un développement historique. (…) Il faut commencer par se souvenir que le nazisme s’est lui-même présenté comme une lutte contre la violence: c’est en se posant en victime du traité de Versailles que Hitler a gagné son pouvoir. Et le communisme lui aussi s’est présenté comme une défense des victimes. Désormais, c’est donc seulement au nom de la lutte contre la violence qu’on peut commettre la violence. Autrement dit, la problématique judaïque et chrétienne est toujours incorporée à nos déviations. (…)  Et notre souci des victimes, pris dans son ensemble comme réalité, n’a pas d’équivalent dans l’histoire des sociétés humaines. (…) Le souci des victimes a (…) unifié le monde. René Girard
L’existence d’Israël pose le problème du droit de vivre en sujets libre et souverains des nations non musulmanes dans l’aire musulmane. L’extermination des Arméniens, d’abord par l’empire ottoman, puis par le nouvel Etat turc a représenté la première répression d’une population dhimmie en quête d’indépendance nationale. Il n’y a quasiment plus de Juifs aujourd’hui dans le monde arabo-islamique et les chrétiens y sont en voie de disparition. Shmuel Trigano
Quand les synagogues se comportent comme des ambassades il n’est pas étonnant qu’elles subissent les mêmes attaques qu’une ambassade. Pierre Minnaert
Je ne vois pas comment on peut lutter contre la dérive antisémite de jeunes de banlieue quand les synagogues soutiennent Israël. Pierre Minaert
Moi je ne pousse à rien, je constate, et je constate aussi la hausse d’un discours anti juifs chez jeunes maghrébins qui s’explique. Pierre Minnaert ‏
 Quand les rabbins mettent Dieu dans un camp comment s’étonner qu’ils soient attaqués par l’autre ? Ils renforcent l’antisémitisme. Pierre Minnaert
Ils sont environ 7 000 à défiler dans les rues de Paris, ce dimanche 13 juillet, entre Barbès et la Bastille, pour dire leur solidarité avec les Palestiniens. Le parcours a été négocié par les responsables du NPA (Nouveau parti anticapitaliste), l’organisation héritière de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire. Pourquoi avoir exigé un parcours qui s’achève à proximité du quartier du Marais, connu pour abriter plusieurs lieux de culte juif ? Le fait est que les responsables de la Préfecture de police l’ont validé. Parmi les manifestants, de nombreuses femmes, souvent voilées, mais surtout des jeunes venus de la banlieue francilienne. Les premiers slogans ciblent Israël, mais aussi la « complicité française ». Très vite, les « Allah Akbar » (Dieu est grand) dominent, donnant une tonalité fortement religieuse au cortège. La préfecture de police ne s’attendait pas à une telle mobilisation, mais ses responsables ont vu large au niveau du maintien de l’ordre, puisque cinq « forces mobiles », gendarmes et CRS confondues, ont été mobilisées. C’est à priori suffisant pour sécuriser tous les lieux juifs le long du parcours. Aucune dégradation, aucun incident n’est signalé en marge du cortège, jusqu’à l’arrivée à proximité de la Bastille. Un premier mouvement de foule est observé à la hauteur de la rue des Tournelles, qui abrite une synagogue. Les gendarmes bloquent la voie et parviennent sans difficulté à refouler les assaillants vers le boulevard Beaumarchais. Place de la Bastille, la dispersion commence, accélérée par une ondée, lorsque des jeunes décident de s’en prendre aux forces de l’ordre. De petites grappes s’engouffrent vers les rues adjacentes. Se donnent-ils le mot ? Ils sont entre 200 et 300 à marcher en direction de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette… où se tient un rassemblement pour la paix en Israël, en présence du grand rabbin. Les organisateurs affirment avoir alerté le commissariat de police, mais l’information n’est apparemment pas remontée jusqu’à la Préfecture de police. Détail important : s’ils avaient su, les responsables du maintien de l’ordre auraient forcément barré l’accès à la rue. Les choses se compliquent très vite, car les manifestants ne sont pas les seuls à vouloir en découdre. Une petite centaine de membres de la LDJ (ligue de défense juive) sont positionnés devant la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette, casques de moto sur la tête et outils (armes blanches) à portée de main. Loin de rester passive, la petite troupe monte au contact des manifestants, comme ils l’ont déjà fait lors d’une manifestation pro-palestinienne organisée Place Saint-Michel quelques jours auparavant. On frôle la bagarre générale, mais la police parvient à s’interposer. Les assaillants refluent vers le boulevard, tandis que les militants juifs reviennent vers la synagogue. Frédéric Ploquin
Une équipe qui a su non seulement séduire au-delà des frontières, mais donner à l’Allemagne une autre image d’elle-même : multiculturelle, ouverte et aimée à l’étranger. Sur les 23 joueurs de la sélection de Joachim Löw, onze sont d’origine étrangère. Outre le trio d’origine polonaise (Piotr Trochowski, Miroslav Klose, Lukas Podolski), qui depuis longtemps n’est plus considéré comme exotique, évoluent sur le terrain Marko Marin, Jérôme Boateng, Dennis Aogo, Sami Khedira ou encore deux joueurs d’origine turque : Serdar Tasci et le jeune prodige Mesut Özil. Tous les observateurs, en Allemagne, s’accordent à reconnaître que cette arrivée de nouveaux talents « venus d’ailleurs » fait beaucoup de bien à l’équipe. « Cela lui donne une aptitude à l’engagement, une envie de reconnaissance, vis-à-vis d’eux-mêmes mais également vis-à-vis des autres », déclarait le ministre de l’intérieur Thomas de Maizière à la Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung. Pour Bastian Schweinsteiger, talentueux milieu de terrain, « les diverses influences vivifient l’équipe, elles lui donnent un tout autre tempérament ». Une diversité qui fait également beaucoup de bien au pays. A Kreuzberg, le quartier de Berlin où vit la plus importante communauté turque du pays, on défend depuis le début du mondial les couleurs de la Mannschaft. « Les performances des jeunes donnent à notre travail un élan énorme », se réjouit Gül Keskinler, une Turque chargée de l’intégration à la Fédération allemande de football. « L’exemple de Mesut Özil est à cet égard particulièrement important, souligne-t-elle. Les footballeurs ont, à travers leur fonction d’exemple, un rôle très fort, ils sont des ambassadeurs pour la jeunesse. » Dans les rues de Berlin, pas de célébration pourtant d’un esprit de fraternité « black blanc beur » tel qu’avait pu le connaître la France après sa victoire au Mondial de 1998. Pour beaucoup d’Allemands, le maillot est rassembleur : peu importe l’origine des joueurs, à la première victoire ils ont été adoptés sans cérémonie. La diversité n’est qu’un élément parmi d’autres dans l’impression de renouveau que donne l’équipe d’Allemagne. « La diversité montre surtout que l’Allemagne va enfin chercher son inspiration ailleurs, estime Holger Cesnat, 35 ans. Le style de l’équipe a changé, il est plus léger, parce que Joachim Löw observe le football pratiqué au-delà des frontières et a rompu avec le style qui prédominait dans le football allemand jusqu’ici. » Le Monde
Cela a commencé en 2006, c’était la première fois qu’on osait être fier de son pays, fier de son équipe, cela a libéré beaucoup de choses. Rainer Stich
C’est la première fois que l’équipe est si appréciée à l’étranger. Même en Israël on trouve la Mannschaft sympathique. C’est un sentiment auquel nous ne sommes pas habitués. Emilie Parker
 Cette idée de la France ‘black blanc beur’, c’est quelque chose qui les a beaucoup marqués pour révolutionner leur football. Jean-Jacques Bourdin (RMC)
La danse des Gauchos était de mauvais goût (…) Subitement, la modestie allemande a disparu dans le triomphe. Tagesspiegel (quotidien berlinois)
Plusieurs médias allemands critiquaient mercredi la «Nationalmannschaft» championne du monde pour avoir interprété lors des célébrations du titre mardi à Berlin une danse moquant les adversaires argentins vaincus en finale (1-0 a.p.). Mimant des Argentins courbés, comme par le désespoir et le poids de la défaite, six joueurs de l’équipe ont chanté : «ainsi marchent les Gauchos, les Gauchos marchent ainsi». Puis se relevant bien droits et fiers, ils ont continué : «Ainsi marchent les Allemands, les Allemands marchent ainsi». Ils ont répété la séquence plusieurs fois sous les applaudissements, dans un pays où toute expression ostentatoire de fierté nationale reste sujet à controverse. Libération
Maybe to explain what they sing. They sing: « So gehen die Gauchos, die Gauchos die gehen so. So gehen die Deutschen, die Deutschen die gehen so. » (« That’s how the Gauchos walk, the Gauchos walk like this. That’s how the Germans walk, the Germans walk like this. ») And it’s important to note that this song is a very common song in Germany for teasing the team that has lost the match. So they didn’t make an entirely new song up by themselves. Reddit
Israël existe et continuera à exister jusqu’à ce que l’islam l’abroge comme il a abrogé ce qui l’a précédé. Hasan al-Bannâ (préambule de la charte du Hamas, 1988)
Le Mouvement de la Résistance Islamique est un mouvement palestinien spécifique qui fait allégeance à Allah et à sa voie, l’islam. Il lutte pour hisser la bannière de l’islam sur chaque pouce de la Palestine. Charte du Hamas (Article six)
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Cela prouve le caractère de notre noble peuple, combattant du djihad, qui défend ses droits et ses demeures le torse nu, avec son sang. La politique d’un peuple qui affronte les avions israéliens la poitrine nue, pour protéger ses habitations, s’est révélée efficace contre l’occupation. Cette politique reflète la nature de notre peuple brave et courageux. Nous, au Hamas, appelons notre peuple à adopter cette politique, pour protéger les maisons palestiniennes. Sami Abu Zuhri (porte-parole du Hamas)
I didn’t actually know that the picture was recycled. I guess I just used it as an illustration – people don’t need to take it as a literal account. If you think of bombs going off that’s pretty much what it looks like.. Twitteuse britannique (16 ans)
Il est interdit de tuer, blesser ou capturer un adversaire en recourant à la perfidie. Constituent une perfidie les actes faisant appel, avec l’intention de la tromper, à la bonne foi d’un adversaire pour lui faire croire qu’il a le droit de recevoir ou l’obligation d’accorder la protection prévue par les règles du droit international applicable dans les conflits armés. Les actes suivants sont des exemples de perfidie : (…) c) feindre d’avoir le statut de civil ou de non-combattant; d) feindre d’avoir un statut protégé en utilisant des signes emblèmes ou uniformes des Nations Unies (…) Protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève de 1949 relatif à la protection des victimes des conflits armés internationaux, I, article 37, alinéa 1, 1977)
Sont interdits les actes ou menaces de violence dont le but principal est de répandre la terreur parmi la population civile. (…) Les personnes civiles jouissent de la protection accordée par la présente Section, sauf si elles participent directement aux hostilités et pendant la durée de cette participation. Protocole additionnel aux Conventions de Genève de 1949 (I, art. 51, al. 2 & 3)
See, the Hamas and the other terrorist groups like Islamic Jihad are firing from Gaza when their rocketeers and their command posts are embedded in homes, hospitals, next to kindergartens, mosques. And so we are trying to operate, to target them surgically, but the difference between us is that we’re using missile defense to protect our civilians, and they’re using their civilians to protect their missiles. So naturally they’re responsible for all the civilian deaths that occur accidentally. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
Lors d’une inspection, l’agence pour l’aide aux réfugiés palestiniens (UNRWA) a trouvé « environ 20 roquettes cachées » dans une école vide située dans la bande de Gaza, un « premier » incident du genre. L’Express
If 80 rockets would be fired upon the citizens of Great Britain, No way I wouldn’t be taking action. If an Israeli prime minister would fail to take action, people would say that this is unacceptable. Tony Blair
Depuis le début de l’opération, au moins 35 bâtiments résidentiels auraient été visés et détruits, entraînant dans la majorité des pertes civiles enregistrées jusqu’à présent, y compris une attaque le 8 Juillet à Khan Younis qui a tué sept civils, dont trois enfants, et blessé 25 autres. Dans la plupart des cas, avant les attaques, les habitants ont été avertis de quitter, que ce soit via des appels téléphoniques de l’armée d’Israël ou par des tirs de missiles d’avertissement. Rapport ONU (09.07.14)
Selon bon nombre de ses détracteurs, Israël serait en train de massacrer des civils à Gaza. Pour un membre arabe du parlement israélien, son armée «élimine délibérément des familles entières». Pour Mahmoud Abbas, président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Israël est en train de commettre un «génocide –le meurtre de familles entières». Et selon l’Iran, il s’agit de «massacres contre des Palestiniens sans défense». De telles accusations sont fausses. Selon les standards de la guerre, les efforts que déploie Israël pour épargner les civils sont exemplaires. Ce combat n’a pas été décidé par Israël. Selon le Hamas et le Djihad Islamique, les deux organisations terroristes qui contrôlent Gaza, Israël aurait provoqué ces hostilités en arrêtant en Cisjordanie des membres du Hamas. Mais des arrestations sur un territoire ne justifient pas des bombardements aériens sur un autre. Israël ne s’en est pris à Gaza qu’après le tir de plus de 150 roquettes sur son territoire et le refus par les terroristes d’un cessez-le-feu. Plusieurs images publiées ces derniers jours et censées prouver le carnage des bombes israéliennes sont des faux, empruntés à d’autres guerres. Mercredi après-midi, le bilan humain oscillait entre 30 et 50 personnes, voire davantage, une fourchette dépendant du moment choisi pour marquer le début de ce conflit. La moindre mort est tragique, et plus les hostilités dureront, plus le bilan s’alourdira. Pour autant, en sachant qu’Israël a lancé plus de 500 raids aériens, vous pouvez en tirer deux conclusions. La première, c’est que l’armée israélienne est misérablement nulle pour tuer des gens. La seconde, et la plus plausible, c’est qu’elle fait au contraire tout son possible pour ne pas en tuer. Le ministre israélien de la Défense a admis que ses offensives avaient ciblé des «domiciles de terroristes», mais aussi des «armes, des infrastructures terroristes, des systèmes de commandements, des institutions du Hamas [et] des bâtiments officiels». Les logements étaient ceux de chefs militaires du Hamas. Selon les dires d’un officiel israélien, «au Hamas, le moindre petit commandant de brigade n’a désormais plus de maison où rentrer chez lui». En termes légaux, Israël justifie ces attaques en affirmant que ces maisons étaient des «centres de commandement terroristes», impliqués dans des tirs de roquette et autres «activités terroristes». Mais si Israël a parfois tenté (et réussi) de tuer des leaders du Hamas dans leurs voitures, son armée a toujours évité de se prendre sans sommation à leurs maisons. La dernière fois qu’Israël a tiré sur des bâtiments civils à Gaza, voici un an et demi, ses habitants ont été au préalable prévenus par téléphone ou par le parachutage de tracts pour qu’ils quittent les lieux. L’armée israélienne se sert aussi de fusées éclairantes ou de mortiers à faibles charges explosives (la consigne dite du «toquer au toit») pour signaler la survenue de bombardements. (…) Le bilan civil le plus grave –sept morts, selon les informations les plus récentes– est survenu dans le bombardement d’une maison située dans la ville de Khan Younès et appartenant à un leader terroriste. Pour le Hamas, il s’agit d’un «massacre contre des femmes et des enfants». Mais selon des voisins, la famille a été prévenue à la fois par téléphone et par un tir de mortier léger sur le toit. Selon un membre des services de sécurité israéliens, les forces israéliennes ont attendu que la famille quitte le bâtiment pour tirer leur missile. Il ne comprend pas pourquoi des membres de cette famille, avec visiblement certains de leurs voisins, sont retournés à l’intérieur. Pour des personnes vivant sur place, c’est parce qu’ils ont voulu «former un bouclier humain». (…) Difficile, très difficile à dire. Mais, dans ce conflit, quiconque se préoccupe des civils tués délibérément devrait d’abord se tourner vers le Hamas. Les tirs de roquettes de Gaza vers Israël ont commencé bien avant l’offensive israélienne sur Gaza. Au départ, les roquettes sont une idée du Djihad Islamique. Mais, ces derniers jours, le Hamas ne s’est pas fait prier pour la reprendre, et a revendiqué plusieurs tirs de missiles, tombés entre autres sur Tel Aviv, Jérusalem et Haïfa. William Saletan (Slate)
Trente pour cent des 172 Palestiniens qui ont perdu la vie ces sept derniers jours et nuits dans la bande de Gaza sont des femmes et des enfants, selon l’agence de presse allemande (DPA). Cette dernière s’est basée sur une liste des victimes fournie par le ministère de la Santé à Gaza. Au total des sept journées d’offensives contre Gaza, ce sont 29 femmes qui ont péri, dont sept étaient âgées de moins de 18 ans. On retrouve également parmi les victimes 24 hommes de moins de 18 ans. Environ la moitié sont de jeunes garçons âgés de dix ans ou moins, le plus jeune est un bébé âgé de 18 mois. Il n’est pas immédiatement possible de vérifier combien de civils se trouvent parmi les 119 hommes tués. Deux d’entre eux étaient âgés de 75 et 80 ans. Libre Belgique
Il est 15 h 20 à Gaza, mercredi 16 juillet, quand une terrible déflagration ébranle le front de mer. Quelques minutes plus tard, une seconde frappe retentit. Touchée par ce qui semble être un obus tiré d’un navire israélien, une bicoque de pêcheurs, construite sur la digue du port de pêche, est réduite en un tas de parpaings éclatés et de tôles noircies. A côté des décombres, les corps en partie calcinés de quatre garçons de la même famille, Mohammad, Ahed, Zakariya et Ismail. Ils avaient entre 9 et 11 ans. Les enfants Bakr jouaient sur la plage depuis quelques heures. Certains avaient apporté un ballon, d’autres pêchaient ou grattaient le sable à la recherche de morceaux de métal à revendre. Après la première frappe millimétrée sur la cabane, il semble que les enfants, blessés, aient été pris sciemment pour cible alors qu’ils remontaient la plage pour se mettre à l’abri. A quelques mètres de la cahute, Mohammad Abou Watfah a assisté au carnage : «Les enfants étaient paniqués, ils se sont mis à courir vers la plage. Un deuxième obus les a suivis. Il est tombé à quelques mètres et j’ai perdu connaissance», raconte péniblement le commerçant, touché à l’estomac par des éclats. Le corps ensanglanté, hors d’haleine, des enfants blessés parviennent à la terrasse d’un établissement du bord de mer, alors que résonne l’explosion d’un troisième obus. (…) Dans le service de chirurgie, Tagred, une autre mère du clan Bakr, veille sur son fils, Ahmad, 13 ans, touché à la poitrine par des éclats d’obus: «Ce ne sont que des enfants. Ils ne faisaient rien de mal contre les Israéliens, pleure d’incompréhension la mère palestinienne. Mon fils jouait simplement avec ses cousins et maintenant ils sont tous morts.» «Comment peut-on tirer sur des enfants qui courent ?» L’armée israélienne a annoncé, dans la soirée, qu’elle enquêtait «consciencieusement» pour déterminer les circonstances exactes de la mort des quatre enfants. Expliquant que les frappes visaient, en principe, des membres du Hamas, Tsahal n’a pas exclu la possibilité d’une «erreur» dans cette attaque, dont l’étendue sera de toute évidence difficile à justifier. Le Monde
Mercredi, sous les yeux des journalistes occidentaux, quatre enfants palestiniens ont été tués sur une plage de Gaza après un tir ou une explosion. Immédiatement, les médias occidentaux attribuent leur mort à deux navires de guerre de l’armée israélienne situés au large de la plage. Le 9 juin 2006, sur cette même plage, huit personnes (dont trois enfants) d’une même famille avaient été tuées, et plus de trente autres civils furent blessés par une explosion dont l’origine a été attribuée à l’armée israélienne par les médias occidentaux. Or, après enquête de l’armée israélienne il s’est avéré que l’explosion sur la plage n’a pas pu être provoquée par la marine israélienne car il s’est écoulé 10 minutes entre le dernier tir d’obus et le drame. Les éclats de projectiles qui ont été retirés des corps des personnes blessées ne correspondent à aucune des armes en circulation dans l’armée israélienne. D’autre part, les services de renseignement israéliens et égyptiens sont arrivés à la conclusion que la famille a été victime d’une mine installée par les artificiers du Hamas la semaine précédente, afin d’empêcher les commandos marines israéliens de débarquer sur la côte et d’intercepter ses lanceurs de roquettes. Dans les deux cas, et dans de nombreux autres cas, comme dans celui de l’affaire Al-Dura, il est intéressant de souligner la présence au même moment, d’équipes de télévisions filmant en direct ce qui semble être un non-événement, et qualifié après par les médias de « massacre ». Le Monde juif
So far, 194 Palestinians been killed during Operation Protective Edge; that’s already a higher death toll than that of the entire 2012 Operation Pillar of Defense. Or at least that’s what’s reported in the press, internationally but also in Israel. The truth is that the number of casualties, and the percentage of civilians among the dead, comes exclusively from Palestinian sources. Israel only publishes its version of the body count — which is always significantly lower than the Palestinian account — weeks after such operations end. Meanwhile, the damage to Israel’s reputation is done. During Pillar of Defense, 160 Palestinians were killed, 55 “militants” and 105 civilians, according to Palestinian sources. According to the IDF, 177 Palestinians were killed during the weeklong campaign — about 120 of whom were enemy combatants. A report by the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center says 101 of those killed were terrorists, while 68 were noncombatants. B’Tselem claims 62 combatants and 87 civilians died. And yet, the figures from the Gazan ministry are routinely adopted, unquestioned, by the United Nations. Times of Israel
Hamas and affiliate militant factions out of the Gaza Strip are so far rejecting an Egyptian-proposed cease-fire, having launched far more than 100 rockets since the cease-fire proposal. In exposing Israel’s inability to stem the rocket flow, Hamas is trying to claim a symbolic victory over Israel. Hamas’ spin aside, the military reality paints a very different picture.
Nonstate actors such as Hamas and many of its peer organizations, of course, need some ability to exert force if they are to influence the actions of a state whose imperatives run counter to their own. The Gaza Strip is small and its resource base is limited, reducing the options for force. This makes cheap asymmetric tactics and strategies ideal. For Gaza and its militants, terrorizing the Israeli population through limited force often has previously influenced, constrained or forced the hand of the Israeli government and its subsequent policies. It accomplished this with assassinations, ambushes or suicide bombings targeting security forces or Israeli citizens. A confluence of events later led to a gradual evolution in the conflict. By 2006, the security wall that surrounds and contains the Gaza Strip had eliminated militants’ ability to directly engage the Israeli populace and security personnel, and Israel Defense Forces had completely withdrawn from the territory. Meanwhile, Hezbollah had demonstrated the effectiveness of relatively cheap artillery rockets volleyed into Israel in a high enough volume to seriously disrupt the daily life of Israeli life. While artillery rockets were not new to Gaza, the conditions were ripe for this tactic’s adoption. The intent was to build up a substantial arsenal of the weapons and increase their range to threaten Israel’s entire population as much as possible. (Increased range was also needed to overcome Israel’s growing defensive capabilities.) This would be the asymmetric threat that could be used to project force, albeit limited force, from Gaza. (…) Much of this cyclical nature is because both sides are operating under serious limitations, preventing either from gaining « victory » or some form of permanent resolution. For Israel there are two main limitations. The first is the intelligence gaps created by monitoring from the outside and having no permanent presence on the ground. The Israelis have been unable to stop the rockets from getting into Gaza, cannot be sure where they are exactly and can only degrade the ability to launch with airstrikes and naval strikes. This leads to the second constraint, which is the cost associated with overcoming this gap by doing a serious and comprehensive clearing of the entire strip. Though Operation Cast Lead did have a ground component, it was limited and did not enter the major urban areas or serious tunnel networks within them. This is exactly where many of the resources associated with the rocket threat reside. The intense urban operation that would result if Israeli forces entered those areas would have a huge cost in casualties for Israeli personnel and for civilians, the latter resulting in intense international and domestic pressure being brought to bear against the Israeli government. For decision-makers, the consequences of sitting back and absorbing rocket attacks versus trying to comprehensively accomplish the military objective of eliminating this capability keep weighing on the side of managing the problem from a distance. But the longer the conflict lasts, the more complications the militants in Gaza face as they see their threat of force erode with time. Adversaries adapt to tactics, and in this case Israel Defense Forces have steadily improved their ability to mitigate the disruptive ability of these attacks through a combination of responsive air power and Iron Dome batteries that effectively provide protection to urban populations. Subsequently, the terror and disruption visited upon the Israeli population diminishes slightly, and the pressures on the government lessen. So militants seem to be in a position to maintain their tool, but that tool is becoming less effective and imposing fewer costs. This raises the question of what new tactic or capability the militants will adopt next to exert new costs on Israel. Many surmise the incident that started this latest round — the kidnapping and killing of three Israeli teenagers in the West Bank — might become the tactic of choice if it proves effective in accomplishing its goals and is repeatable. The militants will also almost certainly attempt to refine their projectiles’ accuracy and range through the acquisition of more advanced rockets or even missiles. What is certain regarding the latest round of fighting is that we are far from seeing victory or any form of conclusion and that the conflict will continue to evolve. Stratfor
After Algeria gained its independence, according to its 1963 Nationality Code, it authorized citizenship only to Muslims. It extended citizenship only to those individuals whose fathers and paternal grandfathers were personally Muslim.  All but 6,500 of the country’s 140,000 Jews were essentially driven into exile by this change. Some 130,000 took advantage of their French citizenship and moved to France along with the pied-noirs, settlers of French ancestry. Moroccan Jews who were living in Algeria and Jews from the M’zab Valley in the Algerian Sahara, who did not have French citizenship, as well as a small number of Algerian Jews from Constantine, emigrated to Israel at that time. After Houari Boumediene came to power in 1965, Jews were persecuted in Algeria, facing social and political discrimination and heavy taxes. In 1967-68 the government seized all but one of the country’s synagogues and converted them to mosques. By 1969, fewer than 1,000 Jews were still living in Algeria. Only 50 Jews remained in Algeria in the 1990s. Wikipedia
À la suite des accords d’Évian en mars 1962, les départs sont massifs. Le contexte du conflit israélo-arabe va contribuer à envenimer les relations entre les Musulmans et les Juifs d’Algérie dans les années qui vont suivre. L’indépendance de l’Algérie est proclamée le 5 juillet 1962, et en octobre, on ne compte plus que 25 000 Juifs en Algérie dont 6000 à Alger. En 1971, il n’en reste plus qu’un millier117. En 1975, la Grande synagogue d’Oran, comme toutes les autres, est transformée en mosquée. À l’instar de nombreux cimetières chrétiens, beaucoup de cimetières juifs sont profanés. En 1982, on compte encore environ 200 Juifs, la guerre civile algérienne des années 1990 provoque le départ des derniers membres de la communauté. Le dossier juif reste un sujet tabou car les Juifs résidant dans le pays n’ont pas de personnalités connues, mis à part quelques conseillers ayant travaillé avec le ministre algérien du commerce Ghazi Hidoussi, à cause de la sensibilité du dossier et de son lien avec Israël. Certains partis, notamment nationalistes et islamistes, comme le Mouvement de la renaissance islamique, réagissent violemment à l’accréditation du Lions Clubs et du Rotary Club qu’ils présument d’obédience sioniste et franc-maçonne ainsi qu’à la poignée de main du président algérien Abdelaziz Bouteflika et du premier ministre israélien Ehud Barak, lors des funérailles du roi Hassan II au Maroc en juillet 1999. En 1999, Abdelaziz Bouteflika rend un hommage appuyé aux Juifs constantinois, à l’occasion du 2500e anniversaire de cette ville. En 2000, la tournée qu’Enrico Macias doit effectuer sur sa terre natale est annulée à la suite de pressions internes et malgré l’invitation officielle de la présidence. En mars 2003, un plan d’action avait été mis en place par les autorités françaises et algériennes, pour que les cimetières juifs retrouvent leur dignité et ce, selon un programme établi annuellement. Le projet reste cependant lettre morte dans des dizaines de cimetières communaux dans lesquels existent des carrés juifs. En 2005, deux évènements marquent l’actualité : la tenue d’un colloque des Juifs de Constantine à Jérusalem provoquant une rumeur selon laquelle ils auraient fait une demande d’indemnisation auprès du gouvernement de l’Algérie, à la suite de leur départ en 1962. Cette information sera démentie par les autorités d’Alger et la visite à Tlemcen de 130 Juifs originaires de cette ville, fait sans précédent depuis l’indépendance, est vécue dans l’émotion tant du côté des Juifs Algériens que de celui des Musulmans Algériens[réf. nécessaire]. En décembre 2007, Enrico Macias bien qu’invité par le président français Sarkozy, à l’accompagner en visite officielle en Algérie, il doit renoncer face à l’hostilité et au refus du ministre algérien des Anciens Combattants. En 2009, l’État algérien accrédite un organisme représentant la religion hébraïque en Algérie, présidé par Roger Saïd. On recense 25 synagogues, abandonnées pour la plupart, les Juifs d’Algérie ayant peur d’organiser des cérémonies de culte pour des raisons sécuritaires. Cet organisme devra également agir, en coordination avec le ministère des affaires religieuses sur l’état des tombes juives, particulièrement à Constantine, Blida et Tlemcen[réf. nécessaire]. En janvier 2010, le dernier Juif vivant en Oranie décède à l’hôpital civil d’Oran. En août 2012, le représentant de la communauté juive en Algérie, maitre Roger Saïd chargé de veiller sur les intérêts judéo-algériens décède à Paris. Wikipedia
Although much is heard about the plight of the Palestinian refugees from the aftermath of the 1948 Israeli War of Independence and the 1967 Six Day War, little is said about the hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forced to flee from Arab states before and after the creation of Israel. In fact, these refugees were largely forgotten because they were assimilated into their new homes, most in Israel, and neither the United Nations nor any other international agency took up their cause or demanded restitution for the property and money taken from them. In 1945, roughly 1 million Jews lived peacefully in the various Arab states of the Middle East, many of them in communities that had existed for thousands of years. After the Arabs rejected the United Nations decision to partition Palestine and create a Jewish state, however, the Jews of the Arab lands became targets of their own governments’ anti-Zionist fervor. As Egypt’s delegate to the UN in 1947 chillingly told the General Assembly: “The lives of one million Jews in Muslim countries will be jeopardized by partition.” The dire warning quickly became the brutal reality. Throughout 1947 and 1948, Jews in Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Syria, and Yemen (Aden) were persecuted, their property and belongings were confiscated, and they were subjected to severe anti-Jewish riots instigated by the governments. In Iraq, Zionism was made a capital crime. In Syria, anti-Jewish pogroms erupted in Aleppo and the government froze all Jewish bank accounts. In Egypt, bombs were detonated in the Jewish quarter, killing dozens. In Algeria, anti-Jewish decrees were swiftly instituted and in Yemen, bloody pogroms led to the death of nearly 100 Jews. Jewish virtual library

Attention: des réfugiés peuvent en cacher d’autres !

A l’heure où, entre boucliers humains et photos et chiffres trafiqués, le martyre du peuple palestinien fait à nouveau la une de nos journaux

Et que nos chères têtes blondes en profitent pour crier « mort aux juifs » à tous les coins de rue et préférentiellement devant les nouvelles ambassades que sont devenues – dixit un responsable écologiste français –  les synagogues

Pendant que 70 ans après l’abomination nazie outre-rhin, l’équipe de la diversité que tout le monde attendait se voit crucifier par sa propre presse pour avoir fêté leur victoire en Coupe du monde en chambrant comme c’est l‘habitude dans leur pays leurs adversaires qualifiés pour l’occasion de gauchos …

Et que, de l’autre côté de la Méditerrannée, on tente de « rejudaïser » un pays qui, entre exil forcé, synagogues transformées en mosquées ou désaffectées et carrés juifs profanés,  avait réussi en un peu plus de 60 ans à effacer 2 000 ans et 90% de sa présence juive   …

Retour sur ces réfugiés dont on ne parle jamais …

A savoir, entre l’extermination des chrétiens arméniens, assyriens ou grecs de Turquie et l’actuel nettoyage ethnique des mêmes chrétiens du reste du Monde musulman, ces quelque 900 000 juifs ethniquement épurés du Monde arabe …

Fact Sheet:
Jewish Refugees from Arab Countries

(Updated January 2013)


Although much is heard about the plight of the Palestinian refugees from the aftermath of the 1948 Israeli War of Independence and the 1967 Six Day War, little is said about the hundreds of thousands of Jews who were forced to flee from Arab states before and after the creation of Israel. In fact, these refugees were largely forgotten because they were assimilated into their new homes, most in Israel, and neither the United Nations nor any other international agency took up their cause or demanded restitution for the property and money taken from them.

Yemenite Jews
Yemenite Jews flee during Operation Magic Carpet

In 1945, roughly 1 million Jews lived peacefully in the various Arab states of the Middle East, many of them in communities that had existed for thousands of years. After the Arabs rejected the United Nations decision to partition Palestine and create a Jewish state, however, the Jews of the Arab lands became targets of their own governments’ anti-Zionist fervor. As Egypt’s delegate to the UN in 1947 chillingly told the General Assembly: “The lives of one million Jews in Muslim countries will be jeopardized by partition.” The dire warning quickly became the brutal reality.

Throughout 1947 and 1948, Jews in Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Syria, and Yemen (Aden) were persecuted, their property and belongings were confiscated, and they were subjected to severe anti-Jewish riots instigated by the governments. In Iraq, Zionism was made a capital crime. In Syria, anti-Jewish pogroms erupted in Aleppo and the government froze all Jewish bank accounts. In Egypt, bombs were detonated in the Jewish quarter, killing dozens. In Algeria, anti-Jewish decrees were swiftly instituted and in Yemen, bloody pogroms led to the death of nearly 100 Jews.

In January 1948, the president of the World Jewish Congress, Dr. Stephen Wise, appealed to U.S. Secretary of State George Marshall: “Between 800,000 and a million Jews in the Middle East and North Africa, exclusive of Palestine, are in ‘the greatest danger of destruction’ at the hands of Moslems being incited to holy war over the Partition of Palestine … Acts of violence already perpetrated, together with those contemplated, being clearly aimed at the total destruction of the Jews, constitute genocide, which under the resolutions of the General Assembly is a crime against humanity. » In May 1948, the New York Times echoed Wise’s appeal, and ran an article headlined, « Jews in Grave Danger in all Muslim Lands: Nine Hundred Thousand in Africa and Asia face wrath of their foes. »

With their lives in danger and the situation growing ever more perilous, the Jews of the Arab World fled their homes as refugees.

Of the 820,000 Jewish refugees between 1948 and 1972, more than 200,000 found refuge in Europe and North America while 586,000 were resettled in Israel – at great expense to the Israeli government, and without any compensation from the Arab governments who had confiscated their possessions. The majority of the Jewish refugees left their homes penniless and destitute and with nothing more than the shirts on their backs. These Jews, however, had no desire to be repatriated in the Arab World and little is heard about them because they did not remain refugees for long.

In Israel, a newly independent country that was still facing existential threats to its survival, the influx of immigrants nearly doubled the population and a put a great strain on an economy struggling to just meet the needs of its existing population.  The Jewish State, however, never considered turning away the refugees and, over the years, worked to absorb them into society.

Iraqi Jews
Iraqi Jews flee as refugees to Israel

Overall, the number of Jews fleeing Arab countries for Israel in the years following Israel’s independence was nearly double the number of Arabs leaving Palestine. The contrast between the Jewish refugees and the Palestinian refugees grows even starker considering the difference in cultural and geographic dislocation – most of the Jewish refugees traveled hundreds or thousands of miles to a tiny country whose inhabitants spoke a different language and lived with a vastly different culture. Most Palestinian refugees traveled but a few miles to the other side of the 1949 armistice lines while remaining inside a linguistically, culturally and ethnically similar society.

Moreover, the value of Jewish property left behind and confiscated by the Arab governments is estimated to be at least 50 percent higher than the total value of assets lost by the Palestinian refugees.  In the 1950’s, John Measham Berncastle, under the aegis of the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, estimated that total assets lost by Palestinian refugees from 1948 – including land, buildings, movable property, and frozen bank accounts – amounted to roughly $350 million ($650 per refugee). Adding in an additional $100 million for assets lost by Palestinian refugees as a result of the Six Day War, an approximate total is $450 million – $4.4 billion in 2012 prices. By contrast, the value of assets lost by the Jewish refugees – compiled by a similar methodology – is estimated at $700 million – roughly $6.7 billion today.

To date, more than 100 UN resolutions have been passed referring explicitly to the fate of the Palestinian refugees. Not one has specifically addressed Jewish refugees. Additionally, the United Nations created a organization, UNRWA, to solely handle Palestinian refugees while all other refugees are handled collectively by UNHRC. The UN even defines Palestinian refugees differently than every other refugee population, setting distinctions that have allowed their numbers to grow exponentially so that nearly 5 million are now considered refugees despite the fact that the number estimated to have fled their homes is only approximately 400-700,000.

Today, nearly half of Israel’s native population descends from the Jewish refugees of the Arab world and their rights must be recognized alongside any discussion of the rights for Palestinian refugees and their descendants. In Israel, the issue of the Jewish refugees has been of preeminent importance during all peace negotiations with the Palestinians, including the 1993 Oslo Accords and the 2000 Camp David summit.  Under the leadership of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon, Israel is now calling on United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon to hold a summit specifically the issue of the Jewish refugees.

In the United States, led by Congressman Jerrold Nadler, efforts are also being made to ensure the world recognizes the plight of these Jewish refugees.  In July 2012, Nadler led a bipartisan group of six congressmen in sponsoring H.R. 6242, legislation that would require the President to submit a regular report to Congress on actions taken relating to the resolution of the Jewish refugee issue. Nadler’s latest effort comes more than four years after he successfully passed H.R. 185, a non-binding resolution asking the President to ensure that explicit reference is made to the Jewish refugees in any international forum discussing Middle East or Palestinian refugees.

Use the resource below to learn more about
the Jewish Refugees from the Arab World:

AlgeriaEgyptIraqLibyaMoroccoSyriaTunisiaYemen (Aden)

Jews in the Arab World
1948
1958
1968
1978
2011
Algeria
140,000
130,000
1,500
1,000
1,500
Egypt
75,000
40,000
1,000
400
100
Iraq
135,000
6,000
2,500
350
7
Libya
38,000
3,750
100
40
0
Morocco
265,000
200,000
50,000
18,000
4,000
Syria
30,000
5,000
4,000
4,500
100
Tunisia
105,000
80,000
10,000
7,000
1,500
Yemen/Aden
63,000
4,300
500
500
250
Total
851,000
469,060
69,600
31,790
~7,500

Algeria

Jews in 1948: 140,000. Jews in 2011: 1,500.

Jewish settlement in Algeria can be traced back to the first centuries of the Common Era. In the 14th century, with the deterioration of conditions in Spain, many Spanish Jews moved to Algeria, among them a number of outstanding scholars including Rav Yitzchak ben Sheshet Perfet (the Ribash) and Rav Shimon ben Zemah Duran (the Rashbatz). After the French occupation of the country in 1830, Jews gradually adopted French culture and were granted French citizenship.

On the eve of WWII, there were around 120,000 Jews in Algeria. In 1934, incited by events in Nazi Germany, Muslims rampaged in Constantine, killing 25 Jews and injuring many more. Starting in 1940, under Vichy rule, Algerian Jews were persecuted socially and economically. In 1948, at the time of Israel’s independence and on the eve of the Algerian Civil War, there were approximately 140,000 Jews living in Algeria, of whom roughly 30,000 lived in the capital.

Nearly all of the Algerian Jews fled the country shortly after it gained independence from France in 1962. The newly established Algerian government harassed the Jewish community, confiscated Jewish property, and deprived Jews of their principle economic rights. As a result, almost 130,000 Algerian Jews immigrated to France and, since 1948, 25,681 Algerian Jews have immigrated to Israel.

According to the State Department, there is now fewer than 2,000 Jews in Algeria and there are no functioning synagogues in the country.

EGYPT

Jews in 1948: 75,000. Jews in 2011: 100.

Jews have lived in Egypt since Biblical times. Israelite tribes first moved to the land of Goshen, the northeastern edge of the Nile Delta, during the reign of the Egyptian pharaoh Amenhotep IV (1375-1358 BCE). By 1897, there were more than 25,000 Jews in Egypt, concentrated in Cairo and Alexandria.

The first Nationality Code was promulgated by Egypt in May 1926 and said that only those « who belonged racially to the majority of the population of a country whose language is Arabic or whose religion is Islam » were entitle to Egyptian nationality. This provision served as the official pretext for expelling many Jews from Egypt.

In 1937, the Jewish population was 63,500 but by 1945, with the rise of Egyptian nationalism and the cultivation of anti-Jewish sentiment, violence erupted against the peaceful Jewish community. That year, 10 Jews were killed, more than 300 injured, and a synagogue, a Jewish hospital, and an old-age home were destroyed. In July 1947, an amendment to Egyptian law stipulated that companies must employ a minimum of 90% Egyptian nationals. This decree resulted in the loss of livelihood for many Jews.

Israel’s establishment led to further anti-Jewish sentiments. Between June and November 1948, bombs set off in the Jewish Quarter of Cairo killed more than 70 Jews and wounded nearly 200, while another 2,000 Jews were arrested and had their property confiscated. Rioting over the following months resulted in more Jewish deaths. In 1956, the Egyptian government used the Sinai Campaign as a pretext for expelling almost 25,000  Jews and confiscating their property while approximately 1,000 more Jews were sent to prisons and detention camps. In November 1956, a government proclamation declared that « all Jews are Zionists and enemies of the state, » and promised that they would be soon expelled. Thousands of Jews were ordered to leave the country, allowed to take only one suitcase, a small sum of cash, and forced to sign declarations « donating » their property to the Egyptian government.

By 1957 the Jewish population had fallen to 15,000 and in 1967, after the Six-Day War, there was a renewed wave of persecution and the community dwindled to 2,500. By the 1970’s, after the remaining Jews were given permission to leave the country, the number of Jews feel to just a few hundred. Today, the community is on the verge of extinction with fewer than 100 Jews remaining in Egypt, the majority elderly.

IRAQ

Jews in 1948: 135,000. Jews in 2011: 7.

Jews have lived in modern-day Iraq since before the common era and prospered in what was then called Babylonia until the Muslim conquest in 634 AD. Under Muslim rule, the situation of the Jewish community fluctuated yet at the same time, Jews were subjected to special taxes and restrictions on their professional activity. Under British rule, which began in 1917, Jews fared well economically, but this changed when Iraq gained independence.

In June 1941, the Mufti-inspired, pro-Nazi coup of Rashid Ali sparked rioting and a pogrom in Baghdad. Armed mobs, with the complicity of the police and the army, murdered 180 Jews and wounded almost 1,000. Although emigration was prohibited, many Jews made their way to Mandate Palestine with the aid of an underground movement.

Additional outbreaks of anti-Jewish rioting occurred between 1946 and 1949, and following the establishment of Israel in 1948, Zionism was made a capital crime. In 1950, the Iraqi parliament legalized emigration to Israel, provided that Iraqi Jews forfeited their citizenship before leaving. Between May 1950 and August 1951, the Jewish Agency and the Israeli government succeeded in airlifting approximately 110,000 Jews to Israel in Operation Ezra & Nehemiah. At the same time, 20,000 Jews were smuggled out of Iraq through Iran. A year later the property of Jews who emigrated from Iraq was frozen, and economic restrictions were placed on Jews who remained in the country.

In 1952, Iraq’s government barred Jews from emigrating, and publicly hanged two Jews after falsely charging them with hurling a bomb at the Baghdad office of the U.S. Information Agency. A community that had reached a peak of 150,000 in 1947, dwindled to a mere 6,000 after 1951. Persecutions continued, especially after the Six Day War in 1967, when 3,000 Jews were arrested, dismissed from their jobs, and some hanged in the public square of Baghdad. In one instance, on January 27, 1969, Baghdad Radio called upon Iraqis to “come and enjoy the feast” and some 500,000 people paraded and danced past the scaffolds where the bodies of the hanged Jews swung; the mob rhythmically chanting “Death to Israel” and “Death to all traitors.”

As of 2008, the Jewish Agency for Israel estimated that there were only seven Jews remaining in Iraq while Baghdad’s Meir Tweig synagogue, the last synagogue in use, was closed in 2003 after it became too dangerous to gather openly. The State Department reported in 2011 that anti-Semitism is still widespread in both state-owned and private media outlets and Holocaust denial is often glorified.

LIBYA

Jews in 1948: 38,000. Jews in 2011: 0.

The Jewish community of Libya traces its origin back some 2,500 years to the time of Hellenistic rule under Ptolemy Lagos in 323 B.C.E. in Cyrene. Once home to a very large and thriving Jewish community, Libya is now completely empty of Jews due to anti-Jewish pogroms that spurred immigration to Israel.

At the time of the Italian occupation in 1911, there were approximately 21,000 Jews in the country, the majority in the capital Tripoli. By the late 1930s, fascist anti-Jewish laws were gradually being enforced and the Jewish community was subject to terrible repression. Yet, in 1941, the Jews still accounted for a quarter of Tripoli’s population and maintained 44 synagogues.

In 1942, the Germans occupied the Jewish quarter of Benghazi, plundered shops, and deported more than 2,000 Jews across the desert, where more than one-fifth of them perished. Many Jews from Tripoli were also sent to forced labor camps.

Conditions did not greatly improve following liberation and under the British occupation there were a series of brutal pogroms. One savage pogrom occurred in Tripoli on November 5, 1945, when more than 140 Jews were massacred and almost every synagogue in the city was looted. In June 1948, rioters murdered another 12 Jews and destroyed 280 Jewish homes. When the British legalized emigration in 1949, more than 30,000 Jews fled Libya.

Thousands more Jews fled to Israel after Libya became independent in 1951 and was granted membership in the Arab League. A law passed in December 1958 ordered for the dissolution of the Jewish Community Council. In 1961, a special permit was needed to show proof of being a « true Libyan » and all but six Jews were denied this document.

After the Six-Day War, the Jewish population – numbering roughly 7,000 – was again subjected to pogroms in which 18 people were killed and many more injured; the riots also sparked a near-total exodus from the Jewish community, leaving fewer than 100 Jews in Libya. When Muammar Gaddafi came to power in 1969, all Jewish property was confiscated and all debts to Jews cancelled. Although emigration was illegal, more than 3,000 Jews succeeded in leaving for Israel.

By 1974, there were no more than 20 Jews in the country, and it is believed that Esmeralda Meghnagi, who died in February 2002, was the last Jew to live in Libya.  In October 2011, protests in Tripoli called for the deportation of a Jewish activist who had returned to Libya with the intent of restoring Tripoli’s synagogue. Some protesters’ signs read, “There is no place for the Jews in Libya,” and “We don’t have a place for Zionism.”

MOROCCO

Jews in 1948: 265,000. Jews in 2011: 4,000.

Jews have been living in Morocco since the time of Antiquity, traveling there two millennia ago with Phoenician traders, and the first substantial Jewish settlements developed in 586 BCE after Nebuchadnezzar destroyed Jerusalem and exiled the Jews.

Prior to World War II, the Jewish population of Morocco reached its height of approximately 265,000, and though Nazi deportations did not occur the Jewish community still suffered great humiliation under the Vichy French government. Following the war, the situation became even more perilous.

In June 1948, bloody riots in Oujda and Djerada killed 44 Jews while wounding scores more. That same year, an unofficial economic boycott was instigated against the Moroccan Jewish community. By 1959 Zionist activities were made illegal and in 1963, at least 100,000 Moroccan Jews were forced out from their homes. Nearly 150,000 Jews sought refuge in Israel, France and the Americas.

In 1965, Moroccan writer Said Ghallab described the attitude of Moroccan Muslims toward their Jewish neighbors when he wrote:

« The worst insult that a Moroccan could possibly offer was to treat someone as a Jew … The massacres of the Jews by Hitler are exalted ecstatically. It is even credited that Hitler is not dead, but alive and well, and his arrival is awaited to deliver the Arabs from Israel. »

In early 2004, Marrakech had a small Jewish population of about 260 people, most over the age of 60, while Casablanca had the largest community, about 3,000 people. There are still synagogues in use today in CasablancaFez, Marrakech, Mogador, Rabat, Tetuan and Tangier.

The Jewish community now numbers between 4,000 and 5,500 and while the government is one of the most friendly towards Israel, the Jewish community is still the target of sporadic violence. On a Saturday in May 2003, for example, a series of suicide bombers attacked four Jewish targets in Casablanca, though fortunately no Jews were killed.  In a show of kindness, the government subsequently organized a large rally in the streets of Casablanca to demonstrate support for the Jewish community and the king reasserted his family’s traditional protection for the country’s Jews.

SYRIA

Jews in 1948: 30,000. Jews in 2011: 100.

Jews had lived in Syria since biblical times and the Jewish population increased significantly after the Spanish expulsion in 1492. Throughout the generations, the main Jewish communities were to be found in Damascus and Aleppo.

By 1943, the Jewish community of Syria had approximately 30,000 members but In 1944, after Syria gained independence from France, the new Arab government prohibited Jewish immigration to Palestine, severely restricted the teaching of Hebrew in Jewish schools, called boycotts against Jewish businesses, and sat idle as attacks against Jews escalated. In 1945, in an attempt to thwart international efforts to establish a Jewish homeland in Palestine, the Syrian government fully restricted Jewish emigration, burned, looted and confiscated Jewish property, and froze Jewish bank accounts.

When partition was declared in 1947, Arab mobs in Aleppo devastated the 2,500-year-old Jewish community and left it in ruins. Scores of Jews were killed and more than 200 homes, shops and synagogues were destroyed. Thousands of Jews illegally fled as refugees, 10,000 going to the United States and 5,000 to Israel.  All of their property were taken over by the local Muslims.

Over the next few decades, those Syrian Jews that remained were in effect hostages of a hostile regime as the government intensified its persecution of the Jewish population. Jews were stripped of their citizenship and experienced employment discrimination. They had their assets frozen and property confiscated. The community lived under constant surveillance by the secret police. Freedom of movement was also severely restricted and any Jew who attempted to flee faced either the death penalty or imprisonment at hard labor. Jews could not acquire telephones or driver’s licenses and were barred from buying property. An airport road was paved over the Jewish cemetery in Damascus; Jewish schools were closed and handed over to Muslims.

The last Jews to leave Syria departed with the chief rabbi in October 1994. By the middle of 2001, Rabbi Huder Shahada Kabariti estimated that 150 Jews were living in Damascus, 30 in Haleb and 20 in Kamashili. while two synagogues remained open in Damascus. According to the US State Department, there were about 100 Jews left in country as 2011, concentrated in Damascus and Aleppo.  Contact between the Syrian Jewish community is Israel is prohibited.

TUNISIA

Jews in 1948: 105,000. Jews in 2011: 1,500.

The first documented evidence of Jews living in Tunisia dates back to 200 CE. By 1948, the Tunisian Jewish community had numbered 105,000, with 65,000 living in the capital Tunis.

Tunisia was the only Arab country to come under direct German occupation during World War II and, according to Robert Satloff, “From November 1942 to May 1943, the Germans … implemented a forced-labor regime, confiscations of property, hostage-taking, mass extortion, deportations, and executions. They required thousands of Jews in the countryside to wear the Star of David.”

When Tunisia gained independence in 1956, the new government passed a series of discriminatory anti-Jewish decrees. In 1957, the rabbinical tribunal was abolished and a year later the Jewish community councils were dissolved.  The government also destroyed ancient synagogues, cemeteries, and even Tunis’ Jewish quarter for « urban renewal » projects.

During the Six-Day War, Jews were attacked by rioting Arab mobs, while businesses were burned and the Great Synagogue of Tunis was destroyed. The government actually denounced the violence and appealed to the Jewish population to stay, but did not bar them from leaving.

The increasingly unstable situation caused more than 40,000 Tunisian Jews to immigrate to Israel and at least 7,000 more to France. By 1968, the country’s Jewish population had shrunk to around 10,000.

Today, the US State Department estimates that there are 1,500 Jews remaining in Tunisia, with one-third living in and around the capital and the remainder living on the island of Djerba.  The Tunisian government now provides the Jewish community freedom of worship and also provided security and renovation subsidies for the synagogues.

YEMEN (Aden)

Jews in 1948: 63,000. Jews in 2011: 250.

The first historical record of Jews in Yemen is from the third century CE.

In 1922, the government of Yemen reintroduced an ancient Islamic law decreeing that Jewish orphans under age 12 were to be converted to Islam.

In 1947, after the partition vote on Palestine, the police forces joined Muslim rioters in a bloody pogrom in Aden, killing 82 Jews and destroying hundreds of Jewish homes. The pogrom left Aden’s Jewish community economically paralyzed, as most of the stores and businesses were destroyed.

Early in 1948, looting occurred after six Jews were falsely accused of murdering two Arab girls and the government began to forcefully evict the Jews. Between June 1949 and September 1950, Israel ran Operation « Magic Carpet » and brought virtually the entire Yemenite Jewish community – almost 50,000 people – to Israel as refugees.

In 1959, another 3,000 Jews from Aden emigrated to Israel while many more fled as refugees to the US and England. A smaller, continuous migration was allowed to continue into 1962, when a civil war put an abrupt halt to any further Jewish exodus.

Today, there are no Jews in Aden and there are an estimated 250 Jews in Yemen. The Jews are the only indigenous non-Muslim religious minority and the small community that remains in the northern area of Yemen is tolerated and allowed to practice Judaism. However, the community is still treated as second-class citizens and cannot serve in the army or be elected to political positions. Jews are traditionally restricted to living in one section of a city and are often confined to a limited choice of employment.


Sources: Aharon Mor & Orly Rahimiyan, « The Jewish Exodus from Arab Lands, » Jerusalem Center for Public Opinion, (September 11, 2012).
« Compensate Jewish Refugees from Arab Countries, Conference Urges, » JTA, (September 10, 2012).
Kershner, Isabel. “The Other Refugees.“ Jerusalem Report, (January 12, 20/04).
Littman, David. “The Forgotten Refugees: An Exchange of Population.“ The National Review, (December 3, 2002).
Matas, David, Urman, Stanley A. “Jews From Arab Countries: The Case for Rights and Redress.“ Justice for Jews from Arab Countries, (June 23, 2003).
Sachar, Howard. A History of Israel. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., New York, 2000.
Stillman, Norman. The Jews of Arab Lands in Modern Times. The Jewish Publication Society of America, 1991.
“Ad Hoc Committee on Palestine – 30th Meeting,” United Nations Press Release GA/PAL/84, (November 24, 1947).
Arieh Avneri, The Claim of Dispossesion, (NJ: Transaction Books, 1984), p. 276.
Jerusalem Post, (December 4, 2003).
Stephen Farrell, « Baghdad Jews Have Become a Fearful Few, » New York Times, (June 1, 2008).
US State Department – Religious Freedom Reports (2011); Human Rights Reports (2011)
Roumani, Maurice. The Jews from Arab Countries: A Neglected Issue. WOJAC, 1983
American Jewish Yearbook: 1958, 1969, 1970, 1978, 1988, 2001. Philadelphia: The Jewish Publication Society of America
American Sephardi Federation
« Point of no return: Information and links about the Middle East’s forgotten Jewish refugees »
Jews Indigenous to the Middle East and North Africa (JIMENA)
Association of Jews from the Middle East and North Africa (HARIF)
« Israel Pushing for UN Summit on Jewish Refugees, » The Algemeiner, (August 27, 2012).
Hillel Fendel, « US Congress Recognizes Jewish Refugees from Arab Lands, » Arutz Sheva, (February 4, 2008).
House Resolution 185 (110th), « Regarding the Creation of Refugee Populations in the Middle East, » GovTrack.
House Resolution 6242 (112th), « Relating to the Resolution of the Issue of Jewish Refugees from Arab Countries, » GovTrack.

Voir aussi:

Algérie: des salafistes contre les synagogues
RFI

En Algérie, une manifestation a réuni quelques dizaines de personnes dans un quartier populaire de la capitale. Les manifestants, des salafistes, veulent protester contre l’annonce officielle de la réouverture des synagogues dans le pays.

Ce n’est pas la première fois qu’Abdelfattah Hamadache, imam salafiste du quartier de Bellecourt, proche du Front islamique du salut (FIS), appelle à manifester. Il y a quelques semaines, c’était pour s’opposer au ministre du Commerce qui venait de donner plusieurs autorisations d’ouverture de magasins d’alcool.

Vendredi, plusieurs dizaines d’hommes ont manifesté contre la réouverture des synagogues, mesure annoncée par le ministre des Affaires religieuses. Ils considèrent que l’Algérie est musulmane et qu’il n’y a pas de place pour une autre religion.

Cette manifestation, rapidement bloquée par les forces de l’ordre, n’a surpris personne. Mais l’annonce du ministre, en revanche, a laissé certains observateurs sans voix. Chaque été, la police arrête certaines personnes sous prétexte qu’elles mangent en plein jour pendant le ramadan, le ministre affirmant que le respect du jeûne était une affaire personnelle.

Alors lorsqu’il affirme que les synagogues vont être ouvertes après 20 ans de fermeture pour des raisons de sécurité, la presse ne sait pas comment réagir. Si les journaux défendent pour la majorité la liberté de culte, difficile de savoir si la mesure sera vraiment appliquée. Les commentaires se multiplient sur les réseaux sociaux, mais les salafistes, eux, sont bien les premiers à rendre le débat public.

Contre la « judaïsation » de l’Algérie

En Algérie, la communauté juive est discrète, mais elle existe toujours. Les synagogues sont fermées pour des raisons de sécurité depuis que dans les années 1990, deux figures de cette communauté avaient été assassinées.

Les manifestants, qui ont dénoncé cette mesure comme « une provocation contre les musulmans en plein ramadan », disent vouloir s’opposer à la « judaïsation » de l’Algérie. Ils craignent que la réouverture des synagogues soit un premier pas vers une normalisation des relations de l’Algérie avec Israël.

Voir également:

Why doesn’t Israel publish figures and details of Gaza casualties?
The world relies on data from the Hamas-run health ministry, and there’s nothing we can do about that, officials in Jerusalem say
Raphael Ahren
The Times of Israel
July 15, 2014
Raphael Ahren is the diplomatic correspondent at The Times of Israel.

So far, 194 Palestinians been killed during Operation Protective Edge; that’s already a higher death toll than that of the entire 2012 Operation Pillar of Defense. Or at least that’s what’s reported in the press, internationally but also in Israel. The truth is that the number of casualties, and the percentage of civilians among the dead, comes exclusively from Palestinian sources. Israel only publishes its version of the body count — which is always significantly lower than the Palestinian account — weeks after such operations end. Meanwhile, the damage to Israel’s reputation is done.

During Pillar of Defense, 160 Palestinians were killed, 55 “militants” and 105 civilians, according to Palestinian sources. According to the IDF, 177 Palestinians were killed during the weeklong campaign — about 120 of whom were enemy combatants. A report by the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center says 101 of those killed were terrorists, while 68 were noncombatants. B’Tselem claims 62 combatants and 87 civilians died.

Why the confusion, and what is the accurate body count for the current conflict?

For Operation Protective Edge, the only data published so far comes from the health ministry in Gaza. This ministry is run by Hamas, therefore rendering the number of casualties and injuries it reports more than unreliable, said Maj. Arye Shalicar of the Israel Defense Forces Spokesperson’s unit. “Hamas has no shame about lying. We know they’re a terrorist organization that makes cynical use of casualty numbers for propaganda purposes. You can’t trust a single number they publish.”

And yet, the figures from the Gazan ministry are routinely adopted, unquestioned, by the United Nations. “According to preliminary information, over 77 per cent of the fatalities since 7 July have been civilians, raising concerns about respect for international humanitarian law,” states a situation report published Tuesday by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Once given the stamp of approval of such an important body, these numbers are quoted everywhere else.

“All these publications are not worth the paper they’re written on,” said Reuven Erlich, the director of the Meir Amit Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center. “They’re based mostly on Palestinian sources in Gaza, who have a vested interest in showing that we’re killing many civilians.”

His center spends considerable resources on researching the real number of casualties, publishing a daily report with information as reliable as can be obtained. On Monday, the center’s “initial and temporary data” suggested the distribution of those killed so far in Operation Protective Edge is as follows: of 157 Gazans who have died, 57 were terrorist operatives (29 from Hamas, 22 from Palestinian Islamic Jihad and six from other terrorist organizations); 76 were non-involved civilians; and 38 could not be identified.

“The numbers from Gaza’s Health Ministry are very general, they don’t explain who is a terrorist and who is a civilian,” Erlich said. “Knowing how many of the casualties were terrorists and how many were civilians requires very thorough work. You have to check every single name. Such an investigation takes time, and unfortunately every day new names are being added to the list.”

In order to ascertain who was killed and whether the victim is a terrorist or a civilian, the center’s staff looks up their names on Palestinian websites and searches for information about their funerals and for other hints that could shed light on a person’s background.

The authorities in Gaza generally count every young man who did not wear a uniform as a civilian — even if he was involved in terrorist activity and was therefore considered by the IDF a legitimate target, military sources said.

And yet, no official Israeli government body releases any information about casualties caused by Israeli airstrikes in real-time. We simply cannot know what we hit, several officials said. In the West Bank, IDF forces are able to ascertain who dies as a result of IDF actions, but since Israel has no military or civilian presence in Gaza, no information is available during or right after a strike. To be sure, the IDF does investigate claims about casualties, but results are usually only released weeks after the hostilities have ended. By then, the world, gauging Israel’s conduct in part on the basis of available information on civilian casualties, has turned its attention elsewhere.

After Israel’s 2008-9 Operation Cast Lead, many pro-Palestinian activists were outraged over the high number of innocent Palestinians killed. Palestinian sources, widely cited including by the UN, reported 1,444 casualties, of whom 314 were children. Israel, on the other hand, said that 1,166 Gazans were killed — 709 of them were “Hamas terror operatives”, 295 were “uninvolved Palestinians,” while the remaining 162 were “men that have not yet been attributed to any organization.” It put the number of children (under 16-years-old) killed at 89.

The international outrage over the operation played a role in the UN Human Rights Commission’s appointment of a panel to investigate “all violations of international human rights law and international humanitarian law that might have been committed.” Headed by Judge Richard Goldstone, the panel authored the now-notorious “UN Fact Finding Mission on the Gaza Conflict,” also known as Goldstone report. It leveled heavy criticism against Israel, including the assertion that Israel set out deliberately to kill civilians, an allegation which Goldstone, though not his fellow commission members, later retracted.

How difficult it can be to ascertain who is being killed by Israeli airstrikes in Gaza is perhaps best illustrated by an incident from Operation Pillar of Defense, in which the infant son of a BBC employee was killed.

On November 14, 2012, 11-month-old Omar Jihad al-Mishrawi and Hiba Aadel Fadel al-Mishrawi, 19, died after what appeared to be an Israeli airstrike. The death of Omar, the son of BBC Arabic journalist Jihad al-Mishrawi, garnered more than usual media attention and focused anger for the death on Israel. Images of the bereaved father tearfully holding the corpse of his baby went around the world.
Jihad Mishrawi speaks to the media, while carrying the body of his son Omar, on November 15, 2012. (photo credit: screenshot BBC)

Jihad Mishrawi speaks to the media, while carrying the body of his son Omar, on November 15, 2012. (photo credit: screenshot BBC)

Only months later did a UN report clear Israel of the charge it had killed the baby, suggesting instead he was hit by shrapnel from a rocket fired by Palestinians that was aimed at Israel, but missed its mark.

Given the difficulty of determining who exactly was killed by an airstrike in Gaza, Israeli authorities are focusing their public diplomacy efforts on other areas.

Rather than arguing about the exact number of Palestinians killed, and what percentage of them were civilians, officials dealing with hasbara (pro-Israel advocacy) try to engage the public opinion makers in a debate about asymmetrical warfare.

“Our work doesn’t focus on the number of casualties, but rather on Hamas’s methods, which are the sole reason for the fact that civilians are being hurt; and on our method, which is to do everything to avoid civilian casualties,” said Yarden Vatikai, the director of the National Information Directorate at the Prime Minister’s Office.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu tries to hammer this point home every time he talks to a world leader or to the press. “See, the Hamas and the other terrorist groups like Islamic Jihad are firing from Gaza when their rocketeers and their command posts are embedded in homes, hospitals, next to kindergartens, mosques,” he said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” “And so we are trying to operate, to target them surgically, but the difference between us is that we’re using missile defense to protect our civilians, and they’re using their civilians to protect their missiles. So naturally they’re responsible for all the civilian deaths that occur accidentally.”

Numbers matter, and although it’s tough to explain the many civilian casualties caused by Israeli air raids, there is nothing the IDF can do about it, officials insist. It’s simply impossible to establish an independent body count while the hostilities are ongoing, admitted a senior official in the government’s hasbara apparatus. “It’s a challenge. But even if you said: No, only 40 or 50 percent of those killed were civilian, and not 70 — would that change anything in the world’s opinion?”

The numbers game is not an arena in which Israel can win, the official said. “When it comes to arguments over the actual justice of our campaign, I think we can win. When it comes to numbers, though, we cannot win. Because first of all, we don’t really have the ability to count the casualties, and secondly, because most people don’t really care that it was, say, only 50 percent and not 60.”

If the UN or other groups want to investigate possible war crimes or the high number of casualties after Operation Protective Edge, Jerusalem will deal with it then, the official said. Even if Israel were to publish its body count at the same time as the Gazan health ministry, it would not prevent a second Goldstone report, he added. “The people involved in these kinds of reports are not interested in the exact numbers. If they want to attack Israel they will do it regardless of the true number of casualties. They have their narrative, and nothing is going to change that.”

Voir encore:

L’Allemagne s’enflamme pour sa Mannschaft « black blanc beur »

Cécile Boutelet – Berlin, correspondance

Le Monde

07.07.2010

« Je ne veux pas forcément qu’ils deviennent champions du monde, je veux surtout qu’ils continuent à jouer. » Pour cette Allemande de 39 ans, la demi-finale de la Coupe du monde qui opposera l’Espagne à l’Allemagne, mercredi, sera un rendez-vous de plus avec l’équipe qui lui semble la plus sympathique et la plus talentueuse du Mondial 2010. Une équipe qui a su non seulement séduire au-delà des frontières, mais donner à l’Allemagne une autre image d’elle-même : multiculturelle, ouverte et aimée à l’étranger.

Sur les 23 joueurs de la sélection de Joachim Löw, onze sont d’origine étrangère. Outre le trio d’origine polonaise (Piotr Trochowski, Miroslav Klose, Lukas Podolski), qui depuis longtemps n’est plus considéré comme exotique, évoluent sur le terrain Marko Marin, Jérôme Boateng, Dennis Aogo, Sami Khedira ou encore deux joueurs d’origine turque : Serdar Tasci et le jeune prodige Mesut Özil.

Tous les observateurs, en Allemagne, s’accordent à reconnaître que cette arrivée de nouveaux talents « venus d’ailleurs » fait beaucoup de bien à l’équipe. « Cela lui donne une aptitude à l’engagement, une envie de reconnaissance, vis-à-vis d’eux-mêmes mais également vis-à-vis des autres », déclarait le ministre de l’intérieur Thomas de Maizière à la Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung. Pour Bastian Schweinsteiger, talentueux milieu de terrain, « les diverses influences vivifient l’équipe, elles lui donnent un tout autre tempérament ».

Une diversité qui fait également beaucoup de bien au pays. A Kreuzberg, le quartier de Berlin où vit la plus importante communauté turque du pays, on défend depuis le début du mondial les couleurs de la Mannschaft. « Les performances des jeunes donnent à notre travail un élan énorme », se réjouit Gül Keskinler, une Turque chargée de l’intégration à la Fédération allemande de football. « L’exemple de Mesut Özil est à cet égard particulièrement important, souligne-t-elle. Les footballeurs ont, à travers leur fonction d’exemple, un rôle très fort, ils sont des ambassadeurs pour la jeunesse. »

Dans les rues de Berlin, pas de célébration pourtant d’un esprit de fraternité « black blanc beur » tel qu’avait pu le connaître la France après sa victoire au Mondial de 1998. Pour beaucoup d’Allemands, le maillot est rassembleur : peu importe l’origine des joueurs, à la première victoire ils ont été adoptés sans cérémonie.

La diversité n’est qu’un élément parmi d’autres dans l’impression de renouveau que donne l’équipe d’Allemagne. « La diversité montre surtout que l’Allemagne va enfin chercher son inspiration ailleurs, estime Holger Cesnat, 35 ans. Le style de l’équipe a changé, il est plus léger, parce que Joachim Löw observe le football pratiqué au-delà des frontières et a rompu avec le style qui prédominait dans le football allemand jusqu’ici. »

Pour Rainer Stich, 52 ans : « C’est quand même une vraie tendance à l’ouverture. On parie sur des jeunes, sur des joueurs d’origines diverses. Vingt ans après la réunification, le pays n’est plus concentré sur lui-même, sur sa propre réunification. Cela a commencé en 2006, c’était la première fois qu’on osait être fier de son pays, fier de son équipe, cela a libéré beaucoup de choses. » Emilie Parker se félicite : « C’est la première fois que l’équipe est si appréciée à l’étranger. Même en Israël on trouve la Mannschaft sympathique. C’est un sentiment auquel nous ne sommes pas habitués. »

La Mannschaft « new look », un baromètre de la diversité migratoire
Pierre Weiss
Le Nouvel Observateur
21-06-2014

Jusqu’à très récemment, la sélection allemande comptait peu ou pas de joueurs d’origine immigrée. Explications.

La présence massive de descendants d’immigrés dans l’effectif de la « Deutsche Nationalmannschaft » est un phénomène relativement récent. S’il ne s’apparente pas à une manifestation de rue ni à un scrutin politique, il peut à tout le moins être un révélateur ou un traducteur, intéressant à examiner à ce titre (1).

Formule associée à l’équipe de France championne du monde de football en 1998, le « Black-Blanc-Beur » s’est décliné en Allemagne, depuis le début des années 2000, sous la forme du « multikulti ». Un simple regard sur la liste des 23 internationaux sélectionnés par l’entraîneur Joachim Löw à l’occasion du mondial brésilien suffit à identifier six noms trahissant une histoire sociale marquée par le processus « d’émigration-immigration » (2). Il s’agit des défenseurs Jérôme Boateng et Shkodran Mustafi, des milieux de terrain Sami Khedira, Mesut Özil et Lukas Podolski, ainsi que du buteur emblématique Miroslav Klose. A leur manière, ces joueurs cumulant plus de 380 matchs sous le maillot du « Nationalelf » sont un baromètre de la diversité migratoire de la société allemande. En ce sens, ils permettent de rappeler que cette dernière apparaît comme une société d’ancienne immigration (3), à l’instar de ses voisines française ou anglaise. Néanmoins, à la différence de la France, l’Allemagne a maintenu une forte immigration depuis le milieu des années 1990, entre autres pour compenser le vieillissement de sa population active.

En même temps, la composition ethnoculturelle de plus en plus diversifiée de la « Mannschaft » témoigne de signes d’une tangible transformation du mode de constitution de la nation allemande. Profitant de la réforme du Code de la nationalité en 2000 qui mit fin au seul droit du sang, l’Allemagne a en effet tourné la page et de l’équipe nationale et de la communauté des citoyens monochromatiques. Cette sélection de sportifs « new look » traduit enfin un mouvement de modernisation des instances dirigeantes du football allemand, dont l’origine se situe à la charnière du XXe et du XXIe siècles. Ainsi l’espace des joueurs issus de l’immigration est marqué par l’empreinte de la politique antidiscriminatoire menée par le « Deutscher Fußball-Bund » (DFB) et ses organisations-membres.

1 – Les « couleurs » de l’histoire

Depuis la Coupe du monde en 2002, les compositions successives de l’équipe allemande qui a participé aux phases finales du tournoi planétaire sont un bon révélateur de l’histoire des flux migratoires du pays, à l’exception des populations d’origine italienne, portugaise ou marocaine.

Les sportifs immigrés polonais ou enfants d’immigrés représentent le contingent le plus important. Ils sont au nombre de quatre : nés en Pologne, Miroslav Klose, Lukas Podolski et Piotr Trochowski émigrent en Allemagne à la fin des années 1980 ; Tim Borowski, quant à lui, est né en RDA de parents polonais. Leur émigration – ou celle de leur famille – s’inscrit dans le contexte plus large des arrivées massives « d’Aussiedler » (des « réfugiés de souche allemande ») entre 1950 et 1989 (4). N’ayant pratiquement pas d’équivalent dans d’autres pays occidentaux, cette forme de migration puise sa source dans les relations conflictuelles entre l’Etat et la « nation ethnique » en Allemagne, mais encore dans les changements politiques et territoriaux résultant des deux guerres mondiales et de la guerre froide.

Les footballeurs immigrés ghanéens ou descendants d’immigrés constituent le second groupe. Ils sont trois : né au Ghana, Gerald Asamoah émigre en Allemagne en 1990 ; concernant David Odonkor et Jérôme Boateng, ils sont nés en RFA et d’origine ghanéenne par leur père. Cette immigration d’Afrique de l’Ouest trouve notamment son explication dans l’histoire de l’empire colonial voulu par Bismarck. Protectorat allemand depuis 1884, le « Togoland » est partagé entre la France et la Grande-Bretagne suite au Traité de Versailles de 1919. En 1956, la partie anglaise de cette province jadis germanisée est rattachée à la République indépendante du Ghana et échappe à l’Etat indépendant du Togo en 1960 (5). Aussi est-il assez cohérent que l’Allemagne soit la destination privilégiée des membres des minorités germanophones implantées au Ghana.

Les joueurs enfants d’immigrés de Turquie se placent en troisième position. Ils sont au nombre de deux : nés outre-Rhin de parents turcs, Mesut Özil et Serdar Tasci incarnent la génération de la « Mannschaft » du mondial de 2010. Leurs ascendants ont émigré en RFA à l’occasion du « Wirtschaftswunder » d’après-guerre. Entre 1961 et 1973, le patronat allemand et les autorités fédérales ont en effet recruté des milliers de travailleurs immigrés originaires de Turquie pour occuper les emplois pénibles dont les nationaux ne voulaient pas, en particulier dans les secteurs de l’agriculture, de la construction et de l’automobile (6). Par la suite, cet ensemble d’ouvriers faiblement qualifiés est complété par une immigration familiale dans le cadre des regroupements primaire et secondaire.

2 – La diversification de la communauté des citoyens

La composition de l’équipe allemande des années 2000 affiche l’origine ethnoculturelle de plus en plus diversifiée des Allemands, et le soutien que ces derniers lui apportent, notamment depuis 2006 (7), informe du niveau de consensus rencontré par cette diversification. Le contraste est d’ailleurs saisissant entre cette équipe « multikulti » et la sélection unicolore du siècle dernier. Entre 1934 et 1998, la « Mannschaft » n’a par exemple accueilli qu’un seul joueur d’origine non germanique en la personne de Maurizio Gaudino, descendant d’immigré italien ayant pris part à la Coupe du monde en 1994 (8). Précisons toutefois que ce constat ne vaut que si l’on fait abstraction de la présence importante de footballeurs issus de l’immigration polonaise, mais en réalité « de souche allemande ».

A l’inverse, entre 2002 et 2014, le « Nationalelf » a déjà comporté 15 sportifs d’origine non germanique, dont neuf binationaux : Asamoah, Klose, Podolski, Boateng, Cacau, Gomez, Khedira, Özil et Mustafi. D’un côté, l’hétérogénéité frappante de l’équipe des années 2000 témoigne d’une modification tangible du mode de constitution de la nation allemande. Pendant longtemps, le principe fondateur de cette dernière a reposé intégralement sur les liens du sang – « ethnos » (9). Créée par une idéologie « ethnicisante » distinguant ce qui n’est pas allemand au sens « ethnique » du terme, cette frontière institutionnelle explique à la fois l’homogénéité de l’équipe allemande du XXe siècle et l’intégration progressive des joueurs polonais d’ascendance germanique. Menée à son terme par la coalition « rouge-verte », avec le soutien des libéraux et des démocrates-chrétiens, la réforme du Code de la nationalité du 1er janvier 2000 a désormais introduit dans la législation des éléments du droit du sol. Ce dernier facilite la naturalisation des migrants et l’inclusion de leurs descendants. Il est fondé sur une conception de la citoyenneté mettant surtout l’accent sur l’individu au sens politique du terme – « demos ». Nés en Allemagne de parents turcs, Mesut Özil et Serdar Tasci ont acquis la nationalité allemande par ce biais. Tous deux ont commencé à jouer en sélection U19, entre 2006 et 2007. Il existe donc un lien de causalité entre le Code de la nationalité et la taille du vivier de footballeurs disponibles pour le système de formation.

D’un autre côté, il faut prendre en compte les effets de l’assouplissement de la politique de nationalité sportive menée par la FIFA ; en particulier ceux du décret de 2009 autorisant un sportif professionnel à changer une fois d’équipe nationale, sans limite d’âge, à condition de n’avoir jamais porté le maillot de sa précédente sélection « A » en compétition. Le cas des frères Boateng est intéressant à scruter à ce titre. S’ils sont tous les deux nés à Berlin, l’un, Jérôme, évolue sous les couleurs de la « Mannschaft », tandis que l’autre, Kevin-Prince, a opté pour le pays de son père, le Ghana.
3 – La modernisation des instances du football allemand

La présence de joueurs de couleur et de sportifs aux patronymes à la consonance étrangère dans le « Nationalelf » traduit en dernier ressort la modernisation des instances dirigeantes du football allemand. A la suite de l’élimination prématurée de l’équipe nationale en quart de finale de la Coupe du monde en 1998, de nombreuses voix s’élevèrent, pour la première fois, contre le système de formation et la politique d’intégration des immigrés menée par le DFB. Parmi elles, on peut citer l’entraîneur du Bayern de Munich de l’époque, Ottmar Hitzfeld, qui déclara dans le « Spiegel » que sans les migrants et leurs descendants, l’Allemagne renonçait inconsidérément à plus de 50 % de la nouvelle génération de footballeurs de haut niveau, potentiellement sélectionnables en équipe nationale (10).

Le développement des attitudes racistes et xénophobes dans les ligues amateurs, les exclusions d’immigrés des clubs allemands et la recrudescence des associations mono-ethniques ont alors conduit les responsables du DFB à utiliser le football à la fois comme un outil de lutte contre la discrimination ethno-raciale et comme un vecteur de promotion de la diversité culturelle. L’arrivée en 2004 d’Oliver Bierhoff en tant que manager général de l’équipe d’Allemagne constitue une étape décisive dans ce processus. Ancien international, Bierhoff est diplômé en sciences économiques et en management de l’Université d’Hagen. Habitué à la rhétorique managériale et proche des milieux entrepreneuriaux, il introduit la thématique de la « diversité » au sein du DFB. Par son travail politique et son capital symbolique, cette notion venue des pays anglo-saxons devient une nouvelle catégorie de l’action sportive à destination des jeunes garçons issus de l’immigration et des classes populaires.

Profitant de l’organisation du Mondial de 2006 en Allemagne, le DFB, appuyé par les pouvoirs publics, lance des initiatives visant à favoriser la pratique du football chez les immigrés et leurs enfants. Cette impulsion donne par exemple naissance à des dispositifs socio-sportifs d’intégration des descendants d’immigrés des quartiers paupérisés des grandes métropoles. Quelle que soit son efficacité en matière de prévention et d’éducation, cette politique antidiscriminatoire est surtout une bonne manière de repérer puis d’inclure de nouveaux talents dans le système de formation du football national. A la Coupe du monde au Brésil, Shkodran Mustafi est là pour nous le rappeler !

La « Mannschaft » new look n’est pas un « miroir » de la société allemande et de ses évolutions. Tout au plus, elle peut en être un reflet déformant. En ce sens, nous avons (trop) rapidement tenté de montrer que les significations contenues dans les manifestations de la diversité migratoire auxquelles donne lieu le spectacle des joueurs du « Nationalelf » sont sans effet historique. Ces significations ne comportent aucune autonomie réelle ; au mieux, elles ne font que traduire un mouvement, sans jamais être en mesure de l’influencer. Autrement dit, dans ce cas précis, elles sont entièrement dépendantes des contextes historique, politico-juridique et socio-sportif. Pour les sciences sociales, le football national n’est finalement qu’une clé de compréhension des sociétés humaines et de leurs transformations (11).

(1) Voir Paul Yonnet, Systèmes des sports, Paris, Editions Gallimard, 1998.

(2) Nous empruntons cette expression au sociologue Abdelmalek Sayad. Cf. son ouvrage intitulé La double absence : des illusions de l’émigré aux souffrances de l’immigré, Paris, Editions du Seuil, 1999.

(3) Rien qu?au cours des années 1950-1960, la RFA a par exemple recruté plus de trois millions de travailleurs étrangers suite à des accords conclus avec une série d?Etats : Italie, Espagne, Grèce, Turquie, Maroc, Portugal, Tunisie et Yougoslavie.

(4) 1 238 316 Aussiedler de Pologne se sont installés en Allemagne au cours de cette période. Voir Rainer Ohliger, « Une migration privilégiée. Les Aussiedler, Allemands et immigrés », Migrance, n° 17-18, 2000-2001, pp. 8-17.

(5) Voir Ulrike Schuerkens, Du Togo allemand aux Togo et Ghana indépendants, Paris, Editions L’Harmattan, 2001.

(6) Cf. Ulrich Herbert, Geschichte der Ausländerpolitik in Deutschland. Saisonarbeiter, Zwangsarbeiter, Gastarbeiter, Flüchtlinge, Munich, C. H. Beck, 2001.

(7) Albrecht Sonntag, « Un été noir-rouge-or », in C. Demesmay et H. Stark (éd.), Radioscopies de l’Allemagne 2007, Paris, IFRI Travaux et Recherches, 2007, pp. 19-39.

(8) Voir le site Internet suivant : http://www.dfb.de/index.php?id=11848

(9) Cf. Dominique Schnapper, L’Europe des immigrés : essai sur les politiques d’immigration, Paris, Editions F. Bourin, 1992.

(10) Sur ce point, voir Diethelm Blecking, « Le football allemand, une histoire d’identités multiples », Allemagne d’aujourd’hui, n° 193, 2010, pp. 93-101.

(11) Cf. Norbert Elias et Eric Dunning, Sport et civilisation. La violence maîtrisée, Paris, Editions Fayard, 1994.

Voir enfin:

Manif pro-palestinienne à Paris : deux synagogues prises pour cible

Frédéric Ploquin

Marianne

14 Juillet 2014

Plusieurs manifestations pro-palestiennes ont eu lieu dimanche 13 juillet en France. A Paris, deux synagogues ont été prises pour cible. Voici les faits.

Ils sont environ 7 000 à défiler dans les rues de Paris, ce dimanche 13 juillet, entre Barbès et la Bastille, pour dire leur solidarité avec les Palestiniens. Le parcours a été négocié par les responsables du NPA (Nouveau parti anticapitaliste), l’organisation héritière de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire. Pourquoi avoir exigé un parcours qui s’achève à proximité du quartier du Marais, connu pour abriter plusieurs lieux de culte juif ? Le fait est que les responsables de la Préfecture de police l’ont validé.

Parmi les manifestants, de nombreuses femmes, souvent voilées, mais surtout des jeunes venus de la banlieue francilienne. Les premiers slogans ciblent Israël, mais aussi la « complicité française ». Très vite, les « Allah Akbar » (Dieu est grand) dominent, donnant une tonalité fortement religieuse au cortège.
La préfecture de police ne s’attendait pas à une telle mobilisation, mais ses responsables ont vu large au niveau du maintien de l’ordre, puisque cinq « forces mobiles », gendarmes et CRS confondues, ont été mobilisées. C’est à priori suffisant pour sécuriser tous les lieux juifs le long du parcours.

Aucune dégradation, aucun incident n’est signalé en marge du cortège, jusqu’à l’arrivée à proximité de la Bastille. Un premier mouvement de foule est observé à la hauteur de la rue des Tournelles, qui abrite une synagogue. Les gendarmes bloquent la voie et parviennent sans difficulté à refouler les assaillants vers le boulevard Beaumarchais.

Place de la Bastille, la dispersion commence, accélérée par une ondée, lorsque des jeunes décident de s’en prendre aux forces de l’ordre. De petites grappes s’engouffrent vers les rues adjacentes. Se donnent-ils le mot ? Ils sont entre 200 et 300 à marcher en direction de la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette… où se tient un rassemblement pour la paix en Israël, en présence du grand rabbin. Les organisateurs affirment avoir alerté le commissariat de police, mais l’information n’est apparemment pas remontée jusqu’à la Préfecture de police. Détail important : s’ils avaient su, les responsables du maintien de l’ordre auraient forcément barré l’accès à la rue.

Les choses se compliquent très vite, car les manifestants ne sont pas les seuls à vouloir en découdre. Une petite centaine de membres de la LDJ (ligue de défense juive) sont positionnés devant la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette, casques de moto sur la tête et outils (armes blanches) à portée de main. Loin de rester passive, la petite troupe monte au contact des manifestants, comme ils l’ont déjà fait lors d’une manifestation pro-palestinienne organisée Place Saint-Michel quelques jours auparavant. On frôle la bagarre générale, mais la police parvient à s’interposer. Les assaillants refluent vers le boulevard, tandis que les militants juifs reviennent vers la synagogue.

Durant le week-end, des manifestations similaires ont été organisées dans plusieurs grandes villes. Selon la police, ils étaient 2 300 à Lille, 1 200 à Marseille et autour de 400 à Bordeaux. Aucun incident n’a été signalé.


Immigration: Qui sont les racistes ? (Who are the bigots ? While the Obama Administration simply chooses not to enforce existing laws and Silicon Valley and Wall Street pity the poor immigrants)

13 juillet, 2014
http://www.truthrevolt.org/sites/default/files/images/Ramirez%202(1).jpg
http://www.truthrevolt.org/sites/default/files/images/mckee.jpg
Ce ne sont pas les différences qui provoquent les conflits mais leur effacement. René Girard
En présence de la diversité, nous nous replions sur nous-mêmes. Nous agissons comme des tortues. L’effet de la diversité est pire que ce qui avait été imaginé. Et ce n’est pas seulement que nous ne faisons plus confiance à ceux qui ne sont pas comme nous. Dans les communautés diverses, nous ne faisons plus confiance à ceux qui nous ressemblent. Robert Putnam
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Cela prouve le caractère de notre noble peuple, combattant du djihad, qui défend ses droits et ses demeures le torse nu, avec son sang. La politique d’un peuple qui affronte les avions israéliens la poitrine nue, pour protéger ses habitations, s’est révélée efficace contre l’occupation. Cette politique reflète la nature de notre peuple brave et courageux. Nous, au Hamas, appelons notre peuple à adopter cette politique, pour protéger les maisons palestiniennes. Sami Abu Zuhri (porte-parole du Hamas)
Depuis le début de l’opération, au moins 35 bâtiments résidentiels auraient été visés et détruits, entraînant dans la majorité des pertes civiles enregistrées jusqu’à présent, y compris une attaque le 8 Juillet à Khan Younis qui a tué sept civils, dont trois enfants, et blessé 25 autres. Dans la plupart des cas, avant les attaques, les habitants ont été avertis de quitter, que ce soit via des appels téléphoniques de l’armée d’Israël ou par des tirs de missiles d’avertissement. Rapport ONU (09.07.14)
Mais pourquoi n’appelle-t-on pas ce mur, qui sépare les Gazaouites de leurs frères égyptiens « mur de la honte » ou « de l’apartheid »? Liliane Messika (Primo-Europe)
Dieu, source de tensions, précisément au-dessus de ce mur, surplombé par la coupole du Dome, un lieu saint islamique contrôlé par la police israélienne. Cette Esplanade des mosquées interdite de fait à des milliers de musulmans exclus de la ville par cet autre mur érigé par Israël à l’est des remparts.  (…) Le dernier-né des murs de Jérusalem travesti en toile géante par des artistes de rue, rêvant de faire tomber cette muraille un jour prochain peut-être … Patrick Fandio
The idea that Palestinians use their children as human shields is racist and reprehensible. And the idea that the Israelis are somehow spewing this and we’re to believe it is also racist. … I somehow do not believe, though, that people are going to listen to somebody who says stay inside while your house is being bombed. People don’t want to die, Jake. And the fact that the Israelis continue to drop bombs on them doesn’t make them want to die any more. It’s simply a fact that what the Israelis are doing is they’re dropping bombs of a magnitude that we have never seen before on a captive civilian child population. Diana Buttu (human rights attorney and a former legal adviser to the PLO)
Washington va bientôt cesser d’expulser de jeunes immigrés sans papiers Cette annonce prochaine de Barack Obama pourrait renforcer sa popularité auprès de l’électorat Hispanique à cinq mois de la présidentielle.Les Etats-Unis vont cesser d’expulser de jeunes immigrés sans papiers sur la base de critères précis. Une décision favorable aux Hispaniques à l’approche de l’élection présidentielle de novembre. Cette annonce s’appliquera aux mineurs qui sont arrivés dans le pays avant l’âge de 16 ans, sont actuellement âgés de moins de trente ans, scolarisés ou ayant obtenu leur baccalauréat et n’ayant aucun antécédent judiciaire, ont expliqué vendredi 15 juin des responsables américains, avant une annonce en ce sens du président Barack Obama. Cette mesure, qui devrait susciter l’opposition vigoureuse des Républicains, peut permettre au président-candidat de renforcer sa popularité auprès des jeunes et des Hispaniques, dont le soutien peut s’avérer crucial dans certains Etats-clés. Le Nouvel Observateur (15.06.12)
Most Americans believe that our country has a clear and present interest in enacting immigration legislation that is both humane to immigrants living here and a contribution to the well-being of our citizens. Reaching these goals is possible. Our present policy, however, fails badly on both counts. We believe it borders on insanity to train intelligent and motivated people in our universities — often subsidizing their education — and then to deport them when they graduate. Many of these people, of course, want to return to their home country — and that’s fine. But for those who wish to stay and work in computer science or technology, fields badly in need of their services, let’s roll out the welcome mat. A “talented graduate” reform was included in a bill that the Senate approved last year by a 68-to-32 vote. It would remove the worldwide cap on the number of visas that could be awarded to legal immigrants who had earned a graduate degree in science, technology, engineering or mathematics from an accredited institution of higher education in the United States, provided they had an offer of employment. The bill also included a sensible plan that would have allowed illegal residents to obtain citizenship, though only after they had earned the right to do so. Americans are a forgiving and generous people, and who among us is not happy that their forebears — whatever their motivation or means of entry — made it to our soil? For the future, the United States should take all steps to ensure that every prospective immigrant follows all rules and that people breaking these rules, including any facilitators, are severely punished. No one wants a replay of the present mess. We also believe that America’s self-interest should be reflected in our immigration policy. For example, the EB-5 “immigrant investor program,” created by Congress in 1990, was intended to allow a limited number of foreigners with financial resources or unique abilities to move to our country, bringing with them substantial and enduring purchasing power. Reports of fraud have surfaced with this program, and we believe it should be reformed to prevent abuse but also expanded to become more effective. People willing to invest in America and create jobs deserve the opportunity to do so. Their citizenship could be provisional — dependent, for example, on their making investments of a certain size in new businesses or homes. Expanded investments of that kind would help us jolt the demand side of our economy. These immigrants would impose minimal social costs on the United States, compared with the resources they would contribute. New citizens like these would make hefty deposits in our economy, not withdrawals. Whatever the precise provisions of a law, it’s time for the House to draft and pass a bill that reflects both our country’s humanity and its self-interest. Sheldon Adelson, Warren Buffett and Bill Gates
Illegal and illiberal immigration exists and will continue to expand because too many special interests are invested in it. It is one of those rare anomalies — the farm bill is another — that crosses political party lines and instead unites disparate elites through their diverse but shared self-interests: live-and-let-live profits for some and raw political power for others. For corporate employers, millions of poor foreign nationals ensure cheap labor, with the state picking up the eventual social costs. For Democratic politicos, illegal immigration translates into continued expansion of favorable political demography in the American Southwest. For ethnic activists, huge annual influxes of unassimilated minorities subvert the odious melting pot and mean continuance of their own self-appointed guardianship of salad-bowl multiculturalism. Meanwhile, the upper middle classes in coastal cocoons enjoy the aristocratic privileges of having plenty of cheap household help, while having enough wealth not to worry about the social costs of illegal immigration in terms of higher taxes or the problems in public education, law enforcement, and entitlements. No wonder our elites wink and nod at the supposed realities in the current immigration bill, while selling fantasies to the majority of skeptical Americans. Victor Davis Hanson
Who are the bigots — the rude and unruly protestors who scream and swarm drop-off points and angrily block immigration authority buses to prevent the release of children into their communities, or the shrill counter-protestors who chant back “Viva La Raza” (“Long Live the Race”)? For that matter, how does the racialist term “La Raza” survive as an acceptable title of a national lobby group in this politically correct age of anger at the Washington Redskins football brand? How can American immigration authorities simply send immigrant kids all over the United States and drop them into communities without firm guarantees of waiting sponsors or family? If private charities did that, would the operators be jailed? Would American parents be arrested for putting their unescorted kids on buses headed out of state? Liberal elites talk down to the cash-strapped middle class about their illiberal anger over the current immigration crisis. But most sermonizers are hypocritical. Take Nancy Pelosi, former speaker of the House. She lectures about the need for near-instant amnesty for thousands streaming across the border. But Pelosi is a multimillionaire, and thus rich enough not to worry about the increased costs and higher taxes needed to offer instant social services to the new arrivals. Progressives and ethnic activists see in open borders extralegal ways to gain future constituents dependent on an ever-growing government, with instilled grudges against any who might not welcome their flouting of U.S. laws. How moral is that? Likewise, the CEOs of Silicon Valley and Wall Street who want cheap labor from south of the border assume that their own offspring’s private academies will not be affected by thousands of undocumented immigrants, that their own neighborhoods will remain non-integrated, and that their own medical services and specialists’ waiting rooms will not be made available to the poor arrivals. … What a strange, selfish, and callous alliance of rich corporate grandees, cynical left-wing politicians, and ethnic chauvinists who have conspired to erode U.S. law for their own narrow interests, all the while smearing those who object as xenophobes, racists, and nativists. Victor Davis Hanson

Attention: un  raciste peut en cacher un autre !

Manifestants qui empêchent l’application de la loi contre les clandestins, gouvernements qui n’appliquent pas ladite loi, parents qui abandonnent leurs enfants aux griffes des passeurs dès leur plus jeune âge, responsables politiques milliardaires prônant l’amnistie, politiciens et militants associatifs lorgnant sur de futurs électeurs, capitalistes de Silicon Valley et de Wall Street à la recherche de main d’oeuvre bon marché …

A l’heure où, après le Pape et nos médias et pendant que pleuvent les roquettes sur ses villes et que le Hamas vante l’efficacité de sa chair à canon, il est de bon ton de condamner comme raciste toute mesure de l’Etat d’Israël pour se défendre de ceux qui appellent à son annihilation …

Et où, poussés par de véritables mafias de trafiquants humains toujours plus innovants et encouragés par les paroles lénifiantes de dirigeants toujours plus irresponsables (dont notamment une annonce d’amnistie partielle pour les jeunes immigrés irréguliers par le président Obama à cinq mois comme par hasard de sa réélection) …

C’est à présent par centaines à la fois que les nouveaux damnés de la terre s’échouent sur nos côtes ou s’attaquent à nos murs de la honte (pardon: « barrières de sécurité ») …

Petite remise des pendules à l’heure avec l’historien militaire américain Victor Davis Hanson …

Qui, rappelant les intérêts politiques ou économiques bien compris de ceux qui n’ont jamais de mots assez durs pour stigmatiser l’intolérance des masses, montre que les racistes ne sont pas toujours ceux que l’on croit …

The Moral Crisis on Our Southern Border
A perfect storm of special interests have hijacked U.S. immigration law
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review Online
July 10, 2014

No one knows just how many tens of thousands of Central American nationals — most of them desperate, unescorted children and teens — are streaming across America’s southern border. Yet this phenomenon offers us a proverbial teachable moment about the paradoxes and hypocrisies of Latin American immigration to the U.S.

For all the pop romance in Latin America associated with Venezuela, Nicaragua, and Cuba, few Latinos prefer to immigrate to such communist utopias or to socialist spin-offs like Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, or Peru.

Instead, hundreds of thousands of poor people continue to risk danger to enter democratic, free-market America, which they have often been taught back home is the source of their misery. They either believe that America’s supposedly inadequate social safety net is far better than the one back home, or that its purportedly cruel free market gives them more opportunities than anywhere in Latin America — or both.

Mexico strictly enforces some of the harshest immigration laws in the world that either summarily deport or jail most who dare to cross Mexican borders illegally, much less attempt to work inside Mexico or become politically active. If America were to emulate Mexico’s immigration policies, millions of Mexican nationals living in the U.S. immediately would be sent home.

How, then, are tens of thousands of Central American children crossing with impunity hundreds of miles of Mexican territory, often sitting atop Mexican trains? Does Mexico believe that the massive influxes will serve to render U.S. immigration law meaningless, and thereby completely shred an already porous border? Is Mexico simply ensuring that the surge of poorer Central Americans doesn’t dare stop in Mexico on its way north?

The media talks of a moral crisis on the border. It is certainly that, but not entirely in the way we are told. What sort of callous parents simply send their children as pawns northward without escort, in selfish hopes of soon winning for themselves either remittances or eventual passage to the U.S? What sort of government allows its vulnerable youth to pack up and leave, without taking any responsibility for such mass flight?

Here in the U.S., how can our government simply choose not to enforce existing laws? In reaction, could U.S. citizens emulate Washington’s ethics and decide not to pay their taxes, or to disregard traffic laws, or to build homes without permits? Who in the pen-and-phone era of Obama gets to decide which law to follow and which to ignore?

Who are the bigots — the rude and unruly protestors who scream and swarm drop-off points and angrily block immigration authority buses to prevent the release of children into their communities, or the shrill counter-protestors who chant back “Viva La Raza” (“Long Live the Race”)? For that matter, how does the racialist term “La Raza” survive as an acceptable title of a national lobby group in this politically correct age of anger at the Washington Redskins football brand?

How can American immigration authorities simply send immigrant kids all over the United States and drop them into communities without firm guarantees of waiting sponsors or family? If private charities did that, would the operators be jailed? Would American parents be arrested for putting their unescorted kids on buses headed out of state?

Liberal elites talk down to the cash-strapped middle class about their illiberal anger over the current immigration crisis. But most sermonizers are hypocritical. Take Nancy Pelosi, former speaker of the House. She lectures about the need for near-instant amnesty for thousands streaming across the border. But Pelosi is a multimillionaire, and thus rich enough not to worry about the increased costs and higher taxes needed to offer instant social services to the new arrivals.

Progressives and ethnic activists see in open borders extralegal ways to gain future constituents dependent on an ever-growing government, with instilled grudges against any who might not welcome their flouting of U.S. laws. How moral is that?

Likewise, the CEOs of Silicon Valley and Wall Street who want cheap labor from south of the border assume that their own offspring’s private academies will not be affected by thousands of undocumented immigrants, that their own neighborhoods will remain non-integrated, and that their own medical services and specialists’ waiting rooms will not be made available to the poor arrivals.

Have immigration-reform advocates such as Mark Zuckerberg or Michael Bloomberg offered one of their mansions as a temporary shelter for needy Central American immigrants? Couldn’t Yale or Stanford welcome homeless immigrants into their now under-occupied summertime dorms? Why aren’t elite academies such as Sidwell Friends or the Menlo School offering their gymnasia as places of refuge for tens of thousands of school-age Central Americans?

What a strange, selfish, and callous alliance of rich corporate grandees, cynical left-wing politicians, and ethnic chauvinists who have conspired to erode U.S. law for their own narrow interests, all the while smearing those who object as xenophobes, racists, and nativists.

Voir aussi:

Break the Immigration Impasse
Sheldon Adelson, Warren Buffett and Bill Gates on Immigration Reform

By SHELDON G. ADELSON, WARREN E. BUFFETT and BILL GATES

The NYT

JULY 10, 2014

AMERICAN citizens are paying 535 people to take care of the legislative needs of the country. We are getting shortchanged. Here’s an example: On June 10, an incumbent congressman in Virginia lost a primary election in which his opponent garnered only 36,105 votes. Immediately, many Washington legislators threw up their hands and declared that this one event would produce paralysis in the United States Congress for at least five months. In particular, they are telling us that immigration reform — long overdue — is now hopeless.

Americans deserve better than this.

The three of us vary in our politics and would differ also in our preferences about the details of an immigration reform bill. But we could without doubt come together to draft a bill acceptable to each of us. We hope that fact holds a lesson: You don’t have to agree on everything in order to cooperate on matters about which you are reasonably close to agreement. It’s time that this brand of thinking finds its way to Washington.

Most Americans believe that our country has a clear and present interest in enacting immigration legislation that is both humane to immigrants living here and a contribution to the well-being of our citizens. Reaching these goals is possible. Our present policy, however, fails badly on both counts.

We believe it borders on insanity to train intelligent and motivated people in our universities — often subsidizing their education — and then to deport them when they graduate. Many of these people, of course, want to return to their home country — and that’s fine. But for those who wish to stay and work in computer science or technology, fields badly in need of their services, let’s roll out the welcome mat.

A “talented graduate” reform was included in a bill that the Senate approved last year by a 68-to-32 vote. It would remove the worldwide cap on the number of visas that could be awarded to legal immigrants who had earned a graduate degree in science, technology, engineering or mathematics from an accredited institution of higher education in the United States, provided they had an offer of employment. The bill also included a sensible plan that would have allowed illegal residents to obtain citizenship, though only after they had earned the right to do so.

Americans are a forgiving and generous people, and who among us is not happy that their forebears — whatever their motivation or means of entry — made it to our soil?

For the future, the United States should take all steps to ensure that every prospective immigrant follows all rules and that people breaking these rules, including any facilitators, are severely punished. No one wants a replay of the present mess.

We also believe that America’s self-interest should be reflected in our immigration policy. For example, the EB-5 “immigrant investor program,” created by Congress in 1990, was intended to allow a limited number of foreigners with financial resources or unique abilities to move to our country, bringing with them substantial and enduring purchasing power. Reports of fraud have surfaced with this program, and we believe it should be reformed to prevent abuse but also expanded to become more effective. People willing to invest in America and create jobs deserve the opportunity to do so.

Their citizenship could be provisional — dependent, for example, on their making investments of a certain size in new businesses or homes. Expanded investments of that kind would help us jolt the demand side of our economy. These immigrants would impose minimal social costs on the United States, compared with the resources they would contribute. New citizens like these would make hefty deposits in our economy, not withdrawals.

Whatever the precise provisions of a law, it’s time for the House to draft and pass a bill that reflects both our country’s humanity and its self-interest. Differences with the Senate should be hammered out by members of a conference committee, committed to a deal.

A Congress that does nothing about these problems is extending an irrational policy by default; that is, if lawmakers don’t act to change it, it stays the way it is, irrational. The current stalemate — in which greater pride is attached to thwarting the opposition than to advancing the nation’s interests — is depressing to most Americans and virtually all of its business managers. The impasse certainly depresses the three of us.

Signs of a more productive attitude in Washington — which passage of a well-designed immigration bill would provide — might well lift spirits and thereby stimulate the economy. It’s time for 535 of America’s citizens to remember what they owe to the 318 million who employ them.

How did such immoral special interests hijack U.S. immigration law and arbitrarily decide for 300 million Americans who earns entry into America, under what conditions, and from where?

Voir également:

Washington va bientôt cesser d’expulser de jeunes immigrés sans papiers
Cette annonce prochaine de Barack Obama pourrait renforcer sa popularité auprès de l’électorat Hispanique à cinq mois de la présidentielle.
Le Nouvel Observateur avec AFP
15-06-2012

Les Etats-Unis vont cesser d’expulser de jeunes immigrés sans papiers sur la base de critères précis. Une décision favorable aux Hispaniques à l’approche de l’élection présidentielle de novembre.

Cette annonce s’appliquera aux mineurs qui sont arrivés dans le pays avant l’âge de 16 ans, sont actuellement âgés de moins de trente ans, scolarisés ou ayant obtenu leur baccalauréat et n’ayant aucun antécédent judiciaire, ont expliqué vendredi 15 juin des responsables américains, avant une annonce en ce sens du président Barack Obama.

Cette mesure, qui devrait susciter l’opposition vigoureuse des Républicains, peut permettre au président-candidat de renforcer sa popularité auprès des jeunes et des Hispaniques, dont le soutien peut s’avérer crucial dans certains Etats-clés.
« Nos lois en matière d’immigration doivent être appliquées de façon ferme et judicieuse », a déclaré la secrétaire à la Sécurité intérieure, Janet Napolitano, chargée des questions d’immigration

« Mais elles ne sont pas conçues pour être appliquées aveuglément, sans tenir compte des circonstances individuelles de chaque cas », a-t-elle poursuivi. « Elles ne sont pas non plus conçues pour perdre des jeunes gens productifs et les renvoyer vers des pays où ils n’ont peut-être pas vécu ou dont ils ne parlent pas la langue ».

Cette décision consacre les objectifs d’un projet de loi — baptisé DREAM Act — soutenu par la Maison Blanche et qui permettrait, s’il était voté, aux jeunes immigrés arrivés avec leurs parents de devenir des résidents permanents du pays.

Ce projet de loi, auquel le candidat républicain Mitt Romney et les conservateurs s’opposent, n’a pas obtenu l’aval du Congrès.

Voir encore:

Migration
The mobile masses
The costs and benefits of mass immigration
The Economist
Sep 28th 2013

Exodus: How Migration is Changing Our World. By Paul Collier. Oxford University Press USA; 309 pages; $27.95. Allen Lane; £20. Buy from Amazon.com, Amazon.co.uk

PAUL COLLIER is one of the world’s most thoughtful economists. His books consistently illuminate and provoke. “Exodus” is no exception. Most polemics about migration argue either that it is good or bad. They address the wrong question, says Mr Collier. The right one is: how much more migration would be beneficial, and to whom?

He examines this question from three perspectives: the migrants themselves, the countries they leave and the countries to which they move.

Migration makes migrants better off. If it did not, they would go home. Those who move from poor countries to rich ones quickly start earning rich-country wages, which may be ten times more than they could have earned back home. “Their productivity rockets upwards,” says Mr Collier, because they are “escaping from countries with dysfunctional social models”.

This is a crucial insight. Bar a few oil sheikhdoms, rich countries are rich because they are well organised, and poor countries are poor because they are not. A factory worker in Nigeria produces less than he would in New Zealand because the society around him is dysfunctional: the power keeps failing, spare parts do not arrive on time and managers are busy battling bribe-hungry bureaucrats. When a rich country lets in immigrants, it is extending to them the benefits of good governance and the rule of law.

What of the countries that receive immigrants? Mr Collier argues that they have benefited from past immigration, but will probably suffer if it continues unchecked.

So far, immigrants have typically filled niches in the labour market that complement rather than displace the native-born. For most citizens of rich countries, immigration has meant slightly higher wages, as fresh brains with new ideas make local firms more productive. It may have dragged down wages for the least-skilled, but only by a tiny amount.

However, says Mr Collier, continued mass immigration threatens the cultural cohesion of rich countries. Some diversity adds spice: think of Thai restaurants or Congolese music. But a large unabsorbed diaspora may cling to the cultural norms that made its country of origin dysfunctional, and spread them to the host country. Furthermore, when a society becomes too heterogeneous, its people may be unwilling to pay for a generous welfare state, he says. Support for redistribution dwindles if taxpayers think the beneficiaries will be people unlike themselves.

Finally, Mr Collier looks at the effect of emigration on poor countries. Up to a point, it makes them better off. Emigrants send good ideas and hard currency home. The prospect of emigration prompts locals to study hard and learn useful skills; many then stay behind and enrich the domestic talent pool instead. But if too many educated people leave, poor countries are worse off. Big emerging markets such as China, India and Brazil benefit from emigration, but the smallest and poorest nations do not: Haiti, for example, has lost 85% of its educated people.

Mr Collier’s most arresting argument is that past waves of migration have created the conditions under which migration will henceforth accelerate. Emigration is less daunting if you can move to a neighbourhood where lots of your compatriots have already settled. There, you can speak your native language, eat familiar food and ask your cousins to help you find a job. Because many Western countries allow recent immigrants to sponsor visas for their relatives, Mr Collier frets that large, unassimilated diasporas will keep growing. And as they grow, they will become harder to assimilate.

Mr Collier is plainly not a bigot and his arguments should be taken seriously. Nonetheless, he is far too gloomy. He lives in Britain, which is nearly 90% white and has seen substantial immigration only relatively recently. His worries are mostly about the harm that immigration might do, rather than any it has already done. Indeed, the evidence he marshals suggests that so far it has been hugely beneficial.

It is possible that Britain will prove unable to cope with greater diversity in the future, but one cannot help noticing that the most diverse part of the country—London, which is less than 50% white British—is also by far the richest. It is also rather livelier than the lily-white counties that surround it.

America’s population consists almost entirely of immigrants and their descendants, yet it is rich, dynamic, peaceful and united by abundant national pride. Every past wave of newcomers has assimilated; why should the next one be different? The recent history of Canada, Australia and New Zealand also suggests that large-scale immigration is compatible with prosperity and social cohesion.

Mr Collier is right that there is a tension between mass immigration and the welfare state. A rich country that invited all and sundry to live off the dole would not stay rich for long. Immigrants assimilate better in America than in most European countries in part because welfare is less generous there. In parts of Europe it is possible for able-bodied newcomers to subsist on handouts, which infuriates the native-born. In America, by and large, immigrants have to work, so they do. Through work, they swiftly integrate into society.

Mr Collier approves of the European-style welfare state, so his policy prescriptions are aimed largely at preventing immigration from undermining it. He would peg the number of immigrants to how well previous arrivals have integrated. He would welcome quite a lot of skilled migrants and students (a good idea) but curb family reunions (which sounds harsh). He would allow in asylum-seekers from war zones but send them back when peace returns to their homelands. (This, he explains, would help their homelands rebuild themselves.) As for illegal immigrants, he would offer them the chance to register as guest workers who pay taxes but receive no social benefits.

Insisting that immigrants work is sound policy, but the tone of “Exodus” is problematic. Mr Collier finds endless objections to a policy—more or less unlimited immigration—that no country has adopted. In the process, he exaggerates the possible risks of mobility and underplays its proven benefits.

Voir encore:

Obama administration to stop deporting some young illegal immigrants
Tom Cohen
CNN
June 16, 2012

In an election-year policy change, the Obama administration said Friday it will stop deporting young illegal immigrants who entered the United States as children if they meet certain requirements.

The shift on the politically volatile issue of immigration policy prompted immediate praise from Latino leaders who have criticized Congress and the White House for inaction, while Republicans reacted with outrage, saying the move amounts to amnesty — a negative buzz word among conservatives — and usurps congressional authority.

Those who might benefit from the change expressed joy and relief, with celebratory demonstrations forming outside the White House and elsewhere.

Pedro Ramirez, a student who has campaigned for such a move, said he was « definitely speechless, » then added: « It’s great news. »

In a Rose Garden address Friday afternoon, President Barack Obama said the changes caused by his executive order will make immigration policy « more fair, more efficient and more just. »

« This is not amnesty. This is not immunity. This is not a path to citizenship. It’s not a permanent fix, » Obama said to take on conservative criticism of the step. « This is a temporary stopgap measure. »

Noting children of illegal immigrants « study in our schools, play in our neighborhoods, befriend our kids, pledge allegiance to our flag, » Obama said, « it makes no sense to expel talented young people who are, for all intents and purposes, Americans. »

When a reporter interrupted Obama with a hostile question, the president admonished him and declared that the policy change is « the right thing to do. »

Under the new policy, people younger than 30 who came to the United States before the age of 16, pose no criminal or security threat, and were successful students or served in the military can get a two-year deferral from deportation, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said.

It also will allow those meeting the requirements to apply for work permits, Napolitano said, adding that participants must be in the United States now and be able to prove they have been living in the country continuously for at least five years.

The change is part of a department effort to target resources at illegal immigrants who pose a greater threat, such as criminals and those trying to enter the country now, Napolitano said, adding it was « well within the framework of existing laws. »

The move addresses a major concern of the Hispanic community and mimics some of the provisions of a Democratic proposal called the DREAM Act that has failed to win enough Republican support to gain congressional approval.

Obama has been criticized by Hispanic-American leaders for an overall increase in deportations of illegal aliens in recent years. Last year, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement removed 396,906 illegal immigrants, the largest number in the agency’s history.

Friday’s policy change is expected to potentially affect 800,000 people, an administration official told CNN on background.

Both Obama and Napolitano called for Congress to pass the DREAM Act, which would put into law similar steps for children of illegal immigrants to continue living and working in the country.

« I’ve been dealing with immigration enforcement for 20 years and the plain fact of the matter is that the law that we’re working under doesn’t match the economic needs of the country today and the law enforcement needs of the country today, » Napolitano told CNN. « But as someone who is charged with enforcing the immigration system, we’re setting good, strong, sensible priorities, and again these young people really are not the individuals that the immigration removal process was designed to focus upon. »

Republicans who have blocked Democratic efforts on immigration reform immediately condemned the move, with some calling it an improper maneuver to skirt congressional opposition.

Rep. Steve King of Iowa, a leading GOP foe of Democratic proposals for immigration reform, threatened to file a lawsuit asking the courts to stop Obama « from implementing his unconstitutional and unlawful policy. »

In a Twitter post, Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina called the decision « a classic Barack Obama move of choosing politics over leadership, » while House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith, R-Texas, called the change a « decision to grant amnesty to potentially millions of illegal immigrants. »

« Many illegal immigrants will falsely claim they came here as children and the federal government has no way to check whether their claims are true, » Smith said in a statement. « And once these illegal immigrants are granted deferred action, they can then apply for a work permit, which the administration routinely grants 90% of the time. »

Others complained the move will flood an already poor job market for young Americans with illegal immigrants.

However, Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, who sponsored the DREAM Act, welcomed the announcement that he said « will give these young immigrants their chance to come out of the shadows and be part of the only country they’ve ever called home. »

He rejected the GOP argument that Obama’s move was all about politics, noting « there will be those who vote against him because of this decision, too. That’s what leadership is about. »

Durbin also noted that Obama repeatedly called for Congress to pass immigration reform legislation, including the DREAM Act. Now that it is clear no progress would occur this Congress, the president acted, Durbin said.

Obama has used executive orders more frequently in recent months to launch initiatives he advocates that have been stymied by the deep partisan divide in Congress. A White House campaign of such steps involving economic programs was labeled « We Can’t Wait. »

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, who has been working on an alternative version of the DREAM Act, criticized Obama for taking a piecemeal approach Friday. He said in a statement that « by once again ignoring the Constitution and going around Congress, this short-term policy will make it harder to find a balanced and responsible long-term one. »

Rubio is considered a possible running mate for certain GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who rejected the DREAM Act in the heat of the Republican primary campaign but has since expressed willingness to consider whatever Rubio proposes.

Later Friday, Romney told reporters that the issue needs more substantive action than an executive order, which can be replaced by a subsequent president.

He said he agrees with Rubio’s statement that Obama’s move makes finding a long-term solution more difficult. As president, Romney said, he would seek to provide « certainty and clarity for people who come into this country through no fault of their own by virtue of the actions of their parents. »

Hispanics make up the fastest-growing immigrant population in the country, and the Latino vote is considered a crucial bloc for the November presidential election.

A spokeswoman for a major Latino group, the National Council of La Raza, hailed the administration’s move.

« In light of the congressional inaction on immigration reform, this is the right step for the administration to take at this time, » said NCLR spokeswoman Laura Vazquez.

Immigration lawyers also called the change a major step in the right direction. However, one immigration expert warned that the new policy does not guarantee the result sought by participants.

« I worry that the announcement will be implemented more stingily than the administration would like, » said Stephen Yale-Loehr, who teaches immigration law at Cornell Law School.

Meanwhile, some evangelical Christian leaders who recently met at the White House to discuss immigration issues also endorsed Friday’s move, along with the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops and some Jewish groups.

For Jose Luis Zelaya, who came to the United States illegally from Honduras at age 14 to find his mother, also an illegal immigrant, the new policy means that « maybe I will be able to work without being afraid that someone may deport me. »

« There is no fear anymore, » he said.

Voir par ailleurs:

A vastly changed Middle East

Caroline B. Glick

The Jerusalem Post

11/21/2013

When America returns, it will likely find a changed regional landscape; nations are disintegrating, only to reintegrate in new groupings.

A week and a half ago, Syria’s Kurds announced they are setting up an autonomous region in northeastern Syria.

The announcement came after the Kurds wrested control over a chain of towns from al-Qaida in the ever metastasizing Syrian civil war.

The Kurds’ announcement enraged their nominal Sunni allies – including the al-Qaida forces they have been combating – in the opposition to the Assad regime. It also rendered irrelevant US efforts to reach a peace deal between the Syrian regime and the rebel forces at a peace conference in Geneva.

But more important than what the Kurds’ action means for the viability of the Obama administration’s Syria policy, it shows just how radically the strategic landscape has changed and continues to change, not just in Syria but throughout the Arab world.

The revolutionary groundswell that has beset the Arab world for the past three years has brought dynamism and uncertainty to a region that has known mainly stasis and status quo for the past 500 years. For 400 years, the Middle East was ruled by the Ottoman Turks. Anticipating the breakup of the Ottoman Empire during World War I, the British and the French quickly carved up the Ottoman possessions, dividing them between themselves. What emerged from their actions were the national borders of the Arab states – and Israel – that have remained largely intact since 1922.

As Yoel Guzansky and Erez Striem from the Institute for National Security Studies wrote in a paper published this week, while the borders of Arab states remain largely unchanged, the old borders no longer reflect the reality on the ground.

“As a result of the regional upheavals, tribal, sectarian, and ethnic identities have become more pronounced than ever, which may well lead to a change in the borders drawn by the colonial powers a century ago that have since been preserved by Arab autocrats.”

Guzansky and Striem explained, “The iron-fisted Arab rulers were an artificial glue of sorts, holding together different, sometimes hostile sects in an attempt to form a single nation state.

Now, the de facto changes in the Middle East map could cause far-reaching geopolitical shifts affecting alliance formations and even the global energy market.”

The writers specifically discussed the breakdown of national governments and the consequent growing irrelevance of national borders in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Yemen.

And while it is true that the dissolution of central government authority is most acute in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Yemen, in every Arab state national authorities are under siege, stressed, or engaged in countering direct threats to their rule. Although central authorities retain control in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia and Bahrain, they all contend with unprecedented challenges. As a consequence, today it is impossible to take for granted that the regime’s interests in any Arab state will necessarily direct the actions of the residents of that state, or that a regime now in power will remain in power tomorrow.

Guzansky and Striem note that the current state of flux presents Israel with both challenges and opportunities. As they put it, “The disintegration of states represents at least a temporary deterioration in Israel’s strategic situation because it is attended by instability liable to trickle over into neighboring states…. But the changes also mean dissolution of the regular armies that posed a threat in the past and present opportunities for Israel to build relations with different minorities with the potential to seize the reins of government in the future.”

Take the Kurds for example. The empowerment of the Kurds in Syria – as in Iraq – presents a strategic opportunity for Israel. Israel has cultivated and maintained an alliance with the Kurds throughout the region for the past 45 years.

Although Kurdish politics are fraught with internal clashes and power struggles, on balance, the empowerment of the Kurds at the expense of the central governments in Damascus and Baghdad is a major gain for Israel.

And the Kurds are not the only group whose altered status since the onset of the revolutionary instability in the Arab world presents Israel with new opportunities. Among the disparate factions in the disintegrating Arab lands from North Africa to the Persian Gulf are dozens of groups that will be thrilled to receive Israeli assistance and, in return, be willing to cooperate with Israel on a whole range of issues.

To be sure, these new allies are not likely to share Israeli values. And many may be no more than the foreign affairs equivalent of a one-night stand. But Israel also is not obliged to commit itself to any party for the long haul. Transactional alliances are valuable because they are based on shared interests, and they last for as long as the actors perceive those interests as shared ones.

Over the past week, we have seen a similar transformation occurring on a regional and indeed global level, as the full significance of the Obama administration’s withdrawal of US power from the region becomes better understood.

When word got out two weeks ago about the US decision to accept and attempt to push through a deal with Iran that would strip the international sanctions regime of meaning in return for cosmetic Iranian concessions that will not significantly impact Iran’s completion of its nuclear weapons program, attempts were made by some Israeli and many American policy-makers to make light of the significance of President Barack Obama’s moves.

But on Sunday night, Channel 10 reported that far from an opportunistic bid to capitalize on a newfound moderation in Tehran, the draft agreement was the result of months-long secret negotiations between Obama’s consigliere Valerie Jarrett and Iranian negotiators.

According to the report, which was denied by the White House, Jarrett, Obama’s Iranian-born consigliere, conducted secret talks with Iranian negotiators for the past several months. The draft agreement that betrayed US allies throughout the Arab world, and shattered Israeli and French confidence in the US’s willingness to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons, was presented to negotiators in Geneva as a fait accompli. Israel and Saudi Arabia, like other US regional allies were left in the dark about its contents. As we saw, it was only after the French and the British divulged the details of the deal to Israel and Saudi Arabia that the Israelis, Saudis and French formed an ad hoc alliance to scuttle the deal at the last moment.

The revelation of Jarrett’s long-standing secret talks with the Iranians showed that the Obama administration’s decision to cut a deal with the mullahs was a well-thought-out, long-term policy to use appeasement of the world’s leading sponsor of terrorism as a means to enable the US to withdraw from the Middle East. The fact that the deal in question would also pave the way for Iran to become a nuclear power, and so imperil American national security, was clearly less of a concern for Obama and his team than realizing their goal of withdrawing the US from the Middle East.

Just as ethnic, regional and religious factions wasted no time filling the vacuum created in the Arab world by the disintegration of central governments, so the states of the region and the larger global community wasted no time finding new allies to replace the United States.

Voicing this new understanding, Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman said Wednesday that it is time for Israel to seek out new allies.

In his words, “The ties with the US are deteriorating.

They have problems in North Korea, Pakistan, Iran, Syria, Egypt, China, and their own financial and immigration troubles. Thus I ask – what is our place in the international arena? Israel must seek more allies with common interests.”

In seeking to block Iran’s nuclear weapons program, Israel has no lack of allies. America’s withdrawal has caused a regional realignment in which Israel and France are replacing the US as the protectors of the Sunni Arab states of the Persian Gulf.

France has ample reason to act. Iran has attacked French targets repeatedly over the past 34 years. France built Saddam Hussein’s nuclear reactor while Saddam was at war with Iran.

France has 10 million Muslim citizens who attend mosques financed by Saudi Arabia.

Moreover, France has strong commercial interests in the Persian Gulf. There is no doubt that France will be directly harmed if Iran becomes a nuclear power.

Although Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s meeting Wednesday with Russian President Vladimir Putin did not bring about a realignment of Russian interests with the Franco- Sunni-Israeli anti-Iran consortium, the very fact that Netanyahu went to Moscow sent a clear message to the world community that in its dealings with outside powers, Israel no longer feels itself constrained by its alliance with the US.

And that was really the main purpose of the visit. Netanyahu didn’t care that Putin rejected his position on Iran. Israel didn’t need Russia to block Jarrett’s deal. Iran is no longer interested in even feigning interest in a nuclear deal. It was able to neutralize US power in the region, and cast the US’s regional allies into strategic disarray just by convincing Obama and Jarrett that a deal was in the offing. This is why Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei again threatened to annihilate Israel this week. He doesn’t think he needs to sugar coat his intentions any longer.

It is not that the US has become a nonentity in the region overnight, and despite Obama’s ill-will toward Israel, under his leadership the US has not become a wholly negative actor. The successful Israeli-US test of the David’s Sling short-range ballistic missile interceptor on Wednesday was a clear indication of the prevailing importance of Israel’s ties with the US. So, too, the delivery this week of the first of four US fast missile boats to the Egyptian navy, which will improve Egypt’s ability to secure maritime traffic in the Suez Canal, showed that the US remains a key player in the region. Congress’s unwillingness to bow to Obama’s will and weaken sanctions on Iran similarly is a positive portent for a post-Obama American return to the region.

But when America returns, it will likely find a vastly changed regional landscape. Nations are disintegrating, only to reintegrate in new groupings.

Monolithic regimes are giving way to domestic fissures and generational changes. As for America’s allies, some will welcome its return.

Others will scowl and turn away. All will have managed to survive, and even thrive in the absence of a guiding hand from Washington, and all will consequently need America less.

This changed landscape will in turn require the US to do some long, hard thinking about where its interests lie, and to develop new strategies for advancing them.

So perhaps in the fullness of time, we may all end up better off for this break in US strategic rationality.


Islam: Un universitaire égyptien prédit l’effondrement du monde musulman (The collapse of a house is a dangerous matter – and not just for its residents, warns Egyptian-German scholar)

31 mai, 2014
http://cdn.theatlantic.com/static/infocus/syria040513/s02_RTR3DAR3.jpg
http://www.jihadwatch.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Muslims-in-Sweden.jpgMontre-moi que Mahomet ait rien institué de neuf : tu ne trouverais rien que de mauvais et d’inhumain, tel ce qu’il statue en décrétant de faire progresser par l’épée la croyance qu’il prêchait. Manuel II Paléologue (empereur byzantin, 1391)
Dans le septième entretien (dialexis — controverse) édité par le professeur Khoury, l’empereur aborde le thème du djihad, de la guerre sainte. Assurément l’empereur savait que dans la sourate 2, 256 on peut lire : « Nulle contrainte en religion ! ». C’est l’une des sourates de la période initiale, disent les spécialistes, lorsque Mahomet lui-même n’avait encore aucun pouvoir et était menacé. Mais naturellement l’empereur connaissait aussi les dispositions, développées par la suite et fixées dans le Coran, à propos de la guerre sainte. Sans s’arrêter sur les détails, tels que la différence de traitement entre ceux qui possèdent le « Livre » et les « incrédules », l’empereur, avec une rudesse assez surprenante qui nous étonne, s’adresse à son interlocuteur simplement avec la question centrale sur la relation entre religion et violence en général, en disant : « Montre-moi donc ce que Mahomet a apporté de nouveau, et tu y trouveras seulement des choses mauvaises et inhumaines, comme son mandat de diffuser par l’épée la foi qu’il prêchait ». L’empereur, après s’être prononcé de manière si peu amène, explique ensuite minutieusement les raisons pour lesquelles la diffusion de la foi à travers la violence est une chose déraisonnable. La violence est en opposition avec la nature de Dieu et la nature de l’âme. « Dieu n’apprécie pas le sang — dit-il —, ne pas agir selon la raison, sun logô, est contraire à la nature de Dieu. La foi est le fruit de l’âme, non du corps. Celui, par conséquent, qui veut conduire quelqu’un à la foi a besoin de la capacité de bien parler et de raisonner correctement, et non de la violence et de la menace… Pour convaincre une âme raisonnable, il n’est pas besoin de disposer ni de son bras, ni d’instrument pour frapper ni de quelque autre moyen que ce soit avec lequel on pourrait menacer une personne de mort… L’affirmation décisive dans cette argumentation contre la conversion au moyen de la violence est : ne pas agir selon la raison est contraire à la nature de Dieu. Benoit XVI (université de Ratisbonne, 1é septembre 2006)
La condition préalable à tout dialogue est que chacun soit honnête avec sa tradition. (…) les chrétiens ont repris tel quel le corpus de la Bible hébraïque. Saint Paul parle de  » greffe » du christianisme sur le judaïsme, ce qui est une façon de ne pas nier celui-ci . (…) Dans l’islam, le corpus biblique est, au contraire, totalement remanié pour lui faire dire tout autre chose que son sens initial (…) La récupération sous forme de torsion ne respecte pas le texte originel sur lequel, malgré tout, le Coran s’appuie. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard
Quand les phénomènes s’exaspèrent, c’est qu’ils vont disparaitre. René Girard
Dire que l’islamisme n’est pas l’islam, qu’il n’a rien à voir avec l’islam, est faux. Pour le musulman d’hier et d’aujourd’hui il n’y a qu’un seul Coran comme il n’y a qu’un seul prophète. L’islamiste est autant musulman que le mystique car il s’appuie sur ces deux fondements. Et dans ces deux fondements il y a l’appel au combat. Ici-bas la guerre pour la victoire de l’islam doit être poursuivie tant que l’islam n’est pas entièrement victorieux. La paix n’est envisageable que si la victoire paraît, pour le moment, impossible ou douteuse (sourate 47, verset 35/37). Mais la paix sera plutôt une récompense du paradis, quand toute la terre aura été pacifiée. Comment passer sous silence que pour les musulmans le monde se partage entre le territoire de l’islam (dâr al-Islam) et le territoire non musulman, qualifié de territoire de la guerre (dâr al-harb). (…) Entre l’islam et l’islamisme, il n’y a pas de différence de nature mais de degré. L’islamisme est présent dans l’islam comme le poussin l’est dans l’oeuf. Il n’y a pas de bon ou mauvais islam, pas plus qu’il n’y a d’islam modéré. En revanche il y a des musulmans modérés, ceux qui n’appliquent que partiellement l’islam. (…) Pour accepter l’islam, l’Europe a forgé le mythe de l’Andalousie tolérante qui aurait constitué un âge d’or pour les trois religions. Tout ce qui concerne les combats, le statut humiliant du non musulman a été soigneusement gommé. Il s’agit d’une véritable falsification de l’histoire réelle. (…) Là où l’islam est particulièrement dangereux, c’est qu’il englobe toute la vie du croyant, du berceau jusqu’à la tombe, dans tous les domaines et qu’il n’y a pas de séparation entre le public et le privé, pas plus qu’il n’y a de séparation entre le politique et le religieux. L’islam est total, global, il englobe la totalité car tout comportement obéit à une règle. Mais en même temps chaque règle est une règle de comportement religieux, que cette règle soit dans le domaine juridique, politique ou intime. C’est le religieux qui recouvre tout. Le système pleinement réalisé devrait s’appeler théocratie et jamais «démocratie». On nous ment quand on nous affirme que l’islam serait une foi qui se pratique dans la sphère privée, comme le christianisme. L’islam est à la fois une foi, une loi, un droit (fiqh), lequel est l’application de la Loi qu’est la charî’a. Et cette charî’a a prescrit de combattre l’infidèle (jihâd ou qitâl), de lui réserver un traitement inégalitaire (dhimmî), d’appliquer aux musulmans des peines fixes (hudûd) pour des crimes bien définis (adultère (zinâ), apostasie (ridda), blasphème(tajdîf), vol (sariqah), brigandage (qat’ al-tarîq), meurtre (qatl) et bien sûr consommation d’alcool. (…) Pour expliquer les attentats, il suffit de se reporter à la vie du prophète, lequel a justifié l’assassinat politique pour le bien de l’islam. De même, faire peur, inspirer la terreur (rahbat) -dont on a tiré le mot moderne “terrorisme” (irhâb)- était la méthode que le noble modèle préconisait pour semer la panique chez les ennemis de l’islam. Anne-Marie Delcambre
L’idée selon laquelle la diffusion de la culture de masse et des biens de consommation dans le monde entier représente le triomphe de la civilisation occidentale repose sur une vision affadie de la culture occidentale. L’essence de la culture occidentale, c’est le droit, pas le MacDo. Le fait que les non-Occidentaux puissent opter pour le second n’implique pas qu’ils acceptent le premier. Samuel Huntington
Le titre m’est venu de la lecture de l’Apocalypse, du chapitre 20, qui annonce qu’au terme de mille ans, des nations innombrables venues des quatre coins de la Terre envahiront « le camp des saints et la Ville bien-aimée. Jean Raspail
Le 17 février 2001, un cargo vétuste s’échouait volontairement sur les rochers côtiers, non loin de Saint-Raphaël. À son bord, un millier d’immigrants kurdes, dont près de la moitié étaient des enfants. « Cette pointe rocheuse faisait partie de mon paysage. Certes, ils n’étaient pas un million, ainsi que je les avais imaginés, à bord d’une armada hors d’âge, mais ils n’en avaient pas moins débarqué chez moi, en plein décor du Camp des saints, pour y jouer l’acte I. Le rapport radio de l’hélicoptère de la gendarmerie diffusé par l’AFP semble extrait, mot pour mot, des trois premiers paragraphes du livre. La presse souligna la coïncidence, laquelle apparut, à certains, et à moi, comme ne relevant pas du seul hasard. Jean Raspail
Ce qui m’a frappé, c’est le contraste entre les opinions exprimées à titre privé et celles tenues publiquement. Double langage et double conscience… À mes yeux, il n’y a pire lâcheté que celle devant la faiblesse, que la peur d’opposer la légitimité de la force à l’illégitimité de la violence. Jean Raspail
Les pays arabes enregistrent un retard par rapport aux autres régions en matière de gouvernance et de participation aux processus de décision. La vague de démocratisation, qui a transformé la gouvernance dans la plupart des pays d’Amérique latine et d’Asie orientale dans les années quatre-vingts, en Europe centrale et dans une bonne partie de l’Asie centrale à la fin des années quatre-vingt et au début des années quatre-vingt-dix, a à peine effleuré les États arabes. Ce déficit de liberté va à l’encontre du développement humain et constitue l’une des manifestations les plus douloureuses du retard enregistré en terme de développement politique. La démocratie et les droits de l’homme sont reconnus de droit, inscrits dans les constitutions, les codes et les déclarations gouvernementales, mais leur application est en réalité bien souvent négligée, voire délibérément ignorée. Le plus souvent, le mode de gouvernance dans le monde arabe se caractérise par un exécutif puissant exerçant un contrôle ferme sur toutes les branches de l’État, en l’absence parfois de garde-fous institutionnels. La démocratie représentative n’est pas toujours véritable, et fait même parfois défaut. Les libertés d’expression et d’association sont bien souvent limitées. Des modèles dépassés de légitimité prédominent.(…) La participation politique dans les pays arabes reste faible, ainsi qu’en témoignent l’absence de véritable démocratie représentative et les restrictions imposées aux libertés. Dans le même temps, les aspirations de la population à davantage de liberté et à une plus grande participation à la prise de décisions se font sentir, engendrées par l’augmentation des revenus, l’éducation et les flux d’information. La dichotomie entre les attentes et leur réalisation a parfois conduit à l’aliénation et à ses corollaires, l’apathie et le mécontentement. (…) Deux mécanismes parallèles sont en jeu. La position de l’État tutélaire va en s’amenuisant, en partie du fait de la réduction des avantages qu’il est en mesure d’offrir aujourd’hui sous forme de garantie de l’emploi, de subventions et autres mesures incitatives. Par contre, les citoyens se trouvent de plus en plus en position de force étant donné que l’État dépend d’eux de manière croissante pour se procurer des recettes fiscales, assurer l’investissement du secteur privé et couvrir d’autres besoins essentiels. Par ailleurs, les progrès du développement humain, en dotant les citoyens, en particulier ceux des classes moyennes, d’un nouvel éventail de ressources, les ont placés en meilleure position pour contester les politiques et négocier avec l’État. Rapport arabe sur le développement humain 2002
C’est une expérience profondément émouvante d’être à Jérusalem, la capitale d’Israël. Nos deux nations sont séparées par plus de 5 000 miles. Mais pour un Américain à l’étranger, il n’est pas possible de ressentir un plus grande proximité avec les idéaux et les convictions de son propre pays qu’ici, en Israël. Nous faisons partie de la grande fraternité des démocraties. Nous parlons la même langue de liberté et de justice, et nous incarnons le droit de toute personne à vivre en paix. Nous servons la même cause et provoquons les mêmes haines chez les mêmes ennemis de la civilisation. C’est ma ferme conviction que la sécurité d’Israël est un intérêt vital de la sécurité nationale des États-Unis. Et notre alliance est une alliance fondée non seulement sur des intérêts communs, mais aussi sur des valeurs partagées. (…) Quand on vient ici en Israël et qu’on voit que le PIB par habitant est d’environ 21.000 dollars, alors qu’il est de l’ordre de 10.000 dollars tout juste de l’autre côté dans les secteurs gérés par l’Autorité palestinienne, on constate une différence énorme et dramatique de vitalité économique. (…) C’est la culture qui fait toute la différence. Et lorsque je regarde cette ville (Jérusalem) et tout ce que le peuple de cette nation (Israël) a accompli, je reconnais pour le moins la puissance de la culture et de quelques autres choses. Mitt Romney
Le discours de Mitt Romney à Jérusalem, et les déclarations à la presse qui l’ont accompagné n’en finissent décidément pas de faire des vagues. Mitt Romney a parlé du fait que le développement économique et la liberté qui règnent en Israël étaient dues à la culture, et que les handicaps qui marquent le monde musulman et qui touchent les « Palestiniens » auraient aussi une dimension culturelle. Des accusations de racisme ont aussitôt commencé à fuser. (…) Oui, certaines cultures sont plus propices que d’autres au développement économique et à la liberté sous toutes ses formes, et, n’en déplaise aux relativistes, la culture juive est une culture particulièrement propice. La culture du christianisme protestant est plus propice au développement économique et à la liberté que la culture du christianisme catholique, et lorsque des substrats culturels viennent s’ajouter, tels le caudillisme en Amérique latine, les handicaps peuvent devenir écrasants. Oui, les cultures marquées par le confucianisme peuvent susciter le développement économique, mais se trouver confrontées à des obstacles lorsqu’il s’agit de liberté, et cela explique les difficultés de sociétés asiatiques à passer à un fonctionnement post-industriel et post-asiatique. Et oui, hélas, le monde musulman, et en lui tout particulièrement le monde arabe, sont dans une situation de blocage culturel qui ne cesse de s’aggraver et prennent des allures cataclysmiques. Le monde arabe est aujourd’hui dans une phase d’effondrement économique qui s’accompagne d’un effondrement de ses structures politiques et d’une destruction de ses repères culturels. Il ne reste au milieu des décombres qu’une infime minorité de gens ouverts à l’esprit de civilisation et aux sociétés ouvertes, et une immense déferlante islamiste où se mêlent dans le ressentiment, le sectarisme et le tribalisme des gens désireux de revenir à une lecture littéraliste du Coran, des radicaux mélangeant Coran et texte de Marx, Lénine ou Franz Fanon, d’autres qui relisent leurs textes sacrés à la lumière noire de Hitler. Cet effondrement ne fait que commencer. Il va se poursuivre. La situation qui prévaut en Syrie n’en est qu’un fragment. D’autres fragments sont visibles en Libye, dans le Nord du Mali, au Nigeria où agissent les Boko Haram, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Yemen. Il est criminel de ne pas le comprendre. C’est suicidaire aussi. La Russie et la Chine essaient cyniquement de voir quels avantages elles peuvent tirer de l’effondrement et en quoi il peut leur permettre de parasiter le monde occidental. Les dirigeants européens s’essaient à rafistoler une zone euro et une Union Européenne qui sont elles-mêmes au bord de l’effondrement, et font semblant de croire encore aux « promesses du printemps arabe ». Manuel Valls, qui sortait sans doute d’un hôpital où il venait de subir une lobotomie, a parlé le 6 juillet en inaugurant de manière très laïque une mosquée à Cergy Pontoise de l’islam contemporain comme de l’hériter de celui de Cordoue où foisonnait la connaissance. Les dirigeants européens entendent aussi flatter les « Palestiniens » : s’ils ouvraient les yeux (c’est impossible, je sais), et s’ils actionnaient leurs neurones (ce qui est plus impossible encore, je ne l’ignore pas), ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » est en train de mourir et ne survit que grâce aux injections financières européennes et, pour partie, américaines. Ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » s’est développé dans les années mille neuf cent soixante quand le nationalisme arabe était soutenu par l’Union Soviétique. L’Union Soviétique n’existe plus. Le nationalisme arabe agonise dans les décombres de Damas. Guy Millière
La Scandinavie est un ensemble qui a connu une très forte émigration au XIXe siècle, contribuant notamment à peupler les Etats-Unis. Mais il n’y avait jamais eu de vrai phénomène d’immigration. Il est très amusant de comparer la diversité des noms de famille en France, où elle est infinie, et en Scandinavie, où il y a très peu de souches. Là-bas, l’immigration débute, même pas dans les années 50 comme au Royaume-Uni, mais seulement dans les années 70. Au début, ces social-démocraties qui n’ont pas eu de colonies ont accueilli à bras ouverts les immigrés avec des conditions très avantageuses. A ceci près que la masse d’arrivants s’est concentrée dans des zones déjà très peuplées : à l’échelle d’un pays, c’est peu, mais à celle de certains quartiers d’Oslo ou de Copenhague, l’équilibre s’est rompu. Par ailleurs, dans une société très ouverte et très égalitaire, la question du statut des femmes a vite posé problème. Les habitants n’ont pas supporté de voir ces femmes avec le voile noir intégral. Même si ces immigrés ne font rien de mal et vont faire leurs courses chez Ikea, la situation est devenue explosive. (…) [aux élections européennes] …Attendons de voir ces résultats pour en tirer des conclusions, mais on peut s’attendre à une poussée. Le suffrage se fait à la proportionnelle. Beaucoup de partis d’extrême droite sous-représentés en raison d’un scrutin majoritaire national vont donc se révéler. La France n’a que deux députés frontistes pour représenter 16% de la population. Le phénomène est le même en Grande-Bretagne, qui a connu une immigration record ces dernières années. Entre 1991 et 2011, la proportion de la population née à l’étranger est passée de 5,8 à 12,5%. Cela risque d’avoir des répercussions dans les urnes fin mai pour le British National Party [BNP] et le Parti pour l’indépendance du Royaume-Uni [Ukip]. Le vote Front national concerne seulement la partie ouest du Nord-Pas-de-Calais, c’est-à-dire, paradoxalement, la zone la plus développée, la mieux réaménagée, la plus agréable. Les centres-villes de Béthune ou de Lens sont devenus des endroits presque riants, alors qu’ils étaient plutôt déprimants. Tout a bougé, on a cassé des corons, et on a également beaucoup redistribué d’aides sociales. En revanche, la partie nord-est de la région est restée en l’état, fidèle au vote communiste. Cette stagnation n’a pas généré de frustrations. Car si personne n’évolue socialement, il n’y a pas non plus, contrairement à la partie ouest, de sentiment de déclassement. Béatrice Giblin
Les Français ont redit hier que la crise économique et sociale n’était rien à côté de la crise identitaire, liée à l’immigration massive et à la déculturation organisée. Les socialistes corsetés n’ont pas de réponse: Manuel Valls a répété qu’il ne changerait pas sa « feuille de route » et qu’il « demandait du temps ». L’UMP, pour sa part,  avait un temps touché du doigt la bonne stratégie avec la « ligne Buisson », qui consistait à se dégager des interdits de penser. C’est elle qui s’avère plus nécessaire que jamais si la droite veut regagner la confiance. Pour l’UMP, c’est désormais une question de survie. Il n’est en tout cas pas pensable de répondre par l’immobilisme à cette crise de régime. Ceux qui dénoncent dans le FN le « rejet de l’autre » ne peuvent rejeter ce parti devenu majoritaire, à moins d’ostraciser « La France FN » (titre de Libération, ce lundi). D’autant que le procès en antisémitisme qui est fait par certains au mouvement de Marine Le Pen masque la réalité de la haine antijuive  qui s’observe dans des cités (deux jeunes frères portant la kippa ont été agressés samedi soir devant la synagogue de Créteil). Le « populisme » ne menace aucunement la démocratie, comme l’assurent les oligarques contestés par le peuple et qui s’accrochent, eux, à leur pouvoir. Le vrai danger est l’obscurantisme qui, à Bruxelles samedi, a assassiné quatre personnes, dont deux israéliens, au Musée Juif de la ville; or cette menace-là mobilise beaucoup moins les belles âmes. La diabolisation du mouvement de Marine Le Pen est une paresse intellectuelle des politiques et des médias. Ceux-là ont été ses meilleurs alliés, en instituant son parti comme unique formation à l’écoute des gens. L’échec confirmé de cette méthode oblige à y renoncer. Il est devenu, par la volonté des citoyens, un parti comme un autre. Il doit être jugé sur son programme. L’UMP devra s’en inspirer quand le FN parle de la France. Ivan Rioufol
Si les tendances à la fragmentation perdurent, le mouvement islamiste sera condamné, comme le fascisme et le communisme, à n’être rien de plus qu’une menace pour la civilisation, capable de causer des dommages considérables mais sans jamais pouvoir triompher. Ce frein potentiel au pouvoir islamiste, devenu manifeste seulement en 2013, ouvre la voie à l’optimisme mais pas à la complaisance. Même si les choses semblent meilleures qu’il y a un an, la tendance peut à nouveau s’inverser rapidement. La tâche ardue qui consiste à vaincre l’islamisme demeure une priorité. Daniel Pipes
Abdel-Samad avait prédit, avant le déclenchement des révolutions arabes, l’effondrement du monde musulman sous le poids d’un islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, et l’immigration massive vers l’Occident qui s’en suivrait. L’Occident a intérêt à soutenir les forces laïques et démocratiques dans le monde musulman. Et chez nous, il faut encourager la critique de l’islam au lieu de la réprimer sous prétexte de discours de haine. En apaisant les islamistes et en accommodant leurs demandes obscurantistes dans nos institutions, on ne fait que retarder un processus qui serait salutaire pour les musulmans eux-mêmes, et pour l’humanité. Al Masrd
In the western world, an astounding number of people believe that Islam is overpowering and on the rise. Demographic trends, along with bloody attacks and shrill tones of Islamist fundamentalists, seem to confirm that notion. In reality, however, it is the Islamic world which feels on the defensive and determined to protest vehemently against what it perceives as a western, aggressive style of power politics, including in the economic sphere. In short, a stunning pattern of asymmetric communication and mutual paranoia determines the relationship between (Muslim) East and (Christian) West — and has done so for generations. Regarding Islam, I think that in its present condition it may be many things, except for one — that it is powerful. Indeed, I view today’s Islam as seriously ill — and, both culturally and socially, as in retreat. It can offer few, if any, constructive answers to the questions of the 21st century and instead barricades itself behind a wall of anger and protest. The religiously motivated violence, the growing Islamization of public space and the insistence on the visibility of Muslim symbols are merely nervous reactions to this retreat. The rise of Islamism reflects little more than the profound lack of self-awareness and constructive real-life options for many young Muslims. For all the supposed glory and dynamism in the eyes of its acolytes, it is little more than the desperate act to paint a house in seemingly resplendent colors, while the house itself is about to topple onto itself. But no doubt about it, the collapse of a house is a dangerous matter — and not just for its residents. (…)  As far as I can tell, the “clash of civilizations” seized upon by the late Samuel Huntington has long become reality. But it is important to realize that it takes place not only between Islam and the West, as many suspected it, but also within the Islamic world itself. It is an inner-Islamic clash between individualism and conformity pressure, between continuity and innovation, modernity and the past. (…) Perversely, but predictably, the directly related lack of economic productivity and the growing popular discontent over the inability to tap into a gainful economic life help the radical Islamists to advance their cause. (…) When it comes to the future of Islam, I fear that the road to transformation and modernization will only be reached following a period of collapse. This is especially true in the Arab world, where the prospects for both regional and global advancement appear rather daunting, if not — for now — illusory. A rapidly growing, poor and oppressed population, a lagging educational sector, shrinking oil reserves and drastic climate change undermine any prospects for economic progress. In addition, these factors further intensify the existing regional and religious conflicts. The net effect of this could well be an increasing loss of relevance and authority of the state itself, which could lead to a significant spread of violence. The civil wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Algeria, Pakistan, Somalia and Sudan are just the beginning of it — although already a most ominous one. The present form of spiritual and material calcification leads me to make a prediction: Many Islamic countries will tumble, and Islam will have a hard time surviving as a political and social idea, and as a culture. What this does to the world community is difficult to assess. However, it is quite clear that this disintegration will result in one of the largest migrations in history. (And this is precisely where the circle of fear is getting closed again — from New York to Germany.) The downfall of the Islamic world would automatically mean that the waves of migration to Europe would increase significantly. For young Muslim immigrants, fleeing poverty and terrorism, Europe does indeed represent a hope for them, as does the United States. Still, they will not manage to shed themselves of their friend-foe thinking. They will migrate into a continent that they by and large despise — and that they hold responsible for their plight. Worse, neither the recipient country’s government institutions nor the long-established Muslim immigrants there can help them to integrate themselves. The spreading violence that came to the fore in the wake of the downfall of their home countries will simply be outsourced, mainly to Europe, because of its non-shielded immigrant situation. Saying so has nothing to do with scaremongering, but is an act of recognizing what’s real. In the ultimate analysis, it is the natural result of the imbalance in the world in which we live. The many sins of the West and the corresponding failures of the Islamic world itself, which are already the stuff of history for centuries, will become very visible again. This is the downside of the globalization process. Hard times await us on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea. Meanwhile, we are all running out of time. Hamed Abdel-Samad
Les musulmans ne cessent de se vanter d’avoir transmis la civilisation grecque et romaine aux Occidentaux, mais s’ils étaient vraiment porteurs de cette civilisation pourquoi ne l’ont-ils pas préservée, valorisée et enrichie afin d’en tirer le meilleur profit ? (…)  les diverses cultures contemporaines se fécondent mutuellement et s’épanouissent tout en se faisant concurrence, alors que la culture islamique demeure pétrifiée et hermétiquement fermée à la culture occidentale qu’elle qualifie et accuse d’être infidèle? (…) le caractère infidèle de la civilisation occidentale n’empêche pas les musulmans de jouir de ses réalisations et de ses produits, particulièrement dans les domaines scientifiques, technologiques et médicaux. Ils en jouissent sans réaliser qu’ils ont raté le train de la modernité lequel est opéré et conduit par les infidèles sans contribution aucune des musulmans, au point que ces derniers sont devenus un poids mort pour l’Occident et pour l’humanité entière. (…) comment l’élite éclairée dans le monde islamique et arabe saura-t-elle affronter cette réalité ? Hamed Abdel-Samad

Islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, absence de structures économiques assurant un réel développement, absence d’un système éducatif efficace, limitation sévère de la créativité intellectuelle  …

Alors qu’avance chaque jour un peu plus dans les marges de nos villes la contre-colonisation islamique …

Et qu’alimentées, de la Syrie à l’Afrique, par les pires conflits de la planète, les vagues d’immigration sauvages et massives prophétisées par Jean Raspail ont déjà commencé à atteindre nos rivages …

Pendant qu’entre Mohamed Merah en France et son possible émule il y  a une semaine à Bruxelles, les « soldats perdus du jihad » ont peut-être déjà commencé eux aussi à rapatrier leur violence dans nos centre-villes …

Et qu’après le discours de vérité de Benoit XVI sur l’islam et face à l’inquiétude qui monte de nos populations de souche, le Pape François comme nos belles âmes et nos médias nous ramènent à l’apaisement le plus servile …

Petite remise des pendules à l’heure avec l’universitaire égypto-allemand Hamed Abd el Samad

Qui, bien solitaire et au péril de sa vie, rappelait il y a trois ans  le caractère illusoire de l’apparente résurgence du monde islamique ..

Et confirmant, après le fameux rapport des Nations Unies d’il y a douze ans, les analyses tant critiquées de Huntington sur le choc des civilisations comme le lien décrit par René Girard entre l’exaspération et la disparition prochaine d’un phénomène …

Montrait que ledit conflit se joue aussi à l’intérieur du monde musulman lui-même et prédisait un effondrement dans les décennies à venir de la Maison-islam …

Aussi nécessaire et salutaire qu’hélas hautement risqué et dangereux …

Et ce pas seulement pour ses résidents …

Un universitaire égyptien prédit l’effondrement du monde musulman
Un article paru le 1er décembre 2010 dans le journal Al Marsd au sujet d’un livre du politologue allemand d’origine égyptienne, Abdel-Samad.

Abdel-Samad avait prédit, avant le déclenchement des révolutions arabes, l’effondrement du monde musulman sous le poids d’un islam incapable de prendre le virage de la modernité, et l’immigration massive vers l’Occident qui s’en suivrait.L’Occident a intérêt à soutenir les forces laïques et démocratiques dans le monde musulman. Et chez nous, il faut encourager la critique de l’islam au lieu de la réprimer sous prétexte de discours de haine. En apaisant les islamistes et en accommodant leurs demandes obscurantistes dans nos institutions, on ne fait que retarder un processus qui serait salutaire pour les musulmans eux-mêmes, et pour l’humanité.

Hamed Abd el Samad, chercheur et professeur d’université résidant en Allemagne, a publié en décembre 2010 un ouvrage qu’il a intitulé «la chute du monde islamique». Dans son livre il pose un diagnostic sans concessions sur l’ampleur de la catastrophe qui frappera le monde islamique au cours des trente prochaines années. L’auteur s’attend à ce que cet évènement coïncide avec le tarissement prévisible des puits de pétrole au Moyen-Orient. La désertification progressive contribuerait également au marasme économique tandis qu’on assistera à une exacerbation des nombreux conflits ethniques, religieux et économiques qui ont actuellement cours. Ces désordres s’accompagneront de mouvements massifs de population avec une recrudescence des mouvements migratoires vers l’Occident, particulièrement en direction de l’Europe.

Fort de sa connaissance de la réalité du monde islamique, le professeur Abd el Samad en est venu à cette vision pessimiste. L’arriération intellectuelle, l’immobilisme économique et social, le blocage sur les plans religieux et politiques sont d’après lui les causes principales de la catastrophe appréhendée. Ses origines remontent à un millénaire et elle est en lien avec l’incapacité de l’islam d’offrir des réponses nouvelles ou créatives pour le bénéfice de l’humanité en général et pour ses adeptes en particulier.

À moins d’un miracle ou d’un changement de cap aussi radical que salutaire, Abd el Samad croit que l’effondrement du monde islamique connaîtra son point culminant durant les deux prochaines décennies. L’auteur égyptien a relevé plusieurs éléments lui permettant d’émettre un tel pronostic :

Absence de structures économiques assurant un réel développement
Absence d’un système éducatif efficace
Limitation sévère de la créativité intellectuelle

Ces déficiences ont fragilisé à l’extrême l’édifice du monde islamique, le prédisposant par conséquent à l’effondrement. Le processus de désintégration comme on l’a vu plus haut a débuté depuis longtemps et on serait rendu actuellement à la phase terminale.

L’auteur ne ménage pas ses critiques à l’égard des musulmans : «Ils ne cessent de se vanter d’avoir transmis la civilisation grecque et romaine aux Occidentaux, mais s’ils étaient vraiment porteurs de cette civilisation pourquoi ne l’ont-ils pas préservée, valorisée et enrichie afin d’en tirer le meilleur profit ?» Et il pousse le questionnement d’un cran : «Pourquoi les diverses cultures contemporaines se fécondent mutuellement et s’épanouissent tout en se faisant concurrence, alors que la culture islamique demeure pétrifiée et hermétiquement fermée à la culture occidentale qu’elle qualifie et accuse d’être infidèle?» Et il ajoute : «le caractère infidèle de la civilisation occidentale n’empêche pas les musulmans de jouir de ses réalisations et de ses produits, particulièrement dans les domaines scientifiques, technologiques et médicaux. Ils en jouissent sans réaliser qu’ils ont raté le train de la modernité lequel est opéré et conduit par les infidèles sans contribution aucune des musulmans, au point que ces derniers sont devenus un poids mort pour l’Occident et pour l’humanité entière.»

L’auteur constate l’impossibilité de réformer l’islam tant que la critique du coran, de ses concepts, de ses principes et de son enseignement demeure taboue ; cet état de fait empêche tout progrès, stérilise la pensée et paralyse toute initiative. S’attaquant indirectement au coran. l’auteur se demande quels changements profonds peut-on s’attendre de la part de populations qui sacralisent des textes figés et stériles et qui continuent de croire qu’ils sont valables pour tous les temps et tous les lieux. Ce blocage n’empêche pas les leaders religieux de répéter avec vantardise et arrogance que les musulmans sont le meilleur de l’humanité, que les non-musulmans sont méprisables et ne méritent pas de vivre ! L’ampleur de la schizophrénie qui affecte l’oumma islamique est remarquable.

L’auteur s’interroge : «comment l’élite éclairée dans le monde islamique et arabe saura-t-elle affronter cette réalité ? Malgré le pessimisme qui sévit parmi les penseurs musulmans libéraux, ceux-ci conservent une lueur d’espoir qui les autorise à réclamer qu’une autocritique se fasse dans un premier temps avec franchise, loin du mensonge, de l’hypocrisie, de la dissimulation et de l’orgueil mal placé. Cet effort doit être accompagné de la volonté de se réconcilier avec les autres en reconnaissant et respectant leur supériorité sur le plan civilisationnel et leurs contributions sur les plans scientifiques et technologiques. Le monde islamique doit prendre conscience de sa faiblesse et doit rechercher les causes de son arriération, de son échec et de sa misère en toute franchise afin de trouver un remède à ses maux.

Le professeur Abd el Samad ne perçoit aucune solution magique à la situation de l’oumma islamique tant que celle-ci restera attachée à la charia qui asservit, stérilise les esprits, divise le monde entre croyants musulmans et infidèles non-musulmans ; entre dar el islam et dar el harb (les pays islamiques et les pays à conquérir). L’auteur croit qu’il est impossible pour l’oumma islamique de progresser et d’innover avant qu’elle ne se libère de ses démons, de ses complexes, de ses interdits et avant qu’elle ne transforme l’islam en religion purement spirituelle invitant ses adeptes à une relation personnelle avec le créateur sans interférence de la part de quiconque fusse un prophète, un individu, une institution ou une mafia religieuse dans sa pratique de la religion ou dans sa vie quotidienne.

Source : أستاذ جامعي مصري يتنبأ بسقوط العالم الإسلامي خلال 30 سنة, Al-Masrd, 1 décembre 2010. Traduction de l’arabe par Hélios d’Alexandrie

Voir aussi:

Globalization and the Pending Collapse of the Islamic World

With which tools can Islam, in the eyes of the Islamists, actually conquer the world of today? Or can it?
Hamed Abdel-Samad

The Globalist

September 15, 2010

In the western world, an astounding number of people believe that Islam is overpowering and on the rise. Demographic trends, along with bloody attacks and shrill tones of Islamist fundamentalists, seem to confirm that notion.

In reality, however, it is the Islamic world which feels on the defensive and determined to protest vehemently against what it perceives as a western, aggressive style of power politics, including in the economic sphere.

In short, a stunning pattern of asymmetric communication and mutual paranoia determines the relationship between (Muslim) East and (Christian) West — and has done so for generations.

Regarding Islam, I think that in its present condition it may be many things, except for one — that it is powerful. Indeed, I view today’s Islam as seriously ill — and, both culturally and socially, as in retreat.

It can offer few, if any, constructive answers to the questions of the 21st century and instead barricades itself behind a wall of anger and protest.

The religiously motivated violence, the growing Islamization of public space and the insistence on the visibility of Muslim symbols are merely nervous reactions to this retreat.

The rise of Islamism reflects little more than the profound lack of self-awareness and constructive real-life options for many young Muslims.

For all the supposed glory and dynamism in the eyes of its acolytes, it is little more than the desperate act to paint a house in seemingly resplendent colors, while the house itself is about to topple onto itself.

But no doubt about it, the collapse of a house is a dangerous matter — and not just for its residents.

The key question is this: With which tools can Islam, in the eyes of the Islamists, actually conquer the world of today? After all, in the era of nanotechnology, demographics alone is no longer sufficient to determine the fate of the world.

To the contrary, the rise of half-educated masses without any real prospects for economic and social advancement in too many Muslim countries, in my view, is more of a burden on Islam than on the West.

True, there is a widespread trend which has much of the Islamic world disassociate itself from secular and scientific knowledge in a drastic manner — and which chooses to adopt a profoundly irreconcilable attitude to the spirit of modernity.

At the same time, for all their presumed backwardness and lack of perspective, young Muslims in many countries undergo a distinct individualization process.

True, that development primarily concerns those who are quite intense users of the Internet and who, depending on their personal financial situation, also tend to be devoted to buying modern consumer goods.

Either way, the outcome is a profound shift from the pre-Internet past: They no longer trust the old traditional structures.

These trends can ultimately bring about one of two possible outcomes — a move toward democratization or a step back toward mass fanaticism and violence.

Which outcome it will be depends first and foremost on the frameworks in which these young individuals find themselves.

What is as perplexing as it is remarkable is that, in key countries such as Iran and Egypt, the trend toward radicalization and the opposite outcome of young people managing to free themselves from outdated structures occur simultaneously.

Meanwhile, the battle lines between these two opposing outcomes have hardened more than ever before — and a bitter confrontation has become inevitable.

As far as I can tell, the “clash of civilizations” seized upon by the late Samuel Huntington has long become reality. But it is important to realize that it takes place not only between Islam and the West, as many suspected it, but also within the Islamic world itself.

It is an inner-Islamic clash between individualism and conformity pressure, between continuity and innovation, modernity and the past.

It would be naïve to assume that real political reform — and, along with it, a modernizing reform of Islam — are anything but in the rather distant future.

That will be the case as long as the education systems still favor pure loyalty over freer forms of thinking.

Perversely, but predictably, the directly related lack of economic productivity and the growing popular discontent over the inability to tap into a gainful economic life help the radical Islamists to advance their cause.

Even in the socially and politically better-off Gulf countries, the process of opening up is primarily undertaken by « virtue » of introducing modern consumer culture — rather than as a dynamic renewal of thought. (Hello China.)

The so-called reformers of Islam still dare not approach the fundamental problems of culture and religion. Reform debates are triggered frequently, but never completed.

Hardly anyone asks, “Is there possibly a fundamental shortcoming of our faith?” Hardly anyone dares to attack the sanctity of the Koran.

The Muslim World and the Titanic

Does Islam share the same fate as the Titanic?
Hamed Abdel-Samad

The Globalist

September 16, 2010

Comparing the Muslim world of today with the Titanic just before its sinking, some powerful parallels come to mind — sadly so.

That ship was all alone in the ocean, was considered invincible by its proud makers and yet suddenly became irredeemably tarnished in its oversized ambitions. Within a few seconds, it moved in its self-perception from world dominator to sailing helplessly in the icy ocean of modernity, without any concept of where a rescue crew could come from.

The passengers in the third-class cabins remained asleep, effectively imprisoned, clueless about the looming catastrophe. The rich, meanwhile, managed to rescue themselves in the few lifeboats that were available, while the traveling clergy excelled with heartfelt but empty appeals to those caught in between not to give up fighting.

The so-called Islamic reformers remind me of the salon orchestra, which — in a heroic display of giving the passengers the illusion of normalcy — continued to play on the deck of the Titanic until it went down. Likewise, the reformers are playing an alluring melody, but know full well that no one is listening anyway.

All around the world, we live in times of significant global transformation. The disorienting pressures stemming from that need find a real-life expression in such events as the fight in New York City over the location of a mosque, the abandoned burning of Korans in Florida, or German debates about the presumed economic inferiority of Muslim immigrants (advanced by a central banker, who has since resigned from office).

When it comes to the future of Islam, I fear that the road to transformation and modernization will only be reached following a period of collapse.

This is especially true in the Arab world, where the prospects for both regional and global advancement appear rather daunting, if not — for now — illusory.

A rapidly growing, poor and oppressed population, a lagging educational sector, shrinking oil reserves and drastic climate change undermine any prospects for economic progress. In addition, these factors further intensify the existing regional and religious conflicts.

The net effect of this could well be an increasing loss of relevance and authority of the state itself, which could lead to a significant spread of violence.

The civil wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Algeria, Pakistan, Somalia and Sudan are just the beginning of it — although already a most ominous one.

The present form of spiritual and material calcification leads me to make a prediction: Many Islamic countries will tumble, and Islam will have a hard time surviving as a political and social idea, and as a culture.

What this does to the world community is difficult to assess. However, it is quite clear that this disintegration will result in one of the largest migrations in history. (And this is precisely where the circle of fear is getting closed again — from New York to Germany.)

The downfall of the Islamic world would automatically mean that the waves of migration to Europe would increase significantly. For young Muslim immigrants, fleeing poverty and terrorism, Europe does indeed represent a hope for them, as does the United States.

Still, they will not manage to shed themselves of their friend-foe thinking. They will migrate into a continent that they by and large despise — and that they hold responsible for their plight.

Worse, neither the recipient country’s government institutions nor the long-established Muslim immigrants there can help them to integrate themselves.

The spreading violence that came to the fore in the wake of the downfall of their home countries will simply be outsourced, mainly to Europe, because of its non-shielded immigrant situation.

Saying so has nothing to do with scaremongering, but is an act of recognizing what’s real. In the ultimate analysis, it is the natural result of the imbalance in the world in which we live.

The many sins of the West and the corresponding failures of the Islamic world itself, which are already the stuff of history for centuries, will become very visible again.

This is the downside of the globalization process. Hard times await us on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea. Meanwhile, we are all running out of time.

Voir également:

L’islamisme probablement condamné à disparaître
Daniel Pipes
The Washington Times
22 juillet 2013

Version originale anglaise: Islamism’s Likely Doom
Adaptation française: Johan Bourlard

Pas plus tard qu’en 2012, les islamistes semblaient pouvoir coopérer en surmontant leurs nombreuses dissensions internes – religieuses (sunnites et chiites), politiques (monarchistes et républicains), tactiques (politiques et violentes), ou encore sur l’attitude face à la modernité (salafistes et Frères musulmans). En Tunisie, par exemple, les salafistes et les Frères musulmans (FM) ont trouvé un terrain d’entente. Les différences entre tous ces groupes étaient réelles mais secondaires car, comme je le disais alors, « tous les islamistes poussent dans la même direction, vers l’application pleine et sévère de la loi islamique (la charia) ».

Ce genre de coopération se poursuit à un niveau relativement modeste, comme on a pu le voir lors de la rencontre entre un membre du parti au pouvoir en Turquie et le chef d’une organisation salafiste en Allemagne. Mais ces derniers mois, les islamistes sont entrés subitement et massivement en conflit les uns avec les autres. Même s’ils constituent toujours un mouvement à part entière caractérisé par des objectifs hégémoniques et utopistes, les islamistes diffèrent entre eux quant à leurs troupes, leurs appartenances ethniques, leurs méthodes et leurs philosophies.

Les luttes intestines que se livrent les islamistes ont éclaté dans plusieurs autres pays à majorité musulmane. Ainsi, on peut observer des tensions entre sunnites et chiites dans l’opposition entre la Turquie et l’Iran due aussi à des approches différentes de l’islamisme. Au Liban, on assiste à une double lutte, d’une part entre sunnites et islamistes chiites et d’autre part entre islamistes sunnites et l’armée. En Syrie c’est la lutte des sunnites contre les islamistes chiites, comme en Irak. En Égypte, on voit les islamistes sunnites contre les chiites alors qu’au Yémen ce sont les houthistes qui s’opposent aux salafistes.

La plupart du temps, toutefois, ce sont les membres d’une même secte qui s’affrontent : Khamenei contre Ahmadinejad en Iran, l’AKP contre les Gülenistes en Turquie, Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq contre Moqtada al-Sadr en Irak, la monarchie contre les Frères musulmans en Arabie Saoudite, le Front islamique de libération contre le Front al-Nosra en Syrie, les Frères musulmans égyptiens contre le Hamas au sujet des hostilités avec Israël, les Frères musulmans contre les salafistes en Égypte, ou encore le choc entre deux idéologues et hommes politiques de premier plan, Omar el-Béchir contre Hassan al-Tourabi au Soudan. En Tunisie, les salafistes (dénommés Ansar al-charia) combattent l’organisation de type Frères musulmans (dénommée Ennahda).

Des différences apparemment mineures peuvent revêtir un caractère complexe. À titre d’exemple, essayons de suivre le récit énigmatique d’un journal de Beyrouth à propos des hostilités à Tripoli, ville du nord du Liban :

Des heurts entre les différents groupes islamistes à Tripoli, divisés entre les mouvements politiques du 8 Mars et du 14 Mars, sont en recrudescence. … Depuis l’assassinat, en octobre, du Général de Brigade Wissam al-Hassan, figure de proue du mouvement du 14 Mars et chef du service des renseignements, des différends entre groupes islamistes à Tripoli ont abouti à une confrontation majeure, surtout après le meurtre du cheikh Abdel-Razzak al-Asmar, un représentant du Mouvement d’unification islamique, quelques heures seulement après la mort d’al-Hassan. Le cheikh a été tué par balles… pendant un échange de tirs survenu lorsque des partisans de Kanaan Naji, islamiste indépendant associé à la Rencontre nationale islamique, ont tenté de s’emparer du quartier général du Mouvement d’unification islamique.

Cet état de fragmentation rappelle les divisions que connaissaient, dans les années 1950, les nationalistes panarabes. Ces derniers aspiraient à l’unification de tous les peuples arabophones « du Golfe [Persique] à l’Océan [Atlantique] » pour reprendre l’expression d’alors. Malgré la grandeur de ce rêve, ses leaders se sont brouillés au moment où le mouvement grandissait, condamnant un nationalisme panarabe qui a fini par s’effondrer sous le poids d’affrontements entre factions toujours plus morcelées. Parmi ces conflits, on note :

Gamal Abdel Nasser en Égypte contre les partis Baas (ou Ba’ath) au pouvoir en Syrie et en Irak.
Le parti Baas syrien contre le parti Baas irakien.
Les baasistes syriens sunnites contre les baasistes syriens alaouites.
Les baasistes syriens alaouites jadidistes contre les baasistes syriens alaouites assadistes.

Et ainsi de suite. En réalité tous les efforts en vue de former une union arabe ont échoué – en particulier la République arabe unie rassemblant l’Égypte et la Syrie (1958-1961) mais également des tentatives plus modestes comme la Fédération arabe (1958), les États arabes unis (1958-1961), la Fédération des Républiques arabes (1972-1977), la domination syrienne du Liban (1976-2005) et l’annexion du Koweït par l’Irak (1990-1991).

Reflet de modèles bien ancrés au Moyen-Orient, les dissensions qui surgissent parmi les islamistes les empêchent en outre de travailler ensemble. Une fois que le mouvement émerge, que ses membres accèdent au pouvoir et l’exercent réellement, les divisions deviennent de plus en plus profondes. Les rivalités, masquées quand les islamistes languissent dans l’opposition, se dévoilent quand ils conquièrent le pouvoir.

Si les tendances à la fragmentation perdurent, le mouvement islamiste sera condamné, comme le fascisme et le communisme, à n’être rien de plus qu’une menace pour la civilisation, capable de causer des dommages considérables mais sans jamais pouvoir triompher. Ce frein potentiel au pouvoir islamiste, devenu manifeste seulement en 2013, ouvre la voie à l’optimisme mais pas à la complaisance. Même si les choses semblent meilleures qu’il y a un an, la tendance peut à nouveau s’inverser rapidement. La tâche ardue qui consiste à vaincre l’islamisme demeure une priorité.

Addendum, 22 juillet 2013. Les subdivisions parmi les nationalistes panarabes des années 1950 me rappellent une parodie du comédien américain Emo Philips (légèrement adaptée pour la lecture) :

Un jour, j’ai vu un type sur un pont, prêt à sauter.

Je lui ai dit. « Ne fais pas ça ! ». Il a répondu : « Personne ne m’aime. »

« Dieu t’aime. Crois-tu en Dieu ? ». Il a répondu : « Oui. »

« Moi aussi ! Es-tu juif ou chrétien ? » Il a répondu : « Chrétien. »

« Moi aussi ! Protestant ou catholique ? » Il a répondu : « Protestant. »

« Moi aussi ! Quelle dénomination ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord ou du Sud? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur ou libéral ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs ou de l’Est ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs. »

« Moi aussi ! Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs du Conseil de 1879 ou du Conseil de 1912 ? » Il a répondu : « Baptiste du Nord conservateur de la région des Grands Lacs du Conseil de 1912. »

J’ai répondu : « Meurs, hérétique ! » Et je l’ai poussé en bas du pont.

Voir encore:

Le monde arabe est en phase d’effondrement total
Guy Millière
Dreuz.info
02 août 2012

Le discours de Mitt Romney à Jérusalem, et les déclarations à la presse qui l’ont accompagné n’en finissent décidément pas de faire des vagues. Mitt Romney a parlé du fait que le développement économique et la liberté qui règnent en Israël étaient dues à la culture, et que les handicaps qui marquent le monde musulman et qui touchent les « Palestiniens » auraient aussi une dimension culturelle. Des accusations de racisme ont aussitôt commencé à fuser.

Les gens qui profèrent ces accusations sont-ils si idiots qu’ils confondent race et culture ? Pensent-ils vraiment qu’un Africain noir né chrétien et qui se convertit à l’islam change de race, ou qu’un Suédois blond devenu musulman va soudain devenir un Arabe du Proche-Orient ? Je ne peux imaginer que ces gens sont des idiots, je les pense plutôt pervers et imprégnés de haine envers la réussite. Et je les considère animés d’une aversion envers ce qui peut permettre au genre humain de s’émanciper et de s’accomplir.

L’une des notions économiques essentielles développées ces dernières années par des économistes qui vont de David Landes, auteur de « La richesse et la pauvreté des nations », un livre fondamental, à Thomas Sowell auteur de Migrations and Cultures, Race and Cultures, et Conquests and Cultures, de Lawrence Harrison, auteur de Underdevelopment Is A State of Mind à Samuel Huntington, auteur avec Harrison de Culture Matters, est celle de « capital culturel ». J’ai moi-même introduit et exposé l’importance de cette notion dans La Septième dimension.

Ignorer cette notion est ne rien comprendre au monde contemporain et, dans un contexte de guerre, de famines et de fanatisme, il est criminel de ne rien comprendre au monde contemporain.

Oui, certaines cultures sont plus propices que d’autres au développement économique et à la liberté sous toutes ses formes, et, n’en déplaise aux relativistes, la culture juive est une culture particulièrement propice.

La culture du christianisme protestant est plus propice au développement économique et à la liberté que la culture du christianisme catholique, et lorsque des substrats culturels viennent s’ajouter, tels le caudillisme en Amérique latine, les handicaps peuvent devenir écrasants.

Oui, les cultures marquées par le confucianisme peuvent susciter le développement économique, mais se trouver confrontées à des obstacles lorsqu’il s’agit de liberté, et cela explique les difficultés de sociétés asiatiques à passer à un fonctionnement post-industriel et post-asiatique.

Et oui, hélas, le monde musulman, et en lui tout particulièrement le monde arabe, sont dans une situation de blocage culturel qui ne cesse de s’aggraver et prennent des allures cataclysmiques.

Le monde arabe est aujourd’hui dans une phase d’effondrement économique qui s’accompagne d’un effondrement de ses structures politiques et d’une destruction de ses repères culturels. Il ne reste au milieu des décombres qu’une infime minorité de gens ouverts à l’esprit de civilisation et aux sociétés ouvertes, et une immense déferlante islamiste où se mêlent dans le ressentiment, le sectarisme et le tribalisme des gens désireux de revenir à une lecture littéraliste du Coran, des radicaux mélangeant Coran et texte de Marx, Lénine ou Franz Fanon, d’autres qui relisent leurs textes sacrés à la lumière noire de Hitler.

Cet effondrement ne fait que commencer. Il va se poursuivre. La situation qui prévaut en Syrie n’en est qu’un fragment. D’autres fragments sont visibles en Libye, dans le Nord du Mali, au Nigeria où agissent les Boko Haram, en Somalie, au Soudan, au Yemen.

Il est criminel de ne pas le comprendre. C’est suicidaire aussi.

La Russie et la Chine essaient cyniquement de voir quels avantages elles peuvent tirer de l’effondrement et en quoi il peut leur permettre de parasiter le monde occidental.

Les dirigeants européens s’essaient à rafistoler une zone euro et une Union Européenne qui sont elles-mêmes au bord de l’effondrement, et font semblant de croire encore aux « promesses du printemps arabe ». Manuel Valls, qui sortait sans doute d’un hôpital où il venait de subir une lobotomie, a parlé le 6 juillet en inaugurant de manière très laïque une mosquée à Cergy Pontoise de l’islam contemporain comme de l’hériter de celui de Cordoue où foisonnait la connaissance.

Les dirigeants européens entendent aussi flatter les « Palestiniens » : s’ils ouvraient les yeux (c’est impossible, je sais), et s’ils actionnaient leurs neurones (ce qui est plus impossible encore, je ne l’ignore pas), ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » est en train de mourir et ne survit que grâce aux injections financières européennes et, pour partie, américaines. Ils discerneraient que le « mouvement palestinien » s’est développé dans les années mille neuf cent soixante quand le nationalisme arabe était soutenu par l’Union Soviétique. L’Union Soviétique n’existe plus. Le nationalisme arabe agonise dans les décombres de Damas.

Les membres de l’administration Obama font preuve d’autant de stupidité que les dirigeants européens. C’est pour cela qu’on les aime bien en Europe.

C’est ainsi en tout cas : les dirigeants de l’Autorité Palestinienne ne représentent plus rien que leur propre imposture et le rôle que les Européens et l’administration Obama veulent bien leur accorder par pur crétinisme.

Le Hamas régit la bande de Gaza qui va peu à peu se fondre dans l’Egypte islamiste et délabrée. Et le Hamas est prêt à s’emparer de l’Autorité Palestinienne. Or, le Hamas n’en a que faire d’un « Etat palestinien » : il rêve de califat. Il raisonne en termes de dar el islam et de dar el harb. Il n’en a rien à faire de la Judée-Samarie que ses larbins appellent Cisjordanie. Il fait partie intégrante de la déferlante islamiste présente.

Au terme de la tempête qui prend forme, le monde musulman sera en ruines, décomposé, chaotique. Une recomposition s’enclenchera peut-être. Il n’y aura pas de place dans cette reconstruction pour l’Autorité Palestinienne. Il n’y en aura pas pour le nationalisme arabe.

Il y aura une place pour Israël, le seul pays qui a les moyens de surnager au milieu de ce grand océan de tourbe.

Je ne sais s’il y aura une place pour l’Europe. Je dois dire que j’en doute.

Je veux espérer qu’il y aura une place pour les Etats-Unis. Ce sera l’un des enjeux de l’élection de novembre prochain. Dois-je dire que j’espère très vivement que Mitt Romney sera élu. Les Etats-Unis ont besoin d’un Président à la Maison Blanche. Et si ce Président comprend non seulement les vertus du libre marché, mais aussi l’importance du capital culturel, c’est un atout supplémentaire.

Voir encore:

L’effondrement de la Civilisation arabe?

Thérèse Zrihen-Dvir

Le 14 Février, 2011

(Inspiré de l’étude de Michael Fraley),

Il y a cinq ans environ, le lieutenant colonel James G. Lacey, publiait un article dans le journal : Marine Institute: Démarches: « L’effondrement Imminent de la Civilisation Arabe ».  » Il y contestait les conclusions de deux livres qui avaient particulièrement influencé la récente politique étrangère et la grande stratégie : La Crise de L’Islam : Guerre Sainte et Terreur Impie, par Bernard Lewis – et « Le Choc des Civilisations et restructuration de l’ordre Mondial, par Samuel P. Huntington.

Il déclarait dans son article : Une compréhension plus perspicace des événements nous dirige vers la conclusion que la civilisation arabe (pas les musulmans) tend à s’effondrer, et par coïncidence la majorité arabe est musulmane. Tout comme la chute de l’empire romain entraina l’effondrement de l’Europe occidentale, sans pour cela effriter le Christianisme.

Sa thèse souligne que, tandis que l’Islam lui-même continue de s’accroître et de prospérer autour du monde (en effet, il poursuit assidûment des percées intelligentes au sein des états occidentaux), comme il fut le cas spécialement dans le monde arabe, là où l’ont notait des troubles de décomposition de civilisation.

Mais Lacey n’est pas le seul – Azmi Bashara écrivait en 2003, dans le journal Al-Ahram, du Caire : Les arabes … sont dans un état double de délabrement qui défie l’esprit même de ceux qui espéraient un été chaud de décadence poste-guerre… La nation (Arabe) sera divisée entre ceux qui dansent à chaque battement de scandale et défaite, et ceux qui se font exploser pour devenir le gong assourdissant et rebondissant des rites religieux.

Écrivant sur le journal Wall Street, Fouad Ajami entamait son article « Autocratie et le déclin des Arabes », par cette étrange vision : « Je me suis senti si jaloux, » disait Abdulmonem Ibrahim, un jeune activiste politicien, sur les récentes émeutes en Iran. « Nous sommes confondus par l’organisation et la diligence par laquelle le mouvement iranien opère. En Égypte, chacun peut compter le nombre d’activistes sur une main. » Ce degré d' »envier l’Iran » nous cite l’état de stagnation des politiques arabes. La révolution iranienne n’est guère plaisante, mais elle rend son dû aux iraniens : ils ont foncé dans les rues pour contester le mandat des théocrates.

Maintenant que Moubarak a été déposé, la question que nous nous posons tous : était-ce en effet la victoire du peuple de l’Égypte, ou une victoire des islamistes radicaux? »

L’effondrement d’une civilisation ?

Les troubles récents dans le monde arabe, révèlent l’insatisfaction des peuples qui se sont érigés depuis plusieurs dizaines d’années. Mais est-ce bien plus profond et plus ample qu’une série d’insurrections? Maintenant que le siège historique de la puissante culture arabe a été basculé, est-ce l’indication d’un renouvellement ou d’une décomposition de la civilisation dans son ensemble? Colonel Lacey avait prédit les soulèvements actuels traitant le cas de ces événements comme les signes précurseurs de la fin de l’ère arabe. Il reste toutefois une revendication monumentale et Lacey reconnait le scepticisme que cette revendication rencontrera.

La question qui suit est : comment se fait-il que le monde libre n’ait pas identifié et prévu l’effondrement d’une civilisation entière? La réponse est simple, aucune personne vivante n’a jamais assisté à un phénomène pareil. L’effondrement d’une civilisation n’a réellement tenu place que durant l’époque de l’obscurantisme. L’effondrement d’une civilisation s’étend sur de nombreuses années et s’effectue presque imperceptiblement dans la mare des événements quotidiens.

Les graines d’un tel effondrement, si c’est bien ce que nous voyons, pourraient avoir été ensemencées il y 600 ans, selon Lacey, avec l’aube de la Renaissance dans toute l’Europe Occidentale. Toutefois, il est fort possible que le sort de la civilisation arabe ait été fixé deux siècles plus tôt, avec l’exil de Ibn Rushd (plus connu en Occident sous Averroes).

Voies différentes

À un temps lorsque les philosophes occidentaux se mesuraient à des questions d’ontologie (la nature d’être) et d’épistémologie (théorie de la connaissance), les califes des états arabes et leurs universitaires choisis manipulaient les débats philosophiques différemment, comme ils n’ont jamais cessé de le faire d’ailleurs: par des accusations d’infidélité aux écritures, des peines d’incarcération, l’exil, et peine de mort. Ibn Rushd contestait la pensée dominante d’Al Ghazali (1059-1111) adoptant plutôt la tradition d’Ibn Sina, philosophe islamique persan du 11ème siècle.

Yousif Fajr Raslan écrivait : Endigué par la résistance aveugle des académiciens du calife, Ibn Rushd tourna vers la philosophie grecque, où il trouva son idéal chez Aristote… Il appliqua le raisonnement rational de la théologie, approche qui souleva ses collègues contre lui et contre la philosophie dans son ensemble, pour ne pas mentionner leur haine particulière envers les philosophes grecques. Ibn Rushd fut banni, mettant fin à tout espoir de renouveau philosophique et introduction de rationalité historique dans la culture arabe.

Les philosophes occidentaux avaient traversé la Renaissance et les périodes d’empirisme, développant la « méthode scientifique ». Les grands penseurs occidentaux, depuis Thomas Aquinas avaient débattu le thème des relations entre la métaphysique et le physique, de concert avec les issues autoritaires et la recherche de la vérité. Les académiciens éclairés chrétiens et séculiers ensemble présentaient des idées de « loi naturelle », droits de propriété, et « contrat social ».

Les érudits arabes, en revanche, soutenaient Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) né dans ce qui est couramment connu aujourd’hui, la Tunisie moderne, le considérant comme l’un des plus grands penseurs politiques. Sa définition du gouvernement en tant « qu’une institution qui empêche l’injustice autre qu’elle ne la garantie » domine encore la pensée politique arabe.

Choix politiques

Si Lacey disait vrai, et nous sommes réellement les témoins de l’effondrement de la civilisation arabe dans son ensemble, cela n’augure rien de bon pour l’Occident. Les pouvoirs capables et prêts à combler le vide ne sont ni disposés, ni passifs dans leur attitude envers les pays de l’Occident. Ce qui se développe en Égypte pourrait bien présager ce qui se passera dans le reste du monde arabe. La question clef est la suivant : est-ce que l’influence occidentale a été suffisamment instillée chez les égyptiens, au point de les converger vers une démocratie légitime et durable? Sinon, nous verrons probablement une répétition du scénario iranien des années 1970, pas seulement en Egypte, mais dans le monde arabe entier.

Le Colonel Lacey nous a présenté le cas du déclin de la civilisation arabe selon le modèle de la guerre froide: plus précisément, par la tactique de la restriction. Jusqu’à présent, les USA ont largement abusé de cette grande stratégie. Malheureusement, les maladresses de l’administration américaine et ses réactions tempérées face aux événements de l’Égypte, risque de leur faire perdre l’allié le plus important de la région, et conséquemment leur capacité d’inverser le pouvoir d’une vague énorme du radicalisme islamique.

Leurs options uniques pour renforcer leurs relations avec les puissances amies de la région, résident dans leur soutien de ceux qui cherchent la liberté et la démocratie, et leur support des états véritablement libres. Il devient encore plus impératif d’assurer la croissance continuelle de l’Iraq et sa réussite, mais encore plus critique est de restreindre l’Iran et minimiser son ingérence dans les affaires des nations arabes.

Rien dans tout ce programme n’est aisé. Une bonne compréhension de la nature véritable des troubles dans les états arabes devrait produire des mesures plus préventives. Elle doit donner plus de clarté dans la stratégie américaine future de la région. Sinon, nous risquons de voir tantôt l’ascension d’un Islam radical et la déchéance de la civilisation arabe.

Voir enfin:

« Beaucoup de partis d’extrême droite vont se révéler aux européennes »
Catherine CALVET et Jonathan BOUCHET-PETERSEN
Libération
2 mai 2014

INTERVIEW
Entre la crise économique, le rejet des minorités et les blessures historiques, la géographe Béatrice Giblin s’attend à une poussée du Front national et consorts lors du scrutin du 25 mai.

Avec l’émergence électorale du Front national au tournant des années 80, la France a longtemps fait figure d’«exception en Europe», rappelle la géographe Béatrice Giblin, qui a dirigé l’ouvrage collectif l’Extrême droite en Europe. Mais à quelques semaines des élections européennes du 25 mai, la situation est bien différente : l’Autriche, les Pays-Bas et la Belgique, puis l’Europe du Nord ont à leur tour «connu la percée de partis d’extrême droite revendiquant la préférence nationale, dénonçant le cosmopolitisme, le multiculturalisme et, plus directement encore, la présence des étrangers». Même phénomène, dans une moindre mesure, en Grande-Bretagne ou en Espagne. Quant à la Grèce, avec Aube dorée, et surtout la Hongrie, avec la dérive du Premier ministre Viktor Orbán sur fond de montée du Jobbik, elles inquiètent au plus haut point Béatrice Giblin.

Au-delà des particularismes régionaux ou nationaux, souvent liés à des raisons historiques, le rejet des musulmans semble se généraliser dans le discours des extrêmes droites en Europe…

C’est leur principal carburant commun, même si la Hongrie fait exception car il n’y a pas eu l’équivalent d’une arrivée rapide de musulmans dans ce pays. L’antisémitisme y reste dominant, même s’il existe des exemples où islamophobie et antisémitisme cohabitent : au Front national, Jean-Marie Le Pen était pro-irakien par antisémitisme et Marine Le Pen est pro-israélienne car son créneau consiste d’abord à stigmatiser les musulmans. Mais revenons à la Hongrie, qui est un cas très intéressant et très inquiétant. Viktor Orbán a de nouveau presque obtenu la majorité absolue lors du dernier scrutin [deux tiers des sièges aux législatives du 6 avril, ndlr], tandis que la montée du Jobbik se poursuit et, vu ce que véhicule cette formation, il y a de quoi avoir peur. A la manière de Marine Le Pen, les responsables du Jobbik présentent mieux et ont fait le ménage en virant notamment ceux qui osaient s’habiller comme sous la dictature Horthy, mais le fond du discours reste le même. Et parmi les parlementaires du Jobbik exclus, certains ont créé l’Aube hongroise, à l’instar de l’Aube dorée grecque.

En quoi le contexte hongrois est-il à part ?

Un pays qui a perdu deux tiers de son territoire et une grande partie de sa population ne s’en remet pas. Il a ensuite fait la grande erreur de choisir les nazis, précisément pour retrouver la grande Hongrie. Il a payé une deuxième fois, si j’ose dire. Tout ça laisse des traces. Quand j’y suis allée, j’ai été frappée par le fait qu’on voyait partout les cartes de la grande Hongrie : sur les sets de table, des autocollants collés aux vitres des voitures et même dans une pharmacie. Dans des parcs publics, il y a des plates-bandes où le pays actuel est représenté avec des fleurs rouges, autour desquelles il y a la grande Hongrie en blanc, et même du bleu pour montrer qu’à l’époque, elle avait accès à la mer. Cela va jusque-là. C’est sans comparaison avec ce que la France a connu en Alsace-Lorraine : cela nous a pourtant suffisamment marqués pour partir la fleur au fusil en 1914.

Vous évoquez là une époque très lointaine, non ?

En effet, à la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, cela faisait presque soixante-dix ans que la Hongrie tentait de récupérer sa grandeur perdue. A l’échelle de l’histoire, ce n’est pas grand-chose. Et il faudrait d’ailleurs aller voir comment les manuels scolaires hongrois relatent désormais ce fait. Viktor Orbán entretient à dessein cette mythologie. D’une manière générale, l’extrême droite surfe sur ces blessures historiques.

On voit dans votre livre que toutes les extrêmes droites ne sont pas antieuropéennes. Certains régionalistes sont proeuropéens, manière pour eux de passer au-dessus de leur Etat…

C’est notamment vrai en Flandre ou en Espagne avec Plataforma per Catalunya, même si on ne peut pas dire de manière générale que le régionalisme catalan est d’extrême droite. Plataforma, dont on parle assez peu en France mais avec qui Marine Le Pen entretient des liens, développe clairement un discours anti-immigrés et plus particulièrement antimusulmans. Plataforma mélange cela avec un nationalisme régional sur fond d’ultralibéralisme, ce qui en fait un cocktail étonnant.

En Scandinavie, où cohabitent des pays qui appartiennent à l’Union européenne et d’autres pas, des pays prospères et des pays en crise, l’extrême droite est pourtant chaque fois présente…

La Scandinavie est un ensemble qui a connu une très forte émigration au XIXe siècle, contribuant notamment à peupler les Etats-Unis. Mais il n’y avait jamais eu de vrai phénomène d’immigration. Il est très amusant de comparer la diversité des noms de famille en France, où elle est infinie, et en Scandinavie, où il y a très peu de souches. Là-bas, l’immigration débute, même pas dans les années 50 comme au Royaume-Uni, mais seulement dans les années 70. Au début, ces social-démocraties qui n’ont pas eu de colonies ont accueilli à bras ouverts les immigrés avec des conditions très avantageuses. A ceci près que la masse d’arrivants s’est concentrée dans des zones déjà très peuplées : à l’échelle d’un pays, c’est peu, mais à celle de certains quartiers d’Oslo ou de Copenhague, l’équilibre s’est rompu. Par ailleurs, dans une société très ouverte et très égalitaire, la question du statut des femmes a vite posé problème. Les habitants n’ont pas supporté de voir ces femmes avec le voile noir intégral. Même si ces immigrés ne font rien de mal et vont faire leurs courses chez Ikea, la situation est devenue explosive.

A l’instar des sondages flatteurs pour le Front national, on annonce des scores élevés pour l’extrême droite aux élections européennes…

Attendons de voir ces résultats pour en tirer des conclusions, mais on peut s’attendre à une poussée. Le suffrage se fait à la proportionnelle. Beaucoup de partis d’extrême droite sous-représentés en raison d’un scrutin majoritaire national vont donc se révéler. La France n’a que deux députés frontistes pour représenter 16% de la population. Le phénomène est le même en Grande-Bretagne, qui a connu une immigration record ces dernières années. Entre 1991 et 2011, la proportion de la population née à l’étranger est passée de 5,8 à 12,5%. Cela risque d’avoir des répercussions dans les urnes fin mai pour le British National Party [BNP] et le Parti pour l’indépendance du Royaume-Uni [Ukip].

Ces partis d’extrême droite peuvent-ils avoir une stratégie commune au Parlement européen ?

S’ils sont assez nombreux pour peser, ils se rapprocheront : ça ne posera aucun problème au Jobbik de faire cause commune avec le FN, avec le BNP ou avec les Démocrates suédois. Même si l’Ukip, dirigé par l’eurosceptique Nigel Farage qui compte 13 députés européens, préfère s’allier avec Debout la République du souverainiste Nicolas Dupont-Aignan plutôt qu’avec le Front national, et que le FN juge le BNP infréquentable, les contacts sont déjà nombreux. Cela passe beaucoup par Internet, un outil que toutes les extrêmes droites d’Europe maîtrisent très bien. Au Parlement, leur ferment sera en premier lieu un discours très antieuropéen. Et tant que la Banque centrale ne desserrera pas l’étau en faisant marcher la planche à billets pour retrouver de la croissance et des emplois, l’europhobie comme le repli national seront porteurs. Et on continuera à aller dans le mur.

Aux élections municipales, la victoire du Front national à Hénin-Beaumont vous a-t-elle surprise ?

Avec toute la couverture médiatique, les journalistes auraient presque été déçus si Steeve Briois, militant d’Hénin depuis très longtemps, n’avait pas gagné ! Mais il ne l’a emporté que de 32 voix dans une ville de plus de 20 000 habitants : il reste donc une bonne partie de gens structurés à gauche. Je suis très prudente avec le concept à la mode de gaucho-lepénisme, ne serait-ce que parce que je le trouve méprisant. Il faut être prudent dans la façon dont on parle de ces électeurs, qui sont souvent désespérés au moment de choisir un bulletin FN. Il est vrai toutefois que le discours antimondialisation et anti-élites de Marine Le Pen rencontre un écho.

Vous avez étudié précisément le vote FN dans le bassin minier de Hénin-Beaumont. Vous en avez une lecture géographique…

Le vote Front national concerne seulement la partie ouest du Nord-Pas-de-Calais, c’est-à-dire, paradoxalement, la zone la plus développée, la mieux réaménagée, la plus agréable. Les centres-villes de Béthune ou de Lens sont devenus des endroits presque riants, alors qu’ils étaient plutôt déprimants. Tout a bougé, on a cassé des corons, et on a également beaucoup redistribué d’aides sociales. En revanche, la partie nord-est de la région est restée en l’état, fidèle au vote communiste. Cette stagnation n’a pas généré de frustrations. Car si personne n’évolue socialement, il n’y a pas non plus, contrairement à la partie ouest, de sentiment de déclassement.


Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Rejoignez 315 autres abonnés

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :