Hong Kong: La montagne est haute et l’empereur est loin (Think local, blame national: countering Beijing’s strategy, Hong Kong protesters blame not the deviant but the too-obedient local servant)

12 novembre, 2014
 L’ordre public doit à tout prix être maintenu, non seulement à Hong Kong mais aussi partout sur la planète. Xi Jinping
Gouverner par la loi est un pilier fondamental pour la stabilité et la prospérité à long terme de Hongkong, a dit le secrétaire général du Parti communiste, cité par l’agence de presse officielle Chine nouvelle. Le gouvernement central soutient entièrement le chef de l’exécutif et son gouvernement pour gouverner, en particulier pour assurer l’autorité de la loi et l’ordre civil.  Xi Jinping
Vous ne montrez pas tant de nouveautés si vous ne voulez pas faire passer un message fort. Je visite des salons d’armement dans le monde entier et vous ne voyez pas ce genre de choses en libre accès. Cela n’arrive pas. Cela ne se passe pas comme ça normalement. (…) C’est comme si nous avions deux réalités – ou une réalité et un spectre. Le sommet de coopération est le spectre, tandis que le salon de Zhuahi est la réalité concrète et matérielle. William Triplett (ancien premier conseiller du Comité américain des relations internationales du Sénat et expert en sécurité nationale)
He wanted to present himself as someone from the grassroots, not linked to the tycoons… but people have been terribly disappointed. Joseph Cheng (City University of Hong Kong)
He is in daily communication with Beijing. C.Y. is a very obedient cadre. (…) Beijing would … lose face if they were to sack Leung in the near future, [but] it’s a foregone conclusion that C.Y. Leung has to go because he is a very divisive and very unpopular figure. Willy Lam (Chinese University of Hong Kong)
One of his nicknames is « 689 » — a sarcastic reference to the number of votes he obtained from the city’s 1,200-strong election committee, a group of people selected from the largely pro-Beijing elite. And Leung, a former surveyor and real estate consultant, has done little to dispel the prevailing view that he is Beijing’s lackey. A day after being elected as chief executive he paid a visit to the central government liaison office, Beijing’s outpost in the city and he was the first leader to make his inauguration speech in Mandarin — rather than the Cantonese that is spoken by most people in this former British colony. Despite this, Leung was not in fact Beijing’s first choice to become chief executive. The early favorite was Henry Tang, a bumbling former financial secretary best known for his penchant for red wine. But revelations that Tang’s home had an enormous basement which hadn’t been approved for planning permission, dubbed an underground palace, derailed his campaign. However, it was later discovered that Leung’s home in the city’s exclusive Peak neighborhood also had an illegal structure. Leung declared ignorance but it undermined trust in the city’s new leader from the get-go and helped earn him another nickname — « wolf. » The moniker sounds similar in Cantonese to his family name but also suggests a cunning political operator.His approval ratings have plummeted since 2012 and a plush toy wolf made by IKEA sold out across the city earlier this year as Hong Kongers, eager to use it as a tongue-in-cheek symbol of protest, snapped it up. A gigantic, enlarged effigy of Leung’s head, replete with lupine fangs, has also been a distinctive sight on the streets during the protests. For all his colorful nicknames, Harry Harrison, political cartoonist at the South China Morning Post, the city’s main English-language newspaper, says Leung is a difficult character to portray.(…) Those that do usually feature Leung sitting in his office with a picture of malevolent panda — symbolizing China — behind him. The reason, says Harrison, is that Leung is rarely out and about and has little public presence, coming across as aloof.(…) Leung has only appeared in public three times; twice for press conferences and once for a National Day flag-raising ceremony attended by dignitaries. Protest leaders have repeatedly called for him to go and refuse to negotiate with him, preferring a meeting with his number two — Carrie Lam. While Leung says he will not resign, many observers feel his days are numbered, with protesters setting up a makeshift tomb at the protest site. « Beijing would … lose face if they were to sack Leung in the near future, » says Lam at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. But « it’s a foregone conclusion that C.Y. Leung has to go because he is a very divisive and very unpopular figure. CNN
The compiled tweets (…) highlight a unique aspect of this protest compared to others across China. Many protests on the mainland condemn local officials for problems — including land seizures, environmental pollution, corruption, and employment discrimination — that citizens may perceive as stemming from noncompliance with central government policies. In contrast, the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong erupted in late September in response to a central government edict circumscribing universal suffrage in the 2017 local elections for chief executive. Not surprisingly, some Hong Kongers view Leung not as a local official improperly implementing Beijing’s directives, but as the opposite: Beijing’s obedient servant. For example, one tweet reads, « We don’t care if [the] thief executive steps down, he is just Xi Jinping’s puppet. » Several tweets referenced a CNN article that cast Leung as « Beijing’s lackey. » This sentiment is further reflected in the graffiti depicted below, which shows Xi, dressed in Mao-era attire, guiding Leung (as represented by the wolf, the Cantonese word for which sounds similar to Leung’s name) on a leash toward a crowd of yellow umbrella-wielding protesters. Thus while netizens call for Leung to step down, their opposition may ultimately be directed toward Beijing. (…) Of course, this comparison of sentiment toward the two leaders explores merely one aspect of the overall discussion surrounding the Hong Kong protests, much of which may not have been captured on Twitter. Moreover, the discussion on Twitter may have omitted or amplified certain voices; it is possible that a few key individuals may have disproportionately driven conversation targeting either Xi or Leung. In addition, the findings may reflect strategic calculations on the part of protesters who may have sought to avoid direct confrontation with Beijing by purposefully refraining from directly criticizing Xi. Still, when Hong Kong netizens took to Twitter to share their ideas and mobilize support, they revealed the profound disconnect that separates elements of Hong Kong society from their mainland counterparts. These netizens turned « think national, blame local » on its head by blaming « local » for appeasing « national. » For Beijing, that’s worrisome. Douglas Yeung, Astrid Stuth Cevallos

Et si, avec sa  culture propre, Hong Kong  arrivait à contrer Pékin sur son propre terrain ?

A l’heure où, Forum Apec oblige et à coup de décrets de jours de congé (pour réduire la pollution) et de déclarations apaisantes envers ses voisins, la Chine a mis temporairement en veilleuse son incroyable volonté de puissance …

Tout en lançant, au nez et à la barbe du prétendu chef du Monde libre, son propre projet de coopération économique régionale et un nouvel avion furtif

Et rappelant, au nom du « respect du droit » s’il vous plait, son soutien à son pantin de Hong Kong …

Faut-il, avec la revue américaine Foreign policy, voir dans l’insistance des manifestants de Hong Kong à dialoguer directement avec le pouvoir central  …

La subversion de la stratégie chinoise, jusqu’ici particulièrement efficace, de « pensez national et de blamez local »?

Où, loin de menacer les autorités de Pékin, la dénonciation des dirigeants locaux sert à les conforter au contraire.

Sauf que face à une région ayant sa culture propre et notamment sa langue et sa cuisine mais aussi son siècle et demi d’acculturation britannique (où nombre d’adultes « n’y parlent que difficilement le mandarin à tel point que les Chinois du continent doivent parfois leur parler en anglais ») …

Et comme le montre l’analyse par Foreign policy des twits émis à Hong Kong lors des récentes manifestations …

Le dirigeant local n’y est cette fois pas montré du doigt pour son non-respect de la loi nationale …

Mais au contraire pour sa trop grande obéissance !

Tea Leaf Nation
The Mountains Are High and the Emperor Is Far Away
Who do Hong Kong’s netizens blame for the city’s distress?
Douglas Yeung , Astrid Stuth Cevallos
Foreign policy
November 11, 2014

Shan gao, huangdi yuan — « The mountains are high, and the emperor is far away. »

This traditional Chinese saying alludes to local officials’ tendency to disregard the wishes of central authorities in distant Beijing. Indeed, many Chinese believe that social unrest in China occurs when corrupt or incompetent local officials fail to implement well-intentioned central government directives. Eager to deflect citizens’ complaints away from the regime and toward local officials, Chinese leaders have exploited this perception, adopting a strategy that Cheng Li of the Brookings Institution calls « think national, blame local. »

Does this conventional wisdom hold for the recent Hong Kong protest movement? Since Sept. 22, tens of thousands of protesters have flooded the streets, calling for universal suffrage in the 2017 chief executive election and the resignation of current Hong Kong Chief Executive Chun-ying Leung. According to Hong Kong’s Basic Law, the mini-constitution set in place when sovereignty of the former British colony transferred back to mainland China in 1997, Hong Kong must establish « universal suffrage » by 2017. But on Sept. 4, the central government in Beijing, under Chinese President Xi Jinping’s leadership, issued an edict declaring that candidates must be vetted by a Hong Kong committee stacked with pro-Beijing interests — effectively guaranteeing that pro-democracy candidates would not make the ballot. This move ignited the protests that have now roiled the Asian financial center for over six weeks, though Hong Kong authorities now seem to be making plans to clear out the protesters. A court injunction on Nov. 10 granted police the power to arrest protesters who do not cooperate, and on Nov. 11 Hong Kong’s number two Carrie Lam called on demonstrators to end the sit-in. The pro-Beijing Leung’s staunch support of China’s official position, as well as his alternately heavy-handed and evasive approach to the protesters, has vilified him among many of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy supporters.

Which political leader — the local Leung or more distant Xi — appears to be the foremost target of protesters’ discontent?

Measuring sentiment toward these two leaders in netizens’ Twitter posts can help answer this question. Many Hong Kong protesters have used social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter to organize demonstrations and mobilize international support. Facebook and Twitter are blocked on the mainland, but these sites can be accessed freely in Hong Kong. (Although Hong Kongers also use Weibo, the mainland equivalent of Twitter, Weibo is less useful as a means of analyzing popular sentiment in this case because Weibo posts, especially those about sensitive topics like the Hong Kong protests, are subject to censorship.)

From Sept. 10 to Oct. 8, 38,000 tweets were tagged with the hashtags #UmbrellaRevolution or #OccupyCentral, and sent by users who either claimed to be located in Hong Kong or whose posts were geotagged within Hong Kong. Tweets were separated according to mentions of Xi or Leung (or Leung’s nickname, 689, a reference to the number of votes he received from Hong Kong’s 1,200 member election committee). This resulted in just fewer than 1,000 tweets mentioning either leader, with seven times as many tweets about Leung as about Xi. Tweets were processed using Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), an automated content analysis software designed to link word usage to psychological states.

Nearly five times as many tweets about Leung conveyed negative sentiment as tweets about Xi. However, tweets about Xi were more negative in tone than those about Leung. As a percentage of total tweets about each leader, more tweets about Xi contained words conveying negative emotion (e.g., « angry, » « foolish, » « harm, » « lose, » « protesting, » « stupid, » « resign, » « thief ») than those about Leung. Moreover, compared to tweets about Leung, tweets about Xi on average contained a greater proportion of negative emotion words. In particular, words conveying anger (a subset of negative emotion words that includes swearing and words like « hate, » « liar, » and « suck ») were more prevalent in tweets about Xi than in tweets about Leung. (Note: A few hundred of these tweets were written in Chinese. When analyzed, the results appeared similar to those for tweets in English. Because LIWC was not designed to process Cantonese grammar and vocabulary, this analysis focuses on the English-language tweets.)
Hong Kong Twitter users discussing the protests may also have felt more distressed when writing about Leung and more disconnected when writing about Xi. Psychological research has found that use of first-person singular pronouns (e.g., « I, » « my ») is related to self-reflection, while use of third-person pronouns (e.g., « he, » « she, » « they ») suggests that those being referred to are somehow separate or different from oneself and one’s group — that is, they are seen as « others. » As shown above, tweets about Leung used higher rates of first-person singular pronouns than tweets about Xi. Along the same lines, tweets about Xi contained proportionally more third-person pronouns than tweets about Leung.

It is intuitive that Hong Kongers would feel more detached when writing about Xi and more personally affected when writing about Leung, who is both geographically and culturally closer to the protesters. Yet while negative opinion towards Xi may be more strongly felt, the disparity in number of posts about each leader suggests that disapproval of Leung is more widespread than disapproval of Xi. The « othering » of Xi in these tweets parallels a tendency among Hong Kongers to identify less as « Chinese » and more with their city.

The compiled tweets also highlight a unique aspect of this protest compared to others across China. Many protests on the mainland condemn local officials for problems — including land seizures, environmental pollution, corruption, and employment discrimination — that citizens may perceive as stemming from noncompliance with central government policies. In contrast, the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong erupted in late September in response to a central government edict circumscribing universal suffrage in the 2017 local elections for chief executive.

Not surprisingly, some Hong Kongers view Leung not as a local official improperly implementing Beijing’s directives, but as the opposite: Beijing’s obedient servant. For example, one tweet reads, « We don’t care if [the] thief executive steps down, he is just Xi Jinping’s puppet. » Several tweets referenced a CNN article that cast Leung as « Beijing’s lackey. » This sentiment is further reflected in the graffiti depicted below, which shows Xi, dressed in Mao-era attire, guiding Leung (as represented by the wolf, the Cantonese word for which sounds similar to Leung’s name) on a leash toward a crowd of yellow umbrella-wielding protesters. Thus while netizens call for Leung to step down, their opposition may ultimately be directed toward Beijing.

Of course, this comparison of sentiment toward the two leaders explores merely one aspect of the overall discussion surrounding the Hong Kong protests, much of which may not have been captured on Twitter. Moreover, the discussion on Twitter may have omitted or amplified certain voices; it is possible that a few key individuals may have disproportionately driven conversation targeting either Xi or Leung. In addition, the findings may reflect strategic calculations on the part of protesters who may have sought to avoid direct confrontation with Beijing by purposefully refraining from directly criticizing Xi.

Still, when Hong Kong netizens took to Twitter to share their ideas and mobilize support, they revealed the profound disconnect that separates elements of Hong Kong society from their mainland counterparts. These netizens turned « think national, blame local » on its head by blaming « local » for appeasing « national. » For Beijing, that’s worrisome.

 Voir aussi:

C.Y. Leung: Hong Kong’s unloved leader
Katie Hunt
CNN
October 3, 2014

Hong Kong (CNN) — Cunning wolf? Working class hero? Or bland Beijing loyalist?

C.Y. Leung, the Hong Kong leader whose resignation has become a rallying cry for the protesters that have filled the city’s streets this week, was a relative unknown before he took the top job in 2012.

As the son of a policeman who has used the same briefcase since his student days, his supporters said he would improve the lot of ordinary people in a city that has one of the world’s widest wealth gaps.

« He wanted to present himself as someone from the grassroots, not linked to the tycoons… but people have been terribly disappointed, » says Joseph Cheng, a professor of political science at City University of Hong Kong.

Beijing lackey?

One of his nicknames is « 689 » — a sarcastic reference to the number of votes he obtained from the city’s 1,200-strong election committee, a group of people selected from the largely pro-Beijing elite.

And Leung, a former surveyor and real estate consultant, has done little to dispel the prevailing view that he is Beijing’s lackey.

A day after being elected as chief executive he paid a visit to the central government liaison office, Beijing’s outpost in the city and he was the first leader to make his inauguration speech in Mandarin — rather than the Cantonese that is spoken by most people in this former British colony.

« He is in daily communication with Beijing, » says Willy Lam, an adjunct professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. « C.Y. is a very obedient cadre. »

Despite this, Leung was not in fact Beijing’s first choice to become chief executive. The early favorite was Henry Tang, a bumbling former financial secretary best known for his penchant for red wine.

But revelations that Tang’s home had an enormous basement which hadn’t been approved for planning permission, dubbed an underground palace, derailed his campaign.

However, it was later discovered that Leung’s home in the city’s exclusive Peak neighborhood also had an illegal structure.

Leung declared ignorance but it undermined trust in the city’s new leader from the get-go and helped earn him another nickname — « wolf. »

The moniker sounds similar in Cantonese to his family name but also suggests a cunning political operator.

His approval ratings have plummeted since 2012 and a plush toy wolf made by IKEA sold out across the city earlier this year as Hong Kongers, eager to use it as a tongue-in-cheek symbol of protest, snapped it up.

Villain?

For all his colorful nicknames, Harry Harrison, political cartoonist at the South China Morning Post, the city’s main English-language newspaper, says Leung is a difficult character to portray.

« C.Y., despite his pantomime villain appearance, hasn’t really turned out to be all that cartoonable, » he told CNN. « I’ve hardly featured him in any cartoons for months now. »

Those that do usually feature Leung sitting in his office with a picture of malevolent panda — symbolizing China — behind him.

The reason, says Harrison, is that Leung is rarely out and about and has little public presence, coming across as aloof.

His unease with ordinary members of the public has been on display this week.

Leung has only appeared in public three times; twice for press conferences and once for a National Day flag-raising ceremony attended by dignitaries.

Protest leaders have repeatedly called for him to go and refuse to negotiate with him, preferring a meeting with his number two — Carrie Lam.

While Leung says he will not resign, many observers feel his days are numbered, with protesters setting up a makeshift tomb at the protest site.

« Beijing would … lose face if they were to sack Leung in the near future, » says Lam at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

But « it’s a foregone conclusion that C.Y. Leung has to go because he is a very divisive and very unpopular figure. »

Voir également:

Pékin gonfle les muscles en arrière-plan du Sommet de coopération économique
Joshua Philipp

Epoch Times
11.11.2014

10 novembre 2014: le président américain Barack Obama écoute le Premier ministre australien Tony Abbott lors d’une rencontre bilatérale à Pékin. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Enlarge
10 novembre 2014: le président américain Barack Obama écoute le Premier ministre australien Tony Abbott lors d’une rencontre bilatérale à Pékin. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Analyse de l’actualité

Robert Gates, ancien Secrétaire américain à la défense de l’administration Obama,pourrait très certainement analyser pour le Président ce qui est en train de se passer cette semaine à Pékin, tandis que les représentants des armées du monde se sont rassemblés dans la ville méridionale de Zhuhai.

M. Gates avait rencontré les dirigeants militaires en Chine en janvier 2010 pour ce qu’il pensait être un dialogue amical et nécessaire. Près de 6 mois avant son voyage, il avait minimisé la menace de l’avion furtif J-20, en déclarant que la Chine ne le mettrait pas en service avant 2020.

Alors que Robert Gates se trouvait en Chine en 2010, le régime chinois avait procédé au premier vol d’essai du J-20.

La communauté de la défense internationale avait reçu ce geste comme un message à l’agressivité clairement marquée.

Le régime chinois semble vouloir reproduire le même jeu. Alors que l’attention du public et des médias du monde est tournée vers le sommet de Coopération économique de la région Asie Pacifique (CEAP) qui s’est tenu cette année à Pékin, le régime chinois a également organisé son salon aéronautique de Zhuhai qui a attiré tous les dirigeants d’armée et les patrons de la sécurité du monde entier.

Les médias officiels chinois répètent tous la même chanson: ce sommet de Coopération économique représente une étape importante et souligne le plus grand rôle joué par la Chine dans la politique mondiale. De Xinhua au Quotidien du Peuple en passant par le Global Times, le régime chinois est présenté comme un État puissant et pacifique prêt à étendre son influence. Les États-Unis, quant à eux, sont décrits comme un pays trouble-fête essayant d’empêcher la Chine d’atteindre ses objectifs légitimes.

Le régime chinois utilise donc le sommet de la CEAP pour présenter une image de paix mondiale et de prospérité tout en envoyant plus clairement que jamais un message d’agression et de puissance militaire à travers l’édition 2014 du salon aéronautique de Zhuhai.

«Vous ne montrez pas tant de nouveautés si vous ne voulez pas faire passer un message fort,» a commenté lors d’un entretien par téléphone William Triplett, ancien premier conseiller du Comité américain des relations internationales du Sénat et expert en sécurité nationale.

À Zhuhai, le régime chinois semble ne rien vouloir garder pour lui. Il a dévoilé plus d’une douzaine de systèmes d’armes à la pointe de la technologie qui pourraient défier la domination militaire américaine, y compris des armes que les spécialistes de la défense pensaient que la Chine était loin de pouvoir développer.

Parmi ces nouvelles armes se trouvent un missile supersonique anti-navire, des obus d’artillerie guidés par GPS, de nouveaux lasers tactiques, une nouvelle version d’exportation de son avion furtif et ses avions cargo qui pourraient aider le régime à étendre sa portée militaire.

«Je visite des salons d’armement dans le monde entier et vous ne voyez pas ce genre de choses en libre accès», s’est étonné M. Triplett. «Cela n’arrive pas. Cela ne se passe pas comme ça normalement.»

Selon M. Triplett, dans la même perspective que le vol d’essai du J-20 pendant sa visite en Chine en 2010, la présentation de tous ces nouveaux systèmes d’armes pendant que les dirigeants du monde se trouvent au sommet de la CEAP à Pékin envoie un message très clair.

«C’est comme si nous avions deux réalités – ou une réalité et un spectre», a analysé M. Triplett. Le sommet de coopération est le spectre, tandis que le salon de Zhuahi est la réalité concrète et matérielle.»

Comment interpréter Zhuhai

Pour démêler la réalité de la vitrine superficielle, il faudra que les États-Unis souhaitent comprendre le message adressé par le salon de Zhuhai.

Selon Richard Fisher Junior, membre éminent du Centre international de stratégie et d’évaluation, interpréter un événement comme Zhuhai a un certain prix pour le gouvernement américain.

Le Navy Times a révélé il y a quelques jours qu’un éminent dirigeant des renseignements de la Marine américaine avait été démis de ses fonctions pour avoir averti les dirigeants américains d’une menace militaire provenant de Chine. Le Capitaine James Fanell était directeur des opérations de renseignement et d’information de la Flotte américaine dans le Pacifique.

«En résumé, il a été averti que dire la vérité est une erreur», a expliqué M. Fisher, avant d’ajouter que le timing de cette décision a été perçue dans l’armée comme un signe que les pressions exercées par la Chine peuvent atteindre l’armée américaine.

«James Fanell est un analyste très respecté», a poursuivi M. Fisher. «La façon dont il est traité représente les risques auxquels sont exposés tous les Américains portant la responsabilité de dire la vérité au sujet de la Chine. Beaucoup d’entre nous avons souffert professionnellement parce que nous avons dit la vérité au sujet de la Chine.»

Dans l’ensemble, le régime chinois a donc présenté deux visages au cours du sommet de Coopération économique de la région Asie Pacifique qui vient de se dérouler à Pékin – un visage tourné vers le public et l’autre vers la communauté mondiale de la défense.

«Ces événements ne sont pas dus au hasard», a conclu M. Fisher. «Le régime chinois est très habile pour combiner plusieurs messages pour des audiences multiples. Cela est une pratique usitée dans l’histoire de la guerre psychologique.»

Version originale: While World Watches APEC, China Sends a Message

La montagne est haute et l’empereur est loin : introduction au Guangdong
Benoit Geffroy

Cette phrase est la traduction d’une maxime chinoise exprimant ce qu’on pourrait appeler « le paradoxe chinois » – ou au moins « un » paradoxe chinois. Pour dire les choses de manières douces, l’Etat chinois a une longue tradition autoritaire et centralisatrice. Il a toujours cherché à imposer son ordre jusque dans les marches les plus reculées de l’empire. Malgré tout, l’immensité du territoire a permis aux communautés locales de conserver une certaine autonomie. Ce proverbe signifie donc que malgré ses velléités dirigistes, la cour n’a pas toujours le bras assez long pour imposer sa loi sur l’ensemble du territoire. Ne prenez toutefois pas ces mots au pied de la lettre : il ne s’agit pas tant d’échapper à la loi que d’instaurer un équilibre tacite entre les directives nationales et les réalités locales.

Ces considérations sont particulièrement vraies en ce qui concerne le Guangdong. Le Guangdong est la province dans laquelle se trouve Guangzhou, plus connue à l’Ouest sous le nom de Canton. Pour ne pas trop vous dépayser, j’appellerai par la suite la province « cantonais ». De par son statue de Région Administrative Spéciale, Hong Kong n’appartient pas au cantonais. Elle se situe néanmoins sur ses côtes. Le nom de Shenzhen est peut-être familier à certains d’entre vous ; cette ville se situe aussi dans le cantonais. Elle est d’ailleurs collée au territoire hong-kongais.

Bien que d’un point de vue administratif Hong Kong n’appartienne pas au cantonais, elle en est en fait très proche, et ce pour des raisons culturelles. Pour oser une rapprochement hasardeux, on pourrait comparer le cantonais à la Bretagne. Les deux régions possèdent chacune une culture propre, à commencer par la langue et la cuisine. Elles ont enduré une phase de « colonisation » par la « métropole », qui leur a imposé sa langue et son identité nationale. J’arrête ici les frais en même temps que les déclarations discutables, mais l’idée est là.

Au premier rang des particularités de la province se trouve la langue. Je zappe la conférence sur les grandes familles de dialecte chinois, retenez juste que la langue cantonaise est plus éloignée du mandarin, la lingua franca imposée par les communistes, que le français ne l’est de l’espagnol. Parmi les autres différences, on peut noter la cuisine (mais chaque province chinoise a ses spécialités) ou l’architecture (je parle de l’architecture traditionnelle : à Canton comme dans les autres villes chinoises l’immeuble a gagné par K.O.).
La dichotomie qui sépare traditionellement le Nord et le Sud de la Chine joue aussi à plein. Ce sont les clans guerriers du Nord, habitués à un environnement rude, proches des nomades de la steppe mongole, qui ont fait l’unité de la Chine. Les peuples de Chine du Sud, commerçants dans l’âme, à la culture plus raffinée, admettent mal la tutelle du gouvernement central. Ce n’est pas un hasard si toutes les capitales dynastiques de la Chine se sont toujours trouvées dans la moitié nord du pays (à l’exception de celles des Song du Sud, chassés du Nord par les Jurchens puis par les Mongols).

Le cantonais étant la province cotière chinoise la plus méridionale, c’est naturellement là que les navigateurs européens débarquèrent au XVIème siècle. Ils furent accueillis par des commerçants plus qu’enclin au négoce, ce qui ne fit qu’accentuer l’ouverture au monde extérieur de la province. Au XIXème siècle, les Cantonais furent ainsi le fer de lance de l’immigration chinoise aux Etats-Unis. C’est aussi dans cette province qu’est né Sun Yat-Sen, l’homme qui abolit l’empire et proclama la république au début du siècle dernier. Autant de faits qui renforcent la réputation frondeuse de la région.

Retenez donc que le cantonais est une province à part en Chine, et ce par bien des aspects. Certains vont même jusqu’à affirmer qu’en cas de démocratisation de la Chine, un mouvement indépendantiste pourrait apparaître. Sans en arriver jusque là, il est indéniable que le Chinois cantonais n’est pas un Chinois comme les autres. Ces particularités ont été quelque peu nivellées par le régime central de Pékin. Les communistes ayant notamment imposer le mandarin à l’école, tous les Cantonais parlent aujourd’hui la langue commune. Ce qui ne les empêche pas de continuer à communiquer entre eux en cantonais.

C’est beaucoup moins vrai pour Hong Kong, qui n’est soumise aux oukases de Pékin que depuis dix ans : la majorité des adultes n’y parlent que difficilement le mandarin (à tel point que les Chinois du continent doivent parfois leur parler en anglais). Cependant il est difficile de tracer le contour de l’identité cantonaise des Hong Kongais, tant ceux-ci ont le regard tourné vers l’Occident.

Voir enfin:

Think National, Blame Local: Central-Provincial Dynamics in the Hu Era
Cheng Li
Leadership Monitor, No. 17
2007

The alarming statistics on public protests recently released by the Chinese authorities have led some analysts to conclude that the Chinese regime is sitting atop a volcano of mass social unrest. But these statistics can also reaffirm the foresight and wisdom of Hu Jintao, especially his recent policy initiatives that place emphasis on social justice rather than GDP growth. The occurrence of these mass protests could actually consolidate, rather than weaken, Hu’s power in the Chinese political establishment. Although Hu’s populist policy shift seems to be timely and necessary, it may lead to a situation in which the public demand for government accountability undermines the stability of the country. Under this circumstance, Hu’s strategy is to localize the social unrests and blame local leaders. This strategy is particularly evident in the case of Guangdong, which recently experienced some major public protests. An analysis of the formation of the current Chinese provincial leadership, including the backgrounds of 616 senior provincial leaders in the country, reveals both the validity and limitations of this strategy.

The ever-growing number of social protests in China has attracted a great deal of attention from those who study Chinese politics.1 Any comprehensive assessment of the political and socioeconomic conditions in present-day China has usually—and rightly so—cited Chinese official statistics on “mass incidents.” The annual number of these mass incidents in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), including protests, riots and group petitioning, rose from 58,000 in 2003 to 74,000 in 2004, and to 87,000 in 2005— almost 240 incidents per day!
These protests were often sparked by local official misdeeds such as uncompensated land seizures, poor response to industrial accidents, arbitrary taxes, and failure to pay wages. The frequency and number of deaths caused by coal mine accidents in the country, for example, were shamefully astonishing. Despite the recent shutdown of a large number of mines by the central government, in 2005 China’s coal-mining industry still suffered 3,341 accidents, which resulted in 5,986 deaths.2 Not surprisingly, these alarming statistics have led some China analysts to conclude that the current Chinese regime is sitting atop a volcano of mass social unrest.3
The issue here is not whether the Chinese government has been beset by mass disturbances and public grievances; it has, of course. The real question is whether thenew administration under the leadership of President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao will be able to prevent the country from spinning out of control. Two unusual phenomena have occurred since Hu and Wen assumed the top leadership posts in the spring of 2003. These two developments are extraordinarily important, but have been largely overlooked by overseas China analysts.
The Crisis Mode and the Need for a Policy Shift
The first development relates to the release of these statistics and the resulting crisis mode (weiji yishi). Hu and Wen intend to show both the Chinese public and the political establishment that there exists an urgent need for a major policy shift. It is crucial to note that all of these incidents and statistics made headlines in the Chinese official media during the past two or three years. Issues of governmental accountability, economic equality, and social justice have recently dominated political and intellectual discourse in the country. This was inconceivable only a few years ago when some of these statistics would have been classified as “state secrets.”
In direct contrast to his predecessor, Jiang Zemin, who was more interested in demonstrating achievements than admitting problems, Hu Jintao is willing to address challenging topics. More importantly, Hu has already changed China’s course of development in three significant ways: from obsession with GDP growth to greater concern about social justice; from the single-minded emphasis on coastal development to a more balanced regional development strategy;4 and from a policy in favor of entrepreneurs and other elites to a populist approach that protects the interests of farmers, migrant workers, the urban unemployed, and other vulnerable social groups.

These policy shifts are not just lip service. They have already brought about some important progress. For example, one can reasonably argue that Hu and Wen, more than any other leaders in contemporary China, are implementing the so-called western development strategy (xibu kaifa zhanlue) effectively. During the past five years, 60 major construction projects have been undertaken in the western region with a total investment of 850 billion yuan (US$105.7 billion).5 Additionally, a new industrial renovation project in Chongqing will have a fixed asset investment of 350 billion yuan (US$43.5 billion) in the next five years.6 Meanwhile, the so-called “northeastern rejuvenation” (dongbei zhenxin) and the “take-off of the central provinces” (zhongyuan jueqi), with direct input from Premier Wen, have also made impressive strides.7
During the past few years, Hu and Wen have taken many popular actions: reducing the tax burden on farmers, abolishing discriminatory regulations against migrants, ordering business firms and local governments to pay their debts to migrant workers, restricting land lease for commercial and industrial uses, shaking hands with AIDS patients, visiting the families of coal mine explosion victims, and launching a nationwide donation campaign to help those in need.8 These policy changes and public gestures by Hu and Wen suggest that current top Chinese leaders are not only aware of the tensions and problems confronting the country, but also are willing to respond to them in a timely, and sometimes proactive, fashion.
To a certain extent, the large number of social protests occurring in China today reaffirms the foresight and wisdom of the new leadership, especially its sound policy shift. In an interesting way, the occurrence of these mass protects could actually consolidate, rather than undermine, Hu and Wen’s power in the Chinese political establishment. This, of course, does not mean that the Hu-Wen leadership is interested in enhancing social tensions in the country. On the contrary, their basic strategy is to promote a “harmonious society.” In their judgment, the Chinese public awareness of the frequency of mass unrest and the potential for a national crisis actually highlights the pressing need for social stability in this rapidly changing country.
Localization of Social Protests and the Blame Game
The second interesting new phenomenon in the Hu era is that a majority, if not all, of these mass protests were made against local officials, government agencies, or business firms rather than the central government. During the past few years, there has been an absence of unified nationwide protests against the central authorities.9 This does not mean that the country has been immune from major crises on a national scale. In the spring of 2003, for example, China experienced a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, a devastating health crisis that paralyzed the urban life and economic state of the country for several months. The regime survived this “China’s Chernobyl” largely because new top leaders like Hu, Wen, and Vice Premier Wu Yi effectively took charge and confronted the challenge.
It is not a coincidence that protesters often state that their petitions are very much in line with Hu and Wen’s appeal for social justice and governmental accountability. The Chinese public, including public intellectuals, believe that the new national leadership has made an important policy shift to improve the lives of weaker social groups.10 In the eyes of the public, mass protests against local officials are well justified because these local officials refused to implement policy changes made in Zhongnanhai. In Heilongjiang’s Jixi City, for example, the municipal government delayed payment to a construction company for years; consequently, migrant workers employed by the company did not receive their wages. When Premier Wen learned of the situation in Jixi, he requested that the municipal government solve the problem immediately. However, the local officials sent a false report to the State Council, claiming the issue was resolved even though migrant workers remained unpaid. Only after both the Jixi protests and Wen’s request were widely reported by the Chinese media did the municipal government begin to pay migrant workers.11 A recent article published in China Youth Daily used the term “policies decided at Zhongnanhai not making it out of Zhongnanhai” to characterize this prevalent phenomenon of local resistance to the directives of the central government.12
In recent years, the Chinese public, especially vulnerable social groups, seem to hold the assumption that the “bad local officials” often refuse to carry out the right policies of the “good national leaders.” Apparently due to this assumption, mass protests often occur shortly after top leaders visit a region; protesters frequently demand the implementation of the socioeconomic policies initiated by the central government.13 To a great extent, the increasing number of protests in China today can be seen as a result of the growing public consciousness about protecting the rights and interests of vulnerable social groups. Additionally, a multitude of Chinese lawyers who devote their careers to protecting the interests of such groups have recently emerged in the country. They have earned themselves a new Chinese name, “the lawyers of human rights protection” (weiquan lushi).14
Chinese journalists have also become increasingly bold in revealing various economic, sociopolitical, and environmental problems in the country. To a certain extent, the Chinese central authorities encourage the official media to serve as a watchdog over various lower levels of governments. For over a decade, local officials have been anxious when reporters from China’s leading investigative television news programs such as Focus (Jiaodian fangtan) visited their localities. Many local leaders were fired because the media revealed either serious problems in their jurisdiction or outrageous wrongdoings by the officials themselves.
The Hu-Wen leadership’s appeal for transparency of information has provided an opportunity for liberal Chinese journalists to search for real progress in media freedom throughout the country. The Chinese regime under Hu Jintao is apparently not ready to lift the ban on freedom of the press just yet. In recent years, several editors of newspapers and magazines have been fired, their media outlets banned, and several journalists have been jailed.15 But at the same time, some Chinese scholars and journalists such as Jiao Guobiao, a journalism professor at Beijing University, and Li Datong, an editor of China Youth Daily, continue to voice their dissent, and have even sued the top officials of the Propaganda Department of the CCP Central Committee.16
An interesting recent phenomenon in the Chinese media is that some media outlets based in one city or province are often inclined to report the problems and misconducts of leaders in other cities or provinces. Some local officials have banned the media’s negative coverage of their own jurisdiction. But meanwhile, they have actually encouraged the practice of “cross-region media supervision” (meiti yidi jiandu). It isin their interest to have their potential rivals in other regions being criticized by the media, because any damage to their potential rivals’ career could enhance their own chance for promotion. This practice evidently damaged the interests of too many provincial leaders. In the fall of 2005, the authorities of 17 provinces, including Hebei and Guangdong, jointly submitted a petition to the central government, asking to ban the “cross-region media supervision.”17
The dilemma for Hu and his colleagues in the central leadership is that their populist policy shift seems to be timely and necessary on the one hand, but on the other hand it can lead to public demand for social justice, economic equality, and government accountability, all of which can undermine the political stability of the regime. Because of this dilemma, Hu’s strategy has been to localize the social unrest. For the sake of maintaining the vital national interest of political stability, local governments should assume responsibility and accountability for the problems in their jurisdictions. If there is social unrest or other crises, local leaders will be blamed. One may call this strategy of the Chinese central leadership “think national, blame local.”
An important component of this scheme is the new regulations on complaint letters and petition visits that were adopted by the State Council in May 2005. The new regulations emphasize “territorial jurisdiction” and the “responsibility of the departments in charge.”18 Chinese citizens who have complaints and petitions are not encouraged to come to the central government in Beijing. Instead, they are told to go through a step-bystep procedure, submitting their complaints and petitions to the appropriate local government level. In the words of an official of the State Letters and Visits Bureau, the new regulations aim to not only protect “the lawful rights of people with legitimate complaints,” but also to make “local authorities more accountable.”19 This new procedure will place political pressure on local leaders while enabling the central leadership to avoid blame.
The central leadership’s “blame game” has also been facilitated by an allocation of non-economic quotas for provincial governments. In February 2006, Li Yizhong, chair of the State Administration of Work Safety, announced that in order to reduce the number of coal mine explosions and other industrial incidents in the country, the central government would evaluate the performance of provincial governments not only by economic growth, but by four additional indicators: the industrial death rate per 100 million yuan of the GDP, the death rate of work accidents per 100,000 employees in commercial businesses, the death rate per 10,000 automobiles, and the death rate per one million tons produced by coal mines.20
The populist approach of the Hu-Wen leadership has generated or reinforced the public assumption that social protests occurred because local leaders did not comply with the policies of the central government, some officials were notoriously corrupt, and/or these local bosses were incompetent. In the eyes of many people in China, “blaming local” is well justified. Some local governments have constantly resisted the directives of the central government and violated national laws and regulations.
This phenomenon of local resistance to the central authorities is certainly not new to China. The Chinese saying, “The mountain is high and the Emperor is far away,” vividly epitomizes this enduring Chinese trend of local administration. However, the abuse of power by local officials for economic gain has increased during China’s market transition, especially since the mid-1990s when the land lease for commercial and industrial uses spread throughout the country.
A “Wicked Coalition” between Real Estate Firms and Local Governments
It has been widely reported in the Chinese media that business interest groups have routinely bribed local officials and formed a “wicked coalition” (hei tongmeng) with local governments.21 Some Chinese observers believe that various players associated with the property development have emerged as one of the most powerful interest groups in present-day China.22 According to Sun Liping, a sociology professor at Qinghua University, the real estate interest group has accumulated tremendous economic and social capital during the past decade.23 Ever since the real estate bubble in Hainan in the early 1990s, this interest group has consistently attempted to influence governmental policy and public opinion. The group includes not only property developers, real estate agents, bankers, and housing market speculators, but also some local officials and public intellectuals (economists and journalists) who behave or speak in the interest of that group.

24
This explains why the central government’s macroeconomic control policy (hongguan tiaokong) has failed to achieve its intended objectives. A survey of 200 Chinese officials and scholars conducted in 2005 showed that 50 percent believed that China’s socioeconomic reforms have been constrained by “some elite groups with vested economic interests” (jide liyi jituan).25 In the first 10 months of 2005, for example, the real estate sector remained overheated with a 20% increase in the rate of investment despite the central government’s repeated call for cooling investment in this area.26 In the same year, the State Council sent four inspection teams to eight provinces and cities to evaluate the implementation of the central government’s macroeconomic control policy in the real estate sector. According to the Chinese media, most of these provincial and municipal governments did nothing but organize study sessions of the State Council’s policy initiatives.27
In 2004, the central government ordered a reduction in land leases for commercial and industrial uses as well as a reduction in the number of special economic zones that were particularly favorable to land leases. As a result, a total of 4,735 special economic zones were abolished, reducing by 70.2 percent the total number of special economic zones in the country.28 But some local officials violated the orders and regulations of the central government pertaining to land leases. According to one Chinese study conducted in 2004, about 80 percent of illegal land use cases were attributed to the wrongdoings of local governments.29 According to an official of the Ministry of Land Resources, about 50 percent of commercial land lease cases (xieyi churang tudi) contracted by the Beijing municipal government and business firms in 2003 were deemed violations of the central government regulations.30
Not surprisingly, a large number of corruption cases are related to land leases and real estate development. For example, among the 13 total provincial and ministerial level leaders who were arrested in 2003, 11 were primarily accused of illegal pursuits in landrelated decisions.31 Meanwhile, a large portion of mass protests directly resulted from inappropriate compensation for land confiscations and other disputes associated with commercial and industrial land use. According to a recent study by the Institute of Rural Development of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, two-thirds of peasant protests since 2004 were caused by local officials’ misdeeds in the handling of land leases.32
It is of course unfair to assume that the local governments’ enthusiasm for property development in their localities is purely driven by the personal interests of corrupt officials. Conflicting views regarding the issue of land leases between the central authorities and local governments are largely a product of asymmetrical priorities and concerns. As a Chinese analyst recently asserted, “the interests of the local governments are not aligned with [those of] the central government.”33 At present, the central government is apparently more concerned about the “overheat” of the Chinese economy, especially the financial bubble of real estate in coastal cities. In contrast, local governments are more worried about the “coldness” in local investment, foreign trade, consumption, and domestic demand—this is what Zhao Xiao, a scholar at the Research Center of the Chinese Economy of Beijing University, calls the “four coldnesses,” which can be devastating for local economies.34
Since 1994, China has adopted a tax-sharing system (fenshuizhi) in which tax revenue is divided by both the central and local governments. This tax-sharing system is supposed to better define fiscal relations between the central and local governments, promote market competition among various players, stabilize the regular income of the local authorities, and provide an incentive for local governments to collect taxes.35 As a result of this taxation reform, 65 percent of state expenditure now comes from local governments. The economic status of China’s provinces differs enormously from one to the next. Generally, local governments, especially at their lower levels, have been delegated more obligations and responsibilities and less power in allocating economic resources than in the early years of the reform era.
The heavy financial burden on local governments has inevitably driven local leaders to place priority on GDP growth and other methods of creating revenue. The best short cut for local governments to make up for this fiscal deficiency, as some Chinese scholars observe, is to sell or lease land.36 Although local governments’ reservations about the macroeconomic control policy and other regulations adopted by the Hu-Wen leadership may be valid, top local officials are expected to demonstrate their ability to handle various kinds of crises on their own turf. The central authorities’ strategy of “blaming local,” the growing public awareness of rights and interests, and the increasing transparency of media coverage of disasters (both natural and man-made) all place the local leaders on the spot.
Troubled Guangdong in the Spotlight: Blaming Zheng Dejiang?
Perhaps the most noticeable case of the growing central-provincial tension is Guangdong under the leadership of Zhang Dejiang. Zhang, a native of Liaoning, was a protégé of Jiang Zemin and is currently a member of the 25-member Politburo. Born in 1946, he worked as a “sent-down youth” in the countryside of Wangqing County in Jilin Province between 1968 and 1970. He joined the CCP in 1971 and attended Yanbian University to study the Korean language in the early 1970s. After graduation he remained at the university as a party official. In 1978, Zhang was sent by the Chinese government to study in the economics department at Kim Il Sung University in North Korea. He returned to China in 1980 and served as vice president of Yanbian University. He later served as deputy party secretary of Yanji City, Jilin from 1983 to 1986, and vice minister of social welfare in the central government from 1986 to 1990.
According to some China analysts, Zhang Dejiang made a very favorable impression on Jiang Zemin when Zhang escorted him on a visit to North Korea in 1990.37 Two years later, at the age of 44, Zhang became an alternate member of the CCP Central Committee. Since the early 1990s, he has served as the party boss in three provinces, first in Jilin, then Zhejiang, and now Guangdong. As the second youngest member of the current Politburo, Zhang seems poised to play an even more important role in the years to come, especially counterbalancing the growing power of Hu Jintao. However, Zhang’s poor performance in Guangdong may jeopardize his chance for a membership in the standing committee of the next Politburo.
Ever since he assumed the post of Guangdong party secretary in the fall of 2002, what was once the wealthiest province in the country and the frontier of China’s economic reform has turned into a disaster area. When SARS erupted in Guangdong in the fall of 2002, Zhang and his colleagues in the Guangdong government denied its occurrence and thereby enabled the epidemic to spread throughout the public. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), most of the 8,422 cases and 916 deaths in 29 countries (excluding those in the PRC) can be traced to one infected Guangdong doctor who traveled to Hong Kong.38
Additionally, several major episodes of social unrest and contentious events in Guangdong received national or international attention during the past four years. The police brutality that led to the death of a migrant worker named Sun Zhigang in Guangzhou in the spring of 2003 caused outrage among China’s legal scholars and its public. As a result, the State Council abolished the urban detention regulations that discriminated against migrants.
Prior to Zhang’s 2002 arrival in Guangdong, the province hosted several of the most liberal and outspoken newspapers in the country, including the famous Southern Metropolis Daily, which later courageously broke the SARS cover-up in Guangdong and the police brutality case of Sun Zhigang. Four years later, these outstanding editors and journalists were either in jail or moved elsewhere. Under Zhang Dejiang’s watch, the newspaper’s editor-in-chief, Cheng Yizhong, and its general manager, Yu Huafeng, were arrested on corruption charges. Guangdong Province has become notorious for governmental crackdown on media freedom.
In 2005, Guangdong’s disasters frequently made headlines in China and/or abroad. Examples include two coal mine explosions in Meizhou that killed 139 miners, and an excessive discharge of hazardous chemicals from a state firm that contaminated the Beijiang River. The public was not promptly informed about the water contamination. Most seriously, peasant protests in Taishi Village in Guangzhou and Dongzhou Village in Shanwei resulted in violent conflicts between armed police and villagers. Local government officials sent hundreds of armed police to crack down on protesters during the Dongzhou riot. The police fired at the protesters and killed at least three people, injuring at least eight others.39
All these incidents and crises apparently damaged the public image of the Guangdong government, especially that of party boss Zhang Dejiang. It was widely reported in the Hong Kong and overseas media that Zhang admitted his mistakes and took responsibility in his report on the shootings of the Dongzhou riot and other incidents in Guangdong at a recent Politburo meeting.40 In addition, Zhang made a well-publicized speech in a provincial party committee meeting in January 2006, outlining the so-called three red lines.41 According to Zhang, three types of wrongdoing in the acquisition of rural land for construction are usually the triggering factors for social unrests. He requested that no construction could start if: it has not completely fulfilled the central government’s regulation, it has not reached an agreement with peasants on their compensation, or the compensation has not been delivered to the peasants. Any officials who crossed any one of these “three red lines” should be fired, according to Zhang.
Despite these policy prescriptions, social unrest and riots continued to occur in Guangdong in 2006. As an example, in early February, several hundred residents of two opposing villages in Zhanjiang used homemade guns and other weapons to fight against each other because of a land dispute. The local government sent one hundred armed police to crack down on the violent riot. Twenty-nine villagers were reportedly injured.42 According to some Hong Kong and overseas media sources, the frequency of the disasters in the province has led people in Guangdong to engage in a “campaign to cast out Zhang.”43 They argued that lower-level local officials as well as provincial chief Zhang should be held responsible and accountable for these incidents.
Some other Hong Kong–based Chinese newspapers, however, reported that it was unfair to place all the blame on Zhang’s shoulders. According to these newspapers, socioeconomic development in Guangdong under the leadership of Zhang has been very much in line with the policies of the central government. During his visits to Guangdong in 2004 and 2005, Hu Jintao endorsed both the development plan of Guangdong and the performance of Zhang.44 Although it is difficult to verify these rumors and speculations, conflicting reports highlight the tensions between various political players who have a stake in this important province. The complicated nature of central-provincial relations in the case of Guangdong has further clouded the situation.
Politics and Leadership in Guangdong: Past and Present
Guangdong Province has long been known for its demands for autonomy, which are based on its strong economic status and dialectic distinction. During the Nationalist era, Guangdong produced a significant number of political and military elites. However, since the founding of the PRC, there have been only a handful of national leaders who are native Cantonese. Furthermore, to prevent the formation of a “Cantonese separatist movement,” the central government often appointed non-Cantonese leaders to head the province. If a Cantonese leader became too powerful, the central authorities likely “promoted” that leader to the central government in order to constrain local power. For instance, Ye Xuanping, son of the late marshal Ye Jianying, built a solid power base in Guangdong when he served as the party boss in the 1980s. The growing economic and cultural autonomy of Guangdong made the central authorities nervous. After some negotiation, the central authorities promoted Ye to senior vice chair of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference.
It was also reported that in preliminary meetings before the 15th Party Congress in 1997, central authorities intended to replace the sitting party secretary Xie Fei, a Cantonese native, with a non-Cantonese Politburo member as the new party secretary of Guangdong. Local officials in Guangdong rejected that proposal. They insisted that top officials in Guangdong should be Cantonese even if they lost their representation in the Politburo.45 As a result of their stand, Xie Fei has remained in both Guangdong and the Politburo. It took almost a year for local officials to accept Li Changchun, a native of Liaoning and a Politburo member. Their eventual acceptance was largely the result of pressure from the central authorities as well as negotiation between the local and central governments. While serving as provincial leaders in Guangdong, Li Changchun and other non-Cantonese officials such as Wang Qishan (then executive vice governor of Guangdong), repeatedly claimed that they would continue to rely on local officials rather than bringing a large group of leaders from other regions to replace them.46
The fact that Zhang’s predecessor Li Changchun later moved to Beijing where he became a standing committee member of the Politburo seems to suggest that Zhang might also have a chance for further promotion. This, however, depends on whether Zhang will be able to control the province as effectively as his predecessor did.47 One of the most important tasks for Zhang as party boss of Guangdong, as Jiang Zemin told him bluntly, was to prevent Cantonese localism.48 The factional politics in the provincial leadership of Guangdong at present are arguably far more complicated than in the Li Changchun era. This further undermines Zhang’s power and authority in running the province.
Table 1 shows the backgrounds of the 24 most important provincial leaders currently in Guangdong. They include 1) all the Guangdong-based leaders who also hold membership on the 16th Central Committee of the CCP or the 16th Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CMDI), 2) all the standing members of the Guangdong provincial party committee, and 3) all vice governors. Table 1 demonstrates that all of them were appointed to their current positions within the last eight years, and 19 (79 percent) of them were appointed after 2002. All of these leaders are now between 50 and 61 years old.
Of these 24 leaders, 12 are native Cantonese, while four others began to work in Guangdong over three decades ago and can thus be considered locals (among them Head of Propaganda Department Zhu Xiaodan and Vice Governor You Ningfeng). Some of the remaining eight provincial leaders who were transferred from elsewhere have worked in the province for over a decade. As an example, Shenzhen Party Secretary Li Hongzhong, a native of Shandong who grew up in Liaoning, began to serve as a vice mayor of Huizhou, Guangdong, in 1988. Similarly, Chair of Guangdong Provincial Congress Huang Liman, a native of Liaoning, started to work as deputy chief of staff of the Shenzhen Party Committee in 1992.
Li, China Leadership Monitor, No. 17

Table 1
Backgrounds of the Provincial Leaders of Guangdong (as of February 2006)

Name
Current Position
Since
Born
Birthplace
Previous Position
16th CCM
Local/Transfer
Factional Network
Zhang Dejiang Huang Huahua Wang Huayuan Ou Guangyuan Liu Yupu Cai Dongshi Huang Liman Chen Shaoji Zhong Yangsheng Huang Longyun Li Hongzhong Hu Zejun Liang Guoju Lin Shusen Zhu Xiaodan Xiao Zhiheng Xin Rongguo Tang Bingquan Xu Deli You Ningfeng Li Ronggen Xie Qianghua Lei Yulan Song Hai
Party Secretary Governor Disciplinary Sec. Dep. Party Sec. Dep. Party Sec. Dep. Party Sec. Chair, Prov. Congress Chair, Prov. PPCC Exec. Vice Governor Foshan Party Sec. Shenzhen Party Sec, Head, Org. Dept. Head, Pub. Security Bur. Guangzhou Party Sec. Head, Propaganda Dept. Chief of staff, Party Com. Commander, Military Dist. Exe. Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor Vice Governor
2002 2003 2002 2002 2004 2004 2005 2004 2003 2002 2005 2004 2000 2002 2004 2001 2005 2003 1998 2000 2001 2002 2003 2003
1946 1946 1948 1948 1949 1947 1945 1945 1948 1951 1956 1955 1947 1946 1953 1953 ? 1949 1945 1945 1950 1950 1952 1951


Mort de Rémi Fraisse: Attention, une victime peut en cacher bien d’autres (Warning: inequalities may not be where they seem)

7 novembre, 2014
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/12/Kustodiyev_bolshevik.JPG
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/11/World_Income_Gini_Map_%282013%29.svg/800px-World_Income_Gini_Map_%282013%29.svg.png
Les fascistes de demain s’appelleront eux-mêmes antifascistes. Winston Churchill
Le coefficient de Gini est une mesure statistique de la dispersion d’une distribution dans une population donnée, développée par le statisticien italien Corrado Gini. Le coefficient de Gini est un nombre variant de 0 à 1, où 0 signifie l’égalité parfaite et 1 signifie l’inégalité totale. Ce coefficient est très utilisé pour mesurer l’inégalité des revenus dans un pays. (…) Les pays les plus égalitaires ont un coefficient de l’ordre de 0,2 (Danemark, Suède, Japon, République tchèque…). Les pays les plus inégalitaires au monde ont un coefficient de 0,6 (Brésil, Guatemala, Honduras…). En France, le coefficient de Gini est de 0,2891. La Chine devient un des pays les plus inégalitaires du monde avec un indice s’élevant à 0.61 en 2010 selon le Centre d’enquête et de recherche sur les revenus des ménages (institut dépendant de la banque centrale chinoise). Le coefficient de Gini est principalement utilisé pour mesurer l’inégalité de revenu, mais peut aussi servir à mesurer l’inégalité de richesse ou de patrimoine. Le coefficient de Gini en économie est souvent combiné avec d’autres données. Se situant dans le cadre de l’étude des inégalités, il va de pair avec la politique. Ses liens avec l’indicateur démocratique (élaboré par des chercheurs, entre -2.5 au pire et +2.5 au mieux) sont réels mais pas automatiques. Wikipedia
The trend of modern times appears to indicate that citizens of democracies are willing heedlessly to surrender their freedoms to purchase social equality (along with economic security), apparently oblivious of the consequences. And the consequences are that their ability to hold on to and use what they earn and own, to hire and fire at will, to enter freely into contracts, and even to speak their mind is steadily being eroded by governments bent on redistributing private assets and subordinating individual rights to group rights. The entire concept of the welfare state as it has evolved in the second half of the twentieth century is incompatible with individual liberty, for it allows various groups with common needs to combine and claim the right to satisfy them at the expense of society at large, in the process steadily enhancing the power of the state which acts on their behalf.  Richard Pipes (“Property and Freedom”, 2000)
It was one of the fastest decimations of an animal population in world history—and it had happened almost entirely in secret. The Soviet Union was a party to the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, a 1946 treaty that limited countries to a set quota of whales each year. By the time a ban on commercial whaling went into effect, in 1986, the Soviets had reported killing a total of 2,710 humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. In fact, the country’s fleets had killed nearly 18 times that many, along with thousands of unreported whales of other species. It had been an elaborate and audacious deception: Soviet captains had disguised ships, tampered with scientific data, and misled international authorities for decades. In the estimation of the marine biologists Yulia Ivashchenko, Phillip Clapham, and Robert Brownell, it was “arguably one of the greatest environmental crimes of the 20th century.” It was also a perplexing one. Environmental crimes are, generally speaking, the most rational of crimes. The upsides are obvious: Fortunes have been made selling contraband rhino horns and mahogany or helping toxic waste disappear, and the risks are minimal—poaching, illegal logging, and dumping are penalized only weakly in most countries, when they’re penalized at all. The Soviet whale slaughter followed no such logic. Unlike Norway and Japan, the other major whaling nations of the era, the Soviet Union had little real demand for whale products. Once the blubber was cut away for conversion into oil, the rest of the animal, as often as not, was left in the sea to rot or was thrown into a furnace and reduced to bone meal—a low-value material used for agricultural fertilizer, made from the few animal byproducts that slaughterhouses and fish canneries can’t put to more profitable use. Charles Homans
A l’image d’Astérix défendant un petit bout périphérique de Bretagne face à un immense empire, les opposants au barrage de Sivens semblent mener une résistance dérisoire à une énorme machine bulldozerisante qui ravage la planète animée par la soif effrénée du gain. Ils luttent pour garder un territoire vivant, empêcher la machine d’installer l’agriculture industrialisée du maïs, conserver leur terroir, leur zone boisée, sauver une oasis alors que se déchaîne la désertification monoculturelle avec ses engrais tueurs de sols, tueurs de vie, où plus un ver de terre ne se tortille ou plus un oiseau ne chante. Cette machine croit détruire un passé arriéré, elle détruit par contre une alternative humaine d’avenir. Elle a détruit la paysannerie, l’exploitation fermière à dimension humaine. Elle veut répandre partout l’agriculture et l’élevage à grande échelle. Elle veut empêcher l’agro-écologie pionnière. Elle a la bénédiction de l’Etat, du gouvernement, de la classe politique. Elle ne sait pas que l’agro-écologie crée les premiers bourgeons d’un futur social qui veut naître, elle ne sait pas que les « écolos » défendent le « vouloir vivre ensemble ». Elle ne sait pas que les îlots de résistance sont des îlots d’espérance. Les tenants de l’économie libérale, de l’entreprise über alles, de la compétitivité, de l’hyper-rentabilité, se croient réalistes alors que le calcul qui est leur instrument de connaissance les aveugle sur les vraies et incalculables réalités des vies humaines, joie, peine, bonheur, malheur, amour et amitié. Le caractère abstrait, anonyme et anonymisant de cette machine énorme, lourdement armée pour défendre son barrage, a déclenché le meurtre d’un jeune homme bien concret, bien pacifique, animé par le respect de la vie et l’aspiration à une autre vie.  A part les violents se disant anarchistes, enragés et inconscients saboteurs, les protestataires, habitants locaux et écologistes venus de diverses régions de France, étaient, en résistant à l’énorme machine, les porteurs et porteuses d’un nouvel avenir. Le problème du barrage de Sivens est apparemment mineur, local. Mais par l’entêtement à vouloir imposer ce barrage sans tenir compte des réserves et critiques, par l’entêtement de l’Etat à vouloir le défendre par ses forces armées, allant jusqu’à utiliser les grenades, par l’entêtement des opposants de la cause du barrage dans une petite vallée d’une petite région, la guerre du barrage de Sivens est devenue le symbole et le microcosme de la vraie guerre de civilisation qui se mène dans le pays et plus largement sur la planète. (…) Pire, il a fait silence officiel embarrassé sur la mort d’un jeune homme de 21 ans, amoureux de la vie, communiste candide, solidaire des victimes de la terrible machine, venu en témoin et non en combattant. Quoi, pas une émotion, pas un désarroi ? Il faut attendre une semaine l’oraison funèbre du président de la République pour lui laisser choisir des mots bien mesurés et équilibrés alors que la force de la machine est démesurée et que la situation est déséquilibrée en défaveur des lésés et des victimes. Ce ne sont pas les lancers de pavés et les ­vitres brisées qui exprimeront la cause non violente de la civilisation écologisée dont la mort de Rémi Fraisse est devenue le ­symbole, l’emblème et le martyre. C’est avec une grande prise de conscience, capable de relier toutes les initiatives alternatives au productivisme aveugle, qu’un véritable hommage peut être rendu à Rémi Fraisse. Edgar Morin
Est-ce que ces policiers se sont cantonnés à se déguiser en casseur ou est-ce qu’ils sont allés un peu plus loin ? Olivier Besancenot
Mais les policiers pris dans la tourmente ont un argument de poids. Preuve à l’appui, ils expliquent que les manifestants n’hésitent plus à publier les photos de leurs visages sur des sites « anti-flics » et que se masquer est le seul moyen pour eux de ne pas être identifiés. RTL
Depuis début septembre, les heurts entre forces de l’ordre et zadistes ont été particulièrement violents, au point que 56 policiers et gendarmes ont été blessés. La préfecture du Tarn a tenu plusieurs réunions avec les organisateurs de la manifestation dans un esprit de calme et, parallèlement, le ministre de l’Intérieur n’a cessé de donner des consignes d’apaisement. Malgré cela, nous avons très vite compris qu’une frange radicale de casseurs viendrait se mêler aux manifestants pacifiques. (…) Le préfet du Tarn, qui détient l’autorité publique, a fait appel aux forces de gendarmerie car il y avait des risques d’affrontement avec des contre-manifestants favorables au barrage. Il y avait aussi la crainte de voir des casseurs se rendre dans la ville proche de Gaillac. Enfin il fallait éviter le « piégeage » du site qui aurait compromis la reprise des travaux. (…) Ces munitions ne peuvent être utilisées que dans deux situations : soit à la suite de violences à l’encontre des forces de l’ordre, soit pour défendre la zone liée à la mission confiée aux gendarmes. Il faut que le chef du dispositif donne son aval à son utilisation, et celui-ci a donné l’ordre en raison des menaces qui pesaient sur les effectifs. Le tireur est un gradé et agit sur ordre de son commandant, après que les sommations d’usage ont été faites. Donc, je maintiens qu’il n’y a pas eu de faute de la part du gradé qui a lancé cette grenade.(…) Entre minuit et 3 heures du matin, ce sont 23 grenades qui ont été lancées. Environ 400 le sont tous les ans, c’est dire que les affrontements ont été particulièrement violents. J’ai vu des officiers, présents dans la gendarmerie depuis trente ans, qui m’ont dit ne jamais avoir vu un tel niveau de violence. Nous sommes face à des gens qui étaient présents pour « casser » du gendarme. Général Denis Favier (directeur général de la gendarmerie nationale)
Tanzania … with a relatively low Gini of 35 may be less egalitarian than it appears since measured inequality lies so close to (or indeed above) its inequality possibility frontier. … On the other hand, with a much higher Gini of almost 48, Malaysia … has extracted only about one-half of maximum inequality, and thus is farther away from the IPF. (…)  As a country becomes richer, its feasible inequality expands. Consequently, if recorded inequality is stable, the inequality extraction ratio must fall; and even if recorded inequality goes up, the ratio may not. Branko Milanovic
Branko Milanovic, Peter H. Lindert, Jeffrey G. Williamson (…) develop two new interesting concepts: the inequality possibility frontier, which sets the limit of possible inequality, and the extraction ratio, the ratio between the feasible maximum and the actual level of inequality. The idea in a nutshell is that the higher a society’s mean income, the more there is for the ruling class possibly to take. So how much of that have they actually been taking historically, and how does it differ from today?  Amidst a great deal of interesting discussion of the problems inherent in estimating incomes and their distribution in ye olden times, Messrs Milanovic, Lindert, and Williamson find that the extraction ratio in pre-industrial societies of yore were much higher than in pre-industrial nations today, although their actual levels of inequality (as measured by the Gini coefficient) are very similar. A really, really poor country may have a low level of actual inequality, since even the rich have so little. But they may have nevetheless taken all they can get from the less powerful. A richer and nominally less equal place may also be rather less bandit-like; the powerful could hoard more, but they don’t. Because potential and actual inequality come apart, measured actual inequality may therefore tell us less than we think. The Economist
Marx and Engels were pretty good economic reporters. Surveying the economic history literature, Milanovic finds that between 1800 and 1849, the wage of an unskilled laborer in India, one of the poorest countries at the time, was 30 percent that of an equivalent worker in England, one of the richest. Here is another data point: in the 1820s, real wages in the Netherlands were just 70 percent higher than those in the Yangtze Valley in China. But Marx and Engels did not do as well as economic forecasters. They predicted that oppression of the proletariat would get worse, creating an international – and internationally exploited – working class. Instead, Milanovic shows that over the subsequent century and a half, industrial capitalism hugely enriched the workers in the countries where it flourished – and widened the gap between them and workers in those parts of the world where it did not take hold. One way to understand what has happened, Milanovic says, is to use a measure of global inequality developed by François Bourguignon and Christian Morrisson in a 2002 paper. They calculated the global Gini coefficient, a popular measure of inequality, to have been 53 in 1850, with roughly half due to location – or inequality between countries – and half due to class. By Milanovic’s calculation, the global Gini coefficient had risen to 65.4 by 2005. The striking change, though, is in its composition: 85 percent is due to location, and just 15 percent due to class. Comparable wages in developed and developing countries are another way to illustrate the gap. Milanovic uses the 2009 global prices and earnings report compiled by UBS, the Swiss bank. This showed that the nominal after-tax wage for a building laborer in New York was $16.60 an hour, compared with 80 cents in Beijing, 60 cents in Nairobi and 50 cents in New Delhi, a gap that is orders of magnitude greater than the one in the 19th century. Interestingly, at a time when unskilled workers are the ones we worry are getting the rawest deal, the difference in earnings between New York engineers and their developing world counterparts is much smaller: engineers earn $26.50 an hour in New York, $5.80 in Beijing, $4 in Nairobi and $2.90 in New Delhi. Milanovic has two important takeaways from all of this. The first is that in the past century and a half, « the specter of communism » in the Western world « was exorcised » because industrial capitalism did such a good job of enriching the erstwhile proletariat. His second conclusion is that the big cleavage in the world today is not between classes within countries, but between the rich West and the poor developing world. As a result, he predicts « huge migratory pressures because people can increase their incomes several-fold if they migrate. » I wonder, though, if the disparity Milanovic documents is already creating a different shift in the global economy. Thanks to new communications and transportation technologies, and the opening up of the world economy, immigration is not the only way to match cheap workers from developing economies with better-paid jobs in the developing world. Another way to do it is to move jobs to where workers live. Economists are not the only ones who can read the UBS research – business people do, too. And some of them are concluding, as one hedge fund manager said at a recent dinner speech in New York, that « the low-skilled American worker is the most overpaid worker in the world. » At a time when Western capitalism is huffing and wheezing, Milanovic’s paper is a vivid reminder of how much it has accomplished. But he also highlights the big new challenge – how to bring the rewards of capitalism to the workers of the developing world at a time when the standard of living of their Western counterparts has stalled. Chrystia Freeland
At a very basic, agrarian level of development, Milanovic explains, people’s incomes are relatively equal; everyone is living at or close to subsistence level. But as more advanced technologies become available and enable workers to differentiate their skills, a gulf between rich and poor becomes possible. This section also gingerly approaches the contentious debate over whether inequality is good or bad for economic growth, but ultimately quibbles with the question itself. “There is ‘good’ and ‘bad’ inequality,” Milanovic writes, “just as there is good and bad cholesterol.” The possibility of unequal economic outcomes motivates people to work harder, he argues, although at some point it can lead to the preservation of acquired positions, which causes economies to stagnate. In his second and third essays, Milanovic switches to his obvious passion: inequality around the world. These sections encourage readers to better appreciate their own living standards and to think more skeptically about who is responsible for their success. As Milanovic notes, an astounding 60 percent of a person’s income is determined merely by where she was born (and an additional 20 percent is dictated by how rich her parents were). He also makes interesting international comparisons. The typical person in the top 5 percent of the Indian population, for example, makes the same as or less than the typical person in the bottom 5 percent of the American population. That’s right: America’s poorest are, on average, richer than India’s richest — extravagant Mumbai mansions notwithstanding. It is no wonder then, Milanovic says, that so many from the third world risk life and limb to sneak into the first. A recent World Bank survey suggested that “countries that have done economically poorly would, if free migration were allowed, remain perhaps without half or more of their populations.” Catherine Rampell
Considérez le mouvement actuel des indignados, le mouvement des (comme le slogan le dit) « 99% contre le 1% ». Mais si l’on demande où, dans la distribution du revenu mondiale, se trouvent ces « 99% » qui manifestent dans les pays riches, nous trouvons qu’ils sont dans la position supérieure de la distribution du revenu mondiale, disons, autour du 80e percentile. En d’autres mots, ils sont plus riches que les 4/5e des individus vivant dans le monde. Ceci étant, ce n’est pas un argument pour dire qu’ils ne devraient pas manifester, mais ce fait empirique soulève immédiatement la question suivante, celle dont traitent les philosophes politiques. Supposons, pas tout à fait de manière irréaliste, que la mondialisation marche de telle façon qu’elle augmente les revenus de certains parmi ces « autres » 4/5e de l’humanité, ceux vivant en Chine, en Inde, en Afrique, et qu’elle réduit les revenus de ceux qui manifestent dans les rues des pays riches. Que devrait être la réponse à cela ? Devrions-nous considérer ce qui est meilleur pour le monde dans son entièreté, et dire ainsi à ces « 99% » : « vous autres, vous êtes déjà riches selon les standards mondiaux, laissez maintenant quelques autres, qui sont prêts à faire votre travail pour une fraction de l’argent que vous demandez, le faire, et améliorer ce faisant leur sort d’un rien, gagner un accès à l’eau potable ou donner naissance sans danger, par exemple, des choses que vous avez déjà et tenez pour acquises ». Ou bien, devrions-nous dire au contraire que la redistribution doit d’abord avoir lieu dans chaque pays individuellement, c’est-à-dire que l’on redistribue l’argent depuis le 1% le plus riche vers les autres 99% dans le même pays, et, seulement une fois cela accompli, pourrions-nous commencer à envisager ce qui devrait se faire à l’échelle mondiale ? Un optimum global serait ainsi atteint quand chaque pays prendrait soin de lui-même au mieux en premier lieu. Cette dernière position, où l’optimum global n’existe pas en tant que tel mais est le « produit » des optimums nationaux, est la position de John Rawls. La précédente, qui considère l’intérêt de tous sans se préoccuper des pays individuellement, est celle de philosophes politiques plus radicaux. Mais, comme on le voit, prendre une position ou l’autre a des conséquences très différentes sur notre attitude envers la mondialisation ou les revendications des mouvements comme les indignados ou Occupy Wall Street.
Nous sommes souvent pessimistes ou même cyniques quant à la capacité des politiciens d’offrir du changement. Mais notez que cette capacité, en démocratie, dépend de ce que la population veut. Aussi, peut-être devrions-nous nous tourner davantage vers nous-mêmes que vers les politiciens pour comprendre pourquoi changer le modèle économique actuel est si difficile. Malgré plusieurs effets négatifs du néolibéralisme (que j’ai mentionnés plus haut), un large segment de la population en a bénéficié, et même certains parmi ceux qui n’y ont pas gagné « objectivement » ont totalement internalisé ses valeurs. Il semble que nous voulions tous une maison achetée sans acompte, nous achetons une deuxième voiture si nous obtenons un crédit pas cher, nous avons des factures sur nos cartes de crédit bien au-delà de nos moyens, nous ne voulons pas d’augmentation des prix de l’essence, nous voulons voyager en avion même si cela génère de la pollution, nous mettons en route la climatisation dès qu’il fait plus de vingt-cinq degrés, nous voulons voir tous les derniers films et DVDs, nous avons plusieurs postes de télévision dernier cri, etc. Nous nous plaignons souvent d’un emploi précaire mais nous ne voulons renoncer à aucun des bénéfices, réels ou faux, qui dérivent de l’approche Reagan/Thatcher de l’économie. Quand une majorité suffisante de personnes aura un sentiment différent, je suis sûr qu’il y aura des politiciens qui le comprendront, et gagneront des élections avec ce nouveau programme (pro-égalité), et le mettront même en œuvre. Les politiciens sont simplement des entrepreneurs : si des gens veulent une certaine politique, ils l’offriront, de la même manière qu’un établissement vous proposera un café gourmet pourvu qu’un nombre suffisant parmi nous le veuille et soit prêt à payer pour cela.
L’inégalité globale, l’inégalité entre les citoyens du monde, est à un niveau très élevé depuis vingt ans. Ce niveau est le plus élevé, ou presque, de l’histoire : après la révolution industrielle, certaines classes, et puis certaines nations, sont devenues riches et les autres sont restées pauvres. Cela a élevé l’inégalité globale de 1820 à environ 1970-80. Après cela, elle est restée sans tendance claire, mais à ce niveau élevé. Mais depuis les dix dernières années, grâce aux taux de croissance importants en Chine et en Inde, il se peut que nous commencions à voir un déclin de l’inégalité globale. Si ces tendances se poursuivent sur les vingt ou trente prochaines années, l’inégalité globale pourrait baisser substantiellement. Mais l’on ne devrait pas oublier que cela dépend crucialement de ce qui se passe en Chine, et que d’autres pays pauvres et populeux comme le Nigeria, le Bangladesh, les Philippines, le Soudan, etc., n’ont pas eu beaucoup de croissance économique. Avec la croissance de leur population, il se peut qu’ils poussent l’inégalité globale vers le haut. D’un autre côté, le monde est plus riche aujourd’hui qu’à n’importe quel autre moment dans l’histoire. Il n’y a aucun doute sur ce point. Le 20e siècle a été justement appelé par [l’historien britannique] Eric Hosbawm « le siècle des extrêmes » : jamais des progrès aussi importants n’avaient été réalisés auparavant pour autant de monde, et jamais autant de monde n’avait été tué et exterminé par des idéologies extrêmes. Le défi du 21e siècle est de mettre fin à ce dernier point. Mais les développements de la première décennie de ce siècle n’ont pas produit beaucoup de raisons d’être optimiste.
Il y a trois moyens pour s’y prendre. Le premier est une plus grande redistribution du monde riche vers le monde pauvre. Mais l’on peut aisément écarter ce chemin. L’aide au développement officielle totale est un peu au-dessus de 100 milliards de dollars par an, ce qui est à peu près équivalent à la somme payée en bonus pour les « bonnes performances » par Goldman Sachs depuis le début de la crise. De telles sommes ne seront pas une solution à la pauvreté mondiale ou à l’inégalité globale, et de plus, ces fonds vont diminuer dans la mesure où le monde riche a du mal à s’extraire de la crise. La deuxième manière consiste à accélérer la croissance dans les pays pauvres, et l’Afrique en particulier. C’est en fait la meilleure façon de s’attaquer à la pauvreté et à l’inégalité tout à la fois. Mais c’est plus facile à dire qu’à faire. Même si la dernière décennie a été bonne généralement pour l’Afrique, le bilan global pour l’ère post-indépendance est mauvais, et dans certains cas, catastrophiquement mauvais. Ceci étant, je ne suis pas tout à fait pessimiste. L’Afrique sub-saharienne a commencé à mettre de l’ordre dans certains de ses problèmes, et pourrait continuer à avoir des taux de croissance relativement élevés. Cependant, le fossé entre les revenus moyens d’Afrique et d’Europe est désormais si profond, qu’il faudrait quelques centaines d’années pour l’entamer significativement. Ce qui nous laisse une troisième solution pour réduire les disparités globales : la migration. En principe, ça n’est pas différent du fait d’accélérer la croissance du revenu dans un quelconque pays pauvre. La seule différence – mais politiquement c’est une différence significative – est qu’une personne pauvre améliore son sort en déménageant ailleurs plutôt qu’en restant là où elle est née. La migration est certainement l’outil le plus efficace pour la réduction de l’inégalité globale. Ouvrir les frontières de l’Europe et des États-Unis permettrait d’attirer des millions de migrants et leurs niveaux de vie s’élèveraient. On voit cela tous les jours à une moindre échelle, mais on l’a vu également à la fin du 19e siècle et au début du 20e siècle, quand les migrations étaient deux à cinq fois supérieures (en proportion de la population d’alors) à aujourd’hui. La plupart de ceux qui migraient augmentaient leurs revenus. Cependant il y a deux problèmes importants avec la migration. Premièrement, cela mènerait à des revenus plus bas pour certaines personnes vivant dans les pays d’accueil, et elles utiliseraient (comme elles le font actuellement) tous les moyens politiques pour l’arrêter. Deuxièmement, cela crée parfois un « clash des civilisations » inconfortable quand des normes culturelles différentes se heurtent les unes aux autres. Cela produit un retour de bâton, qui est évident aujourd’hui en Europe. C’est une réaction compréhensible, même si beaucoup d’Européens devraient peut-être réfléchir à l’époque où ils émigraient, que ce soit de manière pacifique ou de manière violente, vers le reste du monde, et combien ils y trouvaient des avantages. Il semble maintenant que la boucle soit bouclée : les autres émigrent vers l’Europe. Branko Milanovic

Attention: une victime peut en cacher bien d’autres !

En ce 97e anniversaire du coup d’Etat bolchévique qui lança une révolution et les flots de sang dont on attend toujours le Nuremberg

Et où, à l’occasion du décès accidentel d’un jeune militant écologiste contestant la construction d’un barrage dans le Tarn, nos zélotes de la philosophie la plus criminelle de l’histoire viennent jeter de l’huile sur le feu avec leurs insinuations conspirationnistes contre les forces de l’ordre

Pendant que nos philosophes auto-proclamés dénoncent la « guerre de civilisation » libérale qui aurait déclenché le « meurtre » (sic) d’un jeune « amoureux de la vie, communiste candide, solidaire des victimes de la terrible machine » …

Et que, dans nos écoles, pour défendre le droit des casseurs à attaquer la police à coup de cocktails molotov ou tout autre projectile potentiellement mortel,  des agents provocateurs issus du même mouvement criminel prennent en otage les études de nos enfants  …

Comment ne pas voir avec l’économiste serbo-américain Branko Milanovic …

Et derrière les indignations sélectives de nos enfants gâtés de Wall Street ou des plaines du Tarn …

Les véritables victimes de la mise au ban proposée …

D’un modèle capitaliste qui avec toutes ses tares n’a jamais sorti autant de monde de la pauvreté ?

Le Gini hors de la bouteille. Entretien avec Branko Milanovic
Branko Milanovic
Niels Planel
Sens public
23 novembre 2011

Résumé : Branko Milanovic compte sans doute parmi les spécialistes des inégalités les plus importants sur la scène internationale. Économiste à la Banque mondiale, il se penche sur les questions des disparités depuis plusieurs décennies. Dans son livre paru cette année, The Haves and the Have-Nots (Les nantis et les indigents), il réussit le tour de force de rendre accessibles au plus grand nombre des idées complexes sur les inégalités entre les individus, entre les pays, et entre les citoyens du monde dans un style attrayant. Pour ce faire, l’auteur illustre ses propos au travers de petites histoires (des « vignettes ») audacieuses et d’une incroyable originalité, dans lesquelles il répond à des questions fascinantes : les Romains prospères étaient-ils comparativement plus riches que les super riches d’aujourd’hui ? Dans quel arrondissement de Paris valait-il mieux vivre au 13e siècle, et qu’en est-il aujourd’hui ? Sur l’échelle de la redistribution du revenu au Kenya, où se situait le grand-père de Barack Obama ? Est-ce que le lieu de naissance influence le salaire que vous aurez au long d’une vie, et si oui, comment ? Qu’a gagné Anna Karénine à tomber amoureuse ? La Chine survivra-t-elle au mitan du siècle ? Qui a été la personne la plus riche au monde ? Reprenant également les travaux de Vilfredo Pareto, Karl Marx, Alexis de Tocqueville, John Rawls ou Simon Kuznets à une époque où la question des inégalités préoccupe de plus en plus, son ouvrage fait le pari d’éclairer un enjeu aussi ancien que passionnant. Branko Milanovic a accepté de répondre aux questions de Sens Public.

Sens Public – D’où votre intérêt pour le sujet des inégalités vous vient-il ?

Branco Milanovic – Depuis le lycée, et même depuis l’école élémentaire, j’étais toujours très intéressé par les enjeux sociaux. J’ai choisi l’économie précisément pour cela. C’était une science sociale et elle traitait de ce qui était probablement l’une des questions les plus importantes à l’époque : comment augmenter le revenu des gens, comment leur permettre de vivre de meilleures vies, dans de plus grands appartements, avec un accès à l’eau chaude, au chauffage, des rues mieux pavées, des trottoirs plus propres.

J’ai étudié dans ce qui était alors la Yougoslavie, qui avait un fort taux de croissance. Le bien être des gens (y compris celui de ma propre famille) augmentait chaque année ; atteindre un taux de croissance de 7-10% par an semblait presque normal. J’aimais l’économie empirique, et j’ai choisi les statistiques (dans le département d’économie). Dans les statistiques, on travaille beaucoup avec les questions de distributions. Et puis, soudainement, les deux intérêts que j’avais préservés, en l’état, dans deux compartiments séparés de mon cerveau, celui pour les enjeux sociaux, et celui pour les statistiques, se sont rejoints.

J’étais assez fasciné (j’avais alors vingt ou vingt-et-un ans), quand j’ai appris pour la première fois des choses au sujet du coefficient de Gini, Pareto ou de la distribution log-normale, et j’ai commencé à voir si les données sur les revenus que j’avais épouseraient la courbe. C’était une époque où l’on utilisait du papier et un stylo, une calculatrice à la main, pour chiffrer la taille de chaque groupe, leur part du revenu total, et pour appliquer une fonction statistique afin de voir si elle correspondait aux nombres ou non. Il me semblait que, d’une certaine manière, le secret de la façon dont l’argent est distribué parmi les individus, ou celui de la manière dont les sociétés sont organisées, apparaîtraient en face de moi. J’ai passé de nombreuses nuits à parcourir ces nombres. Je l’ai souvent préféré à aller dehors avec des amis.

S.P. – Combien de temps vous a pris l’écriture de votre livre sur l’inégalité, et où avez-vous puisé votre inspiration pour rédiger autant d’histoires aussi diverses (vos “vignettes”) ? Les économistes semblent souvent penser d’une manière très abstraite. En utilisant des exemples ancrés dans la vie quotidienne des gens (la littérature, l’histoire, etc.), quelle était votre intention ?

B.M. – Le livre a été rédigé en moins de cent jours, et cela inclut les jours où je ne pouvais pas écrire à cause d’autres choses que j’avais à faire, ou parce que je voyageais. Les meilleurs jours furent ceux où je rédigeais une, voire deux vignettes en moins de vingt-quatre heures. Ceci étant, toutes les idées pour les vignettes et les données requises existaient déjà. C’est pourquoi il m’a été possible d’écrire le livre aussi vite. C’est au cours des nombreuses années où je faisais un travail plus « sérieux » qu’une idée (qui deviendrait plus tard une « vignette ») me frappait, et je passais alors plusieurs heures ou journées à penser et calculer des choses pour lesquelles je ne voyais pas encore un moyen évident de publication. Le vrai défi a été de trouver un format qui permettrait de rassembler tous ces morceaux que j’aimais, et que les gens semblaient apprécier lorsque je les présentais à des conférences, dans un livre. Une fois que, avec l’éditeur de mon premier livre, Tim Sullivan, je parvins à la présente structure, où chaque sujet est introduit par un essai assez sérieux, assez académique, puis illustré par des vignettes, écrire le livre devint facile et vraiment plaisant. J’écris d’ordinaire facilement et rapidement et il me semble que je n’ai jamais rien écrit avec autant d’aise. Et je pense que cela se voit dans le texte.

J’ai tâché d’accomplir deux choses : prendre du plaisir en écrivant les vignettes, et montrer aux lecteurs que bien des concepts secs de l’économie n’ont pas pour sujet des « agents économiques » (comme on appelle les gens en économie), ou des « attentes rationnelles », ou des « marchés efficaces », etc., mais des personnes comme eux-mêmes, ou des personnes célèbres, ou des personnages de fiction. Et que, eux, les lecteurs, ont rarement fait cette transition, à savoir, réaliser que l’économie, et la distribution du revenu, ont vraiment pour sujet les gens, les personnes réelles : comment ils gagnent et perdent de l’argent, comment les riches influencent le processus politique, qui paye des impôts, pourquoi des pays prospèrent et déclinent, pourquoi ce sont toujours les mêmes équipes de football qui gagnent, et même comment une inégalité élevée a pu engendrer la crise actuelle. Ce sont là, je pense, des sujets qui nous concernent tous, fréquemment, au quotidien, et que les économistes rendent compliqués en utilisant un jargon impénétrable.

S.P. – En France, des écrivains comme Victor Hugo et Émile Zola ont produit une œuvre impressionnante sur les conditions sociales et les inégalités de leur époque. Et l’une des vignettes les plus fameuses de votre livre se fonde sur le roman de Tolstoï, Anna Karénine. Vous faites également référence à Orgueil et Préjugés, de Jane Austen… Est-ce que la littérature est un outil aussi efficace que l’économie pour comprendre, observer et expliquer les inégalités ? Et si oui, est-ce que la littérature est toujours une force puissante pour sensibiliser les gens aux inégalités dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, ou bien l’économie est-elle plus efficace pour cela ?

B.M. – La littérature européenne du 19e siècle, et la française en particulier, sont des trésors d’informations sur les sociétés européennes de l’époque et, de ce fait, sur la distribution du revenu. Les grands romans de cette période se préoccupaient de décrire les sociétés telles qu’elles étaient, de regarder les destins individuels dans le cadre d’ensemble de l’évolution sociale, et puisque l’argent jouait un rôle si important, les livres sont pleins de données détaillées sur les revenus, les salaires, le coût de la vie, le prix des choses, etc. C’est vrai de Victor Hugo (dont je connais moins bien les livres) mais bien sûr, également, de Zola et Balzac, ou Dickens. Je pense que la Comédie humaine de Balzac pourrait être aisément convertie en une étude empirique sur l’inégalité de revenu, et la mobilité sociale, au sein de la société française de l’époque. Balzac voyait bien sûr son œuvre comme un portrait de la société dans son ensemble. Orgueil et préjugés et Anna Karénine sont plus limités dans leur prisme (particulièrement le premier) mais ils se concentrent sur une chose qui me semble intéressante : le revenu au sommet de la pyramide de la richesse, les énormes différences de revenus entre ceux qui sont bien lotis et ceux qui sont extrêmement riches, et sur la position des femmes pour qui la seule voie vers une vie confortable et riche passait par le mariage. C’est pourquoi le mariage et l’argent, les « alliances » et les « mésalliances » avaient tant d’importance dans la littérature de l’époque.

Je ne connais pas bien la littérature d’aujourd’hui. Un changement clair me semble avoir eu lieu au cours du siècle dernier. L’objectif est moins de présenter une peinture de la société que de se concentrer sur les individus, leur vie intérieure. Je pense que par principe, une telle littérature est bien moins critique des arrangements sociaux, principalement parce qu’elle les considère comme acquis, ou, si elle est critique, les regarde comme reflétant un malaise humain de base, une condition humaine immuable. Pour prendre un exemple, j’ai aimé et presque tout lu de Sartre et Camus, mais vous ne trouverez presque aucun chiffre dans leurs livres sur combien untel gagne ou sur combien les choses coûtent. Ceci, malgré l’ostensible gauchisme politique de Sartre. De ce point de vue, Balzac était bien plus gauchiste que ce dernier. Pareillement, vous ne trouverez rien de tel dans les sept volumes de Proust malgré le fait que son œuvre est largement au sujet de la société et des changements de fortune (souvent, littéralement, des changements de richesses) parmi la classe aux plus hauts revenus. Mais savons-nous combien Mme de Guermantes gagne par an ? De combien est-elle plus riche que Swann ? Ou, d’ailleurs, quel est le revenu du père du narrateur ?

Je ne vois pas la littérature d’aujourd’hui comme une force puissante pour le changement. Je pense qu’elle a perdu l’importance qu’elle avait au 19e siècle en Europe, en Russie et aux États-Unis. Aujourd’hui, vous avez des hystéries au sujet de tel ou tel livre, et pas plutôt que le volume a été lu, ou plutôt semi-lu, il tombe dans l’oubli.

S.P. – Dans le paysage d’aujourd’hui, où voyez-vous les Tolstoï et les Austen – des auteurs et des artistes qui présentent une vue détaillée des inégalités ?

B.M. – Je pense que ce rôle a été « spécialisé » comme tant d’autres rôles dans les sociétés modernes. Il appartient maintenant aux économistes et aux philosophes politiques. Je vois ces deux groupes (combinés peut-être aux sociologues dans la mesure où ceux-ci sont désireux d’étudier des phénomènes sociaux sérieux plutôt que les menus détails du comportement humain) comme les personnes, peut-être mues par leurs intérêts professionnels, qui peuvent dire quelque chose au sujet des inégalités dans les sociétés où nous vivons. Et dire quelque chose qui ne soit pas simplement des « conjectures » ou des « sentiments », mais fondé sur une preuve empirique ou (dans le cas des philosophes politiques) sur une étude sérieuse et une analyse de la manière dont les sociétés peuvent ou devraient être organisées.

Pour être clair, j’aimerais donner un exemple. Considérez le mouvement actuel des indignados, le mouvement des (comme le slogan le dit) « 99% contre le 1% ». Mais si l’on demande où, dans la distribution du revenu mondiale, se trouvent ces « 99% » qui manifestent dans les pays riches, nous trouvons qu’ils sont dans la position supérieure de la distribution du revenu mondiale, disons, autour du 80e percentile. En d’autres mots, ils sont plus riches que les 4/5e des individus vivant dans le monde. Ceci étant, ce n’est pas un argument pour dire qu’ils ne devraient pas manifester, mais ce fait empirique soulève immédiatement la question suivante, celle dont traitent les philosophes politiques.

Supposons, pas tout à fait de manière irréaliste, que la mondialisation marche de telle façon qu’elle augmente les revenus de certains parmi ces « autres » 4/5e de l’humanité, ceux vivant en Chine, en Inde, en Afrique, et qu’elle réduit les revenus de ceux qui manifestent dans les rues des pays riches. Que devrait être la réponse à cela ? Devrions-nous considérer ce qui est meilleur pour le monde dans son entièreté, et dire ainsi à ces « 99% » : « vous autres, vous êtes déjà riches selon les standards mondiaux, laissez maintenant quelques autres, qui sont prêts à faire votre travail pour une fraction de l’argent que vous demandez, le faire, et améliorer ce faisant leur sort d’un rien, gagner un accès à l’eau potable ou donner naissance sans danger, par exemple, des choses que vous avez déjà et tenez pour acquises ». Ou bien, devrions-nous dire au contraire que la redistribution doit d’abord avoir lieu dans chaque pays individuellement, c’est-à-dire que l’on redistribue l’argent depuis le 1% le plus riche vers les autres 99% dans le même pays, et, seulement une fois cela accompli, pourrions-nous commencer à envisager ce qui devrait se faire à l’échelle mondiale ? Un optimum global serait ainsi atteint quand chaque pays prendrait soin de lui-même au mieux en premier lieu. Cette dernière position, où l’optimum global n’existe pas en tant que tel mais est le « produit » des optimums nationaux, est la position de John Rawls. La précédente, qui considère l’intérêt de tous sans se préoccuper des pays individuellement, est celle de philosophes politiques plus radicaux. Mais, comme on le voit, prendre une position ou l’autre a des conséquences très différentes sur notre attitude envers la mondialisation ou les revendications des mouvements comme les indignados ou Occupy Wall Street.

S.P. – Jusqu’à la fin, votre livre se refuse à entrer dans des considérations politiques sur l’inégalité. Quel est le rôle de la politique dans le combat ou le développement des inégalités ?

B.M. – Je voulais que mon livre reste relativement neutre par rapport à la politique d’aujourd’hui. Les livres de plaidoyer avec des titres longs et idiots ne font pas long feu. Ce sont des « éphémérides ». Qui se souvient aujourd’hui des livres qui, il y a vingt ans, nous mettaient en garde contre la prise de pouvoir mondiale du Japon et pressaient les gouvernements occidentaux de réagir ? Et avant cela, c’était l’OPEC, et encore avant cela, l’Union soviétique.

Réduire les inégalités sera un processus long et laborieux. Depuis la fin des années 1970, une large poussée des inégalités en Occident a eu lieu en conséquence d’un changement idéologique à l’avant-garde de laquelle se trouvaient des économistes comme Hayek et Friedman, et l’école de Chicago en général. Leurs prescriptions furent mises en œuvres par Margaret Thatcher et Ronald Reagan. A la même époque, Deng Xiaoping, suivant la même idéologie (« être riche, c’est être glorieux »), initia des réformes néolibérales similaires en Chine. Et à bien des égards, les réformes en Occident et en Chine ont eu un succès extraordinaire.

Mais elles ont échoué à offrir une société plus heureuse. L’argent, très inégalement distribué, a alimenté la corruption, permis un mode de vie ostentatoire, a rendu triviaux les soucis liés à la pauvreté des autres au travers de fausses organisations-jouets détenues par les riches, a réduit les services sociaux de base dans lesquels l’idée de la citoyenneté était ancrée, comme l’éducation et la santé. Les sociétés occidentales sont devenues beaucoup plus riches, mais, pour reprendre la raillerie de Thatcher, elles sont devenues bien moins sociétés : elles sont souvent seulement des collections d’individus en compétition mutuelle. La Chine est devenue immensément plus riche qu’en 1978, mais c’est l’un des quelques pays dans le monde où les gens sont de moins en moins heureux année après année, selon la World Values Survey. Et les mêmes programmes néolibéraux, mis en œuvre en Russie, après avoir presque détruit le pays, ont conduit à des augmentations massives de la mortalité, ils ont détruit les liens sociaux et les ont remplacés par du cynisme et de l’anomie.

Aussi, pour défaire certains de ces développements, il nous faudra des années de changement. Qui plus est, on ne voit pas même à l’horizon comment ces demandes pour du changement peuvent être traduites dans le processus politique, et comment les politiciens peuvent les utiliser pour gagner des élections. Parce que, tant qu’ils ne les considéreront pas comme des stratégies gagnantes, ils n’iront pas vraiment, l’un après l’autre, concourir sur cette plateforme. Obama a été une grande déception de ce point de vue. Il était chargé d’un mandat massif pour le changement mais a fait peu de choses.

Nous sommes souvent pessimistes ou même cyniques quant à la capacité des politiciens d’offrir du changement. Mais notez que cette capacité, en démocratie, dépend de ce que la population veut. Aussi, peut-être devrions-nous nous tourner davantage vers nous-mêmes que vers les politiciens pour comprendre pourquoi changer le modèle économique actuel est si difficile. Malgré plusieurs effets négatifs du néolibéralisme (que j’ai mentionnés plus haut), un large segment de la population en a bénéficié, et même certains parmi ceux qui n’y ont pas gagné « objectivement » ont totalement internalisé ses valeurs.

Il semble que nous voulions tous une maison achetée sans acompte, nous achetons une deuxième voiture si nous obtenons un crédit pas cher, nous avons des factures sur nos cartes de crédit bien au-delà de nos moyens, nous ne voulons pas d’augmentation des prix de l’essence, nous voulons voyager en avion même si cela génère de la pollution, nous mettons en route la climatisation dès qu’il fait plus de vingt-cinq degrés, nous voulons voir tous les derniers films et DVDs, nous avons plusieurs postes de télévision dernier cri, etc. Nous nous plaignons souvent d’un emploi précaire mais nous ne voulons renoncer à aucun des bénéfices, réels ou faux, qui dérivent de l’approche Reagan/Thatcher de l’économie.

Quand une majorité suffisante de personnes aura un sentiment différent, je suis sûr qu’il y aura des politiciens qui le comprendront, et gagneront des élections avec ce nouveau programme (pro-égalité), et le mettront même en œuvre. Les politiciens sont simplement des entrepreneurs : si des gens veulent une certaine politique, ils l’offriront, de la même manière qu’un établissement vous proposera un café gourmet pourvu qu’un nombre suffisant parmi nous le veuille et soit prêt à payer pour cela.

S.P. – Est-ce que l’inégalité est devenue une devise commune dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, ou bien la prospérité est-elle davantage partagée que par le passé ?

B.M. – L’inégalité globale, l’inégalité entre les citoyens du monde, est à un niveau très élevé depuis vingt ans. Ce niveau est le plus élevé, ou presque, de l’histoire : après la révolution industrielle, certaines classes, et puis certaines nations, sont devenues riches et les autres sont restées pauvres. Cela a élevé l’inégalité globale de 1820 à environ 1970-80. Après cela, elle est restée sans tendance claire, mais à ce niveau élevé. Mais depuis les dix dernières années, grâce aux taux de croissance importants en Chine et en Inde, il se peut que nous commencions à voir un déclin de l’inégalité globale. Si ces tendances se poursuivent sur les vingt ou trente prochaines années, l’inégalité globale pourrait baisser substantiellement. Mais l’on ne devrait pas oublier que cela dépend crucialement de ce qui se passe en Chine, et que d’autres pays pauvres et populeux comme le Nigeria, le Bangladesh, les Philippines, le Soudan, etc., n’ont pas eu beaucoup de croissance économique. Avec la croissance de leur population, il se peut qu’ils poussent l’inégalité globale vers le haut.

D’un autre côté, le monde est plus riche aujourd’hui qu’à n’importe quel autre moment dans l’histoire. Il n’y a aucun doute sur ce point. Le 20e siècle a été justement appelé par [l’historien britannique] Eric Hosbawm « le siècle des extrêmes » : jamais des progrès aussi importants n’avaient été réalisés auparavant pour autant de monde, et jamais autant de monde n’avait été tué et exterminé par des idéologies extrêmes. Le défi du 21e siècle est de mettre fin à ce dernier point. Mais les développements de la première décennie de ce siècle n’ont pas produit beaucoup de raisons d’être optimiste.

S.P. – Quel serait le meilleur moyen de limiter les inégalités dans un monde globalisé ?

B.M. – Il y a trois moyens pour s’y prendre. Le premier est une plus grande redistribution du monde riche vers le monde pauvre. Mais l’on peut aisément écarter ce chemin. L’aide au développement officielle totale est un peu au-dessus de 100 milliards de dollars par an, ce qui est à peu près équivalent à la somme payée en bonus pour les « bonnes performances » par Goldman Sachs depuis le début de la crise. De telles sommes ne seront pas une solution à la pauvreté mondiale ou à l’inégalité globale, et de plus, ces fonds vont diminuer dans la mesure où le monde riche a du mal à s’extraire de la crise.

La deuxième manière consiste à accélérer la croissance dans les pays pauvres, et l’Afrique en particulier. C’est en fait la meilleure façon de s’attaquer à la pauvreté et à l’inégalité tout à la fois. Mais c’est plus facile à dire qu’à faire. Même si la dernière décennie a été bonne généralement pour l’Afrique, le bilan global pour l’ère post-indépendance est mauvais, et dans certains cas, catastrophiquement mauvais. Ceci étant, je ne suis pas tout à fait pessimiste. L’Afrique sub-saharienne a commencé à mettre de l’ordre dans certains de ses problèmes, et pourrait continuer à avoir des taux de croissance relativement élevés. Cependant, le fossé entre les revenus moyens d’Afrique et d’Europe est désormais si profond, qu’il faudrait quelques centaines d’années pour l’entamer significativement.

Ce qui nous laisse une troisième solution pour réduire les disparités globales : la migration. En principe, ça n’est pas différent du fait d’accélérer la croissance du revenu dans un quelconque pays pauvre. La seule différence – mais politiquement c’est une différence significative – est qu’une personne pauvre améliore son sort en déménageant ailleurs plutôt qu’en restant là où elle est née. La migration est certainement l’outil le plus efficace pour la réduction de l’inégalité globale. Ouvrir les frontières de l’Europe et des États-Unis permettrait d’attirer des millions de migrants et leurs niveaux de vie s’élèveraient. On voit cela tous les jours à une moindre échelle, mais on l’a vu également à la fin du 19e siècle et au début du 20e siècle, quand les migrations étaient deux à cinq fois supérieures (en proportion de la population d’alors) à aujourd’hui. La plupart de ceux qui migraient augmentaient leurs revenus.

Cependant il y a deux problèmes importants avec la migration. Premièrement, cela mènerait à des revenus plus bas pour certaines personnes vivant dans les pays d’accueil, et elles utiliseraient (comme elles le font actuellement) tous les moyens politiques pour l’arrêter. Deuxièmement, cela crée parfois un « clash des civilisations » inconfortable quand des normes culturelles différentes se heurtent les unes aux autres. Cela produit un retour de bâton, qui est évident aujourd’hui en Europe. C’est une réaction compréhensible, même si beaucoup d’Européens devraient peut-être réfléchir à l’époque où ils émigraient, que ce soit de manière pacifique ou de manière violente, vers le reste du monde, et combien ils y trouvaient des avantages. Il semble maintenant que la boucle soit bouclée : les autres émigrent vers l’Europe.

Entretien réalisé et traduit de l’anglais par Niels Planel.

Voir aussi:
Workers of the Western world
Chrystia Freeland
Reuters
Dec 2, 2011

(Reuters) – Branko Milanovic has some good news for the squeezed Western middle class – and also some bad news.

Good news first: The past 150 years have been an astonishing economic victory for the workers of the Western world. The bad news is that workers in the developing world have been left out, and their entry into the global economy will have complex and uneven consequences.

Milanovic’s first conclusion is contrarian, at least in its tone. After all, with unemployment in the United States at more than 9 percent and Europe struggling to muddle through its most serious economic crisis since the Second World War, Western workers are feeling anything but triumphant.

But one of the pleasures of Milanovic’s work is a point of view that is both wide and deep.

Milanovic, a World Bank economist who earned his doctorate in his native Yugoslavia, has an intuitively international frame of reference. Both qualities are in evidence in « Global Inequality: From Class to Location, From Proletarians to Migrants, » a working paper released this autumn by the World Bank Development Research Group.

Milanovic contends that the big economic story of the past 150 years is the triumph of the proletariat in the industrialized world. His starting point is 1848 when Europe was convulsed in revolution, industrialization was beginning to really bite, and Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels published the Communist Manifesto.

Their central assertion, Milanovic writes, was that capitalists (and their class allies, the landowners) exploited workers, and that the workers of the world were equally and similarly oppressed.

It turns out that Marx and Engels were pretty good economic reporters. Surveying the economic history literature, Milanovic finds that between 1800 and 1849, the wage of an unskilled laborer in India, one of the poorest countries at the time, was 30 percent that of an equivalent worker in England, one of the richest. Here is another data point: in the 1820s, real wages in the Netherlands were just 70 percent higher than those in the Yangtze Valley in China.

But Marx and Engels did not do as well as economic forecasters. They predicted that oppression of the proletariat would get worse, creating an international – and internationally exploited – working class.

Instead, Milanovic shows that over the subsequent century and a half, industrial capitalism hugely enriched the workers in the countries where it flourished – and widened the gap between them and workers in those parts of the world where it did not take hold.

One way to understand what has happened, Milanovic says, is to use a measure of global inequality developed by François Bourguignon and Christian Morrisson in a 2002 paper. They calculated the global Gini coefficient, a popular measure of inequality, to have been 53 in 1850, with roughly half due to location – or inequality between countries – and half due to class. By Milanovic’s calculation, the global Gini coefficient had risen to 65.4 by 2005. The striking change, though, is in its composition: 85 percent is due to location, and just 15 percent due to class.

Comparable wages in developed and developing countries are another way to illustrate the gap. Milanovic uses the 2009 global prices and earnings report compiled by UBS, the Swiss bank. This showed that the nominal after-tax wage for a building laborer in New York was $16.60 an hour, compared with 80 cents in Beijing, 60 cents in Nairobi and 50 cents in New Delhi, a gap that is orders of magnitude greater than the one in the 19th century.

Interestingly, at a time when unskilled workers are the ones we worry are getting the rawest deal, the difference in earnings between New York engineers and their developing world counterparts is much smaller: engineers earn $26.50 an hour in New York, $5.80 in Beijing, $4 in Nairobi and $2.90 in New Delhi.

Milanovic has two important takeaways from all of this. The first is that in the past century and a half, « the specter of communism » in the Western world « was exorcised » because industrial capitalism did such a good job of enriching the erstwhile proletariat. His second conclusion is that the big cleavage in the world today is not between classes within countries, but between the rich West and the poor developing world. As a result, he predicts « huge migratory pressures because people can increase their incomes several-fold if they migrate. »

I wonder, though, if the disparity Milanovic documents is already creating a different shift in the global economy. Thanks to new communications and transportation technologies, and the opening up of the world economy, immigration is not the only way to match cheap workers from developing economies with better-paid jobs in the developing world. Another way to do it is to move jobs to where workers live.

Economists are not the only ones who can read the UBS research – business people do, too. And some of them are concluding, as one hedge fund manager said at a recent dinner speech in New York, that « the low-skilled American worker is the most overpaid worker in the world. »

At a time when Western capitalism is huffing and wheezing, Milanovic’s paper is a vivid reminder of how much it has accomplished. But he also highlights the big new challenge – how to bring the rewards of capitalism to the workers of the developing world at a time when the standard of living of their Western counterparts has stalled.

(Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

Voir également:

Thy Neighbor’s Wealth
Catherine Rampell
NYT
January 28, 2011

Who needs to keep up with the Joneses? What people really care about is keeping up with the Rockefellers. That’s the main theme of “The Haves and the Have-Nots,” an eclectic book on inequality that attempts to document the long history of coveting by the poor, and the grim consequences of that coveting.

THE HAVES AND THE HAVE-NOTS

A Brief and Idiosyncratic History of Global Inequality

By Branko Milanovic

258 pp. Basic Books. $27.95.
Written by the World Bank economist and development specialist Branko Milanovic, this survey of income distribution past and present is constructed as a sort of textbook-almanac hybrid. It revolves around three technical essays summarizing the academic literature on inequality, which are each followed by a series of quick-hit vignettes about quirkier subjects, like how living standards in 19th-century Russia may have influenced Anna Karenina’s doomed romance, or who the richest person in history was.

The first essay is a primer on how economists think about income inequality within a country — in particular, how it is measured, and how it is related to a country’s overall economic health. At a very basic, agrarian level of development, Milanovic explains, people’s incomes are relatively equal; everyone is living at or close to subsistence level. But as more advanced technologies become available and enable workers to differentiate their skills, a gulf between rich and poor becomes possible.

This section also gingerly approaches the contentious debate over whether inequality is good or bad for economic growth, but ultimately quibbles with the question itself. “There is ‘good’ and ‘bad’ inequality,” Milanovic writes, “just as there is good and bad cholesterol.” The possibility of unequal economic outcomes motivates people to work harder, he argues, although at some point it can lead to the preservation of acquired positions, which causes economies to stagnate.

In his second and third essays, Milanovic switches to his obvious passion: inequality around the world. These sections encourage readers to better appreciate their own living standards and to think more skeptically about who is responsible for their success.

As Milanovic notes, an astounding 60 percent of a person’s income is determined merely by where she was born (and an additional 20 percent is dictated by how rich her parents were). He also makes interesting international comparisons. The typical person in the top 5 percent of the Indian population, for example, makes the same as or less than the typical person in the bottom 5 percent of the American population. That’s right: America’s poorest are, on average, richer than India’s richest — extravagant Mumbai mansions notwithstanding.

It is no wonder then, Milanovic says, that so many from the third world risk life and limb to sneak into the first. A recent World Bank survey suggested that “countries that have done economically poorly would, if free migration were allowed, remain perhaps without half or more of their populations.” Mass-migration attempts are met with sealed borders in the developed world, which then results in the deaths of thousands of anonymous indigents journeying to promised lands only to be swallowed up by the Mediterranean or charred in the Arizona desert.

But while Milanovic demonstrates that inequality between countries is unquestionably toxic, he is less persuasive about the effects of inequality within countries. He frequently assumes that this kind of inequality is by its very nature problematic, but provides scant historical evidence about why, particularly if mobility is ­possible.

In general, mobility — and the policies that promote it — are given disappointingly little space. The same goes for how income inequality might affect the functioning of a democracy.

As a result of such blind spots, “The Haves and the Have-Nots” can feel somewhat patchy or disorganized at times. Milanovic’s more colorful vignettes, on the other hand, are almost uniformly delightful. No matter where you are on the income ladder, Milanovic’s examination of whether Bill Gates is richer than Nero makes for great cocktail party ­conversation.

Catherine Rampell is the economics editor at NYTimes.com.

Voir encore:

The frontiers of inequality
The Economist
Free Exchange | Washington, DC
Dec 6th 2007

AN inventive October NBER paper by Branko Milanovic, Peter H. Lindert, Jeffrey G. Williamson sets itself the task of « Measuring Ancient Inequality ». Therein the authors develop two new interesting concepts: the inequality possibility frontier, which sets the limit of possible inequality, and the extraction ratio, the ratio between the feasible maximum and the actual level of inequality. The idea in a nutshell is that the higher a society’s mean income, the more there is for the ruling class possibly to take. So how much of that have they actually been taking historically, and how does it differ from today?

Amidst a great deal of interesting discussion of the problems inherent in estimating incomes and their distribution in ye olden times, Messrs Milanovic, Lindert, and Williamson find that the extraction ratio in pre-industrial societies of yore were much higher than in pre-industrial nations today, although their actual levels of inequality (as measured by the Gini coefficient) are very similar. A really, really poor country may have a low level of actual inequality, since even the rich have so little. But they may have nevetheless taken all they can get from the less powerful. A richer and nominally less equal place may also be rather less bandit-like; the powerful could hoard more, but they don’t. Because potential and actual inequality come apart, measured actual inequality may therefore tell us less than we think. For example:

Tanzania … with a relatively low Gini of 35 may be less egalitarian than it appears since measured inequality lies so close to (or indeed above) its inequality possibility frontier. … On the other hand, with a much higher Gini of almost 48, Malaysia … has extracted only about one-half of maximum inequality, and thus is farther away from the IPF.
Likewise:

As a country becomes richer, its feasible inequality expands. Consequently, if recorded inequality is stable, the inequality extraction ratio must fall; and even if recorded inequality goes up, the ratio may not.
I have some serious philosophical qualms about they way the authors construct the idea of the inequality possibility frontier, and about the bias inherent in thinking of inequality as necessarily involving some kind of « extraction »–though I don’t doubt that as a historical rule it has. Nevertheless, this work contains the germ of an important advance in thinking about inequality.

First, it moves us away from the sheer craziness of thinking about levels of inequality in isolation from levels of income. Second, it moves us toward thinking about the relationship between the mechanisms of growth and the mechanisms responsible for patterns of income.

For example, robust property rights and effective constraints on predation by and through the state should help explain both economic growth and a falling or stable extraction ratio.

The great cause of inequality is political power. As the authors put it:

The frequent claim that inequality promotes accumulation and growth does not get much support from history. On the contrary, great economic inequality has always been correlated with extreme concentration of political power, and that power has always been used to widen the income gaps through rent-seeking and rent-keeping, forces that demonstrably retard economic growth.
The implication is that a system that limits political power, and keeps rent-seeking to a minimum, will tend to grow, other things equal. Now, my question is this: If there is a way to prevent the economic inequality that emerges through the process of economic exchange from translating into concentrayed political power, such that whatever level of inequality emerges over time is not in fact due to « extraction »–not due to predation, rent-seeking, or anyone’s rigging the system in their favour–then should it still worry us?

Who Was the Richest Person Ever?
Marcus Crassus, John D. Rockefeller, Carlos Slim, Mikhail Khodorovsky — who’s the richest of them all?
By Branko Milanovic, October 21, 2011

When the richissime decide to play a political role in their own countries, then their power there may exceed even the power of the most globally rich.

Mikhail Khodorovsky was richer, and potentially more powerful, than Rockefeller in the United States in 1937.

No stadium in Mexico, not even the famous Azteca, would come close to accommodating all the compatriots Mr. Slim could hire with his annual income.

Crassus’s income was equal to the annual incomes of about 32,000 people, a crowd that would fill about half of the Colosseum.

Comparing incomes from the past with those of the present is not easy. We do not have an exchange rate that would convert Roman sesterces or Castellan 17th-century pesos into dollars of equal purchasing power today.

Even more, what “equal purchasing power” might mean in that case is far from clear. “Equal purchasing power” should mean that one is able to buy with X Roman sesterces the same bundle of goods and services as with Y U.S. dollars today. But not only have the bundles changed (no DVDs in Roman times), but were we to constrain the bundle to cover only the goods that existed both then and now, we would soon find that the relative prices have changed substantially.

Services then were relatively cheap (because wages were low). Nowadays, services in rich countries are expensive. The reverse would be true for bread or olive oil. Thus, to compare the wealth and income of the rich in several historical periods, the most reasonable approach is to situate them in their historical context and measure their economic power in terms of their ability to purchase human labor (of average skill) at that time and place.

In some sense, a given quantum of human labor is a universal yardstick with which we measure welfare. As Adam Smith wrote more than 200 years ago, “[A person] must be rich or poor according to the quantity of labor which he can command.” Moreover, this quantum embodies improvements in productivity and welfare over time, since the income of somebody like Bill Gates today will be measured against the average incomes of people who currently live in the United States.

A natural place to start is ancient Rome, for which we have data on the extremely wealthy individuals and whose economy was sufficiently “modern” and monetized to make comparisons with the present, or more recent past, meaningful. We can consider three individuals from the classic Roman age.

The fabulously rich triumvir Marcus Crassus’s fortune was estimated around the year 50 BCE at some 200 million sesterces (HS). The emperor Octavian Augustus’s imperial household fortune was estimated at 250 million HS around the year 14 CE. Finally, the enormously rich freedman Marcus Antonius Pallas (under Nero) is thought to have been worth 300 million HS in the year 52.

Take Crassus, who has remained associated with extravagant affluence (not to be confused, though, with the Greek king Croesus, whose name has become eponymous with wealth). With 200 million sesterces and an average annual interest rate of 6% (which was considered a “normal” interest rate in the Roman “golden age” — that is, before the inflation of the third century), Crassus’s annual income could be estimated at 12 million HS.

The mean income of Roman citizens around the time of Octavian’s death (14 CE) is thought to have been about 380 sesterces per annum, and we can assume that it was about the same 60 years earlier, when Crassus lived. Thus expressed, Crassus’s income was equal to the annual incomes of about 32,000 people, a crowd that would fill about half of the Colosseum.

Let us fast-forward more closely to the present and apply the same reasoning to three American wealth icons: Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller and Bill Gates. Carnegie’s fortune reached its peak in 1901 when he purchased U.S. Steel. His share in U.S. Steel was $225 million. Applying the same return of 6%, and using U.S. GDP per capita (in 1901 prices) of $282, allows us to conclude that Carnegie’s income exceeded that of Crassus.

With his annual income, Carnegie could have purchased the labor of almost 48,000 people at the time without making any dent in his fortune. (Notice that in all these calculations, we assume that the wealth of the richissime individual remains intact. He simply uses his annual income, that is, yield from his wealth, to purchase labor.)

An equivalent calculation for Rockefeller, taking his wealth at its 1937 peak ($1.4 billion), yields Rockefeller’s income to be equal to that of about 116,000 people in the United States in the year 1937. Thus, Rockefeller was almost four times as rich as Crassus and more than twice as rich as Andrew Carnegie. The people whom he could hire would easily fill Pasadena’s Rose Bowl, and even quite a few would have remained outside the gates.

How does Bill Gates fare in this kind of comparison? Bill Gates’s fortune in 2005 was put by Forbes at $50 billion. Income could then be estimated at $3 billion annually, and since the U.S. GDP per capita in 2005 was about $40,000, Bill Gates could, with his income, command about 75,000 workers. This places him somewhere between Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller, but much above the “poor” Marcus Crassus.

But this calculation leaves open the question of how to treat billionaires such as the Russian Mikhail Khodorovsky and Mexican Carlos Slim, who are both “global” and “national.” Khodorovsky’s wealth, at the time when he was the richest man in Russia in 2003, was estimated at $24 billion.

Globally speaking, he was much less rich than Bill Gates. Yet if we assess his fortune locally and again use the same assumptions as before, he was able to buy more than a quarter million annual units of labor, at their average price. In other words, contrasted with the relatively low incomes of his countrymen, Mikhail Khodorovsky was richer, and potentially more powerful, than Rockefeller in the United States in 1937. It is probably this latter fact — the potential political power — that brought him to the attention of the Kremlin.

Without touching a penny of his wealth, Khodorovsky could, if need be, create an army of a quarter-million people. He was negotiating with both the Americans and the Chinese, almost as a state would, the construction of new gas and oil pipelines. Such potential power met its nemesis in his downfall and eventual jailing. However, Russian history being what it is, the shortest way between two stints in power often takes one through a detour in Siberia. We might not have seen the last of Mr. Khodorovsky.

The Mexican Carlos Slim does Khodorovsky one better. His wealth, also according to Forbes magazine, prior to the global financial crisis in 2009, was estimated at more than $53 billion. Using the same calculation as before, we find that Slim could command even more labor than Khodorovsky at his peak: some 440,000 Mexicans. So he appears to have been, locally, the richest of all! No stadium in Mexico, not even the famous Azteca, would come close to accommodating all the compatriots Mr. Slim could hire with his annual income.

Another complication that may be introduced is the size of populations. When Crassus lived and commanded the labor incomes of 32,000 people, this represented one out of each 1,500 people living in the Roman Empire at the time. Rockefeller’s 116,000 Americans were a higher proportion of the U.S. population: one person out of each 1,100 people. Thus, in both respects Rockefeller beats Crassus.

Can we then say who was the richest of them all? Since the wealthy also tend to go “global” and measure their wealth against the wealth of other rich people living in different countries, it was probably Rockefeller who was the richest of all because he was able to command the highest number of labor units in the then-richest country in the world.

But when the richissime decide to play a political role in their own countries (which may not be the richest countries in the world, such as, for example, Russia and Mexico), then their power there may exceed even the power of the most globally rich.

Editor’s Note: This feature is adapted from THE HAVES AND THE HAVE-NOTS: A BRIEF AND IDIOSYNCRATIC HISTORY OF GLOBAL INEQUALITY by Branko Milanovic. Copyright Basic Books 2011. Reprinted with the permission of the publisher.

Voir enfin:

Rémi Fraisse, victime d’une guerre de civilisation

Edgar Morin (Sociologue et philosophe)

Le Monde

04.11.2014

A l’image d’Astérix défendant un petit bout périphérique de Bretagne face à un immense empire, les opposants au barrage de Sivens semblent mener une résistance dérisoire à une énorme machine bulldozerisante qui ravage la planète animée par la soif effrénée du gain. Ils luttent pour garder un territoire vivant, empêcher la machine d’installer l’agriculture industrialisée du maïs, conserver leur terroir, leur zone boisée, sauver une oasis alors que se déchaîne la désertification monoculturelle avec ses engrais tueurs de sols, tueurs de vie, où plus un ver de terre ne se tortille ou plus un oiseau ne chante.

Cette machine croit détruire un passé arriéré, elle détruit par contre une alternative humaine d’avenir. Elle a détruit la paysannerie, l’exploitation fermière à dimension humaine. Elle veut répandre partout l’agriculture et l’élevage à grande échelle. Elle veut empêcher l’agro-écologie pionnière. Elle a la bénédiction de l’Etat, du gouvernement, de la classe politique. Elle ne sait pas que l’agro-écologie crée les premiers bourgeons d’un futur social qui veut naître, elle ne sait pas que les « écolos » défendent le « vouloir vivre ensemble ».

Elle ne sait pas que les îlots de résistance sont des îlots d’espérance. Les tenants de l’économie libérale, de l’entreprise über alles, de la compétitivité, de l’hyper-rentabilité, se croient réalistes alors que le calcul qui est leur instrument de connaissance les aveugle sur les vraies et incalculables réalités des vies humaines, joie, peine, bonheur, malheur, amour et amitié.

Le caractère abstrait, anonyme et anonymisant de cette machine énorme, lourdement armée pour défendre son barrage, a déclenché le meurtre d’un jeune homme bien concret, bien pacifique, animé par le respect de la vie et l’aspiration à une autre vie.

Nouvel avenir
A part les violents se disant anarchistes, enragés et inconscients saboteurs, les protestataires, habitants locaux et écologistes venus de diverses régions de France, étaient, en résistant à l’énorme machine, les porteurs et porteuses d’un nouvel avenir.

Le problème du barrage de Sivens est apparemment mineur, local. Mais par l’entêtement à vouloir imposer ce barrage sans tenir compte des réserves et critiques, par l’entêtement de l’Etat à vouloir le défendre par ses forces armées, allant jusqu’à utiliser les grenades, par l’entêtement des opposants de la cause du barrage dans une petite vallée d’une petite région, la guerre du barrage de Sivens est devenue le symbole et le microcosme de la vraie guerre de civilisation qui se mène dans le pays et plus largement sur la planète.

L’eau, qui, comme le soleil, était un bien commun à tous les humains, est devenue objet marchand sur notre planète. Les eaux sont appropriées et captées par des puissances financières et/ou colonisatrices, dérobées aux communautés locales pour bénéficier à des multinationales agricoles ou minières. Partout, au Brésil, au Pérou, au Canada, en Chine… les indigènes et régionaux sont dépouillés de leurs eaux et de leurs terres par la machine infernale, le bulldozer nommé croissance.

Dans le Tarn, une majorité d’élus, aveuglée par la vulgate économique des possédants adoptée par le gouvernement, croient œuvrer pour la prospérité de leur territoire sans savoir qu’ils contribuent à sa désertification humaine et biologique. Et il est accablant que le gouvernement puisse aujourd’hui combattre avec une détermination impavide une juste rébellion de bonnes volontés issue de la société civile.

Pire, il a fait silence officiel embarrassé sur la mort d’un jeune homme de 21 ans, amoureux de la vie, communiste candide, solidaire des victimes de la terrible machine, venu en témoin et non en combattant. Quoi, pas une émotion, pas un désarroi ? Il faut attendre une semaine l’oraison funèbre du président de la République pour lui laisser choisir des mots bien mesurés et équilibrés alors que la force de la machine est démesurée et que la situation est déséquilibrée en défaveur des lésés et des victimes.

Ce ne sont pas les lancers de pavés et les ­vitres brisées qui exprimeront la cause non violente de la civilisation écologisée dont la mort de Rémi Fraisse est devenue le ­symbole, l’emblème et le martyre. C’est avec une grande prise de conscience, capable de relier toutes les initiatives alternatives au productivisme aveugle, qu’un véritable hommage peut être rendu à Rémi Fraisse.

Voir par ailleurs:

The Ultimate Global Antipoverty Program
Extreme poverty fell to 15% in 2011, from 36% in 1990. Credit goes to the spread of capitalism.
Douglas A. Irwin
WSJ
Nov. 2, 2014

The World Bank reported on Oct. 9 that the share of the world population living in extreme poverty had fallen to 15% in 2011 from 36% in 1990. Earlier this year, the International Labor Office reported that the number of workers in the world earning less than $1.25 a day has fallen to 375 million 2013 from 811 million in 1991.

Such stunning news seems to have escaped public notice, but it means something extraordinary: The past 25 years have witnessed the greatest reduction in global poverty in the history of the world.

To what should this be attributed? Official organizations noting the trend have tended to waffle, but let’s be blunt: The credit goes to the spread of capitalism. Over the past few decades, developing countries have embraced economic-policy reforms that have cleared the way for private enterprise.

China and India are leading examples. In 1978 China began allowing private agricultural plots, permitted private businesses, and ended the state monopoly on foreign trade. The result has been phenomenal economic growth, higher wages for workers—and a big decline in poverty. For the most part all the government had to do was get out of the way. State-owned enterprises are still a large part of China’s economy, but the much more dynamic and productive private sector has been the driving force for change.

In 1991 India started dismantling the “license raj”—the need for government approval to start a business, expand capacity or even purchase foreign goods like computers and spare parts. Such policies strangled the Indian economy for decades and kept millions in poverty. When the government stopped suffocating business, the Indian economy began to flourish, with faster growth, higher wages and reduced poverty.

The economic progress of China and India, which are home to more than 35% of the world’s population, explains much of the global poverty decline. But many other countries, from Colombia to Vietnam, have enacted their own reforms.

Even Africa is showing signs of improvement. In the 1970s and 1980s, Julius Nyerere and his brand of African socialism made Tanzania the darling of Western intellectuals. But the policies behind the slogans—agricultural collectives, nationalization and price controls, which were said to foster “self-reliance” and “equitable development”—left the economy in ruins. After a new government threw off the policy shackles in the mid-1980s, growth and poverty reduction have been remarkable.

The reduction in world poverty has attracted little attention because it runs against the narrative pushed by those hostile to capitalism. The Michael Moores of the world portray capitalism as a degrading system in which the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. Yet thanks to growth in the developing world, world-wide income inequality—measured across countries and individual people—is falling, not rising, as Branko Milanovic of City University of New York and other researchers have shown.

College students and other young Americans are often confronted with a picture of global capitalism as something that resembles the “dark satanic mills” invoked by William Blake in “Jerusalem,” not a potential escape from horrendous rural poverty. Young Americans ages 18-29 have a positive view of socialism and a negative view of capitalism, according to a 2011 Pew Research poll. About half of American millennials view socialism favorably, compared with 13% of Americans age 65 and older.

Capitalism’s bad rap grew out of a false analogy that linked the term with “exploitation.” Marxists thought the old economic system in which landlords exploited peasants (feudalism) was being replaced by a new economic system in which capital owners exploited industrial workers (capitalism). But Adam Smith had earlier provided a more accurate description of the economy: a “commercial society.” The poorest parts of the world are precisely those that are cut off from the world of markets and commerce, often because of government policies.

Some 260 years ago, Smith noted that: “Little else is requisite to carry a state to the highest degree of opulence from the lowest barbarism, but peace, easy taxes, and a tolerable administration of justice; all the rest being brought about by the natural course of things.” Very few countries fulfill these simple requirements, but the number has been growing. The result is a dramatic improvement in human well-being around the world, an outcome that is cause for celebration.

Mr. Irwin is a professor of economics and co-director of the Political Economy Project at Dartmouth College.

Voir aussi:

The Berlin Wall Fell, but Communism Didn’t
From North Korea to Cuba, millions still live under tyrannous regimes.
Marion Smith
WSJ
Nov. 6, 2014

As the world marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall on Nov. 9, 1989, we should also remember the many dozens of people who died trying to get past it.

Ida Siekmann, the wall’s first casualty, died jumping out of her fourth-floor window while attempting to escape from East Berlin in August 1961. In January 1973, a young mother named Ingrid hid with her infant son in a crate in the back of a truck crossing from East to West. When the child began to cry at the East Berlin checkpoint, a desperate Ingrid covered his mouth with her hand, not realizing the child had an infection and couldn’t breathe through his nose. She made her way to freedom, but in the process suffocated her 15-month-old son. Chris Gueffroy, an East German buoyed by the ease of tensions between East and West in early 1989, believed that the shoot-on-sight order for the Berlin Wall had been lifted. He was mistaken. Gueffroy would be the last person shot attempting to flee Communist-occupied East Berlin.

But Gueffroy was far from the last victim of communism. Millions of people are still ruled by Communist regimes in places like Pyongyang, Hanoi and Havana.

As important as the fall of the Berlin Wall was, it was not the end of what John F. Kennedy called the “long, twilight struggle” against a sinister ideology. By looking at the population statistics of several nations we can estimate that 1.5 billion people still live under communism. Political prisoners continue to be rounded up, gulags still exist, millions are being starved, and untold numbers are being torn from families and friends simply because of their opposition to a totalitarian state.

Today, Communist regimes continue to brutalize and repress the hapless men, women and children unlucky enough to be born in the wrong country.

In China, thousands of Hong Kong protesters recently took to the streets demanding the right to elect their chief executive in open and honest elections. This democratic movement—the most important protests in China since the Tiananmen Square demonstrations and massacre 25 years ago—was met with tear gas and pepper spray from a regime that does not tolerate dissent or criticism. The Communist Party routinely censors, beats and jails dissidents, and through the barbaric one-child policy has caused some 400 million abortions, according to statements by a Chinese official in 2011.

In Vietnam, every morning the unelected Communist government blasts state-sponsored propaganda over loud speakers across Hanoi, like a scene out of George Orwell ’s “1984.”

In Laos, where the Lao People’s Revolutionary Party tolerates no other political parties, the government owns all the media, restricts religious freedom, denies property rights, jails dissidents and tortures prisoners.

In Cuba, a moribund Communist junta maintains a chokehold on the island nation. Arbitrary arrests, beatings, intimidation and total media control are among the tools of the current regime, which has never owned up to its bloody past.

The Stalinesque abuses of North Korea are among the most shocking. As South Korea’s President Park Geun-hye recently told the United Nations, “This year marks the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, but the Korean Peninsula remains stifled by a wall of division.” On both sides of that wall—a 400-mile-long, 61-year-old demilitarized zone—are people with the same history, language and often family.

But whereas the capitalist South is free and prosperous, the Communist North is a prison of torture and starvation run by a family of dictators at war with freedom of religion, freedom of movement and freedom of thought. President Park is now challenging the U.N. General Assembly “to stand with us in tearing down the world’s last remaining wall of division.”

To tear down that wall will require the same moral clarity that brought down the concrete and barbed-wire barrier that divided Berlin 25 years ago. The Cold War may be over, but the battle on behalf of human freedom is still being waged every day. The triumph of liberty we celebrate on this anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s destruction must not be allowed to turn to complacency in the 21st century. Victory in the struggle against totalitarian oppression is far from inevitable, but this week we remember that it can be achieved.

Voir enfin:

The Most Senseless Environmental Crime of the 20th Century
Charles Homans
Pacific & Standard
November 12, 2013

Fifty years ago 180,000 whales disappeared from the oceans without a trace, and researchers are still trying to make sense of why. Inside the most irrational environmental crime of the century.

In the fall of 1946,  a 508-foot ship steamed out of the port of Odessa, Ukraine. In a previous life she was called the Wikinger (“Viking”) and sailed under the German flag, but she had been appropriated by the Soviet Union after the war and renamed the Slava (“Glory”). The Slava was a factory ship, crewed and equipped to separate one whale every 30 minutes into its useful elements, destined for oil, canned meat and liver, and bone meal. Sailing with her was a retinue of smaller, nimbler catcher vessels, their purpose betrayed by the harpoon guns mounted atop each clipper bow. They were bound for the whaling grounds off the coast of Antarctica. It was the first time Soviet whalers had ventured so far south.

The work began inauspiciously. In her first season, the Slava caught just 386 whales. But by the fifth—before which the fleet’s crew wrote a letter to Stalin pledging to bring home more than 500 tons of whale oil—the Slava’s annual catch was approaching 2,000. The next year it was 3,000. Then, in 1957, the ship’s crew discovered dense conglomerations of humpback whales to the north, off the coasts of Australia and New Zealand. There were so many of them, packed so close together, the Slava’s helicopter pilots joked that they could make an emergency landing on the animals’ backs.

In November 1959, the Slava was joined by a new fleet led by the Sovetskaya Ukraina, the largest whaling factory ship the world had ever seen. By now the harpooners—talented marksmen whose work demanded the dead-eyed calm of a sniper—were killing whales faster than the factory ships could process them. Sometimes the carcasses would drift alongside the ships until the meat spoiled, and the flensers would simply strip them of the blubber—a whaler on another fleet likened the process to peeling a banana—and heave the rest back into the sea.

The Soviet fleets killed almost 13,000 humpback whales in the 1959-60 season and nearly as many the next, when the Slava and Sovetskaya Ukraina were joined by a third factory ship, the Yuriy Dolgorukiy. It was grueling work: One former whaler, writing years later in a Moscow newspaper, claimed that five or six Soviet crewmen died on the Southern Hemisphere expeditions each year, and that a comparable number went mad. A scientist working aboard a factory ship in the Antarctic on a later voyage described seeing a deckhand lose his footing on a blubber-slicked deck and catch his legs in a coil of whale intestine as it slid overboard. By the time his mates were able to retrieve him from the water he had succumbed to hypothermia. He was buried at sea, lowered into the water with a pair of harpoons to weight down his body.

Still, whaling jobs were well-paying and glamorous by Soviet standards. Whalers got to see the world and stock up on foreign products that were prized on the black market back home, and were welcomed with parades when they returned. When a fourth factory ship, the Sovetskaya Rossiya, prepared for her maiden voyage from the remote eastern naval port of Vladivostok in 1961, the men and women who found positions onboard would have considered themselves lucky.

When the Sovetskaya Rossiya reached the western coast of Australia late that year, however, the whalers found themselves in a desert ocean. By the end of the season the ship had managed to round up only a few hundred animals, many of them calves—what the whalers called “small-sized gloves.” Harpooners on the other fleets’ catcher ships, too, accustomed to the miraculous abundance of years past, now looked upon a blank horizon. Alfred Berzin, a scientist aboard the Sovetskaya Rossiya, offered an alarmed and unequivocal summary in his seasonal report to the state fisheries ministry. “In five years of intensive whaling by first one, then two, three, and finally four fleets,” he wrote, the populations of humpback whales off the coasts of Australia and New Zealand “were so reduced in abundance that we can now say that they are completely destroyed!”

It was one of the fastest decimations of an animal population in world history—and it had happened almost entirely in secret. The Soviet Union was a party to the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, a 1946 treaty that limited countries to a set quota of whales each year. By the time a ban on commercial whaling went into effect, in 1986, the Soviets had reported killing a total of 2,710 humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. In fact, the country’s fleets had killed nearly 18 times that many, along with thousands of unreported whales of other species. It had been an elaborate and audacious deception: Soviet captains had disguised ships, tampered with scientific data, and misled international authorities for decades. In the estimation of the marine biologists Yulia Ivashchenko, Phillip Clapham, and Robert Brownell, it was “arguably one of the greatest environmental crimes of the 20th century.”

The Aleut, the Soviet Union’s oldest factory ship, works off the coast of Kamchatka in 1958. (Photo: Yulia Ivashchenko)
It was also a perplexing one. Environmental crimes are, generally speaking, the most rational of crimes. The upsides are obvious: Fortunes have been made selling contraband rhino horns and mahogany or helping toxic waste disappear, and the risks are minimal—poaching, illegal logging, and dumping are penalized only weakly in most countries, when they’re penalized at all.

The Soviet whale slaughter followed no such logic. Unlike Norway and Japan, the other major whaling nations of the era, the Soviet Union had little real demand for whale products. Once the blubber was cut away for conversion into oil, the rest of the animal, as often as not, was left in the sea to rot or was thrown into a furnace and reduced to bone meal—a low-value material used for agricultural fertilizer, made from the few animal byproducts that slaughterhouses and fish canneries can’t put to more profitable use. “It was a good product,” Dmitri Tormosov, a scientist who worked on the Soviet fleets, wryly recalls, “but maybe not so important as to support a whole whaling industry.”

This was the riddle the Soviet ships left in their wake: Why did a country with so little use for whales kill so many of them?

“It was a good product,” a scientist who worked on the Russian fleets wryly recalls, “but maybe not so important as to support a whole whaling industry.”
ONE AFTERNOON LAST APRIL, I visited Clapham and Ivashchenko at their home in Seattle, a century-old Craftsman overlooking the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood. When I rapped the mermaid-shaped knocker, the two scientists, who are married, appeared in the doorway together, a study in opposites. Ivashchenko is a 38-year-old willowy blonde of almost translucent complexion; Clapham, a 57-year-old Englishman with the build of a bouncer and arms sleeved in Maori tattoos, looks less like a man who studies whales than one who might have harpooned them 150 years ago.

At their feet was a lanky, elderly dog named Cleo, assembled from various shepherds and wolfhounds, whose fur Ivashchenko had shaved into a Mohawk earlier that day. “We’re going to dye it red,” she said matter-of-factly, as she went into the kitchen to put on a pot of Russian caravan tea. We settled into the book-crammed dining room (on one shelf I noticed a first edition of the 1930 Rockwell Kent–illustrated Moby-Dick). At the head of the table was a mannequin, dressed in a bustier and a Carnival mask.

Ivashchenko’s and Clapham’s research, when I’d first stumbled across it, had struck me as similarly eccentric. The papers they had published over the previous decade, as co-authors and with a handful of colleagues, nearly all concerned a single, obscure historical episode: the voyages the Soviet Union’s whaling fleets made in the middle years of the 20th century. On the most basic level, it was an accounting exercise, an attempt to correct the false records the Soviets had released to the world at the time.

But it was in this space, between the false numbers and the real ones, that the researchers’ work became engrossing in ways that had little to do with marine biology. In gathering the figures, the researchers had also gathered stories that explained how the figures had come to be—the scientist who had stashed heaps of documents in his potato cellar; the whaling ship captain accused of espionage; elaborate acts of high-seas tactical misdirection and disguise usually reserved for navies in battle. The authors, I realized, were assembling not just a scientific record but also a human history, an account of a remarkable collision between political ideology and the natural world—and a lesson for anyone seeking to protect the fragile ecosystems that exist in the world’s least governed spaces.

The first time I called him, Clapham explained that the work had begun around the time of the Soviet Union’s collapse, when an earlier generation of Russian scientists and their foreign colleagues began gathering the fragmented documentary records of the program. The Soviet Union had kept the records secret for years, and many had been lost; the scientists were reconstructing the numbers from files that had been left behind in obscure provincial repositories, or quietly preserved by the scientists themselves.

This was not quite what Ivashchenko had envisioned doing with her life. Growing up in Yaroslavl, a landlocked city northeast of Moscow, she pursued a career in marine biology in part because she imagined it would offer everything Yaroslavl did not: “tropics, dolphins, bikinis.” Instead, she told me, laughing, “I ended up with dusty reports.” On her laptop, she pulled up images of thousands of pages’ worth of files she had found the month before in a municipal archive in Vladivostok, the largest new cache of Soviet whaling documents anyone had discovered since the early 1990s. “We thought that all of this stuff had been shredded,” Clapham said. “There’s still some sensitivity—some of the people who did this are still around.” Instead, it turned out to be a matter of knowing where to look.

COMMERCIAL WHALING WAS BANNED just 27 years ago, but it is difficult to think of the industry as anything other than an exotic holdover from a long-receded age—to imagine anyone sailing a small armada of ships to the end of the Earth to kill an animal the size of a school bus whose flesh, to the uninitiated, would seem too gamey to eat. And yet as recently as the mid-20th century, the waters surrounding Antarctica—the most populous whale habitat on Earth, what the polar explorer Ernest Shackleton half a century earlier called “a veritable playground for these monsters”—were crowded with whaling ships not just from Norway and Japan but also Britain and the Netherlands. Farther north, Australian and New Zealander whalers, operating from shore-based stations, plied their own coastlines. There were so many of them that even in an era when marine ecosystems were poorly understood, the need for some sort of regulations became impossible to ignore.

In December 1946, representatives of the whaling nations gathered in Washington to draw up the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling. “[T]he history of whaling has seen overfishing of one area after another and of one species of whale after another,” the treaty read, “to such a degree that it is essential to protect all species of whales from further overfishing.” The countries that were party to the treaty were limited to an annual quota set by the newly formed International Whaling Commission. But the science guiding the quotas was rudimentary at best, and it was only in 1960 that the IWC enlisted the help of three respected fisheries scientists to take the measure of the hunt’s impact.

One of the three scientists—the only one still living—was Sidney Holt, then working for the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. Reviewing the data from the British and Norwegian fleets, Holt saw quickly that the quotas the IWC had set were vastly too high; both countries’ figures showed that whalers were traveling farther and farther in search of whales whose numbers were shrinking at an ominous pace. When the researchers turned their attention to the Soviet ships’ data, however, they were surprised to find that they looked nothing like the others. “We couldn’t make sense of it at all,” Holt told me recently. “It had no pattern. We didn’t know what the hell was wrong.”

In the following years, observers noticed other differences, too. The Soviet Union had many more ships in the Antarctic than any other country, sometimes twice as many catchers for each factory ship. And they worked differently, sweeping the sea in a line like a naval blockade. Holt had met Alexei Solyanik, the captain of the Slava fleet, on several occasions, and had dined with Soviet scientists onboard the country’s research vessels. (Friends of Holt’s who were well-versed in the Soviet crews’ liberality with their ships’ vodka supplies had instructed him to fortify himself with butter before coming aboard.) But, he recalls, “It never occurred to us in the 1960s that the USSR was falsifying the submitted catch statistics.” And even though later scientists had their suspicions, they were impossible to confirm without access to the Soviets’ own records—which would remain classified until 1993, when a Russian scientist named Alexey Yablokov made a remarkable confession.

Twenty-six years earlier, Yablokov, then a prominent Soviet whale researcher, had met a young American scientist named Robert Brownell at the Moscow airport. The two men had been corresponding for years, and Yablokov urged Brownell to stop by on his way back from a research trip to Japan. For the next three days, Brownell recalls, “Yablokov took me all over, showed me the museums. I asked if I could take photos; he said, ‘Go ahead. If you’re taking pictures of something you’re not supposed to, I’ll stop you.’”

Years later, in late 1990, Brownell’s colleague Peter Best was trying to track down data on right whale fetuses. Right whales were the first whale species to come under international protection, in 1935, and Best had been able to locate records of just 13 fetus specimens. On a hunch, he thought to ask Yablokov. Replying months later, Yablokov reported that he had records of about 150 fetuses. At first, Best recalls, he thought he had misunderstood: 150 fetuses would mean that the Soviets had killed at least one or two thousand members of the most protected whale species in the world.

In fact, it turned out to be more than three thousand. Brownell arranged for Yablokov—now the science adviser to the new Russian president, Boris Yeltsin—to make his confession public, in a short speech before a marine mammalogy conference in Galveston, Texas, in 1993. The catch records the Soviets had given the IWC for decades, Yablokov told the scientists in Galveston, had been almost entirely fictitious. Exactly how wrong they were Yablokov didn’t yet know. The Soviet fisheries ministry had classified its whaling data—even doctoral dissertations based on the numbers couldn’t be made public—and as a matter of protocol had destroyed most of the original records.

Yablokov and Brownell both began piecing together the real figures with the assistance of several scientists who had worked aboard the whaling fleets. (Brownell cheekily dubbed them the Gang of Four.) In some cases, they had preserved clandestine troves of documents for decades in hopes of eventually correcting the historical record. The false figures, they knew, had informed years of thinking about whale conservation and population science. It was possible that much of what scientists outside of Russia believed they understood was wrong.

The most valuable set of records came from the scientist Dmitri Tormosov, who had been stationed aboard the factory ship Yuriy Dolgorukiy beginning in the late 1950s. Tormosov had quietly instructed his colleagues to save their individual catch records—what they called “whale passports”—instead of burning them after the record of the season had been filed, as required by the fisheries ministry. When the collection grew into the tens of thousands of pages, Tormosov moved it into his potato cellar. The records covered 15 whaling seasons, and they allowed the non-Russian scientists to grasp, for the first time, the scale of the killing. Even scientists who for years had harbored suspicions of the Soviets were stunned by the true numbers. “We had no idea it was a systematic taking of everything that was available,” Best told me. “It was amazing they got away with it for so long.”

IN NOVEMBER 1994, A letter arrived at Brownell’s office in La Jolla, California. It was addressed from Alfred Berzin, the scientist who had chronicled the disappearance of the Antarctic’s humpbacks from the deck of the Sovetskaya Rossiya. Berzin had spent his entire career at a government laboratory in Vladivostok, and sailed with several Soviet whaling fleets; he and Brownell had known each other since the 1970s. Brownell remembers that Berzin, more than the other Soviet researchers, seemed burdened by what he had seen, and what he had failed to stop. “Nobody paid any attention to him,” Brownell told me. “I think that affected him.”

Berzin had not kept the volume of records that Tormosov had, but he did seem to have an unusually vivid recollection of the day-to-day details of whaling, and Brownell had once suggested that he write down what he remembered. But they hadn’t discussed the matter further, and Brownell was surprised to find in the envelope a short summary of a memoir Berzin was preparing.

Seven months later, a package arrived from Vladivostok, containing a manuscript written in Russian and bound in a hand-drawn cover. Berzin died the next year, and Brownell, who couldn’t read Russian and didn’t have the funding to have the manuscript translated, filed it away in his desk. It was only a decade later that he thought to give it to Yulia Ivashchenko, who had worked for him in the late 1990s on a research trip in the Russian Far East.

Ivashchenko’s translation—the work remains unpublished in Russian—appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Marine Fisheries Review, a small research journal published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, under the title “The Truth About Soviet Whaling: A Memoir.” It is an uncommonly urgent document, animated by Berzin’s understanding that he had witnessed something much stranger than a simple act of industrialized killing.

The Soviet whalers, Berzin wrote, had been sent forth to kill whales for little reason other than to say they had killed them. They were motivated by an obligation to satisfy obscure line items in the five-year plans that drove the Soviet economy, which had been set with little regard for the Soviet Union’s actual demand for whale products. “Whalers knew that no matter what, the plan must be met!” Berzin wrote. The Sovetskaya Rossiya seemed to contain in microcosm everything Berzin believed to be wrong about the Soviet system: its irrationality, its brutality, its inclination toward crime.

Berzin contrasted the Soviet whalers with the Japanese, who are similarly thought to have caught whales off the books in the Antarctic (though in numbers, scientists believe, far short of the Soviets). The Japanese, motivated as they were by domestic demand for whale meat, were “at least understandable” in their actions, he wrote. “I should not say that as a scientist, but it is possible to understand the difference between a motivated and unmotivated crime.” Japanese whalers made use of 90 percent of the whales they hauled up the spillway; the Soviets, according to Berzin, used barely 30 percent. Crews would routinely return with whales that had been left to rot, “which could not be used for food. This was not regarded as a problem by anybody.”

This absurdity stemmed from an oversight deep in the bowels of the Soviet bureaucracy. Whaling, like every other industry in the Soviet Union, was governed by the dictates of the State Planning Committee of the Council of Ministers, a government organ tasked with meting out production targets. In the grand calculus of the country’s planned economy, whaling was considered a satellite of the fishing industry. This meant that the progress of the whaling fleets was measured by the same metric as the fishing fleets: gross product, principally the sheer mass of whales killed.

Whaling fleets that met or exceeded targets were rewarded handsomely, their triumphs celebrated in the Soviet press and the crews given large bonuses. But failure to meet targets came with harsh consequences. Captains would be demoted and crew members fired; reports to the fisheries ministry would sometimes identify responsible parties by name.

Soviet ships’ officers would have been familiar with the story of Aleksandr Dudnik, the captain of the Aleut, the only factory ship the Soviets owned before World War II. Dudnik was a celebrated pioneer in the Soviet whaling industry, and had received the Order of Lenin—the Communist Party’s highest honor—in 1936. The following year, however, his fleet failed to meet its production targets. When the Aleut fleet docked in Vladivostok in 1938, Dudnik was arrested by the secret police and thrown in jail, where he was interrogated on charges of being a Japanese agent. If his downfall was of a piece with the unique paranoia of the Stalin years, it was also an indelible reminder to captains in the decades that followed. As Berzin wrote, “The plan—at any price!”

Berzin recalled seeing so many spouting humpbacks that their blows reminded him of a forest. Years later, he saw only blubber-stripped carcasses bobbing on the waves.
AS THE PLAN TARGETS rose year after year, they inevitably exceeded what was allowed under the IWC quotas. This meant that the Soviet captains faced a choice: They could be persona non grata at home, or criminals abroad. The scientific report for the Sovetskaya Rossiya fleet’s 1970-71 season noted that the ship captains and harpooners who most frequently violated international whaling regulations also received the most Communist Party honors. “Lies became an inalienable part and perhaps even a foundation of Soviet whaling,” Berzin wrote.

By the mid-1960s, the situation was sufficiently dire that several scientists took the unusual risk of complaining directly to Aleksandr Ishkov, the powerful minister of fisheries resources. When one of them was called in front of Ishkov, he warned the minister that if the whaling practices didn’t change, their grandchildren would live in a world with no whales at all. “Your grandchildren?” Ishkov scoffed. “Your grandchildren aren’t the ones who can remove me from my job.”

By then, there were too few humpbacks left in the Southern Hemisphere to bother hunting, and the Soviet fleets had turned their attention northward, to other species and other oceans—in particular the North Pacific. From 1961 to 1964, Soviet catches in the North Pacific jumped from less than 4,000 whales a year to nearly 13,000. In 1965, a Soviet scientist noted that the blue whale was “commercially extinct” in the North Pacific and would soon be gone entirely. “After one more year of such intensive catches,” another researcher warned of the region’s humpbacks, “whale stocks will be so depleted that it will be impossible to continue any whaling.” Berzin, who had sailed along the Aleutian Islands to the Gulf of Alaska and back aboard the Aleut in the late 1950s, recalled seeing so many spouting humpbacks that their blows reminded him of a forest. Scanning the same horizon from the deck of the Sovetskaya Rossiya years later, he saw only blubber-stripped carcasses bobbing on the waves.

In one season alone, from 1959 to 1960, Soviet ships killed nearly 13,000 humpback whales. (Photo: Gamma-Keystone/Getty Images)
On a 1971 voyage north of Hawaii, Berzin watched a catcher vessel systematically run down a mother sperm whale and her calf, betrayed by their telltale blows—two of them, huddled close together, one large and one small. The Sovetskaya Rossiya’s crew, it seemed to him, had become ghastly parodies of the Yankee whalers of the 19th century. “Even now,” he wrote in his memoir, “I can recall seeing the bow of a catcher moving through warm blue tropical waters, and a harpooner behind the gun, dressed only in bathing trunks and with a red bandana on his head, chasing, obviously, a female with a calf. … What dignity this was….” The last was a biting reference to a passage from Moby-Dick: “The dignity of our calling,” Melville wrote, “the very heavens attest.”

In 1972, the IWC finally passed a rule that conservationists had sought for years, requiring that international observers accompany all commercial whaling vessels to independently monitor their catches. The new system proved easy enough to circumvent—the Soviets arranged to have their fleets staffed with Japanese observers who were willing to look the other way as necessary. But by that point, Berzin later recalled, the country’s illegal whaling program had reached its inevitable conclusion anyway. It ended, he wrote, “simply because we killed all the whales.”

Clapham and Ivashchenko now think that Soviet whalers killed at least 180,000 more whales than they reported between 1948 and 1973. It’s a testament to the enormous scale of legal commercial whaling that this figure constitutes only a small percentage—in some oceans, about five percent—of the total killed by whalers in the 20th century. The Soviets, Dmitri Tormosov told me, were well aware of all that had come before them, and were driven by a kind of fatalistic nationalism. “The point,” he says, “was to catch up and get their portion of whale resources before they were all gone. It wasn’t intended to be a long industry.”

But if other countries had already badly pillaged the oceans before the Slava ever sailed from Odessa, scientists now believe that the timing and frenetic pace of Soviet whaling lent it an outsized impact. The Soviets did not lead the world’s whales to the precipice—but they likely pushed the most vulnerable of them over it. Bowhead whales in the Sea of Okhotsk, which were severely depleted by 19th-century whaling, are believed to be endangered today as a result of Soviet whaling. The IWC now charges the Soviets with delaying the recovery of right whale populations in the Southern Hemisphere by 20 years. Blue whales in the North Pacific, whose population had been reduced to an estimated 1,400 by the mid-1970s, now number only between 2,000 and 3,000. The condition of the populations of sperm whales in the Pacific, of which the Soviets killed more than any other species, is still uncertain.

Grimmest is the case of the North Pacific right whale, which appears to have been all but killed off by Soviet whalers over the course of three years in the mid-1960s. “The species is now so rarely sighted in the region,” Clapham and Ivashchenko wrote in 2009, “that single observations have been publishable in scientific journals. We cannot be sure, but it is entirely possible that when the few remaining right whales in the eastern North Pacific live out their lives and die, the species will be gone forever from these waters.”

This was the riddle the Soviet ships left in their wake: Why did a country with so little use for whales kill so many of them?
STILL, THE OCEAN IS a confounding place. In 2004, scientists from 10 countries set out in research vessels across the same North Pacific latitudes the Soviets had once hunted. It was the first comprehensive effort to measure the region’s humpback whale population, which had dwindled to just 1,400 animals by the mid-1960s. The findings, published five years ago, suggested that there were just under 20,000 humpback whales alive and well in the North Pacific—more than twice the previous estimate. The Antarctic humpback population, too, is believed to have rebounded to upwards of 42,000 animals—a steady recovery, if not a complete one.

The need to save the whales has been assumed for so long now, with such urgency, that the idea of some of them actually having been saved is oddly difficult to grapple with. And it’s true that many species soon may be as threatened by the vast changes imposed upon their habitat—the overfishing and climatic transformations that stand to upend entire ocean ecosystems—as they once were by the harpoon. Still, the cloud of existential peril has lifted enough that in 2010, the IWC began considering a possibility that not long before would have been unthinkable: ending the moratorium on commercial whaling.

The whaling nations lobbying for the change have been joined, improbably, by several countries that generally oppose commercial whaling, including the United States. These supporters point to the increasing number of whales that are being killed, in spite of the moratorium, by Norway, Iceland, and Japan. (Japan categorizes its hunting of minke and endangered fin whales in the Antarctic as “scientific:” Its whaling fleet is operated by the government-funded Institute of Cetacean Research, a research institution in little more than name that also supplies whale meat to the country’s seafood markets.)

Legitimizing whaling again under a carefully supervised quota system, the thinking goes, would be preferable to the uncontrolled status quo, allowing the IWC to once again exert some influence over where and how whales are hunted. “We think the moratorium isn’t working,” Monica Medina, the U.S. representative to the IWC, told Time in 2010. “Many whales are being killed, and we want to save as many whales as possible.” In other words, better to have the whalers inside a permissive system than outside a tougher one.

History is always studied with one eye on the present, and Ivashchenko brought up this argument when we spoke about her work. The lesson of the Soviet experience, she told me in Seattle, is that “you cannot trust an individual country to control its own industry. There’s always a temptation to violate the rules, to close your eyes [to] some problems.” (And although its catches today are a fraction of those of years past, the Japanese whaling fleet has come to echo the Soviets’ in its lack of connection to the marketplace; demand for whale meat in Japan is declining, and the government loses about $10 million a year on whaling subsidies.)

It’s difficult to look at the Soviet story and see anything other than a remarkable anomaly, one that seems wildly unlikely to occur again. But in a way, this is the point: If the same international regime that exists today allowed 180,000 whales to vanish without a trace, how can anyone reasonably expect it to notice two or three thousand missing whales tomorrow?

In the last pages of his memoir, Alfred Berzin wrestled with the relevance of his story—with the question of what purpose was served, exactly, by an unsparing account of something that had happened four decades earlier. “When I started to work on this memoir,” he wrote, “some serious people asked me: ‘Do you really need it?’” In answering them, he offered a quote from Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. “There can be no acceptable future,” Solzhenitsyn said, “without an honest analysis of the past.”


Hong Kong/Journée internationale de la non-violence: La leçon retrouvée de la révolution des parapluies (A very civil disobedience: The world’s most polite demonstrators teach the world a 2, 000-year-old lesson)

2 octobre, 2014
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/13/Statue_of_Liberty_1917_poster.jpg
http://38.media.tumblr.com/84d3f5f21ac386a94781b2faeb256008/tumblr_n6eub5bOZy1s7hve0o1_1280.jpg
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2014/7/1/1404225359225/Protesters-march-for-grea-011.jpg
http://actualites.sympatico.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Tianmen-tanks-%C3%A9tudiant.jpg
http://img.qz.com/2014/09/umbrella-revolution-hong-kong-web.jpg?w=640&h=359
http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/S0znXrvtWBR.Vt6E22R7wQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD0zOTA7cT04NTt3PTU3MQ--/http://l.yimg.com/os/152/2012/06/10/TiananmenSquare-11-jpg_011309.jpg
http://abortionno.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/worldMagTiananmen3.jpg
https://satsangsociety.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/sorry-for-the-inconvenience.png?w=450&h=295
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/By36IdsCcAAT9pR.jpg
http://www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/articles/news_and_politics/foreigners/2014/10/141001_FOR_Protesters.jpg.CROP.promo-mediumlarge.jpghttp://www.independent.co.uk/incoming/article9761987.ece/alternates/w620/Vandalised-police-van.jpg
 
http://www.democratic-republicans.us/images/Coat_of_Arms-uk.gif

 

Vous avez appris qu’il a été dit: Tu aimeras ton prochain, et tu haïras ton ennemi. Mais moi, je vous dis: Aimez vos ennemis, bénissez ceux qui vous maudissent, faites du bien à ceux qui vous haïssent, et priez pour ceux qui vous maltraitent et qui vous persécutent, afin que vous soyez fils de votre Père qui est dans les cieux; car il fait lever son soleil sur les méchants et sur les bons, et il fait pleuvoir sur les justes et sur les injustes. Jésus (Matthieu 5: 43-45)
Avec amour de l’humanité et haine des péchés. Saint Augustin
Hais le péché et aime le pécheur. Gandhi
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la « victime inconnue », comme on dirait aujourd’hui le « soldat inconnu ». Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
 Le pouvoir tend à corrompre, le pouvoir absolu corrompt absolument. Les grands hommes sont presque toujours des hommes mauvais. Lord Acton
Trois modernes ont marqué ma vie d’un sceau profond et ont fait mon enchantement: Raychandbhai [écrivain gujarati connu pour ses polémiques religieuses], Tolstoï, par son livre « Le Royaume des Cieux est en vous », et Ruskin et son Unto This Last. Gandhi
Il vous faut abandonner les armes que vous avez car elles n’ont aucune utilité pour vous sauver vous ou l’humanité. Vous inviterez Herr Hitler et signor Mussolini à prendre ce qu’ils veulent des pays que vous appelez vos possessions…. Si ces messieurs choisissent d’occuper vos maisons, vous les évacuerez. S’ils ne vous laissent pas partir librement, vous vous laisserez abattre, hommes, femmes et enfants, mais vous leur refuserez toute allégeance.  Gandhi (conseil aux Britanniques, 1940)
Si j’étais né en Allemagne et y gagnais ma vie, je revendiquerais l’Allemagne comme ma patrie au même titre que le plus grand des gentils Allemands et le défierais de m’abattre ou de me jeter au cachot; je refuserais d’être expulsé ou soumis à toute mesure discriminatoire. Et pour cela, je n’attendrais pas que mes coreligionaires se joignent à moi dans la résistance civile mais serais convaincu qu’à la fin ceux-ci ne manqueraient pas de suivre mon exemple. Si un juif ou tous les juifs acceptaient la prescription ici offerte, ils ne pourraient être en plus mauvaise posture que maintenant. Et la souffrance volontairement subie leur apporterait une force et une joie intérieures que ne pourraient leur apporter aucun nombre de résolutions de sympathie du reste du monde. Gandhi (le 26 novembre, 1938)
Un gouvernement qui n’est pas responsable face à son propre peuple ne peut être responsable face au reste du monde. (…) Ne pas vouloir offenser la Chine signifie qu’ils ne peuvent pas aider la Chine, ne peuvent pas aider le peuple chinois à jouir de ses droits et ne peuvent pas aider la communauté internationale à intégrer un membre fiable, stable et pacifique. Cela n’est pas une bonne chose. Si le monde est indifférent, il porte une grande part de la responsabilité. Bao Tong (ami personnel de Zhao Ziyang)
Tant que le parti ne reverra pas son jugement sur le 4 juin, et ne reconnaîtra pas que c’était un mouvement patriotique et démocratique, la démocratie ne pourra pas avancer ici. Cela veut dire que tout ce qu’ils nous racontent sur la démocratie en marche et les droits de l’Homme ne sont que mensonges. Qi Zhiyong (ancien étudiant ayant perdu une jambe sous les balles le 4 juin)
Nous les démocrates chinois, nous sommes comme les Juifs dans l’Allemagne Nazie. Pourquoi les Occidentaux ne viennent pas à notre secours est un grand mystère. Lorsque nous aurons tous été exterminés, vous aurez honte de votre passivité. Vous vous demanderez pourquoi vous ne nous aviez pas vu disparaître? Liu Xia (épouse du dissident emprisonné Liu Xiaobo)
Tout se passe comme si les intérêts économiques prévalaient sur la solidarité élémentaire avec ceux qui souffrent du manque de liberté. Vaclav Havel
Des manifestations suivies d’émeutes fleurissent partout, et nous donnent envie de renommer la ville lumière Paristan. Des commerces juifs, des synagogues, des individus juifs, sont pointés du doigt sur les réseaux sociaux et attaqués par une horde de sauvages qui ne savent même pas mettre Gaza sur une carte. Des gauchistes en mal de combats défient le gouvernement en allant manifester là où des émeutiers brûlent des drapeaux israéliens et exhibent des messages antisémites d’un autre âge, accompagnés de drapeaux du djihad et du hezbollah. Des Français « en ont marre » de cette importation du conflit, mais ne se prononcent pas, et attendent juste que ça passe en évitant certains quartiers les jours de manif. (…) Alors vous, la « majorité silencieuse » qui a « hâte que cela s’arrête », réveillez-vous. Quant à vous, les manifestants du dimanche (et du samedi aussi), qui vous prenez pour Che Guevara parce que vous brûlez des drapeaux israéliens le visage masqué en criant « Hitler reviens » et parce que vous détruisez le bitume parisien, sachez une chose : personne n’est dupe. Vous n’apportez rien à la cause palestinienne si ce n’est de la désolation. Vous desservez tellement votre cause que plus personne ne vous croit.  Alors oui, peut être que je dormirai mieux si je m’en fous. Si je ne regarde plus ce drapeau du djihad qui trône place de la République un samedi après midi d’été au cours d’une manifestation interdite, et organisée quand même par des partis politiques dont le NPA … Sophie Taieb
Despite the crackdown on Occupy in some cities, including the clearance of the original Wall Street camp last week, the movement is now a global phenomenon. Other activist movements, like those for gay rights, black power, peace, environmentalism and women’s rights, have traditionally used design cues to trigger public recognition — names, slogans, symbols and so on. Occupy uses them, too, but it has deployed them differently. As a leaderless movement that is cellular rather than hierarchical in structure, Occupy has depended on the Internet and social media sites, like Twitter and Facebook, to fuel its growth. The different elements of its design identity have been defined by the ingenuity with which its supporters have used those technologies. (…) By christening its first camp “#Occupy Wall Street,” Adbusters set a precedent whereby other groups could instantly invent their own versions of “Occupy” in different locations: Occupy Paris, Occupy Poughkeepsie, and so on. Adopting a customizable name is an efficient way of identifying such a diverse collection of people and causes. Each new group can raise awareness of the global movement with the first part of its name, while asserting its own identity with the second part. The recurrence of the word “Occupy” is ideal for maximizing impact on social networks, as is the addition of #, the hashtag symbol that enables Twitter users to search for tweets with a common theme, to “#OccupyWallStreet.” With or without the hashtag, the word “Occupy” is a good choice for a global movement. It translates easily from English into several other languages including “occuper” in French, “occupare” in Italian, “occupar” in Spanish though not, admittedly, “besetzen” in German. And it is firmly rooted in the history of the protest movement, from the factory occupations by striking workers in the United States during the 1930s to the global student sit-ins of the late 1960s. In short, “Occupy” is a stellar example of both what is known in marketing as an umbrella brand name and what the anti-corporatists in the movement could call beating them at their own game. Equally versatile are the slogans adopted by Occupy’s supporters. “We are the 99%” was originally a reference to the concentration of personal wealth in the United States among the richest 1 percent of the population, but it is applicable to other countries, too. The phrase explains a complex economic concept clearly and persuasively, but is concise enough to be included in tweets without breaching Twitter’s 140 character limit. Another popular slogan is the witty and diplomatic: “Sorry for the inconvenience. We are trying to change the world.” The wording differs from group to group but the meaning and humor are consistent. It is when it comes to visual symbolism that Occupy’s approach differs from that of other activist movements, most of which are strongly associated with specific motifs. The pink triangle, which once identified homosexual prisoners in Nazi concentration camps, has become a global symbol of gay rights. The raised fist of the black power movement dates from ancient Assyria, where it signified unity or defiance, and has also been an emblem for the Russian Revolution and workers’ rights. The circular peace symbol was designed in 1958 by a British anti-nuclear campaigner, Gerald Holtorn. The lines inside are based on the semaphore signals for the letters “N” for “nuclear” and “D” for “disarmament.” Environmentalists have adopted green as their signature color worldwide, as well as the rainbow that appeared on Greenpeace’s Rainbow Warrior protest ships and also symbolizes gay rights as a motif. The “Take the Square” movement, which emerged in Spain this spring, when groups of activists occupied squares in different cities, has conformed to convention by adopting a symbol of pink and purple arrows pointing into a square. But the various Occupy groups have adopted a diverse range of motifs. Among the most popular ones are the hashtag and raised fist used by “#OccupyWallStreet.” Smart choices again. The raised fist evokes historic protest movements, while the hashtag strikes a contemporary note. NYT
Hong Kong: A city where protestors don’t smash up shops, and they also clean up after themselves, yet get teargassed and pushed by the police. Message de manifestant
Rather than presenting scenes of smashed shops or violent confrontations with the police—the sort of images we have grown accustomed to in Cairo, Ukraine, and other sites of popular protests against oppressive regimes—the photos from central Hong Kong show smiling students sitting around doing their homework, passing out donations of food, and meticulously picking up litter—even sorting out the recyclables. What, then, is different about these Hong Kong demonstrators? And how might their almost exaggerated politeness help them against the notoriously severe Chinese Communist Party? These aren’t just idealists; these are savvy political operators who understand successful nonviolent resistance. The answers to these questions can be found in the appropriately titled “Manual of Disobedience.” Published online several days before the Occupy Central campaign was set to begin, the document (written in Chinese and English) is part how-to guide and part philosophical mission statement. It details the movement’s tactics, the rules for nonviolent protest, the legal codes that may be violated, and the exact procedure to follow should someone be arrested. It also implores protesters to “avoid physical confrontation, but also to avoid developing hatred in [their] heart,” and explains that the protests must be a model of the values that they are striving to see in their society, namely “equality, tolerance, love, and care.” The protesters understand that these values will not only help win over sympathizers, but lay bare the illegitimacy of the regime if it moves against them with excessive force. These aren’t youthful idealists; these are savvy political operators who understand the secrets of successful nonviolent resistance. (…) Right now the government appears to be set to try to wait the protesters out, hoping that their presence and the disruption of daily life will eventually alienate the movement from wider society. However, Occupy Central has positioned itself well, almost no matter the outcome. If, as many people fear, mainland authorities crack down Tiananmen-style, the training and the discipline the protesters have displayed will serve them well, galvanizing support and isolating the Chinese authorities. On the other hand, if Beijing realizes the dilemma it faces, it will have no choice but to negotiate with Hong Kong’s protest leaders, a show of weakness that may ultimately inspire more yearning for democracy and even further protests. Slate

Attention: une leçon peut en cacher une autre !

Nettoyage des rues, tri sélectif et recyclage de leurs déchets, effaçage de graffitis, mots d’excuses sur les pare-brise des voitures de police vandalisées, distribution gratuite de nourriture, lavage de leurs vêtements pour rester propres sur eux, respect des pelouses, utilisation de seuls parapluies devenus symbole de la révolte contre les gaz lacrymogènes tirés à bout portant sur leurs visages …

A l’heure où, avec son propre référendum sauvage et au grand dam de Pékin, la contagion démocratique semble avoir déjà gagné Macao

Quelle meilleure leçon pour nos casseurs, brûleurs de voitures et crieurs de Allah akbar habituels en cette Journée internationale de la non-violence et anniversaire de Gandhi …

Contre les menaces chinoises de reprise du peu d’autonomie qui leur restait …

Et devant l’indifférence et la pusillanimité d’un Occident aux préoccupations désormais réduites à leurs seuls intérêts économiques …

Que ces exemplaires jeunes manifestants de Hong Kong …

Devenus massacre de Tiananmen oblige …

Mais aussi, comme pour leur avocat formé à Londres de maitre, après les 155 ans d’anglicisation forcée de leur ïle …

Et leur reprise du meilleur des campagnes de désobéissance civile américaines à la Occupy Wall Street …

Autrement dit, comme pour tous les chrétiens qui s’ignorent et pour le meilleur comme le pire que désormais nous sommes, l’héritage de quelque 2 000 ans de judéo-christianisation rampante …

Les manifestants les plus polis du monde ?

The World’s Politest Protesters
The Occupy Central demonstrators are courteous. That’s actually what makes them so dangerous.
Srdja Popovic and Tori Porell

The protest movement that has sprung to life in Hong Kong now represents the most serious challenge to Beijing’s authority since the Tiananmen protests of 1989. Beijing is obviously worried: Earlier this week it banned the photo-sharing site Instagram and ramped up censorship on the popular Chinese social media site Sina Weibo to unprecedented levels.

But while the threat to Beijing’s power is real, the danger isn’t evident on Hong Kong streets: Rather than presenting scenes of smashed shops or violent confrontations with the police—the sort of images we have grown accustomed to in Cairo, Ukraine, and other sites of popular protests against oppressive regimes—the photos from central Hong Kong show smiling students sitting around doing their homework, passing out donations of food, and meticulously picking up litter—even sorting out the recyclables. What, then, is different about these Hong Kong demonstrators? And how might their almost exaggerated politeness help them against the notoriously severe Chinese Communist Party?

These aren’t just idealists; these are savvy political operators who understand successful nonviolent resistance.

The answers to these questions can be found in the appropriately titled “Manual of Disobedience.” Published online several days before the Occupy Central campaign was set to begin, the document (written in Chinese and English) is part how-to guide and part philosophical mission statement. It details the movement’s tactics, the rules for nonviolent protest, the legal codes that may be violated, and the exact procedure to follow should someone be arrested. It also implores protesters to “avoid physical confrontation, but also to avoid developing hatred in [their] heart,” and explains that the protests must be a model of the values that they are striving to see in their society, namely “equality, tolerance, love, and care.” The protesters understand that these values will not only help win over sympathizers, but lay bare the illegitimacy of the regime if it moves against them with excessive force. These aren’t youthful idealists; these are savvy political operators who understand the secrets of successful nonviolent resistance.

The proof of this fact is playing out in the streets of Hong Kong right now. After the protesters’ first attempt to block the financial district was met with volleys of teargas from riot police, the people in the street did not fight back, leaving society shocked and emboldened by the authorities’ outrageous use of force. The next day, thousands more people turned up with signs supporting the students, condemning police tactics, and calling for the resignation of Hong Kong leader C.Y. Leung. Although it may seem obvious that a protest movement must win popular support to combat oppression, it is no easy feat, and something we have seen movements in dozens of countries fail to accomplish. The staunch adherence to nonviolence Occupy Central has demonstrated takes preparation, training, and discipline—a combination that’s very rare for many movements.

Most of the time, organizers aren’t prepared to handle the crowds that surge into the streets, and with no way to maintain calm and cohesion, too many movements have been derailed by a few thrown rocks or smashed storefronts. Governments seize on the smallest acts of disorder or violence as excuses to crack down. However, Occupy Central’s organizers seem to have come prepared. By issuing the manual and attempting to train their activists, they have maintained a united front and warded off the pitfalls that plague too many social movements.

No one has a crystal ball for knowing what Beijing will do next. Right now the government appears to be set to try to wait the protesters out, hoping that their presence and the disruption of daily life will eventually alienate the movement from wider society. However, Occupy Central has positioned itself well, almost no matter the outcome.

If, as many people fear, mainland authorities crack down Tiananmen-style, the training and the discipline the protesters have displayed will serve them well, galvanizing support and isolating the Chinese authorities. On the other hand, if Beijing realizes the dilemma it faces, it will have no choice but to negotiate with Hong Kong’s protest leaders, a show of weakness that may ultimately inspire more yearning for democracy and even further protests. For now, while it is amusing to watch the most polite protesters in the world keeping up with their schoolwork and keeping the streets clean, their politeness actually demonstrates why they have become such a powerful force to reckon with.

Srdja Popovic is the co-founder and executive director of CANVAS, and the author of the forthcoming Blueprint for Revolution.

Tori Porell is a program officer at CANVAS.

Voir aussi:

Hong Kong protests: Occupy movement could be the most polite demonstration ever
Lizzie Dearden
29 September 2014
Pro-democracy demonstrators occupying parts of Hong Kong are in the running to be the most polite protesters ever after apologising for an isolated case of vandalism.
Thousands of people have taken to the streets in opposition to China’s continued control over the city’s leadership, demanding the resignation of current leaders and democratic reform.

Despite clashes with police, who have used tear gas and pepper spray as well as charging crowds with batons in attempts to disperse them, the mood appears to have remained remarkably civil.

On Monday morning, Hong Kong resident James Legge spotted an apology note posted on a vandalised police van near the heart of protests in the Admiralty district.

« Sorry, I don’t know who did this but we are not anarchists – we want democracy, » it read. As protests continue, people have been seen distributing free food and water, as well as cleaning up after themselves in the famously orderly city.

At the main occupation at the city’s Government headquarters, students sorted plastic bottles for recycling even as they wore goggles and plastic sheets to protect against pepper spray.

Thousands of people are camping out in the Admiralty district in continued opposition to the Chinese Government’s refusal to let them select their own candidates for leadership elections in 2017, allowing only Beijing-backed politicians to stand.

The movement, dubbed the Umbrella Revolution because of the widespread use of umbrellas against tear gas and pepper spray, has sparked solidarity protests around the world.

Demonstrations are being run by a group called Occupy Central with Love and Peace, which describes itself as a “non-violent direct action movement that demands a fully democratic government in Hong Kong”.

China has called the protests illegal and endorsed the Hong Kong government’s crackdown, taking a hard line against threats to the Communist Party’s power.

The unpopular Beijing backed leader of Hong Kong, Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying, has urged people to leave the protests.

“We don’t want Hong Kong to be messy,” he said in a statement broadcast on Monday.

Attempting to dispel rumours of intervention by the Chinese army, he added: “I hope the public will keep calm. Don’t be misled by the rumours. Police will strive to maintain social order, including ensuring smooth traffic and ensuring the public safety.”

Voir encore:

Leading Hong Kong activist accuses Cameron of selling out campaigners
PM’s criticism of Chinese crackdown weak, says Martin Lee who argues Beijing is violating 1997 deal with UK over Hong Kong
Luke Harding and Richard Norton-Taylor

The Guardian

30 September 2014

One of Hong Kong’s leading pro-democracy campaigners has accused David Cameron of selling out activists in the territory “for 30 pieces of silver,” and said that the British prime minister has not been strong enough in his criticism of Beijing’s response to the crackdown on protesters.

On Tuesday Cameron said he was “deeply concerned” about the situation in Hong Kong, but the prime minister has failed to back the demands of the pro-democracy campaigners, who argue that China’s tight restrictions on candidates for the post of chief executive ahead of 2017 elections violate the joint agreement signed by Britain and Hong Kong in 1997.

On Tuesday night tens of thousands of demonstrators packed the city’s downtown area for a third night as protest leaders warned they would step up their actions if Hong Kong’s chief executive, Leung Chun-ying, did not meet them by midnight.

Wednesdayis China’s National Day – celebrating the foundation of the People’s Republic by the Communist party – and a public holiday, meaning more people will be free to protest.

Leung earlier said the central government would not change its mind over electoral rules and urged demonstrators to withdraw, stating: “Occupy Central founders had said repeatedly that if the movement is getting out of control, they would call for it to stop. I’m now asking them to fulfil the promise they made to society, and stop this campaign immediately.”

The UK deputy prime minister, Nick Clegg, said he would summon China’s ambassador this week to express his “alarm and dismay”, adding that the people of Hong Kong were “perfectly entitled” to expect free, fair and open elections.

But in an interview with the Guardian, the veteran pro-democracy campaigner Martin Lee called on Cameron to play of more high-profile diplomatic role.

Lee said: “Cameron should talk to the Chinese leadership. He should say: “What the hell is happening? You promised Hong Kong democracy. How can you reverse that?” Cameron needs to intervene and say democracy means genuine democracy. You can’t give the vote without giving the right to nominate candidates. He should do more.”

Lee, a former legislator and the founding chairman of the Democratic party, said Downing Street was a co-signatory with Chinese officials to the joint declaration – the 1984 document that guaranteed civil liberties and enshrined the former colony’s “one country, two systems” policy. The UK should therefore be shaping events and playing a more high-profile diplomatic role, he said, adding: “Britain certainly has the right to say something.”

Lee and other pro-democracy activists visited London over the summer, only to be rebuffed by Cameron and other senior ministers, who refused to meet them. Weeks earlier Cameron had hosted the Chinese premier, Li Keqiang. Lee did meet Clegg, who backed calls for Hong Kong’s leader to be directly elected.

On Tuesday Clegg sent a series of supportive tweets, including: “I sympathise a great deal with the brave pro-democracy demonstrators taking to the streets of Hong Kong.”He said the UK remained committed to the joint declaration and said that “universal suffrage must mean real choice” for voters and “a proper stake in the 2017 election”.

Lee, a QC and senior counsel, said article 26 of the joint declaration was explicit. It guaranteed the right of every permanent resident of Hong Kong to vote and to stand for election “in accordance with the law”. China’s plan to hand-pick candidates violated this. He said that the prime minister appeared more interested in trade deals than fundamental rights. Asked why Cameron had declined to meet him earlier this year, he said: “I think he was a bit ashamed. He was trying to sell us down the river for 30 pieces of silver.”

Roderic Wye, an associate fellow with Chatham House’s Asia programme, said Britain was in a “lose lose situation” over Hong Kong. There were no easy foreign policy options, he said. If the UK sided emphatically with the Hong Kong protesters this would infuriate Beijing and bolster the Chinese narrative that the west – “outside forces” – had incited the uprising. But if it didn’t the demonstrators might legitimately accuse Downing Street of betrayal, and even spinelessness, he suggested.

“In policy terms it’s difficult to get that balance right. The demonstrations pose a real problem, not just for the British but for others too. The question is how do you express support, to be seen to be promoting and aiding democratic forces, when the Chinese have said this is their internal affair. You want to put pressure on the Chinese, making it clear that you support the aspirations of Hong Kong, without dictating what terms these aspirations should be given.”

Wye said that as signatory to the original deal Britain had a “locus” for talking to Beijing. He said that Chinese plans to veto certain political candidates wasn’t at odds with Hong Kong’s legal constitution – even if protesters felt it broke the democratic spirit of the agreement. “It’s not inconsistent with basic law. This says that it [the Hong Kong system] should be backed by elections. It doesn’t say anything about the surrounding processes.” Asked what he would do, if he were a foreign office official giving advice to Downing Street, he said: “I’d be tearing my hair out.”

Lee also complained that the government had failed to condemn the widespread use of tear gas by police. “It was totally unnecessary and therefore illegal,” he said.

It emerged on Tuesday that the police are using teargas sold to them by a British company under an export licence approved by the government. Chemring, based in Romsey, Hampshire, sold the CS gas to the Hong Kong authorities.

The Campaign Against the Arms Trade said the UK had granted six licences worth £180,000 to sell teargas in the past four years. Speaking to the BBC’s Daily Politics show, the foreign secretary, Philip Hammond, said he did not condone its use against protesters. But he said they were a “legitimate export” available from large numbers of sources around the world. Chemring said it worked “in accordance with” government policy. He added: “There wasn’t a word of condemnation about the use of teargas [by police], which was totally unnecessary and therefore illegal, or the excessive use of force.”

Voir de plus:

La « révolution des parapluies », entre trombes d’eau et pressions chinoises
Florence de Changy (Hong Kong, correspondance)
Le Monde
01.10.2014

La « révolution des parapluies », qui doit son nom à la seule « arme » que s’autorisent les manifestants prodémocratie contre les jets de gaz poivre de la police, n’aura jamais aussi bien porté son nom que pendant cette troisième nuit du mouvement d’occupation citoyenne de certains quartiers de l’ancienne colonie britannique. Un énorme orage s’est déclaré en début de soirée, suivi vers 2 heures du matin d’un avis de pluie « Amber », premier niveau de pluie torrentielle, qui techniquement déclenche la mise en alerte des services d’assistance. Mais ni les éclairs ni les trombes d’eau n’ont eu raison de la détermination des milliers de « parapluies », désormais installés dans au moins quatre quartiers différents.

Les manifestants, qui veulent que le gouvernement chinois revoie sa proposition d’accorder le suffrage universel pour 2017 tout en gardant le contrôle des candidatures, réclament aussi à présent la démission du chef de l’exécutif de Hongkong, Leung Chun-ying. Pour certains collégiens et étudiants de la première heure, présents depuis vendredi devant le siège du gouvernement, cette nuit de déluge était en fait la cinquième passée dehors. « Cela s’est bien passé, pas d’ennuis avec la police, on restera jusqu’au bout », affirmait, stoïque, l’un de ces irréductibles, qui n’aurait pas mentionné la tempête si on ne lui en avait pas parlé. Il est de ceux qui se sont approchés autant que possible de Bauhinia Square, la place où avait lieu la cérémonie officielle du lever de drapeau, à l’occasion du 65e anniversaire de la République populaire de Chine, mercredi 1er octobre.

Le 1er octobre est le premier de deux jours fériés qui devraient donner l’occasion aux Hongkongais non encore mobilisés, de témoigner, ou non, de leur soutien au mouvement de révolte.

LES OCCUPATIONS POURRAIENT S’ÉTENDRE GÉOGRAPHIQUEMENT

Des sifflements et des hurlements ont retenti quand, à 8 heures, deux avions de l’Armée populaire de libération ont survolé, à basse altitude, le Victoria Harbour, suivis de deux hélicoptères traînant respectivement un immense drapeau chinois et un tout petit drapeau Hongkongais. Et pendant que le chef de l’exécutif, Leung Chun-ying, officie, coupe de champagne à la main, et parle du « rêve chinois que nous allons construire ensemble », les étudiants, parmi lesquels leur leader Joshua Wong, 17 ans, lèvent leurs bras croisés en signe de désapprobation.

De son côté, le député Leung Kwok-hung, de la Ligue sociale-démocrate, l’éternel révolté de Hongkong qui continue d’être surnommé « Long Hair » malgré la coupe sévère que son récent séjour en prison lui a valu, menait une procession funéraire pour les victimes de Tiananmen.

Alex Chow, le secrétaire général de la fédération des étudiants de Hongkong, a esquissé mardi plusieurs options pour la suite du mouvement. D’abord, les occupations pourraient s’étendre géographiquement. Canton Road, au cœur du quartier préféré des touristes chinois continentaux qui y font leurs courses dans les plus vastes boutiques de luxe du territoire, a rallié, cette nuit, la liste des rues rebelles. Une autre option serait d’occuper non plus des espaces publics, comme des routes ou des places, mais des locaux du gouvernement. Alex Chow a aussi suggéré d’étendre la grève illimitée des étudiants au monde ouvrier, ou à différents secteurs économiques.

« PATIENCE EXTRÊME »

Dans tous les grands faubourgs de la ville, les drapeaux multicolores qui devaient donner un air de fête chinoise à la ville ont cédé la place à une infinité de petits morceaux de ruban jaune, symbole du mouvement protestataire.

Tandis que la mobilisation ne faiblit pas, le moral de certains policiers, traditionnellement très populaires à Hongkong, semble fortement atteint. Il y a deux jours, dans une lettre interne qui a fuité, le commissaire de police, Tsang Wai-Hung, était revenu sur la polémique que les méthodes initiales de dispersion de foule, jugées excessives et brutales, ont suscité. Il félicitait ses hommes de leur « patience extrême » et de « leurs efforts sans limite pour servir la communauté ». Et il concluait en se disant « confiant que nous resterons unis pour surmonter cette situation éprouvante ».

La police a indiqué mercredi matin que l’un de ses inspecteurs s’était suicidé la nuit dernière dans son bureau. « Il serait inapproprié d’établir un lien », a affirmé un porte-parole de la police, indiquant que cet homme n’était pas impliqué dans les opérations liées à Occupy Central.

Voir aussi:

Révolution des parapluies. Comment naissent les noms des révolutions ?
Ouest France

Hong-Kong – 01 Octobre  2014

« Le parapluie est probablement le symbole le plus frappant de ces manifestations », dit Claudia Mo, une députée prodémocratie. | AFP
La révolte qui gronde depuis plusieurs jours à Hong Kong a désormais son nom : la révolutions des parapluies. Mais pourquoi et comment trouve-t-on les noms des révolutions ?

La révolution des parapluies
En images. À Hong Kong, la contestation démocratique s’amplifie

L’expression « révolution des parapluies » fait fureur depuis quelques jours sur les réseaux sociaux. Une banderole mentionnant ladite révolution a également été vue sur une barricade érigée devant une station de métro. Cet accessoire typique des Hongkongais est en train de donner son nom au mouvement de ceux qui réclament à Pékin davantage de libertés politiques.

D’ordinaire, à Hong Kong, il sert à s’abriter du soleil, plus rarement de la pluie. Les habitants de l’ancienne colonie britannique passée sous tutelle chinoise sont habitués à sa météo changeante et se déplacent rarement sans parapluie.

« Le parapluie est probablement le symbole le plus frappant de ces manifestations », dit Claudia Mo, une députée prodémocratie. « Nos manifestations étaient si pacifiques autrefois. Aujourd’hui, le gaz au poivre est devenu si courant qu’on doit s’en protéger avec des parapluies », souligne-t-elle.

La révolution des oeillets
Le 25 avril 1974, la foule descend dans les rues pour renverser le gouvernement salazariste de Marcello Caetano après 48 ans de dictature. L’un des points de rassemblements est le marché aux fleurs de Lisbonne, ou l’on vend beaucoup d’œillets. Des militaires insurgés mettent ces fleurs dans le canon de leur fusil. Au final, cette révolution de fleurs se fera sans heurts et pacifiquement.

La révolution de velours
La « Révolution de velours » ou « révolution douce » mené par Vaclav Havel en novembre 1989 tient son nom de la façon pacifique et sans effusion de sang au régime communiste en Tchécoslovaquie.

La révolution orange
Suite aux fraudes électorales en novembre 2004, foulards et banderoles oranges envahissent les rues. Une couleur qui, plus que n’importe quel slogans, marquera l’histoire du mouvement. Mais pourquoi la couleur orange ? D’abord parce qu’il s’agit de la couleur du parti de l’opposition « Notre ukraine », représenté par Viktor Ioutchenko, en opposition au bleu et blanc du parti de Ianoukovitch. Autre explication, cette révolte est aussi surnommée par la presse anglo-saxonne la « chestnut revolution » ou « Révolution des marronniers » qui bordent la place de l’Indépendance. L’orange rappellerait dont la couleur de ces arbres à cette époque de l’année.

Couleur des sac-poubelle ukrainiens, elle a permis aux moins fortunés de se revêtir de cet uniforme révolutionnaire de fortune pratique et voyant.

La révolution des Tulipes
La révolution des Tulipes designe le coup d’État du 24 mars 2005 au Kirghizistan. Au début du mouvement, les médias parlent de « révolution rose », de « révolution des Citrons » ou de « révolution des Jonquilles ». Le terme de « révolution des Tulipes » ne s’impose qu’après un discours d’Akaïev, le chef d’État renversé et en fuite, qui met en garde contre toute velléité de révolution « colorée ».

La révolution du Cèdre
À l’instar des autres révolutions colorés ou fleuris, le printemps de Beyrouth est baptisé par les médias et les intellectuelles révolution du cèdre. Cette révolution désigne en fait la mobilisation qui avait suivi l’assassinat de l’ancien premier ministre Rafic Hariri le 14 février 2005. Le cèdre, arbre national par excellence, présent sur le drapeau libanais, était censé symboliser la réconciliation nationale après quinze ans de guerre civile.

La révolution de Jasmin
Associé à la révolution populaire qui soulève la Tunisie en plein printemps arabe en 2011, le nom de « révolution du jasmin » s’est imposé dans les médias via le journaliste et blogueur tunisien Zied El-Heni. La fleur blanche et parfumée, emblématique de la Tunisie symbolise la douceur et la pureté. Ce nom repris par les médias occidentaux ne fait pas l’unanimité parmi les manifestants, le nom de la fleur évoquant une certaine douceur, tranchant avec le conflit. De plus le nom de révolution de jasmin était utilisé pour parler de la prise de pouvoir de Ben Ali en 1987.

Voir encore:

Elements of Style as Occupy Movement Evolves
Alice Rawsthorn
The NYT
November 20, 2011

LONDON — If you were told about an organization that started from scratch just over four months ago and had already expanded into more than 1,500 towns and cities all over the world, wouldn’t you be impressed? Thought so.

One organization has achieved all of that since July 13, when the Canadian activist group Adbusters called on “redeemers, rebels and radicals” to “set up tents, kitchens, peaceful barricades and occupy Wall Street for a few months” starting on Sept. 17. By the end of that day, two similar occupations had begun in San Francisco, and hundreds of others swiftly followed.

Despite the crackdown on Occupy in some cities, including the clearance of the original Wall Street camp last week, the movement is now a global phenomenon. Other activist movements, like those for gay rights, black power, peace, environmentalism and women’s rights, have traditionally used design cues to trigger public recognition — names, slogans, symbols and so on. Occupy uses them, too, but it has deployed them differently.

As a leaderless movement that is cellular rather than hierarchical in structure, Occupy has depended on the Internet and social media sites, like Twitter and Facebook, to fuel its growth. The different elements of its design identity have been defined by the ingenuity with which its supporters have used those technologies.

Let’s start with the name. By christening its first camp “#Occupy Wall Street,” Adbusters set a precedent whereby other groups could instantly invent their own versions of “Occupy” in different locations: Occupy Paris, Occupy Poughkeepsie, and so on.

Adopting a customizable name is an efficient way of identifying such a diverse collection of people and causes. Each new group can raise awareness of the global movement with the first part of its name, while asserting its own identity with the second part. The recurrence of the word “Occupy” is ideal for maximizing impact on social networks, as is the addition of #, the hashtag symbol that enables Twitter users to search for tweets with a common theme, to “#OccupyWallStreet.”

With or without the hashtag, the word “Occupy” is a good choice for a global movement. It translates easily from English into several other languages including “occuper” in French, “occupare” in Italian, “occupar” in Spanish though not, admittedly, “besetzen” in German. And it is firmly rooted in the history of the protest movement, from the factory occupations by striking workers in the United States during the 1930s to the global student sit-ins of the late 1960s.

In short, “Occupy” is a stellar example of both what is known in marketing as an umbrella brand name and what the anti-corporatists in the movement could call beating them at their own game.

Equally versatile are the slogans adopted by Occupy’s supporters. “We are the 99%” was originally a reference to the concentration of personal wealth in the United States among the richest 1 percent of the population, but it is applicable to other countries, too. The phrase explains a complex economic concept clearly and persuasively, but is concise enough to be included in tweets without breaching Twitter’s 140 character limit. Another popular slogan is the witty and diplomatic: “Sorry for the inconvenience. We are trying to change the world.” The wording differs from group to group but the meaning and humor are consistent.

It is when it comes to visual symbolism that Occupy’s approach differs from that of other activist movements, most of which are strongly associated with specific motifs.

The pink triangle, which once identified homosexual prisoners in Nazi concentration camps, has become a global symbol of gay rights. The raised fist of the black power movement dates from ancient Assyria, where it signified unity or defiance, and has also been an emblem for the Russian Revolution and workers’ rights. The circular peace symbol was designed in 1958 by a British anti-nuclear campaigner, Gerald Holtorn. The lines inside are based on the semaphore signals for the letters “N” for “nuclear” and “D” for “disarmament.” Environmentalists have adopted green as their signature color worldwide, as well as the rainbow that appeared on Greenpeace’s Rainbow Warrior protest ships and also symbolizes gay rights as a motif.

The “Take the Square” movement, which emerged in Spain this spring, when groups of activists occupied squares in different cities, has conformed to convention by adopting a symbol of pink and purple arrows pointing into a square. But the various Occupy groups have adopted a diverse range of motifs.

Among the most popular ones are the hashtag and raised fist used by “#OccupyWallStreet.” Smart choices again. The raised fist evokes historic protest movements, while the hashtag strikes a contemporary note. Like the @ symbol, an arcane accountancy motif, which was reinvented as a star of the digital age when added to e-mail addresses, the # has been resurrected by digital technology. First, it was added to cellphone keypads as a control button. The hashtag’s presence there and on computer keyboards (except for Apple’s, on which it is made by pressing Alt and 3) convinced Twitter that it was ubiquitous enough to become an identification tag.

Some Occupy groups have adopted the fist or hashtag as symbols. A few of them use both, including #OccupySeattle. Other groups have invented their own motifs. Supporters of OccupyNoLA in New Orleans spell out its name on banners with solid black dots in place of the “O”s. The camps in Frankfurt and Chicago have posted images of their cities on their Web sites. Occupy activists in the feisty Scottish city of Glasgow have plumped for a surprisingly sentimental series of symbols for their site, including flowers, a heart, a rainbow and the slogan “Occupy Glasgow Nicely.”

As the movement evolves, it is possible that more Occupy groups will adopt the same symbols. Or they may conclude that the protocols of protest design have changed and that, in the age of social networking, they can say more about the causes they believe in with the repeated use of a few carefully chosen words than with images.

Postscript: November 22, 2011

The process described in this column to obtain a hash symbol on an Apple keyboard applies to British keyboards. On U.S. Apple keyboards, the hash symbol is generated by holding the shift key and pressing 3.

Voir par ailleurs:

Référendum officieux à Hong Kong: Occupy Central clame victoire
A Hong Kong, le référendum officieux est officiellement terminé depuis dimanche soir. Ses organisateurs, le mouvement Occupy Central, crient victoire et parlent déjà d’un nouveau référendum.
Avec notre correspondante à Hong Kong, Florence de Changy

RFI

30-06-2014

Des trois propositions sur la façon de choisir les candidats susceptibles de devenir chef de l’exécutif, c’est celle de l’alliance des 26 partis pro-démocrates qui l’a emporté avec 42% des votes. 9% des participants à ce référendum officieux se sont abstenus. Les trois options proposées suggéraient toutes que le public puisse directement proposer des candidats. Autrement dit, que le choix ne se fasse pas entre des candidats déjà préselectionnés par Pékin.

Par ailleurs, 88% des participants au référendum ont soutenu l’idée que le Legco, le Conseil législatif, devrait bloquer des propositions de réformes démocratiques qui ne seraient pas en ligne avec les standards internationaux de démocratie. Les organisateurs vont donc demander au gouvernement de prendre en compte la proposition favorite et si le gouvernement fait une contre-proposition inacceptable, ils organiseront un nouveau référendum pour recueillir ou non le soutien de la population sur leur projet d’origine, qui consiste à bloquer Central, le quartier financier de la ville.

Le scrutin de dimanche restera comme la plus vaste consultation populaire qui n’ait jamais eu lieu dans l’histoire de Hong Kong sur son avenir politique. Près de 800 000 personnes ont voté, mais il a fallu décompter 11 200 votes d’électeurs enthousiastes qui ont voté deux fois, en ligne et en personne.

■ « Une farce politique »

Si le vote populaire de Hong Kong satisfait les organisateurs du mouvement Occupy Central, il est ressenti comme une provocation par les autorités chinoises.

Avec notre correspondante à Pékin,  Heike Schmidt

Ce scrutin n’a « aucun statut légal », estime le China Daily, quotidien contrôlé par le Parti communiste chinois. Pour son éditorialiste, le référendum est « anticonstitutionnel », car même si Hong Kong est dotée d’une administration spéciale, elle n’a aucune autorité pour appeler au vote populaire : « Les organisateurs ont démontré leur détermination à violer la loi comme bon leur semble », s’énerve le China Daily.

De son côté, le Global Times dénonce « une farce politique ». Le journal officiel appelle les citoyens de Hong Kong à ne pas se laisser « prendre en otage par des opposants extrémistes, afin de ne pas mettre en péril la prospérité et le bonheur de Hong Kong ».

Pékin est donc décidé à faire la sourde oreille aux revendications bien embarrassantes de ses citoyens hongkongais : hors de question de laisser les électeurs choisir directement leur chef de l’exécutif en 2017 et leur Parlement en 2020. Il va falloir passer par un comité de nomination composé de proches de Pékin. La crainte que le petit territoire rebelle devienne l’exemple à suivre pour toute la Chine semble bien trop grande pour laisser libre cours aux défenseurs de la démocratie.

Voir de même:

Référendum illégal: Macao dans les pas de Hong Kong?
L’avenir de Macao, ville de casinos, se jouera peut-être dans les urnes
Dans l’ancienne colonie portugaise, redevenue chinoise en 1999, des groupes favorables à la démocratie organisent à partir de ce dimanche 24 août et jusqu’au samedi 30 août un référendum non officiel, dans le même esprit que celui organisé à Hong Kong en juin dernier. Les organisateurs veulent mobiliser les 624 000 Macanais pour obtenir le suffrage universel.
Avec notre correspondant à Pékin, Jean Scheubel

RFI

24-08-2014

Le référendum a été déclaré « illégal » par le gouvernement local, et il n’aura peut-être pas le même poids que celui organisé à Hong Kong. Les promoteurs de l’initiative voulaient de vrais bureaux de vote, mais la justice de Macao s’y est opposée. Du coup, les militants sont postés directement dans les rues. Dans leurs mains, des tablettes tactiles grâce auxquelles les passants peuvent voter.

Principale question : le « chef de l’exécutif » – le n°1 de Macao – doit-il être élu au suffrage universel direct ? Pour le moment, son élection se déroule au suffrage indirect. C’est une commission électorale de 400 membres, issus du monde professionnel ou social, qui a la responsabilité de sa désignation. Pour les partisans de la démocratie, tout le monde doit pouvoir voter.

Aucune réforme politique prévue

À Hong Kong, à 30 km de là, ce sera le cas dès 2017, Pékin l’a promis. Mais à Macao, aucune réforme politique n’est prévue. Il faut rappeler que le territoire de Macao est 40 fois plus petit que celui Hong Kong et 13 fois moins peuplé. La défiance de l’opinion à l’égard du gouvernement central est réputée modérée aussi Pékin ne subit-il pas la même pression.

Le résultat du référendum sera dévoilé le 31 août, soit le même jour que l’élection du chef de l’exécutif. Fernando Chui, en poste depuis 2009, brigue un second mandat. C’est le seul candidat en lice.

Voir enfin:

90pc don’t trust Macau leader, says ‘referendum’

Unofficial poll results come just two days after chief executive re-elected
South China Morning Post

03 September, 2014

Macau chief executive Dr Fernando Chui Sai-on has suffered his first setback two days after being re-elected, with a so-called civil referendum finding that almost 90 per cent of residents do not trust him.

In the poll, organised by three pro-democracy groups, 7,762 Macau residents said they had no confidence in the sole candidate in the chief executive election. They represented 89 per cent of the 8,688 votes cast. Only 388 people – just under 5 per cent – said they trusted Chui, with 528 abstentions and 10 blank votes.

« This has shown that Macau residents are no longer staying silent and reluctantly accepting everything, » said Sulu Sou Ka-hou, a key member of Macau Conscience, which organised the poll with Macau Youth Dynamics and Open Macau Society.

The results of the unofficial referendum, conducted from August 24 to Sunday, came after Chui won the one-horse race with 380 votes from the 400-strong election committee.

Sou said the result also proved that Chui’s win would not help improve his credibility.

The organisers had earlier announced the results of another question asked in the poll, where 95 per cent of the voters – or 8,259 votes – were in favour of universal suffrage for the 2019 election.

Sou said the turnout in the referendum, which might seem lukewarm in a city with 624,000 people, was still « encouraging », given the heavy crackdown by the government.

Police shut down all five physical polling stations on the first day and detained five organisers on suspicion of breaching data-protection laws. Jason Chao Teng-hei, leader of Open Macau Society, has been placed under judicial investigation.

Two journalists working for Macau Concealers – an online medium operated by the city’s most prominent pro-democracy group New Macau Association – were also detained by police last Friday after they uploaded a picture on the civil referendum webpage of what was thought to be a staff permit card bearing the Judiciary Police symbol. They were accused of illegally using the emblem of the Judiciary Police, the main police investigation arm.

Chao, chief of Macau Concealers, was also held by police after he returned to Macau from Hong Kong last Sunday as a suspect over the logo misuse.

Sou said the city’s democrats would protest later against the police over their attempt to exhaust every means to attack the referendum. They would also continue to urge the government to start a new round of public consultation on political reform.

This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as 90pc don’t trust Macau leader, says ‘referendum’


Islamophobie: C’est la faute à l’Occident, imbécile ! (When in doubt, blame the West)

28 septembre, 2014
http://www.barenakedislam.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/slide131.jpg
http://www.lemondejuif.info/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/DSCN1348.jpgJe suis tombé par terre, c’est la faute à Voltaire … Gavroche
Il est malheureux que le Moyen-Orient ait rencontré pour la première fois la modernité occidentale à travers les échos de la Révolution française. Progressistes, égalitaristes et opposés à l’Eglise, Robespierre et les jacobins étaient des héros à même d’inspirer les radicaux arabes. Les modèles ultérieurs — Italie mussolinienne, Allemagne nazie, Union soviétique — furent encore plus désastreux …Ce qui rend l’entreprise terroriste des islamistes aussi dangereuse, ce n’est pas tant la haine religieuse qu’ils puisent dans des textes anciens — souvent au prix de distorsions grossières —, mais la synthèse qu’ils font entre fanatisme religieux et idéologie moderne. Ian Buruma et Avishai Margalit
In many respects, Iraq today looks tragically similar to the Iraq of 2006, complete with increasing numbers of horrific, indiscriminate attacks by Iraq’s al Qaeda affiliate and its network of extremists. Add to that the ongoing sectarian civil war in Syria — which is, in many aspects, a regional conflict being fought there — and the situation in Iraq looks even more complicated than it was in 2006 and thus even more worrisome — especially given the absence of American combat forces. David H. Petraeus (October 29, 2013)
La réalité est que, depuis 2002 et l’offensive alliée contre le régime Taliban d’Afghanistan et ses protégés djihadistes, Al-Qaïda relève plus du mythe que de la réalité. C’est un mythe qui a été entretenu par le fait que tout contestataire dans le monde musulman, quelles que soient ses motivations et ses objectifs, a bien compris qu’il devait se réclamer de l’organisation qui avait épouvanté l’Amérique s’il voulait être pris au sérieux. C’est un mythe qui a été entretenu par certains dirigeants des pays musulmans qui ont bien compris qu’ils devaient coller l’étiquette Al-Qaïda sur leurs opposants s’ils voulaient pouvoir les réprimer tranquillement. C’est enfin un mythe qui a été entretenu par les dirigeants et les médias d’un certain nombre de pays occidentaux pour légitimer leur politique sécuritaire intérieure et extérieure. Mais dans la galaxie salafiste, tout le monde sait bien que Al-Qaïda se résumait depuis 2003 à un Ben Laden réfugié dans un « resort » des services pakistanais et à un sentencieux Ayman Zawahiri distribuant les bons et les mauvais points de djihadisme et s’appropriant verbalement des actes de violence commis un peu partout dans le monde qu’il n’avait ni commandités, ni prescrits ni contrôlés. Il était difficile pour des djihadistes ambitieux de remettre en cause la figure emblématique de Ben Laden mais plus facile de s’affranchir de la tutelle morale de Zawahiri. En particulier pour des chefs de bande locaux qui n’avaient que faire du « djihad mondial » sans bénéfice immédiat et souhaitaient plutôt se bâtir un petit sultanat local où ils pourraient exercer un pouvoir sans partage et rançonner la population. C’est ce type de raisonnement, joint aux aléas des rivalités locales et des surenchères entre l’Arabie et le Qatar, qui a poussé un Abou Bakr al-Baghdadi à rejeter le parrainage d’Al-Qaïda et – comme on dit en France – à s’autoproclamer « Calife à la place du Calife ». (…) L’EIIL n’a pas « émergé » comme par miracle l’année dernière. Il est la filiation directe de ce que l’on appelait il y encore quelque temps « Al-Qaïda en Irak » ou « Al-Qaïda en Mésopotamie ». Cette organisation avait été elle-même formée en 2003 par Abou Moussaab al-Zarqawi, ancien membre d’Al-Qaïda rejeté par Ben Laden pour son aventurisme, à partir d’un groupe djihadiste préexistant dans le nord est de l’Irak et connu sous le nom de Ansar al-Islam (Partisans de l’Islam). Après la mort de Zarqawi tué dans un bombardement américain, l’organisation a été reprise en main par son chef actuel qui a continué de bénéficier du soutien actif des services saoudiens dans la perspective de s’opposer à la mainmise totale des chiites sur le pouvoir irakien et à la connivence de plus en plus marquée entre Baghdad et Téhéran. Les choses se sont compliquées début 2011 avec l’émergence des troubles en Syrie. Les services spéciaux saoudiens du Prince Bandar Ben Sultan et le Qatar se sont lancé dans des initiatives rivales pour accélérer la chute de Bashar el-Assad. Les Saoudiens ont organisé en Syrie l’émergence d’un front salafiste anti-régime sous la désignation de Jabhat al-Nosra tandis que les Qataris ont lancé une « OPA hostile » sur l’EIIL en diversifiant ses activités sur la Syrie en complément de l’Irak et en concurrence avec les autres groupes djihadistes. Et tout ce paysage confus s’est transformé à l’été 2013 quand le coup d’État feutré qui a eu lieu à Qatar a écarté l’Emir et son activiste Premier ministre et recentré les investissements de l’Émirat sur des activités économiques plutôt que politiques. Dans le même temps, à la lueur du désordre politique et social induit en Égypte par la gestion des Frères Musulmans, le cabinet royal saoudien – plutôt partisan d’un ordre régional apaisé et d’un système de coexistence plutôt que d’affrontement avec l’Iran – a repris la main sur les extrémistes du clan familial, écarté le Prince Bandar et ses partisans, apporté son soutien au coup d’État du Maréchal Sissi et, surtout, condamné et criminalisé les activités djihadistes au Levant. Brutalement privés de soutiens extérieurs significatifs, Jabhat el-Nosra et surtout l’EIIL se sont retrouvés condamnés à une fuite en avant, coincés sur place et contraints d’y trouver les ressources financières et militaires nécessaires à leur survie. Ce n’est pas par hasard que le premier objectif de l’EIIL dans sa fulgurante offensive du printemps dernier a été de s’emparer de la succursale de la banque centrale d’Irak à Mossoul pour y rafler près d’un demi-milliard de dollars en or et en billets. (…) Ces organisations fonctionnent sur un mode féodal et mafieux où des chefs de bandes locales prêtent allégeance au chef de l’organisation en fonction de leur intérêt du moment. Les frontières entre les mouvements sont donc poreuses mais avec les risques que cela comporte en cas de trahison. D’autre part il faut considérer qu’il existe en Syrie comme en Irak une multitude de groupes armés locaux, parfois à l’échelle du village, du quartier ou du groupe d’immeubles, à l’allégeance mal définie et qui se rallient à tel ou tel en fonction des circonstances et du profit à en espérer.(…) Pour l’instant l’EIIL dispose d’un trésor de guerre estimé à 2 milliards de dollars. Ce trésor repose essentiellement sur le racket de « l’impôt révolutionnaire », sur le contrôle d’un certain nombre de site d’extraction d’hydrocarbures, sur le pillage systématique et la revente sur le marché noir turc des matériaux de construction (souvent arrachés des maisons existantes), matériels industriels et agricoles, véhicules, objets volés dans les propriétés publiques et privées dans les zones contrôlées. Mais il faut se garder pour autant de considérer que l’EIIL dispose maintenant d’un budget annuel fixe et permanent. Le pillage de la succursale de la Banque Centrale d’Irak à Mossoul était un fusil à un coup. Il a été largement dilapidé dans la « location » de chefs de tribus sunnites d’Irak qui ont permis à l’EIIL sa rapide offensive du printemps. Le pillage des biens d’équipement sera bientôt tari par épuisement. De même que « l’impôt révolutionnaire » par suite de ruine ou exode des « assujettis ». Reste le contrôle des ressources pétrolières (vulnérables car les puits ne sont pas déplaçables) qui est soumis au bon vouloir des Turcs et d’un certain nombre d’intermédiaires irakiens, tous susceptibles de « retourner leur veste » en fonction de la conjoncture internationale. Bref, dans six ou huit mois, il ne restera plus grande chose et c’est là que se posera (s’il n’est pas réglé avant) le problème du retour vers leur pays d’origine des mercenaires et volontaires étrangers (Tchétchènes, Bosniaques, Maghrébins, Libyens, Saoudiens interdits de retour au royaume, et – en ce qui nous concerne – Européens.) (…) Al-Qaïda était un mouvement terroriste stricto sensu. C’est-à-dire un groupe restreint ayant une stratégie globale mais pas de tactique définie, mettant en œuvre des non-professionnels de la violence sacrifiables en vue de commettre dans le monde entier des attentats aveugles comme ils pouvaient, où ils pouvaient, quand ils pouvaient pourvu que la violence soit spectaculaire, médiatisée et porte la signature et le message de la mouvance. L’EIIL est, au contraire, une véritable armée de professionnels de la violence avec un chef, une mission, des moyens, un agenda et des objectifs précis dans un espace limité. Le seul fait de se désigner sous le nom d’Etat (Dawla) montre bien que ses responsables entendent se donner un ancrage institutionnel (al-Islami) et géographique (fil-Iraq wa ash-Sham). Ce n’était pas du tout le cas de Ben Laden, au moins dans sa version finale des années 1998-2001 qui prônait une violence déterritorialisée contre le monde entier. Mais qui dit État, dit chef de l’État et – en version islamique fondamentaliste – Calife. D’où l’initiative de Baghdadi qui vise aussi bien à faire un pied de nez aux Saoudiens, gardiens autoproclamés des Lieux saints qui l’ont abandonné et dont il conteste ainsi la légitimité, qu’à mettre l’ensemble des musulmans du monde en demeure de choisir leur camp en ayant à accepter ou rejeter son autopromotion. C’est ce qui explique qu’en se proclamant Calife, il abandonne aussitôt dans la dénomination du mouvement la référence territoriale à l’Irak et au Levant pour devenir « seulement » Etat Islamique (Dawlat al-Islami). Mais tout cela révèle plutôt des finasseries calculatrices de survie plutôt qu’une « vision globalisée du djihad ». (…) L’EIIL pose le même problème que l’Etat Taliban en Afghanistan, AQMI au Sahel, les Shebab en Somalie ou Boko Haram au Nigeria. Il s’agit d’armées constituées, souvent en uniforme ou portant des signes de reconnaissance, utilisant des matériels militaires, des véhicules dédiés, des implantations localisables, des moyens de communication identifiables. Cela relève à l’évidence d’une riposte militaire consensuelle et concertée face à laquelle on semble pourtant tergiverser. Pendant plus de dix ans, les Etats-Unis ont placé l’ensemble du monde musulman sous une loi permanente des suspects, détruit irrémédiablement plusieurs pays, espionné la planète entière – y compris leurs plus proches alliés et leurs concitoyens -, harcelé des millions de voyageurs dans les aéroports, multiplié les tortures et les internements illégaux au nom d’une « guerre globale contre la terreur » qui n’a ramené dans ses filets que quelques seconds couteaux et un Ben Laden « retiré des affaires ». Et aujourd’hui que sont parfaitement localisés avec précision une dizaine de milliers de djihadistes arborant fièrement leur drapeau, défilant dans les rues, égorgeant des citoyens américains devant les télévisions, éventrant médiatiquement femmes et enfants, jouant au foot avec les têtes de leurs ennemis, la Présidence américaine vient dire qu’elle « n’a pas encore de stratégie dans la lutte contre le djihadisme »…. Alain Chouet
Je ne pense pas qu’ils se soient retournés contre ces monstres qu’ils ont conçus, enfantés et nourris en armes, en argent, en combattants et en idéologie ! Ou du moins pas encore. Les deux organisations, Daech et Al-Nosra, sont le pur produit de l’idéologie salafiste wahhabite. Les pays occidentaux et leurs supplétifs du Golfe ainsi que la Turquie avaient, dès les premiers mois du déclenchement de la crise syrienne, opté pour armer l’opposition qu’ils avaient décrite comme «modérée». (…) L’Arabie saoudite, le Qatar et la Turquie n’avaient pas lésiné sur les moyens pour favoriser l’émergence de ces groupes terroristes. (…) Les pays qui avaient favorisé l’émergence de ce chaos indescriptible en Syrie, réalisant que le renversement du régime de Damas n’est plus accessible, craignant le retour des dizaines de milliers de djihadistes dans leurs pays respectifs, ont pris peur et commencent à se mobiliser contre eux. Mais ce retournement n’est jusqu’ici que verbal. (…) Officiellement, les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés et supplétifs n’ont cherché à éradiquer Daech que lorsque ce groupe a décapité des journalistes et des citoyens occidentaux d’une façon répugnante et barbare qui a choqué l’opinion publique. Ils ne pouvaient pas ne pas réagir, ou faire semblant de réagir. En s’emparant d’une grande partie du territoire irakien et de la deuxième ville du pays, Mossoul, en infligeant une défaite humiliante à l’armée irakienne et, enfin, en avançant vers le Kurdistan irakien, en s’attaquant aux minorités chrétienne, turkmène, yézidie… (…) Les mouvements qui prônent un pseudo djihad global, par opposition au djihad local, maîtrisent magistralement l’art de la communication et de la propagande, notamment sur les réseaux sociaux. Aqmi est actuellement sur la défensive. Elle est traquée et rejetée partout. Elle ne survit que grâce au racket, au crime organisé, à la contrebande et aux kidnappings générateurs de rançons que certains pays occidentaux continuent malheureusement à payer. Son projet idéologique, si l’on peut dire, n’attire pas grand monde. Il est donc normal que des dissensions apparaissent dans ses rangs. Pourchassée dans le Nord Mali, elle est actuellement repliée sur la Libye, un pays livré au chaos, aux milices armées et aux bandits de grands chemins. Il est normal, en période de repli, que des dissensions apparaissent mais sans lendemain. Il s’agit le plus souvent de disputes entre gangs autour d’un butin ou dans l’espoir d’accaparer une partie du butin saisi par Daech en Irak et évalué à quelque deux milliards de dollars. Je ne pense pas qu’il faudra accorder beaucoup de crédit à ces dissensions appelées à se multiplier. Le vrai danger c’est le chaos en Libye elle-même devenue le sanctuaire de nombreux terroristes ayant sévi en Syrie et en Irak et qui sont rentrés poursuivre leur combat sous des cieux plus cléments. (…) Cela signifie que ces deux pays ne cherchent pas réellement à éradiquer Daech. Car c’est actuellement la Syrie qui combat le plus efficacement ce fléau. Sans la contribution syrienne à la guerre contre ce monstre, Daech serait déjà en Jordanie, au Liban et à la frontière d’Israël. Il faut cependant discerner entre le refus médiatique et la coordination indirecte mais réelle pour faire barrage à cette organisation. Sur ce plan, une coordination réelle et efficace est engagée entre la Syrie et l’Irak. (…) Les Etats-Unis et la France, après avoir clamé que les jours de Bachar étaient comptés, ont quelque réticence à avaler leur chapeau, reconnaître leur erreur de jugement et retrouver le chemin de Damas. C’est une question de temps. Damas a déjà été approché par des émissaires français et américains pour reprendre une coopération secrète entre services. Mais ils se sont vu répondre que cette époque est bel et bien révolue et que si ces deux pays veulent réellement reprendre la coopération d’antan, il faudrait que ça se fasse à travers des structures diplomatiques. Donc pas avant la réouverture des ambassades américaine et française à Damas.(…) On a d’ailleurs remarqué que les pays du Maghreb, qui se disaient «amis du peuple syrien» (Maroc, Tunisie, Libye) n’avaient pas voulu participer à la conférence de Paris. Ils observent avec inquiétude le retour certain de leurs djihadistes qui sèment la terreur chez eux. C’est le cas également des pays occidentaux qui avaient fermé les yeux, voire encouragé le départ de ces djihadistes en Syrie et en Irak dans l’espoir de s’en débarrasser. A lire la presse occidentale, le retour de ces anciens de la Syrie, qui nous rappelle le retour des anciens d’Afghanistan, est le cauchemar de tous les services de sécurité, à tel point que pour certains analystes, la question n’est plus de savoir si ces terroristes vont passer à l’action en Europe même, mais quand et comment. C’est l’histoire de l’arroseur arrosé. (…) Il est certain que la coalition anti-Daech est actuellement inexistante. Elle est médiatique. Obama, qui ne veut pas terminer son deuxième mandat par une guerre, l’a dit ouvertement : c’est une guerre qui va durer des années. Conclusion : il cherche à épuiser la Syrie et l’Irak et à tout faire pour que ces deux pays retrouvent la place qui leur revient sur l’échiquier du Moyen-Orient. (…) C’est un secret de Polichinelle. Tous ces pays avaient juré la perte de l’Etat syrien. En armant ces mouvements djihadistes, ils pensaient ramener la Syrie dans le giron occidental, l’extraire de son alliance avec l’Iran, la Russie et la Chine et la contraindre à une paix au rabais avec Israël. Jusqu’ici, cette stratégie a lamentablement échoué. Et ces monstres qu’ils ont nourris vont se retourner contre eux. Le jour où les Américains vont constater les dégâts de cette stratégie sur leurs propres intérêts et sur les intérêts de leurs supplétifs du Golfe, ils vont arrêter la partie. On n’en est malheureusement pas encore là. (…) Je veux croire qu’il s’agit là d’une manœuvre du président Obama pour contraindre l’Arabie et les pétromonarchies du Golfe à «choisir leur camp» et à cesser leurs pratiques de double langage qui consiste à condamner verbalement le terrorisme tout en soutenant un peu partout dans le monde les groupes terroristes salafistes et les djihadistes en vue de neutraliser les initiatives démocratiques ou l’influence de l’Iran qu’ils considèrent comme également dangereuses pour le maintien de leur pouvoir.» Majed Nehmé
Si vous pouvez tuer un incroyant américain ou européen – en particulier les méchants et sales Français – ou un Australien ou un Canadien, ou tout […] citoyen des pays qui sont entrés dans une coalition contre l’État islamique, alors comptez sur Allah et tuez-le de n’importe quelle manière. (…) Tuez le mécréant qu’il soit civil ou militaire. (…) Frappez sa tête avec une pierre, égorgez-le avec un couteau, écrasez-le avec votre voiture, jetez-le d’un lieu en hauteur, étranglez-le ou empoisonnez-le. Abou Mohammed al-Adnani (porte-parole de l’EI)
En cette année proclamée par les Nations Unies Année internationale de solidarité avec le peuple palestinien, Israël a choisi d’en faire l’année d’une nouvelle guerre de génocide contre le peuple palestinien. Mahmoud Abbas
Qatar couldn’t care less about the Muslim Brotherhood, it means nothing to them… there is nothing sentimental in this, » just cold, hard realpolitik. They are reassessing the strategic landscape… They realize that, particularly since the recent (ISIS) beheadings, there is a growing international sentiment against Islamism, political Islam, and they don’t want to find themselves on the wrong side,but whether this is permanent remains to be seen (…) If Qatar moves away from supporting the Muslim Brotherhood it’s also going to move away from Hamas, for the simple reason that all the Arabs states will say: ‘If you want to be pro-Palestinian you can support the Palestinian Authority.’ There is an alternative. Professor Hillel Frisch (Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies)
Le but est la raison d’être même de cet Etat: propager la terreur. De plus, l’Etat Islamique dispose d’un véritable pouvoir de séduction, notamment par rapport à Al-Qaïda, grâce à ses ressources, à son statut autoproclamé d’Etat, ainsi qu’à sa parfaite utilisation des média et des réseaux sociaux. Ses succès militaires sont ainsi largement relayés et diffusés et participent de son rayonnement dans le monde. (…) Les services de renseignement et les spécialistes effectuent un énorme travail de repérage, mais il suffit qu’une seule personne passe à travers les mailles du filet pour semer la terreur et le chaos. Il y a actuellement plus de 900 français en Irak et en Syrie, prêts à revenir en France. De plus, le message audio de l’Etat Islamique est à mon sens un appel à l’insurrection lancé aux loups solitaires. Le porte-parole de Daech y enjoint tous ceux se sentant en empathie avec leur Etat à prendre les armes, ou, à défaut, à percuter les gens avec leur voiture, ou à les étrangler. Il s’agit d’un véritable appel au meurtre, visant à faire basculer les personnes fragiles psychologiquement ou isolées dans le terrorisme. On ne peut donc jamais être totalement prêt, car tout peut arriver. Les services font ce qu’ils peuvent pour prévenir ces risques, mais l’acte terroriste est par définition imprévisible. Le pire est toujours à attendre, malgré les progrès de la surveillance et la coopération internationale. Il suffit d’une personne influençable, d’un fou isolé, pour qu’un acte terroriste soit commis. Ce genre d’attentat est donc bien plus difficile à prévoir qu’une action coordonnée, structurée et financée par Al-Qaïda, par exemple. (…) Le terrorisme a énormément évolué, et un attentat comme celui du 11 septembre appartient au XXème siècle et n’arriverait plus aujourd’hui. Les Etats peuvent contrecarrer ce type d’action, et tout ce qui est organisé peut être déjoué puis puni par notre système législatif. Aujourd’hui, le terrorisme prend plutôt la forme du loup solitaire, un concept théorisé aux Etats-Unis par le FBI pour qualifier les attaques des groupuscules d’extrême-droite suprématistes. Ces groupes souhaitaient multiplier les actions terroristes, tout en limitant la possibilité d’arrestation. Ils ont donc commencé à créer de petites cellules, de une à trois personnes, très difficiles à identifier. Hugues Moutouh
Les autorités des pays du Golfe ont traîné des pieds face à Daech (le sobriquet en arabe de l’EI) « afin de ne pas trop heurter une partie de l’opinion publique séduite par la spectaculaire progression du groupe djihadiste, à un moment de crise d’identité des sunnites dans la région », explique le politologue Laurent Bonnefoy, chercheur au Ceri Sciences-Po.  Les monarchies de la région ont toutes les raisons d’être inquiètes : l’EI compterait dans ses rangs, selon certaines sources, plus de 5000 combattants originaires des pays du Golfe, dont quelque 4000 Saoudiens -Il ne faut pas oublier que 15 des 19 kamikazes des attentats du 11 septembre 2001 venaient d’Arabie saoudite. C’est pourquoi Riyad a tardé à s’engager militairement contre l’EI … L’Express
« Jeune-délinquant-Arabe-Syrie-attentat-France-terrorisme-antiterrorisme », toute l’artillerie sémantique est déballée afin de finir de nous convaincre que nous avons toutes les raisons d’avoir peur. Nemmouche n’est pas un monstre. C’est un sale type, narcissique et paumé, prêt à tout pour avoir son heure de gloire. Ses raisons d’aller en Syrie se rapprochaient probablement plus de celles qui, à un certain degré, mènent des adolescents américains à abattre toute leur classe ou certains de nos contemporains à participer à une émission de télé-réalité, qu’à une quelconque lecture du Coran. Ce qu’il incarne, c’est une forme particulièrement triviale de nihilisme. Il est, à cet égard, un pur produit occidental, labellisé et manufacturé par tout ce que la France peut faire subir à ses pauvres comme petites humiliations, stigmatisations et injustices. L’empilement sans fin de nouvelles lois antiterroristes en est l’une des facettes. In fine, tout le discours antiterroriste est ce qui auréole un Nemmouche de gloire. Sans cela, il aurait été considéré pour ce qu’il est, un pauvre type qui assassine des gens pour passer à la télé. En retour, on peut donner toujours plus de pouvoirs aux policiers et aux juges de l’antiterrorisme. Pouvoirs qui ne permettront évidemment pas d’arrêter plus de Nemmouche mais qui, en revanche, resserrent encore un peu plus le maillage policier et le contrôle de la population. Ces nouvelles prérogatives concernent des restrictions de circulation et d’expression pour certaines personnes dont le profil sera considéré à risque par un ou plusieurs Big Brothers bienveillants : la possibilité pour des parents d’inscrire leurs enfants aux fichiers des personnes recherchées ; une association de malfaiteur à une seule personne – un humour auquel Nemmouche sera des plus sensibles. Et, glissé subrepticement dans le tas, un arsenal de pénalisation de la cybercriminalité qui s’attaquera davantage à des initiatives de libre information comme WikiLeaks, plus qu’à des poseurs de bombe sur Internet. J’admets avoir commis une erreur en collaborant avec le service de police politique qu’est l’antiterrorisme. Cela va à l’opposé des positions et des combats que représente mon engagement de journaliste. Je m’en excuse auprès des familles de ceux que cette négligence a mis en danger. Pierre Torres ( ex-otage en Syrie)
Mon livre est provoqué par le fait que dans le système médiatique, dans les milieux intellectuels, chez les académiciens, il est accepté de cibler l’islam et les musulmans en général comme notre problème de civilisation (…) De Claude Guéant à Manuel Valls, sous la dissemblance partisane, d’une droite extrémisée à une gauche droitisée, nous voici donc confrontés à la continuité des obsessions xénophobes et, particulièrement, antimusulmanes (…) Aujourd’hui, et cela a été conquis de haute lutte, nous ne pouvons pas dire sans que cela provoque de réaction – il y a un souci de civilisation qui serait le judaïsme, les Juifs en France – . Eh bien je réclame la même chose pour ces compatriotes qui sont au coeur de ce qu’est notre peuple. (…) Je ne défends pas ceux qui trahissent leur religion en commettant des crimes, je défends nos compatriotes qui n’y sont pour rien et qui sont en même temps stigmatisés ou oubliés. Edwy Plenel
Sur ces questions Mandela a été très ferme (…) En 2001, aux Etats-Unis, lors d’une conversation avec Thomas Friedman, un journaliste américain spécialisé dans le Proche-Orient, il lui dira: « C’est peut-être étrange pour vous d’observer la situation en Palestine ou, plus exactement, la structure des relations politiques et culturelles entre les Palestiniens et les Israéliens, comme un système d’apartheid. »car, dit-il, « les Palestiniens ne luttent pas pour un « Etat » mais pour la liberté, la libération et l’égalité, exactement comme nous avons lutté pour la liberté en Afrique du Sud. » En revanche, il soulignait, sur les questions de la justice, de la terre, de l’occupation: « Israël a montré qu’il n’était pas encore prêt à rendre ce qu’il avait occupé en 1967, que les colonies restent, que Jérusalem est toujours sous souveraineté exclusivement israélienne et les Palestiniens n’ont pas d’Etat indépendant mais sont sous domination économique israélienne, avec un contrôle israélien des frontières, de la terre, de l’air, de l’eau, de la mer. (…) Israël, c’était  la conclusion de Mandela, ne pense pas à un « Etat » mais à une « séparation » avec des guillemets qui renvoient à l’apartheid. Je voudrais rappeler cela pour un peu déranger etmontrer l’actualité de ces combats. Edwy Plenel
Il ne s’agit pas ici de transformer Mandela en héraut du combat pour les droits nationaux des Palestiniens, même s’il n’a jamais fait mystère de son soutien à la lutte contre l’occupation israélienne. Mandela a toujours été, sur ce terrain, beaucoup plus en retrait que l’archevêque Desmond Tutu, qui depuis de longues années soutient la campagne internationale de boycott de l’État d’Israël, qu’il qualifie, à l’instar d’autres dirigeants sud-africains, d’État d’apartheid. Tel n’est pas le cas de Mandela, contrairement à ce que croient ceux qui ont pris pour argent comptant un “Mémo de Nelson Mandela à Thomas Friedman” dénonçant “l’apartheid israélien”, qui est en réalité un exercice de style rédigé par Arjan el-Fassed. Julien Salingue
The main purpose of the Mandela-memo was to respond in a satirical way to Thomas Friedman using the exact same style and even phrases he uses in his columns. Obviously, the ‘mock memo’ had been forwarded to several e-mail lists containing the memo, which originally included the title “Mandela’s First Memo to Thomas Friedman” and a byline “by Arjan El Fassed”, but eventually was forwarded without my name and sometimes without title. I posted the ‘mock memo’ myself on 30 March on an mailinglist of Al-Awda. Despite this, I’ve seen it several times being posted on the same list, something that gives you an idea of the lack of attention many people give to material they forward. In various posts I read, the subject title was changed for example, “Mandela supports…”, “must read”, etc. Perhaps it was wishful thinking. If Nelson Mandela would seriously have written to the New York Times, wouldn’t the New York Times just publish it? Moreover, I believe Nelson Mandela has better things to do then responding to columns written by Thomas Friedman. Arjan El Fassed
L’enquête progresse sur le document publié par Mediapart pour accuser Nicolas Sarkozy d’avoir reçu de l’argent de la Libye sous le régime de Kadhafi. Les derniers éléments recueillis par les juges d’instruction parisiens René Cros et Emmanuelle Legrand renforcent le soupçon d’une falsification, sans que l’origine d’un éventuel montage puisse à ce stade être précisée.(…) Dans un rapport remis aux juges le 7 juillet dernier, les gendarmes évoquent par ailleurs le témoignage d’un ancien diplomate devenu chercheur, spécialiste de la Libye, consulté sur la forme du document. Celui-ci leur a déclaré avoir « reçu les confidences d’un journaliste du Canard enchaîné » qui lui aurait indiqué que l’hebdomadaire satirique détenait la même note « depuis 2008 » mais qu’il n’avait pas souhaité le publier « par principe de précaution », eu égard aux incertitudes sur son authenticité. Hervé Gattegno (Vanity Fair)
« Il y a un problème de l’islam en France », n’hésite pas à proclamer un académicien, regrettant même « que l’on abandonne ce souci de civilisation au Front national ». À cette banalisation intellectuelle d’un discours semblable à celui qui, avant la catastrophe européenne, affirmait l’existence d’un « problème juif » en France, ce livre répond en prenant le parti de nos compatriotes d’origine, de culture ou de croyance musulmanes contre ceux qui les érigent en boucs émissaires de nos inquiétudes et de nos incertitudes. L’enjeu n’est pas seulement de solidarité mais de fidélité. Pour les musulmans donc, comme l’on écrirait pour les juifs, pour les Noirs et pour les Roms, ou, tout simplement, pour la France.» Edwy Plenel
C’est notre voix, à ceux qui ne sont pas musulmans, qui manque (…) Avant de leur dire « montrez que vous êtes contre le terrorisme », à nous de montrer que nous combattons toute cette islamophobie, bienséante, banale qui se répand hélas trop souvent dans le débat public. Edwy Plenel
Dans cet ouvrage en forme de brûlot contre les idées reçues, le journaliste s’élève adroitement contre le poncif selon lequel, citant dans le texte l’académicien Alain Finkielkraut, « il y a un problème de l’islam en France ». Cet essai démasque notamment les tentatives dispersées d’une essentialisation « en bloc ». Dont la conséquence pratique consiste à figer « tout ce qui ressort, peu ou prou, de l’islam dans une menace indistincte », légitimant au passage « l’exclusion et l’effacement » de nos compatriotes musulmans. Tout en constatant le « poids d’un passé colonial jamais vraiment soldé », l’auteur prend le contre-pied de la doxa xénophobe en jugeant que « la question musulmane détient aujourd’hui la clé de notre rapport au monde et aux autres ». L’Humanité
Un de nos compatriotes, tombé entre les mains d’un groupe de barbares fanatisés, vient d’être assassiné et a rejoint ainsi la liste des otages qui ont servi d’exutoire au nom d’un prétendu islam dans lequel aucun de nous ne se reconnaît nullement. Nous musulmans de France, ne pouvons qu’exprimer notre répulsion et dénoncer avec la dernière énergie des crimes abominables perpétrés au nom d’une religion dont les fondements mêmes sont la paix, la miséricorde et le respect de la vie. Nous dénions à ces êtres sauvages le droit de se revendiquer de l’islam et de s’exprimer en notre nom. Les supplices et la mort qu’ils ont infligés à nos frères chrétiens, yazidis ou musulmans, en Syrie, en Irak, au Nigeria et ailleurs, nous ont révulsés et nous ont rendus encore plus malheureux de ne pouvoir faire rien d’autre que d’exprimer notre solidarité et notre immense compassion. Faut-il pour autant se contenter d’exprimer notre solidarité sans aller plus loin dans l’expression de notre fraternité? Non! Car il est de notre devoir, au nom précisément de cette religion de paix et du véritable islam, d’appeler tous les musulmans qui veulent rester fidèles à ces valeurs cardinales, à exprimer, là où ils sont et quelles que soient les circonstances, leur dégoût devant cette ultime manifestation de la barbarie. Certes, cette majorité de musulmans n’est pas toujours audible, faute d’avoir accès aux médias, ou dans l’incapacité de créer elle-même ses propres outils de communication, pour rétablir l’image déformée que l’on renvoie d’eux et qui en fait soit des djihadistes, soit des fondamentalistes mais jamais des citoyens ordinaires soucieux de vivre leur foi dans le cadre des lois de la République et de sauvegarder les traditions et les cultures qui constituent chaque citoyen français dans la diversité de ses origines. Collectif de musulmans
 Les musulmans de France font bloc contre le terrorisme et la « barbarie » La Croix
On se souvient, il y a quelques semaines, des 500 manifestations organisées en France pendant l’opération défense israélienne ‘’bordure protectrice’’. L’immense majorité des protestataires dans ces cortèges étaient de confession musulmane. La haine, la rage contre Israël, les juifs et la France était partout bien présente, palpable, ce n’est plus à démontrer aujourd’hui.(…) En revanche, lorsqu’il s’agit comme hier pour les musulmans de protester contre la barbarie de l’Etat islamiste et des djihadistes, de protester contre le meurtre abject d’Hervé Gourdel, il n’y a exactement P.E.R.S.O.N.N.E. Devant la grande mosquée de Paris, il devait en effet y avoir tout au plus 300 individus qui, si on retire les journalistes, politiques et autres bobos Ve arrondissement, il ne devait y avoir guère plus d’une centaine de musulmans, c’est-à-dire grosso modo ceux sortant de la prière de la grande mosquée de Paris le vendredi. Pourtant, comme d’habitude, la propagande médiatique a fonctionné à plein régime afin de promouvoir cet évènement. En 24h, tous les journalistes ont appelé à cette manifestation sur toutes les chaines, dans tous les journaux : bilan 300 personnes. Si on considère qu’il y a près de 2000 djihadistes ‘’français’’ auprès de l’Etat islamique, le nombre de manifestants était bien moindre, ce qui est dramatique, alors qu’il y a en France des millions de musulmans. Europe-Israël
C’est bien Obama et non Bush qui a interrompu le processus de stabilisation existant en Irak depuis le « surge » de 2008 en quittant l’Irak avec précipitation et en laissant tout le pouvoir aux chiites inféodés à l’Iran, ce qui a démantelé tout l’effort entamé par David Petraeus commencé sous Bush et gagné en faisant alliance avec les tribus sunnites. C’est bien Obama et non Bush qui a laissé faire en Syrie en 2013, refusant d’armer les résistants dits « laïcs », et fermant les yeux sur le financement des groupes islamistes (dont l’ancêtre de l’E.I actuel) opéré par l’Arabie Saoudite et le Qatar aujourd’hui apeurés de voir leur pouvoir féodal vaciller sous les coups de boutoir d’un mouvement islamique parfaitement fidèles aux critères historiques de l’islam depuis le début, l’islam étant par exemple une religion de « paix » dans la mesure où l’on accepte de vivre sous son joug : « que la paix (de l’islam) soit avec toi » voilà ce que veut dire son salut et non pas cette pâle imitation du christianisme, certains imams parlant même « d’amour » ce qui est d’un risible sans pareille lorsque l’on observe le nombre infime d’occurrence en la matière dans leur texte sacré… Que l’Occident soit à l’heure actuelle son défenseur intransigeant (à coup de drones également) en dit long non seulement sur son masochisme mais surtout sa prétention à transformer tout taureau radical en boeuf aseptisé. En tout cas il semble bien qu’il n’existe pas d’islam modéré comme il n’a pas existé de communisme modéré, à moins d’abandonner la dictature du prolétariat, ou la « charia » comme le veulent certains en Tunisie, au Maroc, en Égypte, au Yémen… Wait and see. Lucien SA Oulahbib

C’est la faute à Voltaire !

Alors qu’à coup de « selfies sanglants » les bouchers djihadistes lâchés dans la nature par l’Administration Obama appellent nos concitoyens, de ce côté comme de l’autre côté  de l’Atlantique, à littéralement « égorger nos fils et nos compagnes » …

Pendant qu’à la tribune de l’ONU, nos amis palestiniens dénoncent une « nouvelle guerre de génocide » lancée devinez par qui et que sans compter la perspective de l’arrivée du virus ébola à La Mecque, les argentiers du jihad tremblent eux aussi à Riadh comme à Doha devant les effets en retour du virus salafiste que depuis des décennies ils propagent de par leur monde …

Et qu’après les quelque 500 manifestations contre « l’horreur barbare » à Gaza de l’été et la massive manifestation d’au moins 300 personnes à la sortie de la Grande Mosquée de Paris de vendredi, « les musulmans de France font bloc contre le terrorisme et la ‘barbarie’  » …

Comment ne pas voir, avec l’ancien journaliste trotskyste et autre notoire maitre-faussaire à ses heures perdues Edwy Plenel ou le journaliste et ancien otage en Syrie Pierre Torres …

La grande faute d’un Occident dominateur et colonialiste face à ces nouveaux juifs que sont aujourd’hui les musulmans, pourchassés de la Syrie à l’Irak et de l’Afrique à nos banlieues ?

Edwy Plenel : misère du trotsko-djihadisme
Pour Mediapart, l’Occident est coupable de tout
Luc Rosenzweig
Causeur
25 septembre 2014

Le fondateur de Médiapart, en opération de promotion de son dernier opus Pour les musulmans, promène sa moustache et son sourire crispé sur les plateaux de télévisions et dans les studios des principales radios. Son message est simple : tout le mal qui advient aujourd’hui dans ce bas monde est le résultat, en dernière instance, de l’indignité de l’homme blanc dominateur, marqué pour l’éternité de la flétrissure colonialiste, qui se transmet de génération en génération. Les musulmans sont, de son point de vue, les victimes absolues de ce désordre universel, en Irak, en Syrie, comme dans les banlieues de nos métropoles. J’exagère ? Ceux qui ont regardé « Ce soir ou jamais », le soir du 19 septembre, on pu le voir voler au secours de l’ex-otage en Syrie Pierre Torres, qui avait écrit, dans une tribune publiée par Le Monde : « Mohammed Nemmouche est un pur produit occidental, labellisé et manufacturé par tout ce que la France peut faire subir à ses pauvres comme petites humiliations, stigmatisations et injustices. L’empilement sans fin de nouvelles lois antiterroristes en est l’une des facettes. ». Interpellé à ce sujet par Elisabeth Lévy, avant que Torrès ait pu bredouiller un semblant de justification, Plenel s’exclame : « C’est le passage le plus fort et le plus digne de ce texte ! ». Ce tortionnaire d’Alep, ce tueur de juifs de Bruxelles est donc « notre monstre », à qui il est même dénié d’avoir plus d’autonomie de pensée et d’action que celle octroyée par Mary Shelley à la créature du docteur Frankenstein.

Le jeudi suivant, c’est le jour d’Edwy aux « Matins » de France Culture, où l’excellent Marc Voinchet lui offre un créneau hebdomadaire pour administrer aux auditeurs une dose concentrée de ses délires idéologiques. Ce jeudi là, le 25 septembre 2014, la France est sous le choc de l’assassinat, par égorgement, du guide de haute montagne Hervé Gourdel par les émules algériens de Daech. Comment allait-il s’en sortir ? Difficile, dans ce cas là, de mettre la barbarie des assassins sur le compte des misères subies par des jeunes victimes de harcèlement policier, de contrôles au faciès à répétition, de déréliction sociale dans des cités-ghettos. Lorsque l’actualité vous envoie un uppercut, il convient, en bonne logique plenelienne, de botter en touche dans le champ de l’Histoire : «  C’est reparti comme en 14 !» claironne Edwy. Le scandale du jour, pour lui, ce n’est pas l’assassinat de sang froid, dans des conditions horribles d’un guide de montagne accompagnant des alpinistes algériens dans le massif du Djurdjura, mais l’union nationale, sincère et spontanée, qui s’est révélée pour condamner ce crime, et le soutien quasi-unanime de la classe politique française à la riposte militaire aux égorgeurs de Daech. L’émotion légitime qui nous étreint relève, selon lui d’un « bourrage de crâne » à l’image de celui, dénoncé jadis par les fondateurs du Canard Enchaîné, en 1915, en pleine guerre de 14… À propos de bourrage de crâne, Plenel passe bien évidemment sous silence celui subi par ces jeunes déboussolés qui vont chercher dans le djihad un sens à leur mort. Nous sommes « historiquement » forcément coupable de tout, y compris de la guerre de religion qui oppose les sunnites au chiites dans un affrontement sauvage qui dure depuis près de trente ans au Moyen-Orient. Plenel, et ses amis de Mediapart condamnent toutes les opérations conduites pour limiter l’expansion de cette idéologie mortifère, au Mali, comme en Irak. Ce n’est pas la conduite stratégique et tactique de ces interventions qui sont critiquées – ce qui est parfaitement légitime – mais leur principe même. Quoi que nous fassions, c’est le mal, renversement de la vision binaire et manichéenne des Ronald Reagan et George W. Bush…

Plenel veut de l’Histoire ? On va lui en donner. Plongeons-nous, par exemple dans le passé du trotskisme, dont il persiste à se réclamer, dans sa version «  culturelle », sinon organisationnelle. L’estampille stalinienne de l’expression « hitléro-trotskiste » ne doit pas nous empêcher, comme l’ont fait tous les historiens sérieux, de revisiter le passé de cette mouvance pendant la Seconde guerre mondiale. Dès 1938, le ton est donné par le patron, Léon Trotsky, dans son article «  La lutte anti-impérialiste » : « Il règne aujourd’hui au Brésil un régime semi-fasciste qu’aucun révolutionnaire ne peut considérer sans haine. Supposons cependant que, demain, l’Angleterre entre dans un conflit militaire avec le Brésil. Je vous le demande : de quel côté sera la classe ouvrière ? Je répondrai pour ma part que, dans ce cas, je serai du côté du Brésil “fasciste” contre l’Angleterre “démocratique”. Pourquoi ? Parce que, dans le conflit qui les opposerait, ce n’est pas de démocratie ou de fascisme qu’il s’agirait. Si l’Angleterre gagnait, elle installerait à Rio de Janeiro un autre fasciste, et enchaînerait doublement le Brésil. Si au contraire le Brésil l’emportait, cela pourrait donner un élan considérable à la conscience démocratique et nationale de ce pays et conduire au renversement de la dictature de Vargas ». Après l’assassinat de Trotsky, ses émules de la IVème internationale mettront cette ligne en application, en substituant l’Allemagne hitlérienne au Brésil. Les trotskistes français, dans leur grande majorité1, et jusqu’à la Libération pratiqueront l’entrisme dans les partis collaborationnistes, notamment le Rassemblement national populaire de Marcel Déat, et prôneront le « défaitisme révolutionnaire » face à l’Allemagne nazie. Voici ce qu’on pouvait lire dans La Vérité, organe du mouvement trotskyste, le 22 août 1944, alors que la bataille pour vaincre Hitler faisait rage. Sous le titre «  Pourquoi nous n’avons pas adhéré à la Résistance », on peut lire cette adresse à la classe ouvrière française : « Nous savons que ce programme n’est pas le vôtre. Vous croyez devoir maintenir votre Union Sacrée avec les partis de la bourgeoisie, et prendre à votre compte leurs buts de guerre. Nous croyons qu’une telle politique creuse le fossé entre les ouvriers français et allemands, qu’elle a, entre autres résultats celui de souder les ouvriers allemands autour de leur propre bourgeoisie, de prolonger par là l’existence de Hitler, de paralyser la révolution en Allemagne et en Europe ».

Les temps ont changé, mais l’esprit reste le même : l’ennemi, ce n’est pas le fasciste, aujourd’hui le djihadisme massacreur et égorgeur, mais ceux qui s’unissent pour le combattre.

Une poignée de militants trotskistes, dont le plus connu est David Rousset, rompirent avec cette ligne aberrante, participèrent à la Résistance, notamment dans le travail militant en direction des soldats allemands. Certains d’entre eux furent fusillés et déportés. Mais, comme les poissons volants, ils ne constituent pas la majorité de l’espèce… ↩

Voir également:

Islam : Edwy Plenel publie un plaidoyer « Pour les musulmans »
Le journaliste et essayiste Edwy Plenel publie un livre-plaidoyer contre ceux qui stigmatisent les musulmans de France.
RTL  avec AFP
16/09/2014

Edwy Plenel lance « un cri d’alarme et un geste de solidarité » pour les musulmans de France. Dans son livre-plaidoyer « Pour les musulmans » (éd. La Découverte), qui sort jeudi 18 septembre, le journaliste et essayiste fustige ceux qui ciblent l’islam « comme notre problème de civilisation ».

C’est une petite phrase du philosophe Alain Finkielkraut qui a suscité l’ire du fondateur du site d’information Mediapart et l’a conduit à rédiger ce court essai « à contre-courant », tracé d’une plume vive et engagée: « Il y a un problème de l’islam en France ».

« Mon livre est provoqué par le fait que dans le système médiatique, dans les milieux intellectuels, chez les académiciens, il est accepté de cibler l’islam et les musulmans en général comme notre problème de civilisation », explique Edwy Plenel.

L’auteur poursuit de sa vindicte l’ancien ministre de l’Intérieur Claude Guéant, qui avait considéré comme un problème « l’accroissement du nombre des fidèles » musulmans – ils seraient 3,5 à 5 millions en France selon les estimations. Ou encore Manuel Valls qui, avant d’accéder à Matignon, avait selon Edwy Plenel posé la question « de la compatibilité de l’islam avec la démocratie ».

« De Claude Guéant à Manuel Valls, sous la dissemblance partisane, d’une droite extrémisée à une gauche droitisée, nous voici donc confrontés à la continuité des obsessions xénophobes et, particulièrement, antimusulmanes », écrit le pamphlétaire.

Le titre de son ouvrage renvoie à « Pour les Juifs », article qu’Emile Zola rédigea en 1896, vingt mois avant son fameux « J’accuse » en défense du capitaine Dreyfus. « Aujourd’hui, et cela a été conquis de haute lutte, nous ne pouvons pas dire sans que cela provoque de réaction +il y a un souci de civilisation qui serait le judaïsme, les Juifs en France+. Eh bien je réclame la même chose pour ces compatriotes (musulmans, NDLR) qui sont au coeur de ce qu’est notre peuple », dit Edwy Plenel, précisant que son livre aurait pu s’intituler « Pour les minorités » ou « Pour la France ».

« Je ne défends pas ceux qui trahissent leur religion en commettant des crimes, je défends nos compatriotes qui n’y sont pour rien et qui sont en même temps stigmatisés ou oubliés », confie l’essayiste. Tout en rêvant d’un retour à la « laïcité originelle » inscrite dans la loi de 1905 qui, « loin d’une crispation face à l’affirmation des cultes minoritaires, signifiait leur reconnaissance », écrit-il.

« J’ai commis l’erreur de collaborer avec les services de l’antiterrorisme français »
Pierre Torres (Journaliste, ancien otage en Syrie)
Le Monde
17.09.2014

Juin 2014, me voilà au siège de la Direction centrale du renseignement intérieur (DCRI) avec mes anciens co-otages. Nous sommes face à plein de gens sûrement très importants qui nous expliquent en chœur qu’ils ont Nemmouche et qu’il était peut-être l’un de nos geôliers en Syrie. Ils précisent que, en théorie, ils ont la possibilité de le garder encore des jours et des jours mais que bon, comme ils l’ont déjà depuis un moment, ils vont devoir le refourguer aux Belges.

On sait que la police peut à peu près tout faire avec ceux que l’on soupçonne d’être terroristes, mais là, il y aurait urgence et il faut que nous rappliquions dare-dare pour déposer. Certes, l’oiseau en question n’est pas près de s’envoler et quand bien même il aurait participé à mon enlèvement, quoi qu’il arrive, il n’est pas tout à fait près de sortir de prison. Mon témoignage n’a donc non seulement aucun intérêt pratique à ce moment-là, mais il n’en a aucun dans l’absolu.

GRAVITÉ DE LA SITUATION

Parmi nos hôtes d’importance, Camille Hennetier, procureure, qui dirige le parquet antiterroriste. Elle nous promet qu’aucune instruction ne sera ouverte contre ce suspect, au sujet de notre enlèvement, tant qu’un danger pèsera sur les otages occidentaux. Elle attendra que la crise soit finie. Elle comprend la gravité de la situation. Elle nous rassure.

Trois mois s’écoulent jusqu’à ce qu’une lecture audacieuse de l’actualité pousse on ne sait qui à décréter que le temps était venu de révéler le contenu de nos dépositions. Qu’il est facile d’être audacieux lorqu’on n’est pas en Syrie enfermé entre quatre murs !

Depuis l’assassinat de James Foley, le 19 août, de nombreuses informations ont fuité et de nombreux mensonges ont été proférés. Cela au détriment des familles de ceux encore détenus en Syrie. Les mensonges peuvent émaner de n’importe qui, pas les fuites. Ou plutôt si, nos dépositions ont pu fuiter par n’importe quel bout de l’antiterrorisme français mais pas sans l’aval et l’intérêt de tous.

Aux questions telles que : « Reconnaissez-vous Medhi Nemmouche ? Est-il le sarcastique et pétulant jeune homme que l’on dit ? », il me faut répondre par une autre question : pourquoi le parquet, la Direction générale de la sécurité intérieure ou on ne sait quel juge, donnent-il accès à des dépositions qui, un jour ou l’autre, seront légalement rendues publiques ? Lequel d’entre eux a-t-il perdu à Action ou vérité ?

OPÉRATION DE PROMOTION

Cela relève évidemment de l’opération de promotion. Promotion de quoi ? Nous ne le savons pas encore – promouvoir la nouvelle loi antiterroriste en discussion au Parlement, démontrer que « les services » servent à autre chose qu’à mettre en examen des adolescentes de 14 ans « pour association de malfaiteurs en relation avec une entreprise terroriste » –, nous verrons bien. Ce qui est certain, c’est que la seule chose qui puisse justifier la mise en danger des autres otages, c’est que quelqu’un ou quelque institution policière a vu là la possibilité de se faire mousser.

Du point de vue des organisateurs de cette fuite, l’opération a bien fonctionné. « Jeune-délinquant-Arabe-Syrie-attentat-France-terrorisme-antiterrorisme », toute l’artillerie sémantique est déballée afin de finir de nous convaincre que nous avons toutes les raisons d’avoir peur. Nemmouche n’est pas un monstre. C’est un sale type, narcissique et paumé, prêt à tout pour avoir son heure de gloire. Ses raisons d’aller en Syrie se rapprochaient probablement plus de celles qui, à un certain degré, mènent des adolescents américains à abattre toute leur classe ou certains de nos contemporains à participer à une émission de télé-réalité, qu’à une quelconque lecture du Coran. Ce qu’il incarne, c’est une forme particulièrement triviale de nihilisme. Il est, à cet égard, un pur produit occidental, labellisé et manufacturé par tout ce que la France peut faire subir à ses pauvres comme petites humiliations, stigmatisations et injustices. L’empilement sans fin de nouvelles lois antiterroristes en est l’une des facettes.

In fine, tout le discours antiterroriste est ce qui auréole un Nemmouche de gloire. Sans cela, il aurait été considéré pour ce qu’il est, un pauvre type qui assassine des gens pour passer à la télé. En retour, on peut donner toujours plus de pouvoirs aux policiers et aux juges de l’antiterrorisme. Pouvoirs qui ne permettront évidemment pas d’arrêter plus de Nemmouche mais qui, en revanche, resserrent encore un peu plus le maillage policier et le contrôle de la population.

Ces nouvelles prérogatives concernent des restrictions de circulation et d’expression pour certaines personnes dont le profil sera considéré à risque par un ou plusieurs Big Brothers bienveillants : la possibilité pour des parents d’inscrire leurs enfants aux fichiers des personnes recherchées ; une association de malfaiteur à une seule personne – un humour auquel Nemmouche sera des plus sensibles. Et, glissé subrepticement dans le tas, un arsenal de pénalisation de la cybercriminalité qui s’attaquera davantage à des initiatives de libre information comme WikiLeaks, plus qu’à des poseurs de bombe sur Internet.

J’admets avoir commis une erreur en collaborant avec le service de police politique qu’est l’antiterrorisme. Cela va à l’opposé des positions et des combats que représente mon engagement de journaliste. Je m’en excuse auprès des familles de ceux que cette négligence a mis en danger.

Voir encore:

Le masque est définitivement tombé. Fiasco absolu de la manifestation des musulmans contre le meurtre d’Hervé Gourdel et la barbarie de l’Etat islamique (photos)
Europe-Israël
sept 27, 20149

On se souvient, il y a quelques semaines, des 500 manifestations organisées en France pendant l’opération défense israélienne ‘’bordure protectrice’’. L’immense majorité des protestataires dans ces cortèges étaient de confession musulmane. La haine, la rage contre Israël, les juifs et la France était partout bien présente, palpable, ce n’est plus à démontrer aujourd’hui.

On se souvient également des très nombreux débordements des supporters algériens pourtant ‘’français’’, descendant par centaines de milliers dans les rues des villes de France et occasionnant, comme toujours, de nombreuses exactions sur les biens et sur les personnes.

On se souvient enfin des prières de rue qui mobilisaient des milliers d’individus, occupant sans vergogne des rues entières au mépris des lois, de la culture française et du bien-être des habitants locaux.

En revanche, lorsqu’il s’agit comme hier pour les musulmans de protester contre la barbarie de l’Etat islamiste et des djihadistes, de protester contre le meurtre abject d’Hervé Gourdel, il n’y a exactement P.E.R.S.O.N.N.E.

Devant la grande mosquée de Paris, il devait en effet y avoir tout au plus 300 individus qui, si on retire les journalistes, politiques et autres bobos Ve arrondissement, il ne devait y avoir guère plus d’une centaine de musulmans, c’est-à-dire grosso modo ceux sortant de la prière de la grande mosquée de Paris le vendredi.
Pourtant, comme d’habitude, la propagande médiatique a fonctionné à plein régime afin de promouvoir cet évènement. En 24h, tous les journalistes ont appelé à cette manifestation sur toutes les chaines, dans tous les journaux : bilan 300 personnes.
Si on considère qu’il y a près de 2000 djihadistes ‘’français’’ auprès de l’Etat islamique, le nombre de manifestants était bien moindre, ce qui est dramatique, alors qu’il y a en France des millions de musulmans.

La situation est donc claire et les masques sont définitivement tombés. Il n’est en aucun cas outrancier de dire que les musulmans vivant en France n’ont aucune intention de protester contre l’ignoble Etat islamique et par conséquent, à des degrés divers, se sentent solidaires de celui-ci.

Un collectif de musulmans de France : «Nous sommes aussi de “sales Français”»
Home FIGARO VOX Vox Societe
Par vidéos FigaroVox
25/09/2014

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE- Ils sont médecins, politiques, avocats, français et musulmans. Ils expriment avec la plus grande force la répulsion que leur inspire l’assassinat d’Hervé Gourdel.

Bariza Khiari (première vice-présidente du Sénat), Madjid Si Hocine (médecin et militant associatif), Saad Khiari (cinéaste-auteur), Ghaleb Bencheikh (président de la conférence mondiale des religions pour la paix), Farid Yaker (président du Forum France Algérie), Kamel Meziti (écrivain), Dounia Bouzar (anthropologue du fait religieux), Said Branine (journaliste rédacteur en chef d’Oumma.com), Humeyra Filiz (représentante de l’EMISCO auprés du conseil de l’Europe), l’ONG COJEP internationale, Anissa Meziti (présidente de l’association Agir contre le racisme), Abderahim Hamdani ( financier), Yasser Khaznadar (gériatre), Marwane Ben Yahmed (directeur de la publication de Jeune Afrique), Elie Melki (traducteur), Majed Nehmé (directeur de la rédaction d’Afrique Asie), Adel Kachermi (courtier en aviation), Kamel Kabtane (recteur de la Mosquée de Lyon), Faycal Megherbi (avocat au barreau de Paris), Kamel Maouche (avocat au barreau de Paris)

Un de nos compatriotes, tombé entre les mains d’un groupe de barbares fanatisés, vient d’être assassiné et a rejoint ainsi la liste des otages qui ont servi d’exutoire au nom d’un prétendu islam dans lequel aucun de nous ne se reconnaît nullement. Nous musulmans de France, ne pouvons qu’exprimer notre répulsion et dénoncer avec la dernière énergie des crimes abominables perpétrés au nom d’une religion dont les fondements mêmes sont la paix, la miséricorde et le respect de la vie.

Nous dénions à ces êtres sauvages le droit de se revendiquer de l’islam et de s’exprimer en notre nom. Les supplices et la mort qu’ils ont infligés à nos frères chrétiens, yazidis ou musulmans, en Syrie, en Irak, au Nigeria et ailleurs, nous ont révulsés et nous ont rendus encore plus malheureux de ne pouvoir faire rien d’autre que d’exprimer notre solidarité et notre immense compassion.

Faut-il pour autant se contenter d’exprimer notre solidarité sans aller plus loin dans l’expression de notre fraternité? Non! Car il est de notre devoir, au nom précisément de cette religion de paix et du véritable islam, d’appeler tous les musulmans qui veulent rester fidèles à ces valeurs cardinales, à exprimer, là où ils sont et quelles que soient les circonstances, leur dégoût devant cette ultime manifestation de la barbarie.

Certes, cette majorité de musulmans n’est pas toujours audible, faute d’avoir accès aux médias, ou dans l’incapacité de créer elle-même ses propres outils de communication, pour rétablir l’image déformée que l’on renvoie d’eux et qui en fait soit des djihadistes, soit des fondamentalistes mais jamais des citoyens ordinaires soucieux de vivre leur foi dans le cadre des lois de la République et de sauvegarder les traditions et les cultures qui constituent chaque citoyen français dans la diversité de ses origines.

Nous, Français de France et de confession musulmane, tenons à exprimer avec force notre totale solidarité avec toutes les victimes de cette horde de barbares, soldats perdus d’un prétendu État islamique, et dénonçons avec la dernière énergie toutes les exactions commises au nom d’une idéologie meurtrière qui se cache derrière la religion islamique en confisquant son vocabulaire.

Personne ne peut s’arroger le droit de s’exprimer en notre nom, et, pour mieux attester de notre solidarité dans les circonstances dramatiques actuelles, nous revendiquons l’honneur de dire que «nous sommes aussi de sales Français».

Voir de plus:

Les musulmans de France font bloc contre le terrorisme et la « barbarie »
Plusieurs centaines de personnes se sont rassemblées vendredi 26 septembre en début d’après-midi devant la Grande Mosquée de Paris en hommage à Hervé Gourdel, l’otage français assassiné mercredi 24 septembre.
Lucie Gruau
La Croix
26/9/14

Contrairement à leurs voisins britanniques qui ont choisi Internet et la campagne Not in my name  (pas en mon nom) pour faire entendre leur voix, les musulmans de France ont préféré se rassembler, vendredi 26 septembre, devant un lieu hautement symbolique : la Grande Mosquée de Paris.

Dire non au terrorisme
Pendant qu’à l’intérieur, certains prient, plusieurs centaines de personnes investissent bientôt la place du puits de l’ermite. Toutes les générations sont représentées dans l’assemblée, les jeunes y côtoient les anciens.

Tous sont venus là pour dire « non au terrorisme » et rendre hommage à Hervé Gourdel, l’otage français assassiné par le groupe djihadiste algérien Jund al-Khilafa (les soldats du califat). « L’annonce de cet assassinat m’a énormément touché, raconte Fatia. Ces gens-là ne sont pas des musulmans, ils n’ont rien en commun avec nous ! ».

Un message de paix
Karim et Mohamad, deux amis trentenaires, discutent un peu plus loin sur le trottoir. « On est là par solidarité mais c’est comme si nous musulmans on devait toujours se justifier, et expliquer sans cesse qu’on est contre ce genre de barbarie », regrettent-ils.

Sadek, quarante ans, préfère rester à l’écart de l’agitation. « Je veux faire passer un message de paix, explique-t-il. Quelle que soit notre religion, nous sommes avant tout des êtres humains. »

Unité nationale
Partageant cette idée, certains chrétiens, comme Françoise, ont aussi fait le déplacement pour apaiser le climat actuel, « très tendu ». « Je suis là parce que j’ai des amis musulmans et je ne veux pas d’un climat soupçonneux à leur égard », lance-t-elle alors que la foule se met à scander « Daech assassin ! ».

Sur le parvis de la mosquée, apparaissent alors plusieurs personnalités politiques et religieuses. Le président du Conseil français du culte musulman (CFCM) et recteur de la Grande Mosquée de Paris, Dalil Boubakeur, est le premier à prendre la parole : « Ce rassemblement, c’est l’expression forte et vivante de notre volonté d’unité nationale et de notre volonté inébranlable de vivre ensemble ».

« Je ne partage pas votre foi mais je la respecte »
Mgr Michel Dubost, évêque d’Evry et président du conseil pour les relations interreligieuses à la Conférence des évêques de France (CEF) s’adresse alors aux musulmans présents. « Je suis là pour vous dire de redresser la tête, soyez fiers de ce que vous faites, lance-t-il à la foule. Je ne partage pas votre foi mais je la respecte. »

Puis vient le tour de la maire de Paris, Anne Hidalgo (PS) qui rappelle devant le public que « la communauté nationale ne se laissera pas diviser ».

Voir aussi:

« Le message de l’Etat Islamique est un appel à l’insurrection lancé aux loups solitaires« 
Wladimir Garcin
Le Figaro
22/09/2014

Pour Bernard Cazeneuve, nous sommes prêts à faire face à la menace de l’Etat Islamique. Est-ce vraiment le cas ? Le décryptage d’Hugues Moutouh.

Hugues Moutouh a été conseiller spécial du ministre de l’Intérieur. Il est désormais avocat. Il est l’auteur de 168 heures chrono: la traque de Mohamed Merah.
FigaroVox: Dans un message audio, les djihadistes de l’Etat Islamique menacent les ressortissants français à cause de notre engagement militaire en Irak. Faut-il prendre ces menaces au sérieux?

Hugues MOUTOUH: Le message a été authentifié: la menace doit donc être prise au sérieux. Il ne s’agit certes pas de la première fois qu’un réseau terroriste menace de frapper nos ressortissants, mais cela confirme la dangerosité extrême de cet Etat islamique. Ce groupe est bien plus puissant et dangereux que tous ceux connus jusqu’ici. Installé sur un territoire vaste, disposant d’importantes ressources financières, militaires (un matériel sophistiqué, hérité des stocks américains abandonnés sur place), Daech a les moyens de mener une politique agressive. Le danger va donc croissant, et tous les services de renseignement français le savent.

Quel est le but des terroristes à travers ces intimidations?

Le but est la raison d’être même de cet Etat: propager la terreur. De plus, l’Etat Islamique dispose d’un véritable pouvoir de séduction, notamment par rapport à Al-Qaïda, grâce à ses ressources, à son statut autoproclamé d’Etat, ainsi qu’à sa parfaite utilisation des média et des réseaux sociaux. Ses succès militaires sont ainsi largement relayés et diffusés et participent de son rayonnement dans le monde.

Le ministre de l’Intérieur Bernard Cazeneuve a déclaré que «même si le risque zéro n’existe pas, nous prenons 100% de précaution», et que «La France n’a pas peur» face à la menace terroriste. Sommes-nous vraiment prêts à faire face aux djihadistes?

Les services de renseignement et les spécialistes effectuent un énorme travail de repérage, mais il suffit qu’une seule personne passe à travers les mailles du filet pour semer la terreur et le chaos. Il y a actuellement plus de 900 français en Irak et en Syrie, prêts à revenir en France. De plus, le message audio de l’Etat Islamique est à mon sens un appel à l’insurrection lancé aux loups solitaires. Le porte-parole de Daech y enjoint tous ceux se sentant en empathie avec leur Etat à prendre les armes, ou, à défaut, à percuter les gens avec leur voiture, ou à les étrangler. Il s’agit d’un véritable appel au meurtre, visant à faire basculer les personnes fragiles psychologiquement ou isolées dans le terrorisme.

On ne peut donc jamais être totalement prêt, car tout peut arriver. Les services font ce qu’ils peuvent pour prévenir ces risques, mais l’acte terroriste est par définition imprévisible. Le pire est toujours à attendre, malgré les progrès de la surveillance et la coopération internationale. Il suffit d’une personne influençable, d’un fou isolé, pour qu’un acte terroriste soit commis. Ce genre d’attentat est donc bien plus difficile à prévoir qu’une action coordonnée, structurée et financée par Al-Qaïda, par exemple.

La France n’a pas connu d’attaques majeures depuis la vague d’attentats des années 1995-1996. Comment la menace a-t-elle évolué depuis? Les services de sécurité français ont-ils adapté leurs techniques de renseignement?

Le terrorisme a énormément évolué, et un attentat comme celui du 11 septembre appartient au XXème siècle et n’arriverait plus aujourd’hui. Les Etats peuvent contrecarrer ce type d’action, et tout ce qui est organisé peut être déjoué puis puni par notre système législatif. Aujourd’hui, le terrorisme prend plutôt la forme du loup solitaire, un concept théorisé aux Etats-Unis par le FBI pour qualifier les attaques des groupuscules d’extrême-droite suprématistes. Ces groupes souhaitaient multiplier les actions terroristes, tout en limitant la possibilité d’arrestation. Ils ont donc commencé à créer de petites cellules, de une à trois personnes, très difficiles à identifier. Le FBI a donc inventé le terme de loup solitaire pour qualifier ces individus. Les islamistes utilisent aujourd’hui ce type d’organisations pour préparer leurs actions.

Tout ne peut être fait ou interdit au nom de la lutte contre le terrorisme. La question est aujourd’hui de savoir s’il faut déplacer le curseur entre la sécurité et la liberté vers plus de protection, ce qui impliquerait automatiquement une limitation des libertés et droits.
Dans un précédent entretien, vous déclariez que la principale menace actuelle était celle des loups solitaires, comme Mohamed Merah, endoctrinés et formés sur Internet. L’Etat est-il aujourd’hui capable de surveiller, d’identifier et d’interpeller ce type de menaces plus efficacement, ou Internet reste-t-il une zone difficilement contrôlable?

Internet est évidemment difficilement contrôlable, et, plus largement, la limite de la surveillance, de la protection de la société est le cadre de l’Etat de droit. Tout ne peut être fait ou interdit au nom de la lutte contre le terrorisme. La question est aujourd’hui de savoir s’il faut déplacer le curseur entre la sécurité et la liberté vers plus de protection, ce qui impliquerait automatiquement une limitation des libertés et droits. Ce débat ne peut cependant être mené par les services de sécurité, mais par le Parlement et le gouvernement. Si l’on estime que le risque devient trop important, ces derniers doivent proposer un nouveau cadre pour la société. La question centrale d’un tel débat est bien celle du prix à payer pour la sécurité.

Au-delà des services de police, les citoyens sont-ils prêts psychologiquement à lutter contre la menace terroriste?

Depuis de nombreuses années, les moyens nécessaires à la lutte contre le terrorisme sont refusés au ministère de l’Intérieur, comme l’a montré le scandale du fichier Edvige. Or, un nouveau système, utilisant les nouvelles technologies, les écoutes, la reconnaissance faciale et les fichiers de renseignement est aujourd’hui nécessaire. Les Français sont, à mon sens, prêts à accepter ce nouveau cadre s’il défini et approuvé par le Parlement, et s’ils sont informés intelligemment et clairement à ce propos.

Si l’utilisation de ces nouvelles technologies est régulée et contrôlée, nous pourrons lutter bien plus efficacement contre la menace terroriste, et identifier les déséquilibrés en amont pour les éviter d’agir.

Voir encore:

Alain Chouet : « L’Etat islamique manquera bientôt de ressources humaines et financières »
Saïd Branine et Ian Hamel
Oumma
10 septembre 2014
En exclusivité pour Oumma.com, Alain Chouet, ancien chef du service de renseignement de sécurité de la Direction générale de la sécurité extérieure (DGSE), analyse les chances de survie de l’Etat islamique.

A propos de l’auteur

Ancien chef du service de renseignement de sécurité de la Direction générale de la sécurité extérieure (DGSE), Alain Chouet a notamment été en poste au Liban et en Syrie. Il avait été l’un des premiers spécialistes du terrorisme à révéler que l’organisation Al-Qaïda était « morte sur le plan opérationnel dans les trous à rats de Tora Bora en 2002 ». Et qu’« il ne resterait qu’une cinquantaine de membres, essentiellement des seconds couteaux, incapables d’animer à l’échelle planétaire un réseau coordonné de violence politique ». En exclusivité pour Oumma.com, Alain Chouet analyse les chances de survie de l’Etat islamique (*).

Comment expliquez-vous que la presse francophone n’ait parlé que tardivement de cette scission d’Al-Qaida, aujourd’hui à la tête de l’Etat islamique. On sait pourtant que depuis la mort de Ben Laden, certains djihadistes ont refusé de prêter allégeance à Zawahiri.

La réalité est que, depuis 2002 et l’offensive alliée contre le régime Taliban d’Afghanistan et ses protégés djihadistes, Al-Qaïda relève plus du mythe que de la réalité. C’est un mythe qui a été entretenu par le fait que tout contestataire dans le monde musulman, quelles que soient ses motivations et ses objectifs, a bien compris qu’il devait se réclamer de l’organisation qui avait épouvanté l’Amérique s’il voulait être pris au sérieux. C’est un mythe qui a été entretenu par certains dirigeants des pays musulmans qui ont bien compris qu’ils devaient coller l’étiquette Al-Qaïda sur leurs opposants s’ils voulaient pouvoir les réprimer tranquillement. C’est enfin un mythe qui a été entretenu par les dirigeants et les médias d’un certain nombre de pays occidentaux pour légitimer leur politique sécuritaire intérieure et extérieure.

Mais dans la galaxie salafiste, tout le monde sait bien que Al-Qaïda se résumait depuis 2003 à un Ben Laden réfugié dans un « resort » des services pakistanais et à un sentencieux Ayman Zawahiri distribuant les bons et les mauvais points de djihadisme et s’appropriant verbalement des actes de violence commis un peu partout dans le monde qu’il n’avait ni commandités, ni prescrits ni contrôlés.

Il était difficile pour des djihadistes ambitieux de remettre en cause la figure emblématique de Ben Laden mais plus facile de s’affranchir de la tutelle morale de Zawahiri. En particulier pour des chefs de bande locaux qui n’avaient que faire du « djihad mondial » sans bénéfice immédiat et souhaitaient plutôt se bâtir un petit sultanat local où ils pourraient exercer un pouvoir sans partage et rançonner la population. C’est ce type de raisonnement, joint aux aléas des rivalités locales et des surenchères entre l’Arabie et le Qatar, qui a poussé un Abou Bakr al-Baghdadi à rejeter le parrainage d’Al-Qaïda et – comme on dit en France – à s’autoproclamer « Calife à la place du Calife ».

Comment expliquer l’émergence de l’EIIL et par qui ce groupe était-il financé (avant qu’il ne mette la main sur des banques et des puits de pétrole)?

L’EIIL n’a pas « émergé » comme par miracle l’année dernière. Il est la filiation directe de ce que l’on appelait il y encore quelque temps « Al-Qaïda en Irak » ou « Al-Qaïda en Mésopotamie ». Cette organisation avait été elle-même formée en 2003 par Abou Moussaab al-Zarqawi, ancien membre d’Al-Qaïda rejeté par Ben Laden pour son aventurisme, à partir d’un groupe djihadiste préexistant dans le nord est de l’Irak et connu sous le nom de Ansar al-Islam (Partisans de l’Islam). Après la mort de Zarqawi tué dans un bombardement américain, l’organisation a été reprise en main par son chef actuel qui a continué de bénéficier du soutien actif des services saoudiens dans la perspective de s’opposer à la mainmise totale des chiites sur le pouvoir irakien et à la connivence de plus en plus marquée entre Baghdad et Téhéran.

Les choses se sont compliquées début 2011 avec l’émergence des troubles en Syrie. Les services spéciaux saoudiens du Prince Bandar Ben Sultan et le Qatar se sont lancé dans des initiatives rivales pour accélérer la chute de Bashar el-Assad. Les Saoudiens ont organisé en Syrie l’émergence d’un front salafiste anti-régime sous la désignation de Jabhat al-Nosra tandis que les Qataris ont lancéune « OPA hostile » sur l’EIIL en diversifiant ses activités sur la Syrie en complément de l’Irak et en concurrence avec les autres groupes djihadistes.

Et tout ce paysage confus s’est transformé à l’été 2013 quand le coup d’État feutré qui a eu lieu à Qatar a écarté l’Emir et son activiste Premier ministre et recentré les investissements de l’Émirat sur des activités économiques plutôt que politiques. Dans le même temps, à la lueur du désordre politique et social induit en Égypte par la gestion des Frères Musulmans, le cabinet royal saoudien – plutôt partisan d’un ordre régional apaisé et d’un système de coexistence plutôt que d’affrontement avec l’Iran – a repris la main sur les extrémistes du clan familial, écarté le Prince Bandar et ses partisans, apporté son soutien au coup d’État du Maréchal Sissi et, surtout, condamné et criminalisé les activités djihadistes au Levant.

Brutalement privés de soutiens extérieurs significatifs, Jabhat el-Nosra et surtout l’EIIL se sont retrouvés condamnés à une fuite en avant, coincés sur place et contraints d’y trouver les ressources financières et militaires nécessaires à leur survie. Ce n’est pas par hasard que le premier objectif de l’EIIL dans sa fulgurante offensive du printemps dernier a été de s’emparer de la succursale de la banque centrale d’Irak à Mossoul pour y rafler près d’un demi-milliard de dollars en or et en billets.

Existe-t-il encore des liens entre le Front Al Nosra en Syrie et l’EIIL?

Ces organisations fonctionnent sur un mode féodal et mafieux où des chefs de bandes locales prêtent allégeance au chef de l’organisation en fonction de leur intérêt du moment. Les frontières entre les mouvements sont donc poreuses mais avec les risques que cela comporte en cas de trahison. D’autre part il faut considérer qu’il existe en Syrie comme en Irak une multitude de groupes armés locaux, parfois à l’échelle du village, du quartier ou du groupe d’immeubles, à l’allégeance mal définie et qui se rallient à tel ou tel en fonction des circonstances et du profit à en espérer.

L’EIIL est-il capable d’administrer les territoires conquis?

C’est douteux, faute de ressources humaines et, à terme, de ressources financières. Pour l’instant l’EIIL dispose d’un trésor de guerre estimé à 2 milliards de dollars. Ce trésor repose essentiellement sur le racket de « l’impôt révolutionnaire », sur le contrôle d’un certain nombre de site d’extraction d’hydrocarbures, sur le pillage systématique et la revente sur le marché noir turc des matériaux de construction (souvent arrachés des maisons existantes), matériels industriels et agricoles, véhicules, objets volés dans les propriétés publiques et privées dans les zones contrôlées.

Mais il faut se garder pour autant de considérer que l’EIIL dispose maintenant d’un budget annuel fixe et permanent. Le pillage de la succursale de la Banque Centrale d’Irak à Mossoul était un fusil à un coup. Il a été largement dilapidé dans la « location » de chefs de tribus sunnites d’Irak qui ont permis à l’EIIL sa rapide offensive du printemps. Le pillage des biens d’équipement sera bientôt tari par épuisement. De même que « l’impôt révolutionnaire » par suite de ruine ou exode des « assujettis ».

Reste le contrôle des ressources pétrolières (vulnérables car les puits ne sont pas déplaçables) qui est soumis au bon vouloir des Turcs et d’un certain nombre d’intermédiaires irakiens, tous susceptibles de « retourner leur veste » en fonction de la conjoncture internationale. Bref, dans six ou huit mois, il ne restera plus grande chose et c’est là que se posera (s’il n’est pas réglé avant) le problème du retour vers leur pays d’origine des mercenaires et volontaires étrangers (Tchétchènes, Bosniaques, Maghrébins, Libyens, Saoudiens interdits de retour au royaume, et – en ce qui nous concerne – Européens.)

Quelles sont les différences majeures entre le mode de fonctionnement d’Al-Qaida et l’EIIL? En s’autoproclamant calife, Baghdadi a également une vision globalisée du djihad, comme l’avait Ben Laden.

Al-Qaïda était un mouvement terroriste stricto sensu. C’est-à-dire un groupe restreint ayant une stratégie globale mais pas de tactique définie, mettant en œuvre des non-professionnels de la violence sacrifiables en vue de commettre dans le monde entier des attentats aveugles comme ils pouvaient, où ils pouvaient, quand ils pouvaient pourvu que la violence soit spectaculaire, médiatisée et porte la signature et le message de la mouvance.

L’EIIL est, au contraire, une véritable armée de professionnels de la violence avec un chef, une mission, des moyens, un agenda et des objectifs précis dans un espace limité. Le seul fait de se désigner sous le nom d’Etat (Dawla) montre bien que ses responsables entendent se donner un ancrage institutionnel (al-Islami) et géographique (fil-Iraq wa ash-Sham). Ce n’était pas du tout le cas de Ben Laden, au moins dans sa version finale des années 1998-2001 qui prônait une violence déterritorialisée contre le monde entier.

Mais qui dit État, dit chef de l’État et – en version islamique fondamentaliste – Calife. D’où l’initiative de Baghdadi qui vise aussi bien à faire un pied de nez aux Saoudiens, gardiens autoproclamés des Lieux saints qui l’ont abandonné et dont il conteste ainsi la légitimité, qu’à mettre l’ensemble des musulmans du monde en demeure de choisir leur camp en ayant à accepter ou rejeter son autopromotion. C’est ce qui explique qu’en se proclamant Calife, il abandonne aussitôt dans la dénomination du mouvement la référence territoriale à l’Irak et au Levant pour devenir « seulement » Etat Islamique (Dawlat al-Islami). Mais tout cela révèle plutôt des finasseries calculatrices de survie plutôt qu’une « vision globalisée du djihad ».

Quels sont les moyens les plus efficaces pour combattre cette organisation?

L’EIIL pose le même problème que l’Etat Taliban en Afghanistan, AQMI au Sahel, les Shebab en Somalie ou Boko Haram au Nigeria. Il s’agit d’armées constituées, souvent en uniforme ou portant des signes de reconnaissance, utilisant des matériels militaires, des véhicules dédiés, des implantations localisables, des moyens de communication identifiables. Cela relève à l’évidence d’une riposte militaire consensuelle et concertée face à laquelle on semble pourtant tergiverser.

Pendant plus de dix ans, les Etats-Unis ont placé l’ensemble du monde musulman sous une loi permanente des suspects, détruit irrémédiablement plusieurs pays, espionné la planète entière – y compris leurs plus proches alliés et leurs concitoyens -, harcelé des millions de voyageurs dans les aéroports, multiplié les tortures et les internements illégaux au nom d’une « guerre globale contre la terreur » qui n’a ramené dans ses filets que quelques seconds couteaux et un Ben Laden « retiré des affaires ».

Et aujourd’hui que sont parfaitement localisés avec précision une dizaine de milliers de djihadistes arborant fièrement leur drapeau, défilant dans les rues, égorgeant des citoyens américains devant les télévisions, éventrant médiatiquement femmes et enfants, jouant au foot avec les têtes de leurs ennemis, la Présidence américaine vient dire qu’elle « n’a pas encore de stratégie dans la lutte contre le djihadisme »….

Je veux croire qu’il s’agit là d’une manœuvre du Président Obama pour contraindre l’Arabie et le pétromonarchies du Golfe à « choisir leur camp » et à cesser leurs pratiques de double langage qui consiste à condamner verbalement le terrorisme tout en soutenant un peu partout dans le monde les groupes terroristes salafistes et les djihadistes en vue de neutraliser les initiatives démocratiques ou l’influence de l’Iran qu’ils considèrent comme également dangereuses pour le maintien de leur pouvoir.

L’Iran va-t-il devenir un partenaire à part entière pour combattre l’EIIL?

S’il veut préserver l’avenir et laisser la porte ouverte à l’élaboration d’un système de confiance régional avec les pétromonarchies arabes, l’Iran n’a pas vraiment intérêt à s’afficher comme le fer de lance ou un élément actif d’une coalition pilotée par les Occidentaux pour combattre l’extrémisme sunnite violent.

Téhéran ne peut que se réjouir de l’éradication des salafistes et soutiendra résolument mais aussi discrètement que possible ses alliés chiites irakiens, syriens et libanais comme il l’a toujours fait. Mais pourquoi voudrait-on, alors que l’Arabie multiplie les signaux d’apaisement, qu’il aille compromettre ses chances de coexistence future avec son environnement sunnite pour résoudre un problème qui ne le menace pas directement et qui est la conséquence des erreurs de gestion américaines dans la zone ?

Au-delà des dérapages verbaux de certains de leurs responsables politiques, les Iraniens sont prudents et calculateurs. Selon toute probabilité, ils laisseront les Occidentaux s’occuper du dossier en apportant juste l’aide qu’il faut pour qu’on reconnaisse et salue leur contribution et leur sens des responsabilités internationales mais avec le souci de ne pas justifier l’accusation constante qui leur est faite par les wahhabites d’être des hérétiques ennemis de l’Islam.

Si l’Etat islamique est détruit, ce n’est pas à Téhéran qu’iront se répandre les militants du djihadisme défaits, déçus et avides de vengeance….

(*) Alain Chouet donne une conférence sur le thème « Syrie, le carrefour des contradictions », le 19 septembre à 19 h 30 à la librairie arabe L’Olivier, 5, rue de Fribourg à Genève (Suisse).

Voir encore:

« L’Arabie saoudite, le Qatar et la Turquie n’avaient pas lésiné sur les moyens pour favoriser l’émergence du terrorisme »

Majed Nehmé, directeur d’Afrique Asie

Le Temps d’Algérie

21-09-2014

Le Temps d’Algérie : Certains pays ont fait alliance avec «la rébellion» pour renverser le président Al Assad. Aujourd’hui, ces pays font partie de la coalition anti-Daech. Comment expliquez-vous ce retournement ?

Je ne pense pas qu’ils se soient retournés contre ces monstres qu’ils ont conçus, enfantés et nourris en armes, en argent, en combattants et en idéologie ! Ou du moins pas encore. Les deux organisations, Daech et Al-Nosra, sont le pur produit de l’idéologie salafiste wahhabite.

Les pays occidentaux et leurs supplétifs du Golfe ainsi que la Turquie avaient, dès les premiers mois du déclenchement de la crise syrienne, opté pour armer l’opposition qu’ils avaient décrite comme «modérée». Lors de la conférence des «Amis de la Syrie» réunis à Tunis en février 2012, le ministre saoudien des Affaires étrangères, Saoud Al-Fayçal, avait déclaré publiquement que son pays allait armer l’opposition. Mais très vite, les chancelleries occidentales, et plus particulièrement la France et les Etats-Unis d’Amérique, à travers leurs ambassadeurs à Damas, Eric Chevalier et Robert Ford, avaient compris que les marionnettes du
Conseil national syrien, qu’ils avaient créées de toutes pièces pour se substituer au pouvoir syrien légal, était dominé, directement et indirectement, par des cadres des Frères musulmans. Les libéraux et les démocrates, que j’appellerai les «idiots utiles» de la rébellion, n’avaient aucune représentativité.

En décidant de militariser la contestation, les Occidentaux et leurs marionnettes ont été très vite submergés par des organisations takfiries qui rejetaient à la fois le pouvoir syrien et l’opposition extérieure. Leurs calculs étaient basés sur un pari stupide, à savoir que les jours de Bachar Al Assad étaient désormais comptés (trois à six mois !), que l’armée allait se retourner contre lui et, enfin, que le CNS allait prendre le pouvoir et chasser les extrémistes qui avaient fait le sale boulot pour eux et qu’ils n’avaient qu’à attendre dans les hôtels cinq étoiles en Turquie, en Arabie saoudite, au Qatar et en Europe pour le ramasser.

Pour Burhan Ghalioun et Georges Sabra, les premiers présidents du CNS, «tous ceux qui combattent le régime syrien, y compris Al Nosra, sont des révolutionnaires et des alliés». Auparavant, ils prétendaient que ces groupes islamistes issus souvent de la nébuleuse d’Al Qaïda, étaient manipulés par les services syriens. Mais peu à peu, l’armée syrienne libre était balayée, l’opposition démocratique pacifique réduite au silence ou à l’exil. L’Arabie saoudite, le Qatar et la Turquie n’avaient pas lésiné sur les moyens pour favoriser l’émergence de ces groupes terroristes.

Ils pensaient que ce sont les seuls capables d’écraser le régime syrien.
Plutôt que d’écraser le régime de Damas, ces groupes ont commencé à se livrer bataille entre eux. Le Font Al Nosra, qui a été reconnu officiellement par le successeur de Ben Laden, Ayman Al-Zawahiri, comme le seul représentant d’Al Qaïda au pays du Cham (grande Syrie) est actuellement en guerre larvée contre Daech. Il y a aussi d’autres mouvements rebelles, tous d’obédience takfirie, qui pullulent sur l’ensemble du territoire syrien et qui s’entredéchirent férocement. Ainsi, l’aspiration à la démocratie et au respect des droits de l’homme qui avait animé les premières manifestations n’est plus de mise. Désormais, c’est la création d’un califat et d’un Etat islamique qui semble animer tous ces mouvements hétéroclites.

Les pays qui avaient favorisé l’émergence de ce chaos indescriptible en Syrie, réalisant que le renversement du régime de Damas n’est plus accessible, craignant le retour des dizaines de milliers de djihadistes dans leurs pays respectifs, ont pris peur et commencent à se mobiliser contre eux. Mais ce retournement n’est jusqu’ici que verbal.
Que cherchent les Etats-Unis en mettant en place cette «coalition» contre Daech ?

Officiellement, les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés et supplétifs n’ont cherché à éradiquer Daech que lorsque ce groupe a décapité des journalistes et des citoyens occidentaux d’une façon répugnante et barbare qui a choqué l’opinion publique. Ils ne pouvaient pas ne pas réagir, ou faire semblant de réagir. En s’emparant d’une grande partie du territoire irakien et de la deuxième ville du pays, Mossoul, en infligeant une défaite humiliante à l’armée irakienne et, enfin, en avançant vers le Kurdistan irakien, en s’attaquant aux minorités chrétienne, turkmène, yézidie…

Daech a poussé les Etats-Unis à intervenir symboliquement. Ils en ont profité pour exiger le départ de Maliki et son remplacement par quelqu’un de plus docile. Ce qui a effectivement été fait. Si les bombardements aériens ont pu avoir un impact positif sur le moral des troupes loyalistes et des peshmergas kurdes, et stopper l’avancée des hordes de Daech, il n’en reste pas moins que c’est l’intervention des militaires iraniens et des combattants turcs et syriens du PKK qui a permis de stopper net cette avancée. Or les pasdarans iraniens et les PKK kurdes en Turquie et en Syrie sont considérés par les Occidentaux comme des terroristes !
En fait, tout ce cirque médiatique fait autour de Daech a pour ultime objectif de faire durer la tuerie et la destruction de la Syrie et de l’Irak et ultérieurement, l’Iran.

Une «dissension» a été annoncée au sein d’Al Qaïda au Maghreb islamique (Aqmi), de laquelle serait née une nouvelle organisation terroriste appelée «Djound Al Khilafa» et qui a déjà annoncé son allégeance à Daech. Pourquoi maintenant et pourquoi la région du Sahel ?

Les mouvements qui prônent un pseudo djihad global, par opposition au djihad local, maîtrisent magistralement l’art de la communication et de la propagande, notamment sur les réseaux sociaux. Aqmi est actuellement sur la défensive. Elle est traquée et rejetée partout. Elle ne survit que grâce au racket, au crime organisé, à la contrebande et aux kidnappings générateurs de rançons que certains pays occidentaux continuent malheureusement à payer. Son projet idéologique, si l’on peut dire, n’attire pas grand monde.

Il est donc normal que des dissensions apparaissent dans ses rangs. Pourchassée dans le Nord Mali, elle est actuellement repliée sur la Libye, un pays livré au chaos, aux milices armées et aux bandits de grands chemins. Il est normal, en période de repli, que des dissensions apparaissent mais sans lendemain. Il s’agit le plus souvent de disputes entre gangs autour d’un butin ou dans l’espoir d’accaparer une partie du butin saisi par Daech en Irak et évalué à quelque deux milliards de dollars. Je ne pense pas qu’il faudra accorder beaucoup de crédit à ces dissensions appelées à se multiplier. Le vrai danger c’est le chaos en Libye elle-même devenue le sanctuaire de nombreux terroristes ayant sévi en Syrie et en Irak et qui sont rentrés poursuivre leur combat sous des cieux plus cléments.

Comment qualifiez-vous le refus des Etats-Unis et de la France de coopérer avec l’Etat syrien contre Daech ?

Cela signifie que ces deux pays ne cherchent pas réellement à éradiquer Daech. Car c’est actuellement la Syrie qui combat le plus efficacement ce fléau. Sans la contribution syrienne à la guerre contre ce monstre, Daech serait déjà en Jordanie, au Liban et à la frontière d’Israël.

Il faut cependant discerner entre le refus médiatique et la coordination indirecte mais réelle pour faire barrage à cette organisation. Sur ce plan, une coordination réelle et efficace est engagée entre la Syrie et l’Irak.

L’échange d’informations se fait par l’intermédiaire du gouvernement irakien qui joue, jusqu’ici, le go-between entre Américains et Syriens.

Les Etats-Unis et la France, après avoir clamé que les jours de Bachar étaient comptés, ont quelque réticence à avaler leur chapeau, reconnaître leur erreur de jugement et retrouver le chemin de Damas. C’est une question de temps. Damas a déjà été approché par des émissaires français et américains pour reprendre une coopération secrète entre services. Mais ils se sont vu répondre que cette époque est bel et bien révolue et que si ces deux pays veulent réellement reprendre la coopération d’antan, il faudrait que ça se fasse à travers des structures diplomatiques. Donc pas avant la réouverture des ambassades américaine et française à Damas.

Les «djihadistes» libyens, tunisiens et ceux d’autres pays du Maghreb arabe, partis faire le «djihad» au sein d’organisations criminelles, dont Daech, Al Qaïda et le Front Al Nosra, en Syrie et en Irak, constituent-ils un danger à leur retour dans leurs pays respectifs ?

C’est une évidence. On a d’ailleurs remarqué que les pays du Maghreb, qui se disaient «amis du peuple syrien» (Maroc, Tunisie, Libye) n’avaient pas voulu participer à la conférence de Paris. Ils observent avec inquiétude le retour certain de leurs djihadistes qui sèment la terreur chez eux. C’est le cas également des pays occidentaux qui avaient fermé les yeux, voire encouragé le départ de ces djihadistes en Syrie et en Irak dans l’espoir de s’en débarrasser.
A lire la presse occidentale, le retour de ces anciens de la Syrie, qui nous rappelle le retour des anciens d’Afghanistan, est le cauchemar de tous les services de sécurité, à tel point que pour certains analystes, la question n’est plus de savoir si ces terroristes vont passer à l’action en Europe même, mais quand et comment. C’est l’histoire de l’arroseur arrosé.

Ne croyez-vous pas que cette «coalition anti-Daech pourrait être utilisée par les Etats-Unis pour effectuer des frappes contre l’armée syrienne et l’affaiblir dans le but de faciliter l’avancée de ce qui est appelée «opposition armée modérée» ?

Il est certain que la coalition anti-Daech est actuellement inexistante. Elle est médiatique. Obama, qui ne veut pas terminer son deuxième mandat par une guerre, l’a dit ouvertement : c’est une guerre qui va durer des années. Conclusion : il cherche à épuiser la Syrie et l’Irak et à tout faire pour que ces deux pays retrouvent la place qui leur revient sur l’échiquier du Moyen-Orient.
Quant à l’avancée d’une opposition armée modérée, c’est une vue de l’esprit. Obama lui-même l’avait reconnu. Actuellement, l’initiative est entre les mains de l’armée syrienne et je ne vois pas comment une opposition fanatisée pourra réaliser ce qu’elle n’a pu faire en trois ans de guerre totale. L’objectif réel est de détruire la Syrie à petites doses. Et la situation actuelle arrange bien tous les ennemis de la Syrie.

Ne pensez-vous pas également que certains pays du Moyen-Orient, dont l’Arabie saoudite et la Turquie, et certains pays occidentaux, dont les Etats-Unis d’Amérique, ont grandement contribué à armer les organisations terroristes comme Daech et le Front Al Nosra ?

C’est un secret de Polichinelle. Tous ces pays avaient juré la perte de l’Etat syrien. En armant ces mouvements djihadistes, ils pensaient ramener la Syrie dans le giron occidental, l’extraire de son alliance avec l’Iran, la Russie et la Chine et la contraindre à une paix au rabais avec Israël. Jusqu’ici, cette stratégie a lamentablement échoué. Et ces monstres qu’ils ont nourris vont se retourner contre eux. Le jour où les Américains vont constater les dégâts de cette stratégie sur leurs propres intérêts et sur les intérêts de leurs supplétifs du Golfe, ils vont arrêter la partie. On n’en est malheureusement pas encore là.
Alain Chouet, le plus fin et informé des spécialistes français du renseignement, a mis les points sur les «i» en soulignant l’incohérence occidentale face à Daech.

«Aujourd’hui que sont parfaitement localisés avec précision une dizaine de milliers de djihadistes arborant fièrement leur drapeau, défilant dans les rues, égorgeant des citoyens américains devant les télévisions, éventrant médiatiquement femmes et enfants, jouant au foot avec les têtes de leurs ennemis, la présidence américaine, écrit-il,  vient dire qu’elle «n’a pas encore de stratégie dans la lutte contre le djihadisme»…

Je veux croire qu’il s’agit là d’une manœuvre du président Obama pour contraindre l’Arabie et les pétromonarchies du Golfe à «choisir leur camp» et à cesser leurs pratiques de double langage qui consiste à condamner verbalement le terrorisme tout en soutenant un peu partout dans le monde les groupes terroristes salafistes et les djihadistes en vue de neutraliser les initiatives démocratiques ou l’influence de l’Iran qu’ils considèrent comme également dangereuses pour le maintien de leur pouvoir.»

Des médias évoquent une «rupture» entre Al Qaïda et Daech, alors qu’Al Qaïda vient d’annoncer son soutien à Daech face à la «coalition». Comment expliquez-vous cela ?

C’est une rupture de façade. Les deux organisations, qui se disputent entre elles pour des raisons de contrôle de territoire ou de partage des butins, sont toutes les deux, malgré les apparences, dans une position de repli. Elles poursuivent les mêmes objectifs.

Edwy Plenel et la fausse «lettre de Mandela»
Meir Wentrater
Comme un juif en France
11 décembre 2011

S’exprimant en direct depuis la Jordanie, où il participait à une rencontre d’une ONG vouée au «journalisme d’investigation», Edwy Plenel a consacré un billet, diffusé le 11 décembre 2013 dans «Les Matins de France Culture», à Nelson Mandela [1]. Il a longuement cité une lettre adressée en 2001 par Nelson Mandela au journaliste américain Tom Friedman, dans laquelle le dirigeant sud-africain condamnait sévèrement l’attitude d’Israël envers les Palestiniens.

Le problème est que cette lettre est un faux. Son véritable auteur, un journaliste palestinien vivant aux Pays-Bas nommé Arjan el-Fassed, ne s’en est d’ailleurs jamais caché: il entendait utiliser le genre littéraire de la fausse lettre, afin d’accuser Israël de pratiquer envers les Palestiniens une forme d’apartheid.

Cependant, la prétendue «lettre à Friedman» a circulé sur des forums Internet militants où elle a été présentée comme une parole authentique de Mandela. Jusqu’à ce qu’en 2002 les journalistes du quotidien israélien Haaretz s’adressent à la présidence sud-africaine, et découvrent le pot aux roses [2]. Tout le monde sait aujourd’hui que, non seulement cette «lettre» n’a pas été écrite par Nelson Mandela, mais elle ne représente en rien les positions du dirigeant sud-africain sur le conflit israélo-palestinien [3].

Julien Salingue, l’un des principaux porte-parole de la «cause palestinienne» en France, résume bien les choses quand il écrit sur son blog, le 6 décembre 2013: «Il ne s’agit pas ici de transformer Mandela en héraut du combat pour les droits nationaux des Palestiniens, même s’il n’a jamais fait mystère de son soutien à la lutte contre l’occupation israélienne. Mandela a toujours été, sur ce terrain, beaucoup plus en retrait que l’archevêque Desmond Tutu, qui depuis de longues années soutient la campagne internationale de boycott de l’État d’Israël, qu’il qualifie, à l’instar d’autres dirigeants sud-africains, d’État d’apartheid. Tel n’est pas le cas de Mandela, contrairement à ce que croient ceux qui ont pris pour argent comptant un “Mémo de Nelson Mandela à Thomas Friedman” dénonçant “l’apartheid israélien”, qui est en réalité un exercice de style rédigé par Arjan el-Fassed» [4].

Edwy Plenel figure donc parmi «ceux qui ont pris pour argent comptant» la prétendue «lettre de Mandela». Plus de dix ans après que la fausseté de celle-ci a été démontrée par les journalistes israéliens, il continue de la citer comme parole d’Evangile. Or non seulement le document auquel il se réfère est un faux, mais son contenu ne représente pas – comme le souligne le militant pro-palestinien Julien Salingue – les positions véritables de Mandela sur le sujet [5].

Edwy Plenel, participant en Jordanie à une conférence vouée au «journalisme d’investigation», aurait là un bon sujet d’étude sur la valeur de l’investigation en matière journalistique: comment ne pas s’appuyer sur des faux documents, comment distinguer – chez les autres, et éventuellement chez soi-même – l’analyse des faits et la passion militante [6]. Bref, une réflexion sur un thème qui devrait être cher au cœur des journalistes: la vérité.
NOTES

1. Le billet d’Edwy Plenel: http://www.franceculture.fr/emission-le-monde-selon-edwy-plenel-podcast-2013-12-11#.UqgLcaFeUKk.twitter

2. L’auteur de la «lettre», Arjan el-Fassed, raconte cela lui-même sur son blog: http://arjansweblog.blogspirit.com/mandela_memo

3. Sur ce que Nelson Mandela pensait d’Israël, nous disposons du témoignage d’Abe Foxman, qui participa à la rencontre entre Mandela et les dirigeants juifs américains, à Genève en 1990 (Mandela avait été libéré de prison peu de temps auparavant, et entamait le processus qui devait conduire à la fin de l’apartheid): «Lors de notre rencontre, Mandela exprima non seulement son soutien sans équivoque au droit d’Israël à exister mais aussi son profond respect pour ses dirigeants, parmi lesquels David Ben-Gourion, Golda Meïr et Menahem Begin. Il nous assura également qu’il soutenait le droit d’Israël à la sécurité et son droit de se protéger contre le terrorisme.»

http://blogs.timesofisrael.com/how-mandela-won-over-the-jewish-community/

En octobre 1999, Nelson Mandela, qui avait quitté quelques mois plus tôt la présidence de l’Afrique du Sud, visita les pays du Proche-Orient. Lors de son séjour en Israël, il déclara au terme d’une longue rencontre avec le ministre des affaires étrangères David Lévy: «Selon moi, les discours sur la paix restent creux tant qu’Israël continue d’occuper des territoires arabes. (…) Je ne peux pas imaginer qu’Israël se retire si les Etats arabes ne reconnaissent pas Israël à l’intérieur de frontières sûres.»

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/19991019/aponline113258_000.htm

4. Voir le blog de Julien Salingue (par ailleurs très hostile à Israël):

http://resisteralairdutemps.blogspot.fr/p/comme-la-rappele-pierre-haski-de-rue89.html

5. Le journal en ligne (activement anti-israélien) MondoWeiss défend la thèse bizarre selon laquelle ce sont les pro-israéliens inconditionnels qui diffusent la thèse selon laquelle Nelson Mandela aurait accusé Israël de pratiquer l’apartheid, et ce afin de porter atteinte à l’image de Nelson Mandela:

http://mondoweiss.net/2013/12/apologists-discredit-apartheid.html

6. La réapparition de cette prétendue «lettre», au lendemain de la mort de Nelson Mandela, est significative de l’état d’esprit régnant dans certains milieux où l’activisme anti-israélien va de pair avec l’ignorance des faits. Voir, par exemple, ici:

http://www.palestine-solidarite.org/analyses.Gilles_Devers.061213.htm

Voir aussi:

Mandela memo
How it started?

On March 27, 2001, Thomas Friedman wrote a column in the style of a ‘mock memo’ entitled Bush’s First Memo. In this ‘mock memo’ Thomas Friedman writes in the name of U.S. President George W. Bush a memo to Palestinian President Yasir Arafat.

This ‘mock memo’ — Thomas Friedman had published a number of them in the New York Times, for example, a ‘mock memo’ he wished Secretary of State Colin Powell would have sent to President George W. Bush was published on February 20, 2001 — triggered me to write to the New York Times’ Readers Opinions in the the ‘mock memo’ style that Friedman himself liked to use and offered Nelson Mandela responding to Friedman’s Bush’s First Memo to Arafat.

Mandela’s first memo to Thomas Friedman (30 March 2001)

Since Thomas Friedman tells his readers that Palestinians should forget about 1948 and forget about returning to their homes, I wanted to show that current policies against Palestinians resemble an apartheid-like situation. Since Nelson Mandela has become the personification of the struggle against apartheid, I thought a ‘mock memo’ including Mandela was the logical thing to do. I could also have taken Steven Biko who has said that “the most potential weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed” or Oliver Tambo or others anti-apartheid activists.

The confusion

On 27 March 2001, after reading Friedman’s ‘mock memo’ I wrote a letter entitled Mandela’s first memo to Thomas Friedman to the op-ed editor of The New York Times and I posted the memo on the Thomas Friedman Discussion Board of the New York Times, hoping that Thomas Friedman would read it and that the New York Times would publish it. However, after two days, I came to the conclusion that the New York Times would not dare publishing this piece and I sent it on March 30, 2001 to Media Monitors, “a Platform for Serious Media Contributors”, an online daily.

Soon, however, I found the ‘mock memo’ I wrote and which clearly indicated that I wrote it, on various listservers and websites but without the byline mentioning that it was in fact written by me.

The main purpose of the Mandela-memo was to respond in a satirical way to Thomas Friedman using the exact same style and even phrases he uses in his columns. Obviously, the ‘mock memo’ had been forwarded to several e-mail lists containing the memo, which originally included the title “Mandela’s First Memo to Thomas Friedman” and a byline “by Arjan El Fassed”, but eventually was forwarded without my name and sometimes without title.

I posted the ‘mock memo’ myself on 30 March on an mailinglist of Al-Awda. Despite this, I’ve seen it several times being posted on the same list, something that gives you an idea of the lack of attention many people give to material they forward. In various posts I read, the subject title was changed for example, “Mandela supports…”, “must read”, etc. Perhaps it was wishful thinking. If Nelson Mandela would seriously have written to the New York Times, wouldn’t the New York Times just publish it? Moreover, I believe Nelson Mandela has better things to do then responding to columns written by Thomas Friedman.

How things got worse

On April 24, 2001, Akiva Eldar, chief political columnist and editorial writer for the Israeli national daily Ha’aretz wrote in his Strong Quote from Mandela that the Palestinian daily Al Quds published a letter that Nelson Mandela sent to New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman, in response to a March 27 Frideman column, dubbed “Memo to President Bush.”

Immediately, I wrote a letter to Ha’aretz explaining what happened. Most probably, someone translated the memo (without byline) into Arabic and which was taken up by the Palestinian daily and printed on April 16, 2001, however, without verifying the source. The editor of Al Quds, Marwan Abu Zalaf, said that he had no idea it was a fake, and that one of his reporters found it on the Internet.

On Friday, April 18, the Lebanese daily As-Safir re-published the ‘mock memo’ in Arabic based on the article as printed by the Palestinian daily Al-Quds. On Monday, April 21, The Daily Star had an op-ed entitled “Sharon: Why does the world ignore me?” and at the top of the ‘memo’, they had the following boxed introduction:

« New York Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman has recently popularized the idea of writing opinion pieces framed as « memos » from world leaders to various recipients, prompting various other writers to mimic the practice.

For the byline, at the bottom, the Star wrote in italics: Arjan El Fassed wrote this commentary for MediaMonitors, a website dedicated to providing a platform for all political opinions (NB. The Daily Star’s archive is currently not working).

The Norwegian newspaper Dagsavisen published a commentary in which it quoted The Jerusalem Times which published the ‘mock memo’ on April 6, 2001, again without source, byline, or author, in its publication.

On April 24, 2001, someone wrote to Akiva Eldar the following:

——- Original Message ——-
From: ******* <********@yahoo.com>
To: eldar@haaretz.co.il
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2001 7:26 PM
Subject: Strong quote from Mandela

For the record, I have received the original messages containing each of Arjan El Fassed’s “memos,” sent directly from him (via an e-group). Mr. El Fassed’s byline is clearly present on each article, the articles come from his own e-mail address, and the more recent ones contain an explicit warning against forwarding the article without the byline. There is no possible basis for arguing that Mr. El Fassed intends for people to believe the memos were written by anyone other than himself.

It is hard to imagine that anyone would accuse Tom Friedman of impersonating a world leader if one of his “memos” was forwarded, sans byline, and then re-printed in another newspaper (though the newspaper re-printing the story would be a legitimate target for criticism).

To claim that Mr. El Fassed “tends to sign various missives he sends out to the world signed with the names of famous people” is, if not an intentional lie, than an inadvertent gross misstatement of fact. Whether you like Mr. El Fassed’s writing or not, you have a responsibility to correct what you wrote.

The next day, Akiva Eldar, replied:

—- haaretz eldar@haaretz.co.il wrote:
From: “haaretz”
To: “*******” <*******@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Strong quote from Mandela
Date: Wed, 25 Apr 2001 09:15:42 +0200

Mr El Fassed has give me a full account of his position and it will be reported in my next column.

However, instead of being reported in his next column, Ha’aretz published my own response instead.

Worse, however, Toronto Star columnist, Michele Landsberg wrote on May 20, 2001, Forged letter slights dignity of Nelson Mandela, in which she claimed that she checked with Mandela’s office in South Africa and that she heard from his assistant:

« You enquired about the infamous article that has been doing the rounds across the globe. We’ve received numerous enquiries… . Mr. Mandela did not write the article/letter, and this matter has been referred to his lawyers for further action. »

Nigel Parry responded to that column by writing a letter to the Toronto Star editor:

« Regarding Michele Landsberg’s column, « Forged letter slights dignity of Nelson Mandela », there was no « rat ». Someone obviously forwarded her the memo without its byline and she failed to seek out its source.

The memo was a clearly signed spoof that was first published on the Media Monitors Network.

Landsberg’s assertion that the letter was a “forgery” is as baseless as her claim that the political philosophy of Zionism — which directly resulted in the establishment of an Israeli state on the ruins of 415 Palestinian villages ethnically cleansed of nearly one million Arabs, with a legal system that still discriminates between “Jewish” and “Non Jewish” citizens in areas such as property ownership — is somehow not racist.

The Toronto Star chose not to publish his letter.

On May 26, 2001, the Lebanese newspaper an-Nahar published a clarification in Arabic which is similar to my own response in Ha’aretz.

Even now, some emails are still circulating with the ‘mock memo’. For example, the Palestinian Council for Justice and Peace circulated the ‘mock memo’ and sent a message to their own list on 14 February 2002, saying that

« We sent you a letter, which was supposedly written by Nelson Mandela and addressed to Thomas Friedman. As we received it by email from a friend who was excited about a good answer to Friedman’s latest article in the New York Times, we misread the address, and thought it was in fact written in the New York Times. Thanks to the queries of some of you, we went to the source, and now we know for certain that Mandela did not write the article. It is still a good response, but we have no clue so far as to the author. »

What other readers said

In a message posted on April 13, 2002 on a listserver called Ecunews, Rick Mitchell wrote that the ‘mock memo’:

« reinforces [my] claim that Israel is maintaining a system of Apartheid by keeping Palestinians in captivity (the current occupation dates back to June, 1967) and subject to second-class status. One need not agree with all of his statements, but it is illuminating to recognize that we see and hear very little of this argument in the U.S., as the policy of our government and of the mainstream media has been consistently pro-Israeli. Politics is, of course, politics, but the important point to consider is El Fassed’s (and others’) contention that Zionism is inherently racist and un-democratic, resulting quite logically in an apartheid system of discrimination. It is also the policy of the U.S. government. »

What’s interesting is that some even argued, “but there is also a sense in which the ‘true’ or original author does not matter — and that sense is related to the question, ‘Is it true?’”

Others wrote on various lists, “If this is authentic, it is truly a moral bombshell in the present level of discussion…” and “[It may have been written] as a statement about what perhaps Nelson Mandela would say to someone such as journalist Thomas Friedman.”

« For those of you who are concerned about the authenticity of the Mandela memo, I have researched the matter with the help of others. Apparently Thomas Friedman often writes as though he were someone else and this piece is written with this understanding. I do not question the content because from my own personal experience, I can attest to an apartheid situation. »

Someone else posted this question:

« How could I find an email for Nelson Mandela to alert him to the efforts of us in the Jewish world who oppose Israel’s current treatment of Palestinians – and to discuss with him strategies for having an impact? »

« My husband (among other people) forwarded the ‘Nelson Mandela memo’ to me. I checked up on it through my sources in Palestine and found that it was not written by Nelson Mandela but by someone else using the style of Friedman’s articles. The name of the person is in some email in my file but the name doesn’t really matter. Someone was trying to do good but left the rest of us with egg on our faces. You may want to pass this information on to those from whom you got it and to those to whom you sent it. »

Another reader made this observation, “The existential reality of injustice witnessed first-hand…is a far more powerful teaching tool than injustice heard or read about.”

What Nelson Mandela indeed has said

« It is completely wrong that the United States must be the mediator in this conflict. Everybody knows the United States is a friend of Israel. »

« As far as we are concerned what is being done to the Palestinians is a matter of grave concern. We are the friends of Yasser Arafat. We are the friends of the Palestinians. We support their struggle » (Reuters, 1 June 2001, Mandela, speaking at a news conference after talks with French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin).

« Israel should withdraw from the areas which it won from the Arabs — the Golan Heights, south Lebanon and the West Bank — that is the price of peace » (Dispatch, 20 October 1999)

« Our men and women with vision choose peace rather than confrontation, except in cases where we cannot get, where we cannot proceed, where we cannot move forward. Then, if the only alternative is violence, we will use violence » (Associated Press , 20 October 1999)

« The histories of our two peoples, Palestinian and South African, correspond in such painful and poignant ways, that I intensely feel myself being at home amongst compatriots » (Associated Press , 20 October 1999)

« The long-standing fraternal bonds between our two liberation movements are now translating into the relations between two governments » (Associated Press, 20 October 1999)

Address by President Nelson Mandela at the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People, Pretoria, 4 December 1997

Voir par ailleurs:

Obama est-il responsable de la situation en Irak?
Lucien SA Oulahbib
ResilienceTV
27/9/2014

Certainement. N’en déplaise à tous ceux qui n’ont de cesse de commencer tel un mantra l’amorce d’une réflexion en maudissant d’abord Bush fils et « 2003 ». Or, c’est bien Obama et non Bush qui a interrompu le processus de stabilisation existant en Irak depuis le « surge » de 2008 en quittant l’Irak avec précipitation et en laissant tout le pouvoir aux shiites inféodés à l’Iran, ce qui a démantelé tout l’effort entamé par David Petraeus commencé sous Bush et gagné en faisant alliance avec les tribus sunnites.

C’est bien Obama et non Bush qui a laissé faire en Syrie en 2013, refusant d’armer les résistants dits « laïcs », et fermant les yeux sur le financement des groupes islamistes (dont l’ancêtre de l’E.I actuel) opéré par l’Arabie Saoudite et le Qatar aujourd’hui apeurés de voir leur pouvoir féodal vaciller sous les coups de boutoir d’un mouvement islamique parfaitement fidèles aux critères historiques de l’islam depuis le début, l’islam étant par exemple une religion de « paix » dans la mesure où l’on accepte de vivre sous son joug : « que la paix (de l’islam) soit avec toi » voilà ce que veut dire son salut et non pas cette pâle imitation du christianisme, certains imams parlant même « d’amour » ce qui est d’un risible sans pareille lorsque l’on observe le nombre infime d’occurrence en la matière dans leur texte sacré…

Que l’Occident soit à l’heure actuelle son défenseur intransigeant (à coup de drones également) en dit long non seulement sur son masochisme mais surtout sa prétention à transformer tout taureau radical en boeuf aseptisé. En tout cas il semble bien qu’il n’existe pas d’islam modéré comme il n’a pas existé de communisme modéré, à moins d’abandonner la dictature du prolétariat, ou la « charia » comme le veulent certains en Tunisie, au Maroc, en Égypte, au Yémen… Wait and see.

Enfin, il semble bien que le 11 septembre 2001 ne soit pas la conséquence de « 2003 » (jusqu’à preuve du contraire).

Et à ceux qui rétorquent qu’il aurait fallu (« yaka ») construire des écoles, des routes et des hôpitaux plutôt que d’envoyer des armes il se trouve que tout cela a été construit et a été immédiatement dynamité (comme au Nigeria) parce que « école » n’a pas du tout la même signification en islam et en terre judéo-chrétienne républicaine et libérale.

Par ailleurs si les Kurdes avaient eu leur État dès 1923 à la chute de l’empire ottoman, ou du moins s’ils avaient été armés aussi bien que l’armée irakienne, peut-être que les Kurdes ne seraient pas acculés à reculer sous les coups de boutoir des néo-wahhabites, créatures échappées du laboratoire saoudien, toujours sous la bienveillance américaine et…française… Mais nous ne sommes pas à une contradiction près…

Il est navrant de rappeler ces quelques vérités premières à de si éminents « experts ».

 Voir enfin:

Argument
How We Won in Iraq
And why all the hard-won gains of the surge are in grave danger of being lost today.
David H. Petraeus
Foreign Policy
October 29, 2013

The news out of Iraq is, once again, exceedingly grim. The resurrection of al Qaeda in Iraq — which was on the ropes at the end of the surge in 2008 — has led to a substantial increase in ethno-sectarian terrorism in the Land of the Two Rivers. The civil war next door in Syria has complicated matters greatly, aiding the jihadists on both sides of the border and bringing greater Iranian involvement in Mesopotamia. And various actions by the Iraqi government have undermined the reconciliation initiatives of the surge that enabled the sense of Sunni Arab inclusion and contributed to the success of the venture.  Moreover, those Iraqi government actions have also prompted prominent Sunnis to withdraw from the government and led the Sunni population to take to the streets in protest.  As a result of all this, Iraqi politics are now mired in mistrust and dysfunction.

This is not a road that Iraqis had to travel. Indeed, by the end of the surge in 2008, a different future was possible.  That still seemed to be the case in December 2011, when the final U.S. forces (other than a sizable security assistance element) departed; however, the different future was possible only if Iraqi political leaders capitalized on the opportunities that were present.  Sadly, it appears that a number of those opportunities were squandered, as political infighting and ethno-sectarian actions reawakened the fears of Iraq’s Sunni Arab population and, until recently, also injected enormous difficulty into the relationship between the government in Baghdad and the leaders of the Kurdish Regional Government.

To understand the dynamics in Iraq — and the possibilities that still exist, it is necessary to revisit what actually happened during the surge, a history now explored in a forthcoming book written by my executive officer at the time, Col. (Ret.) Peter Mansoor, now a professor of military history at the Ohio State University.

Leading the coalition military effort during the surge in Iraq in 2007 and 2008 was the most important endeavor — and greatest challenge — of my 37 years in uniform. The situation in Iraq was dire at the end of 2006, when President George W. Bush decided to implement the surge and selected me to command it. Indeed, when I returned to Baghdad in early February 2007, I found the conditions there to be even worse than I had expected. The deterioration since I had left Iraq in September 2005 after my second tour was sobering. The violence — which had escalated dramatically in 2006 in the wake of the bombing of the Shiite al-Askari shrine in the Sunni city of Samarra — was totally out of control. With well over 50 attacks and three car bombs per day on average in Baghdad alone, the plan to hand off security tasks to Iraqi forces clearly was not working. Meanwhile, the sectarian battles on the streets were mirrored by infighting in the Iraqi government and Council of Representatives, and those disputes produced a dysfunctional political environment. With many of the oil pipelines damaged or destroyed, electrical towers toppled, roads in disrepair, local markets shuttered, and government workers and citizens fearing for their lives, government revenue was down and the provision of basic services was wholly inadequate. Life in many areas of the capital and the country was about little more than survival.

In addition to those challenges, I knew that if there was not clear progress by September 2007, when I anticipated having to return to the United States to testify before Congress in open hearings, the limited remaining support on Capitol Hill and in the United States for the effort in Iraq would evaporate.

In short, President Bush had staked the final years of his presidency — and his legacy — on the surge, and it was up to those on the ground to achieve progress. In the end, that is what we did together, military and civilian, coalition and Iraqi. But as my great diplomatic partner Ryan Crocker, the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, and I used to note, Iraq was « all hard, all the time. »

The Surge of Forces and the Surge of Ideas

The surge had many components. The most prominent, of course, was the deployment of the additional U.S. forces committed by President Bush — nearly 30,000 of them in the end. Without those forces, we never could have achieved progress as quickly as we did. And, given the necessity to make progress by the hearings anticipated in September 2007, improvements before then were critical.

As important as the surge of forces was, however, the most important surge was what I termed « the surge of ideas » — the changes in our overall strategy and operational plans. The most significant of these was the shift from trying to hand off security tasks to Iraqi forces to focusing on the security of the Iraqi people. The biggest of the big ideas that guided the strategy during the surge was explicit recognition that the most important terrain in the campaign in Iraq was the human terrain — the people — and our most important mission was to improve their security. Security improvements would, in turn, provide Iraq’s political leaders the opportunity to forge agreements on issues that would reduce ethno-sectarian disputes and establish the foundation on which other efforts could be built to improve the lives of the Iraqi people and give them a stake in the success of the new state.

But improved security could be achieved only by moving our forces into urban neighborhoods and rural population centers. In the first two weeks, therefore, I changed the mission statement in the existing campaign plan to reflect this imperative. As I explained in that statement and the guidance I issued shortly after taking command, we had to « live with the people » in order to secure them. This meant reversing the consolidation of our forces on large bases that had been taking place since the spring of 2004. Ultimately, this change in approach necessitated the establishment of more than 100 small outposts and joint security stations, three-quarters of them in Baghdad alone.

The establishment of each of the new bases entailed a fight, and some of those fights were substantial. We knew that the Sunni insurgents and Shiite militias would do everything they could to keep our troopers from establishing a presence in areas where the warring factions were trying to take control — and those areas were precisely where our forces were needed most. Needless to say, the insurgents and militias would do all that they could to keep us from establishing our new operating bases, sometimes even employing multiple suicide car bombers in succession in attempts to breach outpost perimeters. But if we were to achieve our goal of significantly reducing the violence, there was no alternative to living with the people — specifically, where the violence was the greatest — in order to secure them. Our men and women on the ground, increasingly joined during the surge by their Iraqi partners, courageously, selflessly, and skillfully did what was required to accomplish this goal.

« Clear, hold, and build » became the operative concept — a contrast with the previous practice in many operations of clearing insurgents and then leaving, after handing off the security mission to Iraqi forces that proved incapable of sustaining progress in the areas cleared. Then — Lt. Gen. Ray Odierno, commander of the Multi-National Corps-Iraq, and his staff developed and oversaw the execution of these and the other operational concepts brilliantly. Indeed, in anticipation of the new approach, he ordered establishment of the initial joint security stations in the weeks before I arrived.  His successor in early 2008, then Lt. Gen. Lloyd Austin, did a similarly exemplary job as our operational commander for the final portion of the surge. On receiving the Corps’ guidance, division and brigade commanders and their headquarters orchestrated the implementation of these concepts. And our company, battalion, and brigade commanders and their troopers translated the new strategy and operational concepts into reality on the ground in the face of determined, often barbaric enemies under some of the most difficult conditions imaginable.

But the new strategy encompassed much more than just moving off the big bases and focusing on security of the people. Improving security was necessary, but not sufficient, to achieve our goals in Iraq. Many other tasks also had to be accomplished.

The essence of the surge, in fact, was the pursuit of a comprehensive approach, a civil-military campaign that featured a number of important elements, the effects of each of which were expected to complement the effects of the others. The idea was that progress in one component of the strategy would make possible gains in other components. Each incremental step forward reinforced and gradually solidified overall progress in a particular geographic location or governmental sector. The surge forces clearly enabled more rapid implementation of the new strategy and accompanying operational concepts; however, without the changes in the strategy, the additional forces would not have achieved the gains in security and in other areas necessary for substantial reduction of the underlying levels of ethno-sectarian violence, without which progress would not have been sustained when responsibilities ultimately were transferred to Iraqi forces and government authorities.

The Sunni Awakening and Reconciliation

Beyond securing the people by living with them, foremost among the elements of the new strategy was promoting reconciliation between disaffected Sunni Arabs and our forces — and then with the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government. I often noted at the time that we would not be able to kill or capture our way out of the industrial-strength insurgency that confronted us in Iraq. Hence we had to identify those insurgents and militia members who were « reconcilable, » and we then had to persuade them to become part of the solution in Iraq rather than a continuing part of the problem. Reconciliation thus became a critical component of the overall strategy.

We were fortunate to be able to build on what ultimately came to be known as the Sunni Awakening, the initial increment of which began several months before the surge, outside the embattled Sunni city of Ramadi in violent Anbar Province, some 60 miles west of Baghdad. There, in the late summer of 2006, during the height of the violence in Anbar, Col. Sean MacFarland, a talented U.S. Army brigade commander, and his team agreed to support a courageous Sunni sheikh and his tribal members who decided to oppose al Qaeda in Iraq, which the tribesmen had come to despise for its indiscriminate attacks on the population and implementation of an extreme version of Islam that was not in line with their somewhat more secular outlook on life.  The initiative included empowering young men of the tribes who wanted to help secure their areas against al Qaeda depredations. Ultimately, shortly after the surge of forces commenced and throughout 2007 and into 2008, this arrangement was replicated over and over in other areas of Anbar Province and Iraq. The Awakening proved to be a hugely important factor in combating al Qaeda terrorists and other Sunni insurgents and, over time, similar initiatives in the Shiite population proved important in combating some militias in select areas as well.

Some observers have contended that we got lucky with the Awakening. Undeniably, it was fortunate that the initial development of a tribal rebellion against al Qaeda had begun by the time the surge began. Despite this reality, however, the spread of the Awakening beyond Ramadi was not serendipity; rather, it was the result of a conscious decision and a deliberate effort. I was well aware that there had previously been reconciliation initiatives that had worked in the short term. Indeed, I oversaw the first of these initiatives, in the summer of 2003, when I commanded the 101st Airborne Division in northern Iraq and Amb. Jerry Bremer, the head of the Coalition Provisional Authority, personally authorized me to support an Iraqi-led reconciliation effort. That effort helped make that part of Iraq surprisingly peaceful well into the fall of 2003, as the Sunni Arabs cast out of jobs and out of society by the de-Ba’athification policy still had hope of being part of the new Iraq in our area. Ultimately, however, that initiative, along with reconciliation efforts in subsequent years in western Anbar Province and elsewhere, foundered due to a lack of support by Iraqi authorities in Baghdad. I watched these initiatives during my second tour in Iraq, as commander of the Multi-National Security Transition Command-Iraq from June 2004 to September 2005.

Given my recognition of the importance of reconciliation, I was determined that we would support the nascent Awakening and then, over time, gain our Iraqi partners’ support, as well. In fact, my first trip outside Baghdad, shortly after taking command on Feb. 10, 2007, was to assess the progress of the initiative in Ramadi. After seeing the results of the Awakening up close, I quickly resolved that we would do all that we could to support the tribal rebellion there and also to foster its spread through other Sunni areas of Iraq. (Eventually, we also supported Shiite awakenings in some of the areas troubled by Shiite militias.) We would, in effect, seek to achieve a « critical mass » of awakenings that would set off a « chain reaction » as rapidly as was possible — initially up and down the Euphrates River Valley in Anbar Province and then into neighboring Sunni Arab areas of Iraq. Of equal importance, we would also seek the support of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki for these initiatives. (I personally took him to Ramadi in March 2007 to speak to the tribal sheikhs leading the Awakening there, and I subsequently took him to other Sunni areas for similar endeavors as well.)

The decision to support the Awakening movement and, in essence, reconciliation carried considerable risk and was not initially embraced by all of our commanders. Many correctly pointed out that the leaders and members of the groups that wanted to reconcile with us — groups that might be willing to embrace the Awakening — had American blood on their hands. Beyond that, it was clear early on that Prime Minister Maliki was willing to allow us to support awakenings in strictly Sunni areas such as Anbar, but that he had understandable concerns about them when they approached areas of greater concern to his Shiite coreligionists; moreover, he also was not at all enthusiastic initially about providing Iraqi resources and assistance for what came to be known as the « Sons of Iraq, » the young men who helped augment coalition and Iraqi police and army forces in securing their tribal areas. Regardless, I was convinced that there was no alternative if we were to reduce the violence and divert key elements of the Sunni insurgency from their actual or tacit support for the actions of al Qaeda. So we pressed ahead and dealt with the many issues that arose along the way, helped initially by my first deputy, British Lt. Gen. Sir Graeme Lambe, a friend and colleague of many years, and then by the establishment of a Force Reconciliation Cell that was headed by a talented two-star British officer and an impressive senior U.S. diplomat.

Ultimately, the Awakening movement — and, in effect, reconciliation — did spread dramatically. There were many challenges as this transpired, especially when Prime Minister Maliki and other Shiite leaders developed concerns over the spread of the movement into Baghdad and areas near predominantly Shiite or mixed communities. Our reconciliation team — aided enormously by Emma Sky, a brilliant British woman who served as a special assistant to me during the latter part of the surge (having served as General Odierno’s political adviser earlier and subsequently) — worked tirelessly to deal with the seemingly endless list of issues and with the woman appointed by Prime Minister Maliki to oversee reconciliation initiatives for the Iraqi government. And, ultimately, a year and a half into the surge, we had on our payroll more than 100,000 « Sons of Iraq » (more than 20,000 of them Shiite), young men who lived in the areas of the Awakening movements and who then helped secure their neighborhoods from both Sunni insurgents and Shiite militias.

In sum, the spread of the Awakening was not serendipity; it was the result of a deliberate decision I took soon after taking command. To be sure, the timing of the initiative outside Ramadi was fortuitous, but from even before taking command I knew that reconciliation had to take place if we were to reduce violence significantly by the fall of 2007. We thus were determined to capitalize on the Ramadi initiative by promoting the spread of Awakening movements and facilitating the resulting reconciliation among sects, tribes, and factions. I understood the numerous risks, and we took measures to ensure that Awakening movements and the « Sons of Iraq » did not turn into an unaccountable militia force that would cause more trouble for Iraq in the long run than they were worth in the near term. Looking back, the risks clearly were worth the resulting gains.

Targeted Special Operations

Another critical component of our comprehensive approach was an intensive campaign of targeted operations by U.S. and British Special Operations Forces to capture or kill key insurgent and militia leaders and operatives. Although I publicly acknowledged from the outset that we would not be able to kill or capture our way to victory (hence the need to support the Awakening), killing or capturing the most important of the « irreconcilables » was an inescapable and hugely important element of our strategy. Indeed, we sought to pursue key irreconcilables even more aggressively than was the case before the surge.

Then-Lt. Gen. Stan McChrystal, commander of the U.S. Joint Special Operations Command and the Counter-Terrorism Special Operations Task Force operating in Iraq, led this effort brilliantly. Our special operators were relentless in the pursuit of al Qaeda and other Sunni Arab extremist leaders, bomb makers, financiers, and propaganda cells — and of key Iranian-supported Shiite Arab extremists as well (though the latter effort was frequently constrained by Iraqi political factors, given the proclivities of the Shiite-led government). As the surge proceeded, the capacity and pace of U.S.- and coalition-targeted Special Operations under Lt. Gen. McChrystal and subsequently by then-Vice Adm. William H. McRaven increased substantially, as did the tempo of targeted operations by the Iraqi counterterrorist forces that we trained, equipped, advised, and also enabled with helicopters and various intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets. The results were dramatic: the targeted operations — as many as 10 to 15 per night — removed from the battlefield a significant proportion of the senior and midlevel extremist group leaders, explosives experts, planners, financiers, and organizers in Iraq. Looking back, it is clear that what the American and British special operators accomplished, aided enormously by various intelligence elements, was nothing short of extraordinary. Their relentless operations, employment of unmanned aerial vehicles and other advanced technology, tactical skill, courage, and creativity were truly inspirational. But by themselves they did not and could not turn the tide of battle in Iraq; once again, the key was a comprehensive approach, in which this element, like the others, was necessary but not sufficient.

The Development of Iraqi Security Forces

Supporting the development of the Iraqi Security Forces was also vitally important — and an effort with which I was intimately familiar, as I had led the establishment of the so-called « train and equip » organization and commanded the Multi-National Security Transition Command-Iraq for the first 15 and a half months of the organization’s existence, during which I was also dual-hatted as the first commander of the NATO Training Mission-Iraq.

Although I halted the transition of tasks from coalition to Iraqi forces shortly after I took command, we knew that ultimately such transitions would be essential to our ability to draw down our forces and send them home. As President Bush used to observe, « U.S. forces will stand down as the Iraqi forces stand up. » We knew that ultimately the U.S. military could not support the replacement of the five surge brigades and the other additional forces deployed to Iraq in 2007. It thus was imperative that Iraqi forces be ready by the latter part of 2007 to assume broader duties so that coalition forces could begin to draw down and the surge forces could go home. Beyond that, Iraqi leaders, frequently with unrealistically elevated assessments of the capabilities of their security forces, repeatedly advocated the continued transition of security and governance tasks — a desire that was commendable, if sometimes premature.

Under the capable leadership of then-Lt. Gen. Marty Dempsey and his successor, Lt. Gen. Jim Dubik, the train-and-equip mission steadily expanded its efforts not just to develop Iraqi army, police, border, and special operations units but also to build all of the institutions of the Ministries of Interior and Defense, their subordinate headquarters and elements, and the infrastructure and systems needed for what ultimately grew to a total of 1 million members of the Iraqi security forces.

These tasks required Herculean efforts. Our programs supported every aspect of Iraqi military and police recruiting, individual and collective training, leader development (for example, the creation of basic training complexes, a military academy, branch schools, a staff college, a war college, and a training and doctrine command), equipping Iraqi forces with everything from vehicles and individual weapons to tanks and aircraft, the conduct of combat operations (with advisory teams at every level from battalion and above), development of logistical organizations and depots, construction of tactical and training bases and infrastructure, establishment of headquarters and staffs, and, as noted earlier, the development of all of the elements of the ministries themselves. Indeed, it is hard for anyone who did not see this endeavor firsthand to appreciate its magnitude. Additionally, progress required our Iraqi counterparts to replace substantial numbers of senior army and police leaders who proved to be sectarian, corrupt, or ineffective in the performance of their duties before or during the early months of the surge. Fortunately, Prime Minister Maliki and his senior military and police leaders proved willing to undertake the vast majority of the necessary changes.

Over time, we and our Iraqi counterparts achieved slow but steady progress in building the capabilities of the Iraqi Security Forces. With effective partnering of Iraqi and U.S. forces, Iraqi forces steadily shouldered more of the burdens and took over more tasks. They also increasingly bore the brunt of combat operations, with their losses totaling several times those of coalition forces. I often noted to the president, the prime minister, and others, in fact, that as the surge proceeded, Iraqi security forces clearly were fighting and dying for their country. Progressively, over the months and years that followed, the coalition turned over responsibility for security tasks to Iraqi forces until, at the end of 2011, Iraqi elements assumed all security tasks on their own, with only a residual U.S. office of security cooperation remaining in Iraq.

The Civilian Components

The comprehensive strategy employed during the surge also had significant civilian components. Indeed, Ambassador Crocker and I worked hard to develop unity of effort in all that our respective organizations and coalition and Iraqi partners did. The campaign plan we developed in the spring of 2007, in fact, was a joint effort of my command, Multi-National Force-Iraq, and the U.S. embassy, with considerable input from coalition partners such as Britain. (This civil-military plan built on the partnership that my predecessor, Gen. George Casey, had developed with then-U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, albeit with the changes in strategic and operational concepts that I have described.) And over time, our plan was also, of course, synchronized in close coordination with our Iraqi counterparts. Appropriately, the mission statement in the campaign plan we finalized in the early summer of 2007 included many nonmilitary aspects, highlighting the combined approach on which we all embarked together.

As security improved, the tasks in the civilian arena took on greater importance. It was critical, for example, that we worked with our coalition and Iraqi civilian partners to help repair damaged infrastructure, restore basic services, rebuild local markets, reopen schools and health facilities, and support the reestablishment of the corrections and judicial systems and other governmental institutions. While not determinative by themselves, such improvements gave Iraqi citizens tangible reasons to support the new Iraq and reject the extremists, insurgents, and militia members who had caused such hardship for them.

To facilitate and coordinate such efforts, each brigade and division headquarters was provided an embedded provincial reconstruction team of approximately a dozen civilian and military experts (often led by retired diplomats and development specialists). The U.S. Congress also provided the units substantial funding (through the Commander’s Emergency Response Program) to help with these efforts (and the U.S. embassy and some coalition nations did likewise through their sources of funding). Again, over time, progress in these initiatives proved essential to gaining the support of the Iraqi people for their government and to turning the people against both Sunni and Shiite extremists. These tasks were huge and often expensive, but they were essential to gradually improving basic services and other aspects of life for the Iraqi people. With steadily improving security and with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers taking on the oversight of the larger reconstruction projects for the embassy as well as for the military, the effort moved forward relatively well, although there were innumerable challenges, including security issues, corruption, design and management shortfalls, and so on. But even in the face of such obstacles, substantial reconstruction progress was nonetheless achieved.

Detainee Operations and Rule-of-Law Initiatives

Another important component of the comprehensive approach was the conduct of detainee operations. In this area also, we had to implement significant changes. The scope of this effort was enormous. In fact, the number of detainees in U.S.-administered facilities reached 27,000 after I temporarily halted releases until we could implement programs that provided a review process for the detainees in our facilities and could establish rehabilitation and reintegration programs to reduce the recidivism rate of those we released back to their communities.

Early on in the surge, it was clear to many of us that the detainee facilities we were operating had become breeding grounds for extremism. Indeed, some of our special operators, having recaptured the same individuals more than once, began calling our facilities « terrorist universities. » We were, to be sure, providing humane treatment; however, we had not identified and segregated from the general detainee population the hardcore extremists. Until that was done, the extremists asserted control (often brutally) in the facility enclosures — some of which contained up to 800 detainees — and spread extremist thinking and expertise among the detainee population. It became clear that we had to carry out « counterinsurgency operations inside the wire » in order to identify and separate from the detainee population the irreconcilables, just as we sought to do outside the wire in Iraqi communities. The leadership of Marine Maj. Gen. Doug Stone and of those who led the elements that constituted our detainee operations task force was instrumental in this component of our overall campaign. And the performance of the thousands of soldiers, airmen, and sailors who carried out the myriad duties in the facilities — individuals who often had been retrained from other specialties to augment the limited number of military police detention specialists available in the U.S. Army — was equally impressive.

Over time, Maj. Gen. Stone’s team also began helping our Iraqi partners as they sought to increase their own capacity and to build the prison infrastructure to conduct Iraqi corrections operations. This was another significant U.S. civil-military effort, and it was complemented by a similarly large civil-military initiative to help the Iraqis reestablish their judicial system and to rebuild the infrastructure to support it.

Then-Col. Mark Martins led the judicial support effort on the military side, staying in Iraq for two full years — as he was later also to do in Afghanistan — to oversee it, even as he also served as my senior legal counsel. The scope of this civil-military endeavor was enormous, encompassing construction of judicial facilities, training of judicial security elements, and support for reestablishment of judicial systems and structures. Partners from the U.S. State Department, Department of Justice, FBI, and other government agencies also played key roles in this substantial effort.

Another important initiative that supported the overall campaign was the effort to improve our intelligence about the various extremist elements and what was going on in Iraq more broadly. Here again, we pursued civil-military programs to build our capabilities (including fusion cells started under General Casey at each division headquarters to bring together all elements of the U.S. intelligence community); to expand the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets available (everything from drones to cameras on towers); to build a massive database that our analysts could use to identify correlations and linkages between individuals and organizations; and to improve intelligence sharing with coalition and Iraqi partners. We also established human terrain teams at each brigade headquarters to help our commanders understand in a more granular manner the composition, power structures, customs, and views of the Iraqi people in their areas of responsibility. And we extended secure Internet access to unprecedented levels (down to most company headquarters) within our organizations, as well. Counterinsurgency operations depend on a keen understanding of the political, historical, cultural, economic, and military situation in each area, and our initiatives built on those begun earlier in the war to further our understanding of the dynamics of each province, district, and community. Truly understanding the human terrain was vital to our ability to improve its security.

The Iraqi Political Component and Strategic Communications

The heart of the struggle in Iraq was a competition for power and resources between the major factions in the country — the majority Shiite Arabs and the minority Sunni Arabs and Kurds. (There were subfactions of each group as well, of course, in addition to other minority sects and ethnicities such as Turkoman, Yezidis, and Iraqi Christians, among others.) Achieving enduring progress in Iraq thus required achievement of political agreements on a host of key issues that divided the various factions. Consequently, seeking to foster agreement on such issues was yet another important component of the overall approach, and it developed into one to which Ambassador Crocker and I devoted considerable focus and effort. During the course of the surge, there were important laws passed and initiatives agreed upon — for example, a provincial powers act, an elections law, a reform of the de-Ba’athification decree, an amnesty law, and so forth; however, it was in this area that the most additional progress was (and still is) needed. Nonetheless, the surge made politics once again the operative mechanism through which Iraqis would divide power and resources — even as they struggled to create the political impetus and find the common ground to seize the moment and the opportunity offered to them.

Strategic communications, or public affairs, was another important element of the campaign. My guidance here was clear: we should seek to « be first with the truth, » to be as forthright as possible, to provide information on all developments and not just « good news, » and to avoid the practice of « putting lipstick on pigs » (trying to make bad news look good through spin). This also meant highlighting the violent acts carried out by al Qaeda and the Sunni insurgents, as well as those carried out by Shiite extremists. Hanging around the neck of Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr was the assassination of Shiite police chiefs and governors and the violent acts of his followers in the holy city of Karbala in the summer of 2007, for example, which contributed to his decision to order his militia to stand down until the following March. (Of course, increased pressure by coalition and Iraqi forces and Prime Minister Maliki’s courageous confrontation with the militia members in Karbala contributed to Sadr’s decision, as well.) Clearly establishing in the eyes of the Iraqi people that Iranian elements were supporting members of the most violent Shiite militias also helped turn some Iraqis against Tehran’s meddling in their country. And fostering concepts of integrity in government and pride in the Iraqi security forces, as well as awareness of what was being achieved by coalition and Iraqi efforts — even while acknowledging our shortfalls and mistakes — was all part of a comprehensive strategic communications campaign. Like most of our other efforts, this campaign was increasingly coordinated with — and, over time, replaced by — Iraqi efforts.

There were, of course, many other components of the overall campaign: engagement with religious and academic leaders, jobs programs, support for governance at all levels, initiatives to attract outside investment back to Iraq, work with countries in the region to reengage with Baghdad and to prevent their young men from traveling to Iraq to join the extremist elements, initiatives to improve security on the borders and to reestablish customs and immigrations facilities, and programs to reduce terrorist and insurgent financing. But the elements I have outlined were the major components of the comprehensive civil-military campaign plan that guided our operations and activities. Each was of central importance to the achievement of progress during the course of the surge and accomplishments in each component reinforced and made possible further steps forward in other areas — the cumulative effect of which was considerable by the end of the surge in July 2008. Indeed, some of the various facets of our strategy continue to contribute to the situation in Iraq today, even after all U.S. combat forces have left the country, despite the considerable backsliding in the political and security situation.

Once again, it is important to note that the surge was all of the above, a comprehensive civil-military campaign, not just a substantial number of additional forces. The extra forces were critical to achieving progress as rapidly as we did, but they would not have been enough without the other components of the campaign.

The Magnitude of the Difficulty

As I’ve made clear, all of this was extraordinarily difficult and carried out in an environment of tremendous violence and frustratingly difficult Iraqi political discord. Moreover, we knew — and I stated publicly on numerous occasions — that the situation in Iraq would get worse before it got better. That proved true. There was no way to stop the violence without confronting those responsible for it. And there was no way that we could do that without putting our troopers and those of the Iraqi forces on the sectarian battle lines in Baghdad and elsewhere, especially in the areas most affected by al Qaeda terrorists and sectarian militias. When we did that, the insurgents and militia members predictably fought back. Consequently, violence rose throughout the first five months of the surge, reaching a crescendo in May and June, to well over 200 attacks per day, before beginning to abate and then falling fairly rapidly in July, August, and September of 2007.

The decline in violence overall, and the substantial reduction in car bombings in particular, as well as gradual improvements in a number of other areas of our effort made possible by the improved security, enabled Ambassador Crocker and me to report guarded progress in congressional hearings in September 2007. While highly charged emotionally at the time, those hearings gained us critical additional time and support, without which it is likely that the mission in Iraq would have failed. And, after we were able to report further progress when we testified again in April 2008, having already commenced the drawdown of the surge as well, we were able to gain still further time and support for our efforts in Iraq.

The progress continued throughout the remainder of the surge and beyond, with periodic upticks in violence, to be sure, but with the overall trajectory positive, despite continued inability to resolve many of the major political issues that divided the Iraqi people. Nonetheless, the comprehensive civil-military endeavor pursued during the surge made it possible over time to transfer tasks from U.S. and other coalition forces to Iraqi soldiers and police and, ultimately, for the United States to withdraw its final combat elements at the end of 2011 without a precipitate descent back into the violence and civil conflict that made the surge necessary in the first place. None of this could have been possible were it not for the extraordinary sacrifices and service of the men and women in uniform in Iraq during the surge and their diplomatic, intelligence, and development community partners.

At the highest level, President Bush’s decision to conduct the surge was exceedingly courageous. His advisers were split on the decision, with many favoring other approaches that in my view would have failed. And as the going did get tougher over the early months of the surge, President Bush’s steadfast leadership and his personal commitment to seeing the war through to a successful conclusion (albeit one that might take many years to unfold) took on enormous significance.

I was privileged, together with Ambassador Crocker, to participate in a weekly video teleconference with the president and the members of the National Security Council. It began promptly at 7:30 a.m. Washington time each Monday, thereby ensuring that all participants were focused at the start of the week on the mission to which the president had given his total commitment. I do not believe that any battlefield commander ever had that frequency of contact with his commander in chief, and it was of vital importance to me, as was the support of Secretary of Defense Bob Gates.

I also had a weekly video teleconference with Secretary Gates, who personally drove forward a number of programs of incalculable value to our men and women on the ground, programs such as the accelerated production of mine-resistant, ambush-protected MRAP vehicles; a huge increase in intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance assets (such as Predator unmanned aerial vehicles and optics on towers, among many others); and a host of individual protective systems and enablers for our troopers — not to mention the additional forces that I requested once I got on the ground and identified additional needs beyond those addressed by the initial surge force commitment. Secretary Gates and all of us in Iraq were supported enormously, as well, by Gen. Pete Pace and then Adm. Mike Mullen, the two officers who served as chairman of the Joint Chiefs during the surge. General Pace and Admiral Mullen also did yeoman service in maintaining the support of the military service chiefs who were understandably under enormous strain to produce the forces that we needed, while also gradually increasing the effort in Afghanistan, as it began to go downhill. At one point, of course, this required the extension of the tours in Iraq and Afghanistan from 12 to 15 months, an enormous sacrifice to ask of our men and women there and their families at home, but one that proved hugely important to the campaign.

President Bush’s commitment had an enormous psychological effect on our men and women in Iraq, as well as on the Iraqi people. Our troopers recognized that we had a chance to do what was needed to reverse the terrible cycle of violence that had gripped Iraq in the throes of civil war. And the citizens of the Land of the Two Rivers realized that there was still hope that the new Iraq could realize the potential that so many had hoped for in the wake of the ousting of Saddam Hussein and the collapse of the Ba’athist regime in 2003.

Commanding MNF-I

I recognized early on that I had become the face of the surge. I had not asked for this role, but whether I liked it or not, I had to fill it. Beyond that, of course, it was essential that I determine the right big ideas (with lots to help, to be sure), provide clear direction, communicate that direction in all possible forms, and then oversee the implementation of the resulting plans. It was also critical that I spend time with our troopers on the ground, that I share a measure of risk with them, and that I give encouragement and provide cautious optimism that we could, indeed, achieve the objectives we’d set out for ourselves and our Iraqi partners. In truth, from the beginning I believed that our approach was correct and that we would achieve progress; however, there were undeniably moments when I was uncertain whether we could achieve sufficient progress quickly enough to report that to Congress by September 2007. On more than one occasion as the early months went by, in fact, I sat alone with Gen. Odierno after our morning updates and discussed with him when we thought the situation was going « to turn. » No theater commander ever had a better « operational architect » than I had in him.

As the coalition commander, I also had extensive contact with the military and civilian leaders and legislators of the countries contributing forces to the coalition and also, of course, with Prime Minister Maliki and our key Iraqi partners from all sectors of the population. I had considerable interaction as well with the U.S., international, and Iraqi press. In the latter effort, as with the leaders of the coalition countries, I worked hard to avoid projecting unfounded optimism. When asked whether I was an optimist or a pessimist, for example, I typically replied, « I am neither an optimist nor a pessimist; rather, I am a realist. And reality is that Iraq is all hard, all the time. » I would then note the progress we’d achieved and setbacks we’d suffered in recent weeks. I worked hard, in fact, to maintain credibility with coalition leaders and the media, as well as with our troopers and their Iraqi counterparts. The provision of realistic assessments was hugely important and ranked among the biggest of the many « rocks » in my personal rucksack.

Needless to say, it was the greatest of privileges to serve with the selfless men and women, Iraqi and American and those of our coalition partners, civilian as well as military, who did the hard, dangerous work of the surge. There seldom was an easy period; each day was tough. But those on the ground consistently demonstrated the skill, initiative, determination, and courage needed to turn the big ideas at my level into reality at their levels and in their areas of responsibility. They also displayed the flexibility that was required to ensure that Multi-National Force-Iraq was a learning organization, one that could react faster and display greater adaptability than our terrorist, insurgent, and militia opponents. As the surge progressed, the men and women I was privileged to command continually refined tactics, techniques, and procedures, and they ultimately defeated their enemies in both the physical and intellectual manifestations of counterinsurgency battle.

Because of the complexity of counterinsurgency operations and the mixture of military and civilian tasks that they entail, it is sometimes said that counterinsurgency is the graduate level of warfare. However debatable that assessment may be, there is no question that the men and women of the surge demonstrated a true mastery of all that was required to conduct such operations. As I often noted in later years, they earned the recognition accorded them as « America’s New Greatest Generation. »

The Road Ahead

In many respects, Iraq today looks tragically similar to the Iraq of 2006, complete with increasing numbers of horrific, indiscriminate attacks by Iraq’s al Qaeda affiliate and its network of extremists. Add to that the ongoing sectarian civil war in Syria — which is, in many aspects, a regional conflict being fought there — and the situation in Iraq looks even more complicated than it was in 2006 and thus even more worrisome — especially given the absence of American combat forces.

As Iraqi leaders consider the way forward, they would do well to remember what had to be done the last time the levels of violence escalated so terribly. If Iraqi leaders think back to that time, they will recall that the surge was not just more forces, though the additional forces were very important. What mattered most was the surge of ideas — concepts that embraced security of the people by « living with them, » initiatives to promote reconciliation with elements of the population that felt they had no incentive to support the new Iraq, ramping up of precise operations that targeted the key « irreconcilables, » the embrace of an enhanced comprehensive civil-military approach, increased attention to various aspects of the rule of law, improvements to infrastructure and basic services, and support for various political actions that helped bridge ethno-sectarian divides.

The ideas that enabled progress during the surge are, in many respects, the very ideas that could help Iraq’s leaders reverse the tragic downward spiral that we have seen in recent months. As we discovered in the run-up to the surge of 2007, a singular focus on counterterrorist operations will most likely fail to stem the violence gripping Iraq. If Iraq and the Iraqis are to have yet one more opportunity to move forward, they would likely find it useful to revisit the entire array of approaches pursued in 2007 and 2008. It is heartening, thus, to know that some of the veterans of the surge, American as well as Iraqi, are engaged in the effort to help Iraq determine and then pursue the initiatives needed to address the terrible increase in violence in that country. This is a time for them to work together to help Iraqi leaders take the initiative, especially in terms of reaching across the sectarian and ethnic divides that have widened in such a worrisome manner.  It is not too late for such action, but time is running short.


Najat Vallaud-Belkacem: Attention, une cible idéale peut en cacher une autre ! (When all else fails, blame racism)

14 septembre, 2014
http://referentiel.nouvelobs.com/wsfile/4991409756362.jpg
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme dans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Obama
Je ne peux qu’imaginer ce qu’endurent ses parents. Et quand je pense à ce garçon, je pense à mes propres enfants. Si j’avais un fils, il ressemblerait à Trayvon. Obama
La théorie du genre, qui explique «l’identité sexuelle» des individus autant par le contexte socio-culturel que par la biologie, a pour vertu d’aborder la question des inadmissibles inégalités persistantes entre les hommes et les femmes ou encore de l’homosexualité, et de faire œuvre de pédagogie sur ces sujets. (…) Le vrai problème de société que nous devons régler aujourd’hui, c’est l’homophobie, et notamment les agressions homophobes qui se développent en milieu scolaire. L’école doit redevenir un sanctuaire, et la prévention de la délinquance homophobe doit commencer dès le plus jeune âge. Un jeune homosexuel sur cinq a déjà été victime d’une agression physique, et près d’un sur deux a déjà été insulté. Il est essentiel d’enseigner aux enfants le respect des différentes formes d’identité sexuelle, afin de bâtir une société du respect. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem (secrétaire nationale du PS aux questions de société, 31 août 2011)
La vocation de l’école, c’est d’apprendre. D’apprendre quoi aux enfants? D’apprendre à lire, à compter, à écrire. D’apprendre aussi les valeurs de la République. Que parmi ces valeurs de la République, il y a la liberté, l’égalité, la fraternité.  L’égalité, c’est notamment l’égalité entre les filles et les garçons. C’est cela qu’on apprend aujourd’hui  à l’école aux enfants. Est-ce que ça a quelque chose à voir avec le contenu de ces SMS, avec une soi-disant théorie du genre qui n’existe pas, avec des cours d’éducation sexuelle. (…) On ne parle aucunement de sexualité à des enfants de primaire. On leur parle de ce que les filles et les garçons doivent pouvoir ambitionner d’être à égalité plus tard dans les rêves qu’ils font, dans les ambitions professionnelles qu’ils peuvent avoir’. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem (Europe 1, 29 janvier 2014)
La révolution française est l’irruption dans le temps de quelque chose qui n’appartient pas au temps, c’est un commencement absolu, c’est la présence et l’incarnation d’un sens, d’une régénération et d’une expiation du peuple français. 1789, l’année sans pareille, est celle de l’engendrement par un brusque saut de l’histoire d’un homme nouveau. La révolution est un événement méta-historique, c’est-à -dire un événement religieux. La révolution implique l’oubli total de ce qui précède la révolution. Et donc l’école a un rôle fondamental, puisque l’école doit dépouiller l’enfant de toutes ses attaches pré-républicaines pour l’élever jusqu’à devenir citoyen. C’est à elle qu’il revient de briser ce cercle, de produire cette auto-institution, d’être la matrice qui engendre en permanence des républicains pour faire la République, République préservée, république pure, république hors du temps au sein de la République réelle, l’école doit opérer ce miracle de l’engendrement par lequel l’enfant, dépouillé de toutes ses attaches pré-républicaines, va s’élever jusqu’à devenir le citoyen, sujet autonome. Et c’est bien une nouvelle naissance, une transsubstantiation qui opère dans l’école et par l’école, cette nouvelle église avec son nouveau clergé, sa nouvelle liturgie, ses nouvelles tables de la Loi. La société républicaine et laïque n’a pas d’autre choix que de «s’enseigner elle-même » (Quinet) d’être un recommencement perpétuel de la République en chaque républicain, un engendrement continu de chaque citoyen en chaque enfant, une révolution pacifique mais permanente. Vincent Peillon (« La Révolution française n’est pas terminée », 2008)
Le gouvernement s’est engagé à « s’appuyer sur la jeunesse pour changer les mentalités », notamment par le biais d’une éducation au respect de la diversité des orientations sexuelles. L’engagement de notre ministère dans l’éducation à l’égalité et au respect de la personne est essentiel et prend aujourd’hui un relief particulier. Il vous appartient en effet de veiller à ce que les débats qui traversent la société française ne se traduisent pas, dans les écoles et les établissements, par des phénomènes de rejet et de stigmatisation homophobes. (…) La lutte contre l’homophobie en milieu scolaire, public comme privé, doit compter au rang de vos priorités. J’attire à ce titre votre attention sur la mise en œuvre du programme d’actions gouvernemental contre les violences et les discriminations commises à raison de l’orientation sexuelle ou de l’identité de genre. Je souhaite ainsi que vous accompagniez et favorisiez les interventions en milieu scolaire des associations qui luttent contre les préjugés homophobes, dès lors que la qualité et la valeur ajoutée pédagogique de leur action peuvent être établies. Je vous invite également à relayer avec la plus grande énergie, au début de l’année, la campagne de communication relative à la « ligne azur », ligne d’écoute pour les jeunes en questionnement à l’égard de leur orientation ou leur identité sexuelles. Dans l’attente des conclusions du groupe de travail sur l’éducation à la sexualité, vous serez attentif à la mise en œuvre de la circulaire du 17 février 2003 qui prévoit cette éducation dans tous les milieux scolaires et ce, dès le plus jeune âge. La délégation ministérielle de prévention et de lutte contre la violence dirigée par Eric Debarbieux, permettra de mieux connaître la violence spécifique que constitue l’homophobie. Enfin, vous le savez, j’ai confié à Michel Teychenné une mission relative à la lutte contre l’homophobie, qui porte notamment sur la prévention du suicide des jeunes concernés. Je vous remercie de leur apporter tout le concours nécessaire à la réussite de leurs missions. Je souhaite que 2013 soit une année de mobilisation pour l’égalité à l’école. Vincent Peillon (minitre de l’Education nationale, Lettre aux Recteurs d’Académies, 4 janvier 2013)
2.1.1 À l’école primaire, l’éducation à la sexualité suit la progression des contenus fixée par les programmes pour l’école. Les temps qui lui sont consacrés seront identifiés comme tels dans l’organisation de la classe. Ils feront cependant l’objet, en particulier aux cycles 1 et 2, d’une intégration aussi adaptée que possible à l’ensemble des autres contenus et des opportunités apportées par la vie de classe ou d’autres événements. Aussi, à l’école, le nombre de trois séances annuelles fixé par l’article L. 312-16 du code de l’éducation doit-il être compris plutôt comme un ordre de grandeur à respecter globalement dans l’année que comme un nombre rigide de séances qui seraient exclusivement dévolues à l’éducation à la sexualité. L’ensemble des questions relatives à l’éducation à la sexualité est abordé collectivement par l’équipe des maîtres lors de conseils de cycle ou de conseils de maîtres. Les objectifs de cet enseignement intégré aux programmes ainsi que les modalités retenues pour sa mise en œuvre feront en outre l’objet d’une présentation lors du conseil d’école. Ministère de l’Education nationale (Circulaire N°2003-027 DU 17-2-2003 L’éducation à la sexualité dans les écoles, les collèges et les lycées)
Partout en Europe, en Amérique du Nord, en Australie, la coalition historique de la gauche, centrée sur la classe ouvrière, s’efface. Même dans les pays où existe un lien institutionnel, via les syndicats, entre la classe ouvrière et la gauche politique, le vote ouvrier déserte la gauche : Grande Bretagne, Allemagne, Suède. La social-démocratie perd sa base électorale. Si la coalition historique de la gauche est en déclin, une nouvelle coalition émerge.  (…) La nouvelle gauche a le visage de la France de demain : plus jeune, plus féminin, plus divers, plus diplômé, mais aussi plus urbain et moins catholique . Elle est en phase avec la gauche politique sur l’ensemble de ses valeurs. Contrairement à l’électorat historique de la gauche, coalisé par les enjeux socioéconomiques, cette France de demain est avant tout unifiée par ses valeurs culturelles, progressistes : elle veut le changement, elle est tolérante, ouverte, solidaire, optimiste, offensive. C’est tout particulièrement vrai pour les diplômés, les jeunes, les minorités . Elle s’oppose à un électorat qui défend le présent et le passé contre le changement, qui considère que « la France est de moins en moins la France », « c’était mieux avant », un électorat inquiet de l’avenir, plus pessimiste, plus fermé, plus défensif. Le facteur socioéconomique joue aussi. Car la France de demain réunit avant tout les « outsiders » de la société, ceux qui cherchent à y rentrer, notamment sur le marché du travail, mais n’y parviennent que difficilement : les jeunes, les femmes, les minorités, les chômeurs, les travailleurs précaires. Ils ont du mal car ils sont la principale variable d’ajustement face à la crise d’une société d’« insiders » qui, pour préserver les droits acquis, sacrifie les nouveaux entrants. Ces « outsiders » ont besoin de l’aide de la puissance publique pour surmonter les barrières qui se dressent devant eux : ils ont besoin d’un Etat qui les aide à s’émanciper, à briser le plafond de verre. Ils sont soutenus par les plus intégrés (les diplômés), solidaires de ces « exclus » par conviction culturelle. La nouvelle gauche qui émerge en France est la même que celle qui se dessine partout en Europe. Elle ressemble de près à la coalition qui a porté Barack Obama au pouvoir en 2008.  Terra Nova (think tank socialiste)
Quelle stratégie la gauche doit-elle adopter pour faire le plein de son nouvel électorat naturel ? Elle doit opter pour une stratégie de valeurs. L’électorat « France de demain » les partage. Il y a des marges de manœuvre. Les élections régionales de 2010 ont montré que le vote à gauche des femmes, des jeunes, des diplômés progressent plus fortement que la moyenne de l’électorat. Pour accélérer ce glissement tendanciel, la gauche doit dès lors faire campagne sur ses valeurs, notamment culturelles : insister sur l’investissement dans l’avenir, la promotion de l’émancipation, et mener la bataille sur l’acceptation d’une France diverse, pour une identité nationale intégratrice, pour l’Europe. La gauche doit également privilégier une stratégie de mobilisation. La « France de demain » vote fortement à gauche mais vote peu. Il est toutefois possible d’améliorer son taux de participation : les jeunes ou les minorités ne sont pas des abstentionnistes systématiques, ils votent par intermittence. L’objectif est donc de les mobiliser : cela passe par une campagne de terrain (porte-à-porte, phoning, présence militante sur les réseaux sociaux et dans les quartiers…), sur le modèle Obama. Terra Nova
Aujourd’hui le clivage droite/gauche n’est plus idéologique, mais philosophique et moral. Hervé Bentégeat
Racisme, sexisme : Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, la cible idéale. Titre du Nouvel Observateur
Elle est l’un des symboles de cette gauche a-économique qui s’accommode du virage social-démocrate du Président parce qu’elle n’a pas d’autres ambitions que de réformer les mentalités, de désaliéner le peuple qui ne comprend pas. Hervé Mariton
Quand on écoute Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, on entend Terra Nova. Responsable de l’UMP
Si sa carrière doit beaucoup à Gérard Collomb, le maire de Lyon, qui l’a repérée en 2003, et à Ségolène Royal, qui, en 2007, a fait de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem l’une de ses porte-parole pendant sa campagne présidentielle, elle est tout autant redevable à Olivier Ferrand, avec qui elle s’est liée d’amitié. L’ancienne secrétaire nationale du Parti socialiste chargée des questions société et des droits des personnes lesbiennes, gays, bisexuelles et transgenres (LGBT) était même, pour le fondateur de Terra Nova, comme l’incarnation faite femme des idées progressistes qu’il portait. Deux ans et demi plus tard, NVB, comme elle aimerait que les médias la surnomment sans parvenir à imposer ses initiales, contrairement à NKM, pleure encore. La nouvelle ministre de l’Éducation nationale est submergée par l’émotion lorsque Manuel Valls lui rend hommage aux universités d’été du PS, à La Rochelle, saluant, dimanche dernier, « le travail et l’engagement » de la benjamine de son gouvernement, exprimant sa fierté de voir pour la première fois « une femme si jeune occuper cette si lourde fonction ». Lui n’a pas eu cette chance. Il a subi les sifflets des frondeurs et des militants du Mouvement des jeunes socialistes, qui ont fait la claque pour perturber son discours de clôture. Il a peiné à ramener le calme. Najat, elle, a eu droit à une ovation debout. Rien de tout celan’étonne le premier ministre. Manuel Valls sait que Najat Vallaud-Belkacem est aujourd’hui le dernier trait d’union d’un Parti socialiste fracturé, qui ne se retrouve plus que sur les grandes réformes sociétales, « le plus petit dénominateur commun d’une gauche hier plurielle, qui est aujourd’hui une gauche plus rien », selon la formule d’un fin connaisseur du PS. Raphaël Stainville
Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, c’est d’abord un sourire accompagné d’un petit rire à peine réprimé qui lui donne de prime abord un côté si sympathique, si humain. Mais il ne faut pas s’y tromper. Derrière le sourire se cache une volonté de fer. Hervé Mariton, le député UMP de la Drôme, la décrit comme une «Viêt-minh souriante»! Une manière de souligner son côté sectaire, sa propension à ne pas souffrir la contestation et à diaboliser ses adversaires. Il aurait pu dire une «Khmère rose». Même son de cloche du côté de Jean-Frédéric Poisson, le patron du Parti chrétien-démocrate (PCD), qui évoque «ce beau visage donné à l’idéologie». «Un sourire de salut public, comme il y a des gouvernements du même nom», avait écrit un jour Philippe Muray au sujet de Ségolène Royal. Comme la madone du Poitou, qui fut la première à lui donner sa chance en politique, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem a fait de son sourire l’un de ses atouts, une marque de fabrique. «Un masque», disent certains. Ce sourire, les responsables de l’UMP en dissertent volontiers. Pour Christian Jacob, le patron du groupe UMP à l’Assemblée nationale: «Elle parle beaucoup, affiche son sourire, mais derrière cela sonne creux». Ses traits délicats, ses yeux de chat, ses tailleurs élégants, son charme évident ne seraient qu’une manière d’habiller la vacuité de la politique du PS. «Une fausse valeur», affirme encore le chef de file des députés de l’opposition. Hervé Mariton, qui fut l’orateur de l’UMP pendant les débats sur le mariage pour tous, la considère avec davantage de sérieux et de crainte. Il a pu constater avec quelle vigueur et, parfois, avec quelle rage la benjamine du gouvernement était à la pointe du combat «progressiste». «Elle est, dit-il, l’un des symboles de cette gauche a-économique qui s’accommode du virage social-démocrate du Président parce qu’elle n’a pas d’autres ambitions que de réformer les mentalités, de désaliéner le peuple qui ne comprend pas.» Et pour cause: même si elle n’a pas toujours été en première ligne, laissant à d’autres, comme Christiane Taubira, le soin de porter des lois comme le mariage pour tous, qui ne relevaient pas de son ministère, elle est toujours en pointe ou à la relance sur ces sujets sociétaux. «Sur le mariage homosexuel, la PMA , les mères porteuses, la lutte contre les discriminations liées aux stéréotypes et à l’identité de genre, elle n’en rate pas une.» Avant de devenir, à 34 ans, la plus jeune ministre du gouvernement Ayrault, n’était-elle pas la secrétaire nationale du PS chargée des questions de société? En 2010 déjà, elle défendait l’idée de la gestation pour autrui solidaire, appelant de ses vœux à la GPA non marchande, au nom de «l’éthique du don». Pendant la campagne présidentielle, c’est elle qui représentait François Hollande au meeting LGBT (lesbiennes, gays, bi et trans) pour l’égalité. Pas étonnant qu’aujourd’hui on retrouve la ministre à la manœuvre sur toutes ces questions qui hérissent une grande partie de la société française. La ministre des Droits des femmes incarne, mieux que d’autres, cette gauche qui a délaissé le social et l’économie pour investir le champ sociétal. «À son programme: culpabilisation et rééducation», résume le philosophe François-Xavier Bellamy. D’ailleurs, même le gouvernement a eu droit à son stage pour lutter contre le sexisme. Et, puisqu’il semble que nombre de Français sont déjà perdus pour ses causes, elle consacre une grande partie de son énergie à s’occuper des générations futures. Dans la novlangue dont est friande la ministre, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem se contente de sensibiliser à l’égalité femme-homme (comment être contre?), à l’identité de genre pour lutter contre les stéréotypes… Cela commence dès la crèche. Elle sensibilise. On dirait une caresse. Tout se fait dans la douceur. C’est «bienvenue dans Le Meilleur des mondes!» Une école qui rééduque avant d’instruire. (…) Najat Vallaud-Belkacem a épousé le logiciel de ce laboratoire d’idées du PS qui préconisait en 2011, dans l’une de ses notes, que la gauche, pour espérer revenir au pouvoir, devait désormais viser un électorat constitué de femmes, de jeunes, de minorités et de diplômés, plutôt que d’essayer de convaincre une classe ouvrière largement ralliée aux idées du Front national. Nous y sommes. Tant et si bien qu’il est difficile de savoir ce que pense vraiment la ministre, tant elle est aujourd’hui habitée par la pensée dominante définie par ce think tank. «Quand on écoute Christiane Taubira, on découvre une personnalité. Quand on écoute Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, on entend Terra Nova», assure un responsable de l’UMP. «Elle coche toutes les cases», ajoute même un député de la Droite populaire, comme pour expliquer le succès de la ministre auprès des sympatisants du PS.(…) Bon chic mauvais genre, elle incarne très exactement le gauchisme culturel tel que le sociologue Jean-Pierre Le Goff l’a défini. Une école de pensée qui n’entend pas «changer la société par la violence et la contrainte», mais qui veut «changer les mentalités par les moyens de l’éducation, de la communication moderne et par la loi». Il procède par des tentatives de déstabilisation successives. Hier le pacs, aujourd’hui le mariage homosexuel, le genre, l’ABCD de l’égalité, et demain l’euthanasie… Certaines manœuvres opèrent. D’autres échouent au gré des résistances qu’elles rencontrent et suscitent. C’est le cas de la théorie du genre. Elle est devenue si sulfureuse que Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, qui en faisait pourtant la promotion à longueur de déplacements, et jusque dans les crèches, en est venue à expliquer qu’elle n’avait jamais existé. Pas plus tard que le vendredi 7 février, elle annulait un échange à Sciences-Po Paris avec Janet Halley, une juriste américaine spécialiste de la famille et du genre. Il figurait encore à son agenda le matin même. Mais, dans le contexte, cette rencontre aurait probablement fait désordre. Elle prenait le risque d’être soumise à la question et d’être une nouvelle fois obligée de se dédire sur la théorie du genre.Pour autant, de l’aveu d’un proche, la ministre des Droits des femmes ne connaît pas le doute. On pense qu’elle recule. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem avance toujours. Il en va ainsi des «forces de progrès». Comme le dit Jean-Pierre Le Goff, «elle a beau avoir le sourire du dalaï-lama, elle n’en a pas moins la rage des sans-culottes». Raphaël Stainville
Le gauchisme culturel n’entend pas changer la société par la violence et la contrainte, mais «changer les mentalités» par les moyens de l’éducation, de la communication moderne et par la loi. Il n’en véhicule pas moins l’idée de rupture avec le Vieux Monde en étant persuadé qu’il est porteur de valeurs et de comportements correspondant à la fois au nouvel état de la société et à une certaine idée du Bien. Ce point aveugle de certitude lui confère son assurance et sa détermination par-delà ses déclarations d’ouverture, de dialogue et de concertation. Les idées et les arguments opposés à ses propres conceptions peuvent être vite réduits à des préjugés issus du Vieux Monde et/ou à des idées malsaines. Le débat démocratique s’en trouve par là même perverti. (…) Ces postures ne sont pas sans rappeler celles du passé qui s’ancraient alors dans de grandes idéologies et les utopies issues du XIXe siècle, et plus précisément du communisme. Ce rapprochement, qui saisit des traits bien réels et souligne à juste titre le danger que le gauchisme culturel fait peser sur la liberté d’opinion et sur le fonctionnement de la démocratie, n’en est pas moins trompeur. Dans le cas du gauchisme culturel, l’«idéologie» – pour autant que l’on puisse utiliser ce mot – est d’une nature particulière. Elle n’est pas «une» mais plurielle, composée de bouts de doctrines anciennes en décomposition (communisme, socialisme, anarchisme), mais aussi des idées issues des «mouvements sociaux» et des nouveaux groupes de pression communautaires (écologie, féminisme, mouvement étudiant et lycéen, associations antiracistes, groupes homosexuels…), voire des références aux «peuples premiers» et aux spiritualités exotiques, comme on l’a vu à propos de l’écologie. Elle n’est pas une «idéologie de granit» – pour reprendre une expression de Claude Lefort – fondée sur une science qui prétend englober sous sa coupe l’ensemble des sphères d’activité, même si l’on peut y trouver des relents de scientisme. Ses représentants, qui se montrent parfois sourds, intransigeants et d’un sectarisme à tout crin, ne sont pas pour autant de dangereux fanatiques exerçant la terreur sur leurs adversaires et dans la société. Ils ont parfois des allures de boy-scouts et leurs opposants ont souvent l’impression de «boxer contre des édredons». Les représentants du gauchisme culturel ressembleraient plutôt à ce qu’on appelle des «faux gentils». Ils affichent le sourire obligé de la communication tant qu’ils ne sont pas mis en question; ils se réclament de l’ouverture, de la tolérance, du débat démocratique, tout en en délimitant d’emblée le contenu et les acteurs légitimes. En ce sens, la droite se trompe en parlant de nouveau «totalitarisme», même si l’on peut estimer que le gauchisme culturel en a quelques beaux restes. En réalité, ce dernier s’inscrit pleinement dans le contexte des «démocraties post-totalitaires»: il puise dans différentes idéologies du passé en décomposition qu’il recompose à sa manière et fait coexister sans souci de cohérence et d’unité, n’en gardant que des schèmes de pensée et de comportement. À ses pointes extrêmes, le gauchisme culturel combine la rage des sans-culottes et le sourire du dalaï-lama. (…) c’est surtout dans les années 1980 que le gauchisme culturel va recevoir sa consécration définitive dans le champ politique, plus précisément au tournant des années 1983-1984, au moment où la gauche change de politique économique sans le dire clairement et entame la «modernisation». Le gauchisme culturel va alors servir de substitut à la crise de sa doctrine et masquer un changement de politique économique mal assumé. À partir de ce moment, la gauche au pouvoir va intégrer l’héritage impossible de mai 68, faire du surf sur les évolutions dans tous les domaines, et apparaître clairement aux yeux de l’opinion comme étant à l’avant-garde dans le bouleversement des mœurs et de la «culture». Nous ne sommes pas sortis de cette situation. (…) nous assistons à la fin d’un cycle historique dont les origines remontent au XIXe siècle; la gauche a atteint son point avancé de décomposition, elle est passée à autre chose tout en continuant de faire semblant qu’il n’en est rien; il n’est pas sûr qu’elle puisse s’en remettre. Le gauchisme culturel, qui est devenu hégémonique à gauche et dans la société, a été un vecteur de cette décomposition et son antilibéralisme intellectuel, pour ne pas dire sa bêtise, est un des principaux freins à son renouvellement. La gauche est-elle capable de rompre clairement avec lui? Rien n’est certain étant donné la prégnance de ses postures et de ses schémas de pensée.(…) Quand les mécanismes de défense identitaires l’emportent sur la liberté de pensée et servent à se mettre à distance de l’épreuve du réel, il y a de quoi s’inquiéter sur l’avenir d’une gauche qui ne parvient pas à rompre avec ses vieux démons et se barricade entre gens du même milieu qui ont tendance à croire que la gauche est le centre du monde. (…) Et pendant ce temps-là, la France continue de se morceler sous l’effet de multiples fractures sociales et culturelles. L’extrême droite espère bien en tirer profit en soufflant sur les braises, mais, à vrai dire, elle n’a pas grand-chose à faire, le gauchisme culturel continue de lui faciliter la tâche. Jean-Pierre Le Goff

Attention: une cible idéale peut en cacher une autre !

« Ayotollah », viêt-minh souriante », « Khmère rose », « beau visage donné à l’idéologie », « culpabilisation et rééducation », « rage des sans-culottes et sourire du dalaï-lama » …

A l’heure où, du côté de la Maison Blanche, le premier président de la diversité est, du haut de son notoire mépris pour les ouvriers et de son recours systématique à la carte raciale, bien parti pour remporter le titre de pire président du siècle

Et où entre deux scandales ou dérives sociétales devant la même désaffection de la classe ouvrière, son homologue français semble enfin lui aussi se décider à revenir au réel du moins au niveau économique et au niveau du discours

Et nous ressortent, face aux inévitables critiques dont est notamment l’objet la nouvelle ministre de l’Education et ex-secrétaire nationale du PS chargée des questions de société et parfaite incarnation de la stratégie tout-sociétal du laboratoire d’idées socialiste Terra Nova, la vieille arme de l’accusation de racisme  …

Comment, avec le sociologue Jean-Pierre Le Goff, ne pas y voir le remake de la tentative du PS de masquer la crise de sa doctrine et un changement de politique économique toujours aussi mal assumé qui avait marqué sous Mitterrand le retour de la rigueur des années 83-84 ?

Du gauchisme culturel et de ses avatars
Jean-Pierre Le Goff
Le Débat

24 juin 2014

Pour un néophyte en politique qui s’intéresse à la gauche, il peut sembler difficile de s’y retrouver : « socialisme » ou « social-démocratie » ? « Gauche sociale », « gauche libérale », « gauche de la gauche »… ? Il en va de même au sein du parti socialiste : de la Gauche populaire à la Gauche durable, en passant par Maintenant la gauche ou encore L’Espoir à gauche…, les courants se font et se défont au gré des alliances et des congrès. Certains y voient encore le signe d’un « débat démocratique » au sein d’une gauche dont l’aspect pluriel ne cesse de s’accentuer. On peut au contraire y voir le symptôme du morcellement des anciennes doctrines qui n’en finissent pas de se décomposer.

Dans son livre Droit d’inventaire (Éd. du Seuil, 2009), François Hollande affirmait que le « socialisme navigue à vue ». Depuis lors, la situation n’a pas fondamentalement changé, d’autant qu’il faut faire face à la dette publique et à l’absence de croissance, en assumant plus ou moins clairement une politique de rigueur. La gauche change dans une recherche éperdue d’une nouvelle identité qui tente tant bien que mal de faire le lien ou la « synthèse » entre l’ancien et le nouveau. En réalité, la plupart des débats sans fin sur la redéfinition de la gauche se font en occultant une mutation fondamentale qui a déplacé son centre de gravité de la question sociale vers les questions de société. Cette mutation s’est opérée sous l’influence d’un gauchisme culturel inséparable des effets sociétaux qu’a produits la révolution culturelle de mai 68 et son « héritage impossible ». Tel est précisément ce que cet article voudrait commencer à mettre en lumière.

La notion de « gauchisme culturel » désigne non pas un mouvement organisé ou un courant bien structuré, mais un ensemble d’idées, de représentations, de valeurs plus ou moins conscientes déterminant un type de comportement et de posture dans la vie publique, politique et dans les médias. Il s’est affirmé à travers cinq principaux thèmes particulièrement révélateurs du déplacement de la question sociale vers d’autres préoccupations : le corps et la sexualité ; la nature et l’environnement ; l’éducation des enfants ; la culture et l’histoire. En déplaçant la question sociale vers ces thèmes, le gauchisme culturel s’inscrit dans les évolutions des sociétés démocratiques, mais il le fait d’une façon bien particulière : il se situe dans la problématique de la gauche qu’il adapte à la nouvelle situation historique en lui faisant subir une distorsion, en recyclant et en poussant à l’extrême ses ambiguïtés et ses orientations les plus problématiques 1.

Il a fait valoir une critique radicale du passé et s’est voulu à l’avant-garde dans le domaine des moeurs et de la culture. En même temps, il s’est érigé en figure emblématique de l’antifascisme et de l’antiracisme qu’il a revisités à sa manière. Plus fondamentalement, ce sont toute une conception de la condition humaine et un sens commun qui lui était attaché qui se sont trouvés mis à mal.

Ces conceptions et ces postures du gauchisme culturel sont devenues hégémoniques au sein de la gauche, même si certains tentent de maintenir les anciens clivages comme au « bon vieux temps » de la lutte des classes et du mouvement ouvrier, en les faisant coexister tant bien que mal avec un modernisme dans le domaine des moeurs et de la culture.

Ce gauchisme culturel est présent dans l’appareil du parti socialiste, dans l’État, et il dispose d’importants relais médiatiques. Le PS et la gauche au pouvoir ont pu ainsi apparaître aux yeux de l’opinion comme étant les représentants d’une révolution culturelle qui s’est répandue dans l’ensemble de la société et a fini par influencer une partie de la droite.

Nous n’entendons pas ici analyser l’ensemble de la thématique du gauchisme culturel. Mais la façon dont la gauche s’est comportée dans le débat et le vote de la loi sur le mariage homosexuel nous a paru constituer un exemple type de la prégnance de ce gauchisme et des fractures qu’il provoque dans la société. Dans cette affaire, le gauchisme culturel a prévalu au sein du PS et dans l’État à tel point qu’il est difficile de les démêler. En partant du thème de l’homoparentalité et en le reliant à d’autres comme ceux de l’antiracisme, de l’écologie ou de la nouvelle éducation des enfants, nous avons voulu mettre au jour quelques-unes des idées clés et des représentations qui structurent les comportements dans l’espace politique et médiatique.

Le nouveau domaine de l’égalité

La gauche a fait voter la loi sur le mariage homosexuel dans une situation sociale particulièrement dégradée. Le chômage de masse conjugué avec l’éclatement des familles et l’érosion des liens traditionnels de solidarité a produit des effets puissants de déstructuration anthropologique et sociale. Exclues du travail, vivant dans des familles gentiment dénommées monoparentales ou recomposées – alors qu’elles sont décomposées et marquées dans la plupart des cas par l’absence du père –, des catégories de la population connaissent de nouvelles formes de précarité sociale et de déstructuration identitaire. Les drames familiaux combinés souvent avec le chômage alimentent presque quotidiennement la rubrique des faits divers. C’est dans ce contexte que la gauche a présenté le mariage et l’adoption par les couples homosexuels comme la marque du progrès contre la réaction.

On attendait la gauche sur la question sociale qui constitue historiquement un facteur essentiel de son identité. En fait, elle a abandonné une bonne partie des promesses électorales en lanmatière, tout en se montrant intransigeante sur une question qui a divisé profondément le pays.

Elle a ainsi reporté sur cette dernière une démarcation avec la droite qu’elle a du mal à faire valoir dans le champ économique et social. Les anciens schémas de la lutte contre l’« idéologie bourgeoise », contre le fascisme montant se sont réinvestis dans les questions sociétales avec un dogmatisme et un sectarisme d’autant plus exacerbés.

Les partisans du « Mariage pour tous » l’ont affirmé clairement : « Pour nous, les craintes et les critiques suscitées par ce projet n’ont pas de base rationnelle 2. » Dans ces conditions, le débat avec des opposants mus par des craintes irrationnelles et une phobie vis-à-vis des homosexuels ne sert à rien. Les Jeunes Socialistes de leur côté ont appelé les internautes à dénoncer les « dérapages homophobes » de leurs élus sur l’Internet et sur Twitter à l’aide d’une « carte interactive » signalant leur nom, leur mandat, leur parti, la date et la « teneur du dérapage » 3.

La gauche au pouvoir a donné quant à elle l’image d’un État partisan, d’hommes d’État transformés en militants. La façon pour le moins cavalière dont elle a consulté les représentants religieux et a réagi à la prise de position de l’Église catholique avait des relents de lutte contre la religion du temps du père Combes, à la différence près que la loi de séparation a été votée depuis cette époque et que l’Église catholique a fini par se réconcilier avec la République.

Restent les intégristes, que l’on n’a pas manqué de mettre en exergue. Lors des grands rassemblements de la Manif pour tous, des journalistes militants braquaient systématiquement leurs micros et leurs caméras sur les petits cortèges de Civitas et de l’extrême droite, guettant le moindre incident qui viendrait confirmer leurs schémas préconçus et leur permettrait de déclarer comme un soulagement : « Voyez, on vous l’avait bien dit ! » Quoi de plus simple que de considérer ce mouvement contre le mariage et l’adoption pour les couples homosexuels comme un succédané du fascisme des années 1930 et du pétainisme, de le réduire à une manifestation de l’intégrisme catholique et de l’extrême droite qui n’ont pas manqué d’en profiter ?

Les partisans du mariage homosexuel se sont trouvés pris au dépourvu : ils n’imaginaient pas qu’une loi, qui pour eux allait de soi, puisse susciter des manifestations de protestation d’une telle ampleur.

Pour la gauche, il ne faisait apparemment aucun doute que les revendications des groupes homosexuels participaient d’un « grand mouvement historique d’émancipation » en même temps que leur satisfaction représentait une « grande avancée vers l’égalité ».
La Gay Pride, à laquelle la ministre de la Famille fraîchement nommée s’est empressée de participer avant même le vote de la loi, leur apparaissait comme partie intégrante d’un « mouvement social » dont elle se considère le propriétaire légitime. Ce mouvement s’est inscrit dans une filiation imaginaire avec le mouvement ouvrier passé tout en devenant de plus en plus composite, faisant coexister dans la confusion des revendications sociales, écologistes, culturelles et communautaires. Devenu de plus en plus un « mouvement sociétal » par adjonction ou substitution des revendications culturelles aux vieux mots d’ordre de la lutte des classes, son « sujet historique » s’en est trouvé changé. À la classe ouvrière qui « n’ayant rien à perdre que ses chaînes » se voyait confier la mission de libérer l’humanité tout entière, aux luttes des peuples contre le colonialisme et l’impérialisme se sont progressivement substituées des minorités faisant valoir leurs droits particuliers et agissant comme des groupes de pression.

C’est ainsi que les revendications des lesbiennes, gays, bi et trans se sont trouvées intégrées dans un sens de l’histoire nécessairement progressiste, en référence analogique lointaine et imaginaire avec le mouvement ouvrier défunt et les luttes des peuples pour leur émancipation.

En inscrivant le « Mariage pour tous » dans la lutte pour l’égalité, la gauche a par ailleurs opéré un déplacement dont elle ne perçoit pas les effets. « Égalité rien de plus, rien de moins », proclamait un slogan des manifestations pour le mariage homosexuel en janvier 2012, comme s’il s’agissait toujours du même combat. Or, appliquée à des domaines qui relèvent de l’anthropologie, cette exigence d’égalité change de registre.

Elle concerne de fait, qu’on le veuille ou non, une donnée de base fondamentale de la condition humaine : la division sexuelle et la façon dont les êtres humains conçoivent la transmission de la vie et la filiation.

Obnubilée par la lutte contre les inégalités, la gauche ne mesure pas les effets de ce changement de registre qui ouvre une boîte de Pandore :
dans cette nouvelle conception de la lutte contre les inégalités, les différences liées à la condition humaine et les aléas de la vie peuvent être considérés comme des signes insupportables d’inégalité et de discrimination.

Dans le domaine de la différence sexuelle, comment alors ne pas considérer le fait de pouvoir porter ou non et de mettre au monde un enfant comme une « inégalité » fondamentale entre gays et lesbiennes ?

Dans ce cadre, la revendication de la gestation pour autrui paraît cohérente et prolonge à sa manière cette nouvelle lutte pour l’« égalité ».
Ce changement de registre marque une nouvelle étape problématique dans la « passion de l’égalité » propre à la démocratie. Dans la conception républicaine, la revendication d’égalité se déploie dans un cadre juridique et politique lié à une conception de la citoyenneté qui implique un dépassement des intérêts et des appartenances particulières pour se penser membre de la cité ; la lutte contre les inégalités économiques s’inscrit dans le cadre d’une « justice sociale » et vise à créer les conditions favorables à cette citoyenneté.

C’est en se plaçant dans cette perspective que la lutte contre les inégalités prend son sens et ne verse pas dans l’égalitarisme, en ne s’opposant pas à la liberté mais en l’intégrant comme une condition nécessaire et préalable pour que celle-ci puisse concerner le plus grand nombre de citoyens. Dans cette optique, il s’agit d’améliorer les conditions économiques et sociales, de développer l’éducation tout particulièrement en direction des couches les plus défavorisées afin d’accroître cette liberté. En ce sens, les paroles de Carlo Rossi, socialiste, antifasciste italien, assassiné en 1937, constituent le meilleur de la tradition de la gauche et du mouvement ouvrier : « Le socialisme c’est quand la liberté arrive dans la vie des gens les plus pauvres 4. »

Cette conception de l’égalité articulée à la liberté et finalisée par elle ne se confond pas avec le « droit à la réussite pour tous » ou la revendication des « droits à » de la part des individus ou des groupes communautaires.

Ces derniers portent en réalité la marque de la « démocratie providentielle En ce sens, la mobilisation des Noirs américains des années 1960 pour les « droits civiques » en référence à la Constitution américaine est un combat pour la liberté et la citoyenneté. Ce combat n’est pas de même nature que la revendication pour le mariage et l’adoption pour les couples homosexuels, dans la mesure où cette dernière s’insère dans la lignée des « droits créances » qui se sont multipliés au fil des ans en sortant du registre économique et social. Les partisans du mariage homosexuel ont même fait valoir l’amour pour légitimer leur demande de droits : « Nous, citoyens hétéros ou gays, nous pensons que chacun a le droit de s’unir avec la personne qu’il aime, de protéger son conjoint, de fonder une famille 6. » Qui pourrait aller à l’encontre d’un si noble sentiment ?

La gauche s’est voulue rassurante en faisant valoir à ses adversaires qu’il ne s’agissait pas de changer ou de retirer des droits existants mais simplement d’en ouvrir de nouveaux, comme sices derniers raisonnaient dans le cadre du « socialindividualisme » (la société comme service rendu aux individus) avec son « militantisme procédurieret demandeur de droits 7 ».

Contrairement à ce que la gauche a laissé entendre, le rejet de la loi n’impliquait pas nécessairement un refus de prendre en compte juridiquement les situations des couples homosexuels et des enfants adoptés. Les opposants ont mis en avant, en tout cas, un questionnement et des conceptions différentes qui heurtaient la bonne conscience de la gauche ancrée dans ses certitudes. Dans cette affaire, les manifestations des intégristes catholiques, les provocations et les violences de l’extrême droite sont venues à point nommé pour ramener la confrontation à des schémas bien connus.

L’antifascisme revisité

La gauche s’est toujours donné le beau rôle de l’antifascisme qui constitue un des principaux marqueurs de son identité. La mort de Clément Méric dans une rixe avec des skinheads d’extrême droite a relancé une nouvelle fois la mobilisation en même temps qu’elle faisait apparaître une configuration nouvelle. Les skinheads et les « antifas » se sont rencontrés dans un appartement de The Lifestyle Company lors d’une vente privée de vêtements de marque Fred Perry qu’ils affectionnent particulièrement ; la bagarre qui s’ensuivit et la mort de Clément Méric ne ressemblent en rien aux violences et aux assassinats pratiqués par les chemises noires de Mussolini et encore moins à la terreur et à la barbarie des SA et des SS. Même l’extrême gauche de mai 68 aurait du mal à s’y retrouver, elle qui pourtant avait déjà tendance à traiter les CRS de « SS » et à voir du fascisme partout.

Autres temps, autres moeurs : à cette époque, l’attirance pour les marques n’aurait pas manqué d’être considérée par les militants comme un goût « petitbourgeois » ou le signe certain de l’« aliénation capitaliste ». Les violences entre « fascistes » et « antifas » des nouvelles générations ont des allures de révolte et de règlements de comptes entre bandes d’adolescents ou de post-adolescents mus par le besoin de décharger leur agressivité dans une société qui se veut policée, à la manière des affrontements de certains supporters de clubs de football.

Les idéologies extrémistes peuvent venir s’y greffer sans pour autant aboutir aux mêmes phénomènes que par le passé. Cela ne justifie en rien la mort de Clément Méric, la haine, les violences et les exactions commises par ces groupuscules, mais contredit les analogies historiques rapides et les amalgames. Ces derniers n’ont pas manqué à travers les propos de gens de gauche qui n’ont pas hésité à faire le rapprochement entre la mort de Clément Méric et la Manif pour tous.

L’antifascisme constitue en réalité un fonds de souvenirs passionnels et un stock d’idées toujours prêts à rejaillir à la moindre occasion, occultant la plupart du temps la façon dont le communisme l’a promu et la grille d’interprétation qu’il a fournie à la gauche à cette occasion. Dans le schéma communiste, le fascisme n’est qu’une forme de la dictature de la bourgeoisie poussée jusqu’au bout, constituée des éléments les plus réactionnaires du capitalisme. Le fascisme étant étroitement lié au capitalisme, «le ventre est toujours fécond d’où est sortie la bête immonde» et le combat antifasciste est un perpétuel recommencement tant que ne sera pas mis à bas le capitalisme. Ce schéma méconnaît l’opposition entre démocratie et totalitarisme et fait toujours porter le soupçon sur une droite qui, représentant les intérêts de la bourgeoisie, est constamment tentée de s’allier avec les éléments les plus réactionnaires.

La gauche ne semble pas vraiment avoir rompu avec ce schéma. En témoignent, par exemple, les déclarations du premier secrétaire du parti socialiste demandant à l’UMP de dissoudre la « droite populaire », ou accusant la droite, lors d’affrontements provoqués par des groupuscules opposés au Mariage pour tous, de « s’abriter derrière l’extrême droite », de se comporter « comme la vitrine légale de groupes violents ».

Un « antiracisme de nouvelle génération »

La façon dont la gauche s’est comportée sur la question du mariage homosexuel n’est pas le seul exemple de ses orientations problématiques. La lutte contre le racisme en est une autre illustration. Cette cause apparaît simple, répondant à une exigence morale, mais les meilleures intentions ne sauraient passer sous silence le glissement qui s’est là aussi opéré. La façon dont l’antiracisme a été promu dans les années 1980 par SOS Racisme, étroitement lié au pouvoir socialiste mitterrandien, a entraîné la gauche vers de nouveaux horizons. Dans son livre Voyage au centre du malaise français. L’antiracisme et le roman national 10, Paul Yonnet a été l’un des premiers à mettre en lumière le paradoxe présent au cœur même de cet «antiracisme de nouvelle génération»: en promouvant de fait les identités ethniques dont le slogan «Black, blanc, beur» deviendra l’expression, il a introduit le principe racial et le communautarisme ethnique qu’il affirme combattre. Ce faisant, il a rompu à la fois avec la lutte des classes marxiste et le modèle républicain. Cette rupture intervient au moment même où se décompose le messianisme révolutionnaire et le nouvel antiracisme lui a servi d’idéologie de substitution: «Ainsi, avec SOS Racisme, passe-t-on d’une vision classiste de la société à une vision panraciale, des ouvriers aux immigrés, comme nouveaux héros sociaux, de la conscience de classe […] à la conscience ethnique, du séparatisme ouvrier au culturalisme ethnique, de l’utopie communiste à l’utopie communautaire 11.» Ce changement s’est accompagné d’une relecture de notre propre histoire qui a renversé la perspective. Au «roman national épique 12» du gaullisme et du communisme de l’après-guerre a succédé une fixation sur les pages sombres de notre histoire, tout particulièrement celles de Vichy, de la Collaboration et du colonialisme. Cet effondrement du «roman national» s’est accompagné de la dissolution de la nation dans le monde au nom de l’universalisme des droits de l’homme. Loin de lutter efficacement contre ce qu’il combat, ce nouvel antiracisme a produit des effets inverses, en exacerbant les sentiments collectifs de crise identitaire et en suscitant en réaction une «xénophobie de défense». Ce livre de Paul Yonnet provoquera de violentes polémiques. Soupçonné d’emblée d’être proche des thèses du Front national, il sera ostracisé par la gauche et ses thèses n’ont pas donné matière à un débat de fond.

En mars 2012, lors de sa campagne électorale, François Hollande s’est engagé à demander au Parlement de supprimer le mot race de l’article premier de la Constitution qui déclare: «La France assure l’égalité devant la loi de tous les citoyens sans distinction de race et de religion.» En mai 2013, les groupes de gauche à l’Assemblée nationale et une partie des centristes ont voté la loi supprimant le mot «race» de la législation française. Pour une partie de la gauche, il ne s’agit là que d’une première étape avant la suppression de ce mot dans la Constitution.

Croit-on sérieusement qu’une telle disposition puisse faire reculer le racisme? Jusqu’où ira-t-on dans cette volonté d’éradication du langage au nom de l’antiracisme?

La révolution culturelle de l’écologie

La conversion rapide de la gauche à l’écologie peut, elle aussi, donner lieu à des changements de problématique non seulement sur les problèmes sociaux, mais plus globalement sur une façon de concevoir le devenir du monde. Les problèmes bien réels de la dégradation de la nature et de l’environnement ne sont pas ici en question, mais le sont les discours qui confèrent  à l’écologie une signification et une mission salvatrice qui ne vont pas de soi. Les écologistes ne cessent d’en appeler à une «transformation radicale», à la nécessité absolue de «changer radicalement nos modes de vie», de «changer l’imaginaire de la société».

La rupture écologique paraît tout aussi radicale que celle de la rupture révolutionnaire, mais elle se présente désormais sous les traits d’une nécessité «en négatif». En ce sens, l’utopie écologique apparaît comme une utopie de substitution au saint-simonisme et aux philosophies de l’histoire, une sorte de messianisme inversé chargé d’eschatologie rédemptrice. La catastrophe annoncée de la fin possible de toute vie sur la planète doit permettre d’ouvrir enfin les yeux d’une humanité vivant jusqu’alors dans l’obscurantisme
productiviste et consumériste, sous le règne prométhéen de la science et de la technique érigées souvent en entités métaphysiques. Ce n’est plus désormais par le développement des «forces productives», de la science et de la technique que l’humanité pourra se débarrasser d’un passé tout entier marqué par l’ignorance et les préjugés. L’utopie écologique renverse la perspective en faisant du rapport régénéré à la nature le nouveau principe de la fraternité universelle et de la réconciliation entre les hommes.

Un tel schéma de pensée induit une relecture de notre propre histoire qui, s’ajoutant à celle de l’antiracisme, renforce la vision noire des sociétés modernes, en oubliant au passage le fait que le développement de la production, de la science et de la technique a permis la fin du paupérisme et le progrès social. En poussant à bout cette logique – mais pas tant que cela –, ce sont des pans entiers de notre culture qui peuvent être relus et déconsidérés comme étant la manifestation d’un désir de domination sur la nature, source de tous nos maux. Dans ce cadre, l’expression du philosophe René Descartes «maîtres et possesseurs de la nature» tient lieu de paradigme. Mais c’est aussi le projet d’émancipation des Lumières, fondé sur l’exercice de la raison et sur l’autonomie de jugement, qui lui aussi peut être interprété comme l’affirmation présomptueuse de la supériorité de l’homme sur la nature.

La révolution culturelle écologique poussée jusqu’au bout aboutit à remettre radicalement en question nombre d’acquis de la culture européenne. Celle-ci a été marquée à la fois par l’héritage des Lumières qui accorde une place centrale à la raison et à l’idée de progrès, et les religions juives et chrétiennes, pour qui la dignité de l’homme est première dans l’ordre de la création, et qui donnent une importance primordiale à la relation avec autrui. L’écologie est devenue l’un des principaux vecteurs d’une révolution
culturelle qui ne dit pas son nom.

L’éducation des enfants

Dans la mutation du monde qui s’annonce, les jeunes ont, pour les écologistes, un rôle décisif à jouer. Ils naissent dans un nouveau contexte marqué par la crise et les «désillusions du progrès» et peuvent plus facilement prendre conscience des nouveaux enjeux de l’humanité; ils sont l’«avenir du monde» et il importe de veiller à l’éducation de ces nouveaux pionniers.

À l’école, la notion confuse et élastique de «développement durable» est désormais intégrée au «socle commun de connaissances et de compétences» qui fixe les repères culturels et civiques du contenu de l’enseignement obligatoire, et elle donne lieu à d’étranges considérations sur l’homme, sur la nature et sur les animaux 13. Ces dernières sont également massivement diffusées en douceur par le biais d’émissions de télévision, de films catastrophes, de  dessins animés et toute une littérature enfantine remplie de bonnes intentions. Dans le domaine de l’écologie, les livres abondent. Le Petit Livre vert pour la Terre 14 de la fondation Nicolas Hulot, diffusé à plus de quatre millions d’exemplaires, recense une centaine de bons comportements pour sauver la planète et être un «citoyen de la terre», le tout placé sous l’égide du Mahatma Gandhi cité dès le début du livre: «Soyez vous-mêmes le changement que vous voudriez voir dans le monde.» Cette attention attachée aux gestes les plus quotidiens se retrouve dans toute la littérature écologique pour les enfants sous forme de leçons de morale: «Vous ignorez peut-être qu’en utilisant un mouchoir en papier, vous contribuez très certainement à la déforestation 15. […] En jouant, en se lavant, en s’éclairant, en se déplaçant, en mangeant, en consommant on agit nous aussi sur le fonctionnement du monde 16.»

Quant aux nouveaux parents, ils se doivent de reconnaître leurs fautes: «En peu d’années, notre génération et celle de nos parents ont beaucoup abîmé la planète: l’air, l’eau, la mer et la terre, quatre éléments fondamentaux de la vie, pour “raison économique”, pour faire de l’argent 17.» De la même façon, depuis les années 2000, la littérature enfantine visant à éduquer les enfants aux nouveaux paradigmes de la sexualité et de la famille est en pleine expansion. Ces livres publiés par de petites maisons d’édition ne sont pas seulement destinés à des familles homoparentales, toutes ont le même but: dédramatiser et banaliser l’homoparentalité auprès des enfants. Les petites histoires avec un beau graphisme doivent les aider à mieux comprendre et à aborder des situations qui peuvent ou non les concerner directement: parents divorcés dont le père est devenu homosexuel (Marius 18); famille homoparentale (À mes amoures 19, Mes mamans se marient 20, Dis… mamans 21), les fables animalières avec leur couple de pingouins (Tango a deux papas et pourquoi pas? 22), de grenouilles (Cristelle et Crioline 23), les louves et leur louveteau (Jean a deux mamans 24) sont mis à contribution, mais aussi les histoires de princesse (Titiritesse 25) pour découvrir en douceur l’homosexualité féminine. Le petit livre J’suis vert 26 accompagné d’un CD de dix chansons aborde sans détour les questions de société qui touchent aussi les enfants, parmi lesquelles le divorce et les familles recomposées sous la forme d’une petite chanson enfantine «Je vous aime tous les deux». Celle-ci fait
approuver par l’enfant le choix de la séparation et présente sous des traits angéliques la nouvelle situation:

«Depuis pas mal de temps déjà je voyais que ça n’allait pas. […] «Papa tu rentrais toujours tard, Maman tu faisais chambre à part. «C’est sûr ça pouvait plus durer, il valait mieux… vous séparer.
Refrain
«Mais si ça peut vous consoler, je voulais juste que vous sachiez… «Que je vous aime, je vous aime tous les deux.
[…]
«Enfin, c’est pas ma faute à moi, c’est la faute à personne je crois.
«C’est difficile d’aimer toujours, c’est c’qu’ils disent dans les films d’amour. […] 47

«Et pour plus tard ce que j’espère, c’est des demi-sœurs et des demi-frères.
«J’suis sûr qu’on peut bien rigoler dans les familles “recomposées” 27.»

Les paroles de la chanson, qui sont supposées être celles de l’enfant, reflètent on ne peut mieux un optimisme gentillet qui a des allures de déni et semblent faites surtout pour rassurer les parents. Un livre plus volumineux répond précisément à cet objectif en combinant les histoires pour enfants avec des «fiches psycho-pratiques» à l’usage des parents. Vendu à plus de 150 000 exemplaires, 100 histoires du soir 28 a explicitement une visée à la fois thérapeutique et éducative «pour surmonter les petits et les gros soucis du quotidien». Seize histoires fort bien imaginées et écrites couvrent un vaste ensemble de situations allant du coucher de l’enfant jusqu’aux «histoires d’écologie et de grignotage», en passant par les maladies, l’école et les copains, le chômage («Comment
dire à ses enfants qu’on est au chômage?»), le divorce des parents (comment lui annoncer un divorce?). Les histoires consacrées à l’homoparentalité («Le petit bisou», «Moi j’ai deux papas!», «Deux moineaux japonais… et une cigogne», «Le Papa au blouson couleur de ciel») sont suivies de fiches composées d’une série d’explications et de recommandations auprès de parents homosexuels sur la bonne façon de dire les choses et de bien se comporter vis-à-vis de l’enfant. La Convention interministérielle pour l’égalité entre les filles et les garçons, les femmes et les hommes dans le système éducatif (2013-2018) affirme tout bonnement: «Préjugés et stéréotypes sexuels, ancrés dans l’inconscient collectif, sont la source directe de discriminations et doivent être combattus dès le plus jeune âge.

Ainsi, la mixité acquise en droit et ancrée dans la pratique demeure une condition nécessaire mais non suffisante à une égalité réelle entre filles et garçons et plus tard entre femmes et hommes. Elle doit être accompagnée d’une action volontariste des pouvoirs publics, de l’ensemble des acteurs de la communauté éducative et des partenaires de l’école 29.» La notion de genre si controversée y figure en toutes lettres: «Les savoirs scientifiques issus des recherches sur le genre, les inégalités et les stéréotypes doivent nourrir les politiques publiques», «donner aux élèves, étudiants et étudiantes les outils nécessaires pour mieux appréhender le traitement du genre dans les médias», «rendre visibles les recherches sur le genre et les expert(e)s à travers la mise en place de recensements nationaux», «réaliser un travail de vulgarisation et de diffusion des recherches sur le genre». La formation est pareillement concernée: «La formation des formateurs et formatrices ainsi que la formation des personnels se destinant à travailler auprès d’enfants, d’adolescents, de jeunes adultes doivent comprendre une formation au genre et à l’égalité s’appuyant sur des données chiffrées et une vision sensible aux inégalités entre les femmes et les hommes dans l’ensemble des thématiques abordées.»

De son côté, le ministre de l’Éducation nationale a déclaré qu’il n’y avait pas de débat sur la théorie du genre à l’école et qu’il s’agissait seulement de «lutter contre toutes les discriminations à la fois de race, de religion et bien entendu sur les orientations sexuelles car elle cause de la souffrance 30». Pour faire face à cette souffrance, le partenariat existant entre l’Éducation nationale et des associations lesbiennes et gays lui donne satisfaction. Pourquoi les associations homosexuelles et pas les autres? Qui peut croire qu’elles n’ont pas d’esprit partisan?

Postures identitaire et mécanismes de déni

À partir de cet examen des changements problématiques de la gauche et de la prégnance de nouveaux schémas de pensée au sein du parti socialiste, il nous paraît possible de mieux cerner les principaux traits du gauchisme culturel.

Celui-ci ne se présente pas comme un mouvement structuré et unifié autour d’une doctrine dogmatique comme les grandes idéologies du passé. Il est pluriel dans ses références comme dans sa composition; il peut faire coexister des idées et des attitudes qui, il y a peu de temps encore, apparaissaient contradictoires et incohérentes. Il n’en possède pas moins des schèmes de pensée et de comportements transversaux qui lui donnent une unité structurant en arrière-fond son identité

Le gauchisme culturel n’entend pas changer la société par la violence et la contrainte, mais «changer les mentalités» par les moyens de l’éducation, de la communication moderne et par la loi. Il n’en véhicule pas moins l’idée de rupture avec le Vieux Monde en étant persuadé qu’il est porteur de valeurs et de comportements correspondant à la fois au nouvel état de la société et à une certaine idée du Bien. Ce point aveugle de certitude lui confère son assurance et sa détermination par-delà ses déclarations d’ouverture, de dialogue et de concertation.

Les idées et les arguments opposés à ses propres conceptions peuvent être vite réduits à des préjugés issus du Vieux Monde et/ou à des idées malsaines.

Le débat démocratique s’en trouve par là même perverti. Il se déroule en réalité sur une double scène ou, si l’on peut dire, avec un double fond qui truque la perspective: les idées et les arguments, pour importants qu’ils puissent paraître, ne changeront rien à la question abordée, l’essentiel se jouant à un autre niveau, celui des «préjugés, des stéréotypes ancrés dans l’inconscient collectif», comme le dit si bien la Convention interministérielle pour l’égalité entre les filles et les garçons, les femmes et les hommes dans le système éducatif. Il s’agit alors de combattre ces préjugés et ces stéréotypes, en sachant que l’important se joue dans l’éducation des générations nouvelles plutôt que dans le dialogue et dans la confrontation avec les opposants considérés comme des individus ancrés dans leurs préjugés inconscients.

Le gauchisme culturel peut même se montrer inquisiteur et justicier en traquant les mauvaises pensées et les mauvaises paroles, en n’hésitant pas à pratiquer la délation et la plainte en justice. À sa façon, sans qu’il s’en rende compte, il retrouve les catégories de faute ou de péché par pensée, par parole, voire par omission, qui faisaient les beaux jours des confessionnaux. Le gauchisme culturel est à la fois un modernisme affiché et un moralisme masqué qui répand le soupçon et la méfiance dans le champ intellectuel, dans les rapports sociaux et la vie privée.

Ce moralisme s’accompagne d’un pathos sentimental et victimaire où les mots «amour», «fraternité», «générosité» s’opposent emphatiquement à la «haine», à l’«égoïsme», à la «fermeture» dans des discours souvent d’une généralité confondante qui laissent l’interlocuteur pantois. L’expression de la subjectivité souffrante agit pareillement, elle paralyse le contradicteur délicat qui ne veut pas apparaître comme un «salaud». Il faut savoir compatir, «écouter la souffrance» avant de «mettre des mots sur les maux». Le
gauchisme culturel pratique ainsi constamment une sorte de chantage affectif et victimaire qui joue sur la mauvaise conscience et le sentiment de culpabilité. Il se veut le porte-parole des victimes de toutes les discriminations en exigeant réparation; c’est la voix des opprimés, des persécutés, des oubliés de l’histoire qui parle à travers sa voix. Que faire face à un interlocuteur qui se veut le représentant des descendants d’esclaves? De quel droit peut-il se prévaloir d’un tel statut?

De telles questions n’ont guère de chance d’être prises en considération, car le gauchisme culturel ne s’adresse pas à la raison. L’indignation lui tient souvent lieu de pensée et le pathos qui l’accompagne brouille la réflexion. L’affirmation d’idées générales et généreuses, les références emblématiques à la résistance et aux luttes héroïques du passé accompagnent son indignation et servent d’arguments d’autorité. La morale et les bons sentiments recouvrent souvent l’inculture et la bêtise, donnant lieu à de vastes synthèses éclectiques et des salmigondis. Mais à vrai dire, l’affirmation avec émotion et véhémence de ce que l’on ressent suffit dans bien des cas: il ne s’agit pas de convaincre avec des arguments mais de faire partager aux autres son émotion et ses sentiments, de les englober dans son «ressenti» comme pour mieux leur faire avaliser ses propres positions. L’«essoreuse à idées médiatique» est particulièrement friande de ce genre d’émotions. Dans les débats publics, à la radio, sur les plateaux de télévision comme dans les dîners en ville, il ne s’agit pas de convaincre mais de gagner en jouant sur tous les registres à la fois. Tout interlocuteur qui refuse d’entrer dans ce cadre peut être considéré comme suspect ou comme un adversaire en puissance. Les doutes et les interrogations ne sont pas de mise; nulle faille apparente ne vient troubler le propos. Le gauchisme culturel s’est arrogé le magistère de la morale et cela lui suffit.

L’exigence morale de combattre le racisme, les exactions de l’extrême droite, les discriminations, pour justifiée qu’elle soit, n’a pas besoin de longues explications, et c’est précisément ce qui fait sa faiblesse. Réduisant ces maux à des pulsions individuelles plus ou moins conscientes, le gauchisme culturel ne s’attarde pas à l’analyse des conditions qui les ont rendus possibles, préférant réitérer indéfiniment ses appels à combattre le mal, en dénonçant publiquement ses auteurs et ses complices. Une telle posture a pu, par réaction, renforcer l’influence de l’extrême droite auprès des couches populaires qui n’apprécient pas qu’on les traite de «beaufs», de «racistes» ou de «fachos» parce qu’ils sympathisent ou votent pour le Front national. Mais depuis des années, le scénario reste fondamentalement le même: déploration, indignation, dénonciation, appel à la mobilisation contre le racisme et le fascisme. Non seulement cela n’apas empêché l’extrême droite de progresser, 50 mais cela a contribué à la mettre un peu plus au centre de l’espace public.

De telles postures permettent également de mettre à distance les questions qui dérangent et de se réconforter dans l’entre-soi. Aborder les questions de la nation, de l’immigration, de l’islam, dont on sait qu’elles préoccupent beaucoup de nos concitoyens, suscite des réactions quasi pavloviennes qui empêchent tout examen et débat serein. Il est vrai que dans cette période de crise l’extrême droite sait jouer sur les peurs et les frustrations dans une logique de bouc émissaire. Mais ce n’est pas la façon dont l’extrême droite et une partie de la droite exploitent ces questions qui est ici en cause, mais la façon dont les questions elles-mêmes sont considérées comme taboues. Le fait même de dire qu’il s’agit de questions peut être considéré comme le signe que l’on est contaminé par des idées de l’extrême droite ou, au mieux, que l’on fait son jeu. Au nom de la lutte contre l’islamophobie, un glissement s’opère qui barre toute réflexion libre sur le rapport de l’islam à la modernité.

Idéologies émiettées et mentalité utopique

Ces postures ne sont pas sans rappeler celles du passé qui s’ancraient alors dans de grandes idéologies et les utopies issues du XIXe siècle, et plus précisément du communisme. Ce rapprochement, qui saisit des traits bien réels et souligne à juste titre le danger que le gauchisme culturel fait peser sur la liberté d’opinion et sur le fonctionnement de la démocratie, n’en est pas moins trompeur.

Dans le cas du gauchisme culturel, l’«idéologie» – pour autant que l’on puisse utiliser ce mot – est d’une nature particulière. Elle n’est pas «une» mais plurielle, composée de bouts de doctrines anciennes en décomposition (communisme, socialisme, anarchisme), mais aussi des idées issues des «mouvements sociaux» et des nouveaux groupes de pression communautaires (écologie, féminisme, mouvement étudiant et lycéen, associations antiracistes, groupes homosexuels…), voire des références aux «peuples premiers» et aux spiritualités exotiques, comme on l’a vu à propos de l’écologie. Elle n’est pas une «idéologie de granit» – pour reprendre une expression de Claude Lefort – fondée sur une science qui prétend englober sous sa coupe l’ensemble des sphères d’activité, même si l’on
peut y trouver des relents de scientisme. Ses représentants, qui se montrent parfois sourds, intransigeants et d’un sectarisme à tout crin, ne sont pas pour autant de dangereux fanatiques exerçant la terreur sur leurs adversaires et dans la société. Ils ont parfois des allures de boy-scouts et leurs opposants ont souvent l’impression de «boxer contre des édredons». Les représentants du gauchisme culturel ressembleraient plutôt à ce qu’on appelle des «faux gentils». Ils affichent le sourire obligé de la communication tant qu’ils ne sont pas mis en question; ils se réclament de l’ouverture, de la tolérance, du débat démocratique, tout en en délimitant d’emblée le contenu et les acteurs légitimes.
En ce sens, la droite se trompe en parlant de nouveau «totalitarisme», même si l’on peut estimer que le gauchisme culturel en a quelques beaux restes. En réalité, ce dernier s’inscrit pleinement dans le contexte des «démocraties post-totalitaires»: il puise dans différentes idéologies du passé en décomposition qu’il recompose à sa manière et fait coexister sans souci de cohérence et d’unité, n’en gardant que des schèmes de pensée et de comportement. À ses pointes extrêmes, le gauchisme culturel combine la rage des sans-
culottes et le sourire du dalaï-lama.
Les utopies subissent un traitement semblable. Le gauchisme culturel véhicule bien un imaginaire qui retrouve nombre de traits anciens recyclés et adaptés à la nouvelle situation historique: ceux d’une société enfin débarrassée des scories du passé, réconciliée et devenue transparente à elle-même, d’un monde délivré du tragique de l’histoire, un monde sans frontières, sans haine, sans violence et sans guerre, pacifié et fraternel, mû par le souci de la planète, du plaisir et du bien-être de chacun. À l’échelle individuelle, cet imaginaire est celui d’un être indifférencié, un être sans dilemmes et sans contradictions, débarrassé de ses pulsions agressives, bien dans sa tête et dans son corps, s’étant réconcilié avec lui-même, avec les autres et avec la nature. Et, qui plus est, autonome et «citoyen actif» de la maternelle jusqu’à son dernier souffle, «citoyen du monde» et «écocitoyen». Cet imaginaire, pour utopique qu’il soit, s’articule en réalité aux évolutions problématiques des sociétés démocratiques européennes qui sont sorties de l’histoire et c’est précisément ce qui lui donne une consistance qui l’apparente à l’état du monde présent. Cette imbrication étroite de l’utopie et des évolutions problématiques de la société change sa nature. Il ne s’agit plus d’attendre la réalisation de l’utopie dans un futur indéterminé sur le modèle du socialisme utopique du XIXe siècle, pas plus que dans une fin de l’histoire articulée au devenir historique dont on détiendrait les clés. L’utopie se conjugue désormais au présent et prétend ne pas en être une. Tel est le paradoxe qu’a
bien mis en lumière Marcel Gauchet: «En ce début du XXIe siècle, l’avenir révolutionnaire a disparu de notre horizon; l’avenir tout entier nous est devenu inimaginable; mais la conscience utopique ne s’est pas totalement évanouie pour autant; elle hante véritablement notre présent 31.» Mais peut-être vaudrait-il mieux parler de mentalité utopique dans la mesure où cette dernière expression désigne un état d’esprit qui n’est pas nécessairement conscient.

L’écologie est de ce point de vue particulièrement révélatrice du nouveau statut de l’utopie dans le monde d’aujourd’hui: si elle retrouve des accents prophétiques annonçant la fin possible du monde et son salut, elle appelle en même temps à mettre en œuvre dès à présent de multiples pratiques alternatives. Celles-ci doivent permettre à la fois de sauver la planète et d’incarner dès maintenant le nouveau monde. Il en va de même avec les «crèches expérimentales», les nouvelles pédagogies qui doivent rendre l’enfant autonome au plus tôt, voire les multiples outils qui permettent de résoudre les contradictions et les tensions. L’utopie est éclatée en de multiples «révolutions minuscules», des «utopies concrètes» (oxymore qui à sa façon traduit bien le statut nouveau de l’utopie au XXIe siècle), dont la mise en œuvre s’accompagne de «guides pratiques», de «boîtes à outils», de «kits pédagogiques» promus par des spécialistes patentés.
Aux origines du gauchisme culturel
Il est, en revanche, une utopie d’un genre par ticulier dont se réclame plus volontiers le gauchisme culturel: celle de mai 68 et des mouvements qui l’ont portée. Ce n’est pas l’événement historique «mai 68» qui est ici en question: cet événement historique comme tel n’appartient à personne, il appartient à notre histoire, comme à celle de l’Europe et à de nombreux pays dans le monde. Cet événement iconoclaste à plusieurs facettes peut être globalement analysé comme un moment de basculement vers le nouveau monde dans lequel nous vivons aujourd’hui, que nous le voulions ou non. En ce sens, l’idée selon laquelle il faudrait «liquider mai 68» est absurde. En revanche, ce qui me paraît être avant tout en question, c’est ce que j’ai appelé son «héritage impossible 33» et c’est précisément dans cet héritage que le gauchisme culturel a pris naissance et s’est développé. Textes, discours, pratiques et comportements de l’époque constituent un creuset premier, chaotique et bouillonnant qui va se répandre sur de multiples fronts, se pacifier et finir par s’intégrer à la nouvelle culture des sociétés démocratiques.

En mai 68 et dans le sillage de l’événement sont apparus de nouveaux thèmes portant sur la sexualité, l’éducation des enfants, la psychiatrie, la culture, qui sont venus interpeller les schémas de la lutte des classes et les idéologies de l’extrême gauche traditionnelle. Le gauchisme culturel naît précisément dans ce cadre et c’est lui qui va le premier déplacer l’axe central de la contestation vers les questions sociétales, à la manière de l’époque, c’est-à-dire de façon radicale et délibérément provocatrice. Il est ainsi devenu le vecteur d’une révolution culturelle qui a mis à mal l’orthodoxie des groupuscules d’extrême gauche, avant de concerner l’ensemble de la gauche et de se répandre dans la société.
Quand on étudie la littérature gauchiste de l’immédiat après-Mai, on est frappé de retrouver nombre de thèmes du gauchisme culturel d’aujourd’hui, mais, en même temps, ces derniers semblent bien mièvres et presque banalisés en regard de la rage dont faisaient preuve les révolutionnaires de l’époque. Leur remise en question radicale a concerné bien des domaines dont nous ne pouvons rendre compte dans le cadre limité de cet article 34. Mais il suffit d’évoquer ce qu’il en fut en matière de mœurs et de sexualité au début des années 1970 pour mieux cerner le fossé qui nous sépare du présent.

Le désir était alors brandi comme une arme de subversion de l’ordre établi qui devait faire sauter tous les interdits, les tabous et les barrières. Il s’agissait de faire tomber tous les masques, en pourchassant les justifications et les refoulements au cœur même des discours les plus rationnels et les plus savants. Être «authentique», c’était oser, si l’on peut dire, regarder le désir en face et ne plus craindre d’exprimer en toute liberté le chaos que l’on porte en soi. C’est sans doute pour cette raison que sur le front du désir la classe
ouvrière a pu apparaître muette à beaucoup. Les religions juives et chrétiennes, la «morale bourgeoise», l’idéologie, le capitalisme réprimaient le désir, il s’agissait alors ouvertement de tout mettre à bas pour le libérer. Le mariage et la famille n’échappaient pas à un pareil traitement. Ils étaient considérés comme un dispositif central dans ce vaste système de répression, la cellule de base du système visant à castrer et à domestiquer le désir en le ramenant dans les credo de la normalité 35. Les lesbiennes et les gays revendiquaient clairement leur différence en n’épargnant pas les «hétéro-flics», la «virilité fasciste», le patriarcat. Il était alors totalement exclu de se marier et de rentrer dans le rang. On peut mesurer les différences et le chemin parcouru depuis lors. Nous sommes passés d’une dynamique de transgression à une banalisation paradoxale qui entend jouer sur tous les plans à la fois: celui de la figure du contestataire de l’ordre établi, celui de la minorité opprimée, celui de la victime ayant des droits et exigeant de l’État qu’il satisfasse au plus vite ses revendications, celui du Républicain qui défend la valeur d’égalité, celui du bon père et de la bonne mère de famille…

Mais, en même temps, force est de constater que nombre de thèmes de l’époque font écho aux postures d’aujourd’hui. Il en est ainsi du culte des sentiments développé particulièrement au sein du MLF. Renversant la perspective du militantisme traditionnel, il s’agissait déjà de partir de soi, de son «vécu quotidien», de partager ce vécu avec d’autres et de le faire connaître publiquement. On soulignait déjà l’importance d’une parole au plus près des affects et des sentiments. Alors que l’éducation voulait apprendre
à les dominer, il fallait au contraire ne plus craindre de se laisser porter par eux. Ils exprimaient une révolte à l’état brut et une vérité bien plus forte que celle qui s’exprime à travers la prédominance accordée à la raison. À l’inverse de l’idée selon laquelle il ne fallait pas mêler les sentiments personnels et la politique, il s’agissait tout au contraire de faire de la politique à partir des sentiments. Trois préceptes du MLF nous paraissent condenser le renversement qui s’opère dès cette période: «Le personnel est politique et le politique est personnel 36»; «Nous avons été dupés par l’idéologie dominante qui fait comme si “la vie publique” était gouvernée par d’autres principes que la “vie privée” 37»; «Dans nos groupes, partageons nos sentiments et rassemblons-les en un tas. Abandonnons-nous à eux et voyons où ils nous mèneront. Ils nous mèneront aux idées puis à l’action 38». Ces préceptes condensent une nouvelle façon de faire de la «politique» qui fera de nombreux adeptes.
Resterait à tracer la genèse de ce curieux destin du gauchisme culturel jusqu’à aujourd’hui, la perpétuation de certains de ses thèmes et leur transformation. L’analyse de l’ensemble du parcours reste à faire, mais cette dernière implique à notre sens la prise en compte du croisement qui s’est opéré entre ce gauchisme de première génération avec au moins trois grands courants: le christianisme de gauche, l’écologie politique et les droits de l’homme. C’est dans la rencontre avec ces courants que le gauchisme culturel s’est pacifié, pris un côté boy-scout et faussement gentillet, et qu’il s’est mis à revendiquer des droits. Mais c’est surtout dans les années 1980 que le gauchisme culturel va recevoir sa consécration définitive dans le champ politique, plus précisément au tournant des années 1983-1984, au moment où la gauche change de politique économique sans le dire clairement et entame la «modernisation». Le gauchisme culturel va alors servir de substitut à la crise de sa doctrine et masquer un changement de politique économique mal assumé. À partir de ce moment, la gauche au pouvoir va intégrer l’héritage impossible de mai 68, faire du surf sur les évolutions dans tous les domaines, et apparaître clairement aux yeux de l’opinion comme étant à l’avant-garde dans le bouleversement des mœurs et de la «culture». Nous ne sommes pas sortis de cette situation.

Au terme de ce parcours qui rend compte des glissements opérés par la gauche et de l’influence du gauchisme culturel en son sein, il 54 nous paraît possible de poser sans détour ce qui n’est plus tout à fait une hypothèse: nous assistons à la fin d’un cycle historique dont les origines remontent au XIXe siècle; la gauche a atteint son point avancé de décomposition, elle est passée à autre chose tout en continuant de faire semblant qu’il n’en est rien; il n’est pas sûr qu’elle puisse s’en remettre. Le gauchisme culturel, qui est devenu hégémonique à gauche et dans la société, a été un vecteur de cette décomposition et son antilibéralisme intellectuel, pour ne pas dire sa bêtise, est un des principaux freins à son renouvellement. La gauche est-elle capable de rompre clairement avec lui? Rien n’est certain étant donné la prégnance de ses postures et de ses schémas de pensée.

Pour nombre de militants, d’adhérents, de sympathisants, d’anciens ou de nouveaux, d’ex ou de dissidents, de tels propos ne sont guère audibles parce que pour eux, la gauche reste toujours la gauche, quoi qu’il en soit de la réalité des changements. C’est une question avant tout «identitaire», une sorte de réflexe indéracinable fondé plus ou moins consciemment sur l’idée que la gauche est, malgré tout, le dépositaire attitré d’une certaine idée du bien, se nourrissant encore, pour les plus anciens, de références au «camp du progrès» et aux luttes passées du mouvement ouvrier. Et d’en appeler de façon de plus en plus éthérée à une «vraie gauche» ou à un «vrai socialisme» qui ne saurait se confondre avec la gauche et le socialisme «réellement existants» comme pour mieux se rassurer face à des évolutions problématiques. Quand les mécanismes de défense identitaires l’emportent sur la liberté de pensée et servent à se mettre à distance de l’épreuve du réel, il y a de quoi s’inquiéter sur l’avenir d’une gauche qui ne parvient pas à rompre avec ses vieux démons et se barricade entre gens du même milieu qui ont tendance à croire que la gauche est le centre du monde. Pour ceux qui n’en pensent pas moins, il est d’autres types d’arguments plus réalistes qui peuvent faire taire le questionnement.

Quand vos amis sont des gens qui se définissent comme «naturellement» de gauche, à quoi bon se fâcher avec eux? Il en va de même avec un petit milieu de l’édition, de journalistes et d’artistes militants qui baignent dans le gauchisme culturel depuis longtemps. On ne tient pas à se voir coller une étiquette qui combine désormais 55  le «réac» et le «ringard». L’argument rabâché selon lequel «il ne faut pas faire le jeu de la droite et de l’extrême droite» (souvent confondues) fait le reste. Malgré les références à l’anticonformisme et aux luttes glorieuses du passé, le courage n’est pas toujours au rendez-vous.

Et pendant ce temps-là, la France continue de se morceler sous l’effet de multiples fractures sociales et culturelles. L’extrême droite espère bien en tirer profit en soufflant sur les braises, mais, à vrai dire, elle n’a pas grand-chose à faire, le gauchisme culturel continue de lui faciliter la tâche.

1. Cf. Jean-Pierre Le Goff, « La difficile réconciliation du socialisme et de la démocratie », Le Débat, n° 131, septembre- octobre 2004.

2. « Manifeste : au mariage pour tous, nous disons oui », Le Nouvel Observateur, janvier 2013. 3. Cf. jeunes-socialistes.fr/alerte-elus-homophobes. RP-

3. Cf. jeunes-socialistes.fr/alerte-élus-homophobes.

4. Carlo Rossi, cité par Monique Canto-Sperber, Les Règles de la liberté, Plon, 2003, pp. 13-14.

5. Dominique Schapper, La Démocratie providentielle. Essai sur l’égalité contemporaine, Gallimard, 2002.

6. « Manifeste : au mariage pour tous, nous disons oui », art. cité. 7. Paul Thibaud, « Triomphe et impotence du socialindividualisme  », Le Débat, n° 173, janvier-février 2013. RP-LeGoff.indd 43 13/08/13 07:17

Mise en ligne CV : 11 février 2014

Jean-Pierre Le Goff est sociologue au CNRS. Derniers ouvrages parus : La Gauche à l’épreuve (Perrin, 2011) et La Fin du village. Une histoire française (Gallimard, 2012).

Voir aussi:

Société
Madame la ministre de la Rééducation nationale
Raphaël Stainville
Valeurs actuelles
04 Septembre 2014

L’ayatollah. Najat Vallaud-Balkacem ne doit pas sa nomination Rue de Grenelle à sa connaissance des dossiers, mais à ses manières d’idéologue qui plaisent tant à la gauche et insupportent la droite. Portrait d’une provocatrice qui ne recule devant rien pour imposer coûte que coûte ses délires progressistes.
Dans son petit poing serré, elle tient un Kleenex. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem n’est pas la seule, ce 4 juillet 2012, à pleurer la mort d’Olivier Ferrand. Toute la famille socialiste, rassemblée à l’église Saint-Sulpice, pleure la disparition du fondateur de Terra Nova. C’est en partie grâce à lui que François Hollande a été élu. En partie grâce à celui qui recommandait au PS d’abandonner les classes populaires au profit d’une nouvelle coalition composée notamment des minorités et des habitants des quartiers à forte population d’origine immigrée.

Dans la foule, il y a là Arnaud Montebourg, qui s’essuie les yeux. Claude Bartolone, le président de l’Assemblée nationale, accompagné de Valérie Trierweiler, qui représente le chef de l’État absent. On y croise Jack Lang, Lionel Jospin. Tout ce que la gauche compte de ministres et d’anciens ministres. Mais derrière Carole Ferrand, la veuve de l’éphémère député socialiste des Bouches-du_Rhône, tout le monde remarque la détresse de celle qui est alors depuis un mois et demi ministre des Droits des femmes. Ses larmes, contrairement à beaucoup d’autres, sont des plus sincères.

Et pour cause. Si sa carrière doit beaucoup à Gérard Collomb, le maire de Lyon, qui l’a repérée en 2003, et à Ségolène Royal, qui, en 2007, a fait de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem l’une de ses porte-parole pendant sa campagne présidentielle, elle est tout autant redevable à Olivier Ferrand, avec qui elle s’est liée d’amitié. L’ancienne secrétaire nationale du Parti socialiste chargée des questions société et des droits des personnes lesbiennes, gays, bisexuelles et transgenres (LGBT) était même, pour le fondateur de Terra Nova, comme l’incarnation faite femme des idées progressistes qu’il portait.

Deux ans et demi plus tard, NVB, comme elle aimerait que les médias la surnomment sans parvenir à imposer ses initiales, contrairement à NKM, pleure encore. La nouvelle ministre de l’Éducation nationale est submergée par l’émotion lorsque Manuel Valls lui rend hommage aux universités d’été du PS, à La Rochelle, saluant, dimanche dernier, « le travail et l’engagement » de la benjamine de son gouvernement, exprimant sa fierté de voir pour la première fois « une femme si jeune occuper cette si lourde fonction ». Lui n’a pas eu cette chance. Il a subi les sifflets des frondeurs et des militants du Mouvement des jeunes socialistes, qui ont fait la claque pour perturber son discours de clôture. Il a peiné à ramener le calme. Najat, elle, a eu droit à une ovation debout. Rien de tout cela n’étonne le premier ministre. Manuel Valls sait que Najat Vallaud-Belkacem est aujourd’hui le dernier trait d’union d’un Parti socialiste fracturé, qui ne se retrouve plus que sur les grandes réformes sociétales, « le plus petit dénominateur commun d’une gauche hier plurielle, qui est aujourd’hui une gauche plus rien », selon la formule d’un fin connaisseur du PS

Voir aussi:

http://www.lefigaro.fr/mon-figaro/2014/02/14/10001-20140214ARTFIG00306-najat-vallaud-belkacem-la-khmere-rose.php

Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, la «Khmère rose»
Raphaël Stainville
Le Figaro magazine
14/02/2014
Derrière un sourire désarmant se cache une volonté féroce d’imposer ses idées. La ministre des Droits des femmes est le symbole de cette gauche sociétale qui a pris le pouvoir et entend rééduquer la France.
La ministre l’a ramené de Brooklyn lors de l’un de ses passages éclairs à New York. C’est un petit caniche qui présente bien des avantages. Il n’aboie pas. Ne mordille pas les chevilles des visiteurs, ni n’abîme le mobilier national de l’hôtel de Broglie qu’elle occupe. Il n’oblige pas à se baisser pour ramasser ce qui doit l’être. Mieux, il n’a pas de sexe. Indifféremment chien ou chienne, chien et chienne, selon les désirs de son maître. Son nom: Invisible Dog, une laisse rigide qui se termine par un collier vide. Outre-Atlantique, il fait fureur chez les bobos. En France, ils ne sont que quelques-uns à en posséder un. Comme souvent, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem se croit en avance sur son temps. C’est vrai en matière d’art. N’a-t-elle pas fait décrocher de son bureau une toile de maître qui faisait pourtant le bonheur de ses prédécesseurs au motif, selon ses propres mots, qu’il s’agissait d’une «vraie croûte!» , lui préférant une peinture abstraite? C’est encore plus vrai en matière de politique et de lois sociétales.

Jusqu’à ce qu’elle ne devienne récemment la ministre la plus populaire du gouvernement Ayrault, profitant de la chute dans les sondages de Manuel Valls, personne ne prenait vraiment garde à la ministre des Droits des femmes. Le grand public ne connaissait Najat Vallaud-Belkacem qu’à travers le porte-parolat du gouvernement Ayrault, son autre casquette ministérielle. Les journalistes politiques lui passaient facilement sa capacité à débiter des éléments de langage au kilomètre pour expliquer les contorsions du gouvernement et les grands écarts du Président. Ils excusaient ses silences, se contentant le plus souvent de son sourire en guise d’explication.

Car Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, c’est d’abord un sourire accompagné d’un petit rire à peine réprimé qui lui donne de prime abord un côté si sympathique, si humain. Mais il ne faut pas s’y tromper. Derrière le sourire se cache une volonté de fer. Hervé Mariton, le député UMP de la Drôme, la décrit comme une «Viêt-minh souriante»! Une manière de souligner son côté sectaire, sa propension à ne pas souffrir la contestation et à diaboliser ses adversaires. Il aurait pu dire une «Khmère rose». Même son de cloche du côté de Jean-Frédéric Poisson, le patron du Parti chrétien-démocrate (PCD), qui évoque «ce beau visage donné à l’idéologie». «Un sourire de salut public, comme il y a des gouvernements du même nom», avait écrit un jour Philippe Muray au sujet de Ségolène Royal. Comme la madone du Poitou, qui fut la première à lui donner sa chance en politique, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem a fait de son sourire l’un de ses atouts, une marque de fabrique. «Un masque», disent certains. Ce sourire, les responsables de l’UMP en dissertent volontiers. Pour Christian Jacob, le patron du groupe UMP à l’Assemblée nationale: «Elle parle beaucoup, affiche son sourire, mais derrière cela sonne creux». Ses traits délicats, ses yeux de chat, ses tailleurs élégants, son charme évident ne seraient qu’une manière d’habiller la vacuité de la politique du PS. «Une fausse valeur», affirme encore le chef de file des députés de l’opposition.

Hervé Mariton, qui fut l’orateur de l’UMP pendant les débats sur le mariage pour tous, la considère avec davantage de sérieux et de crainte. Il a pu constater avec quelle vigueur et, parfois, avec quelle rage la benjamine du gouvernement était à la pointe du combat «progressiste». «Elle est, dit-il, l’un des symboles de cette gauche a-économique qui s’accommode du virage social-démocrate du Président parce qu’elle n’a pas d’autres ambitions que de réformer les mentalités, de désaliéner le peuple qui ne comprend pas.»

Et pour cause: même si elle n’a pas toujours été en première ligne, laissant à d’autres, comme Christiane Taubira, le soin de porter des lois comme le mariage pour tous, qui ne relevaient pas de son ministère, elle est toujours en pointe ou à la relance sur ces sujets sociétaux. «Sur le mariage homosexuel, la PMA , les mères porteuses, la lutte contre les discriminations liées aux stéréotypes et à l’identité de genre, elle n’en rate pas une.» Avant de devenir, à 34 ans, la plus jeune ministre du gouvernement Ayrault, n’était-elle pas la secrétaire nationale du PS chargée des questions de société? En 2010 déjà, elle défendait l’idée de la gestation pour autrui solidaire, appelant de ses vœux à la GPA non marchande, au nom de «l’éthique du don». Pendant la campagne présidentielle, c’est elle qui représentait François Hollande au meeting LGBT (lesbiennes, gays, bi et trans) pour l’égalité. Pas étonnant qu’aujourd’hui on retrouve la ministre à la manœuvre sur toutes ces questions qui hérissent une grande partie de la société française.

La ministre des Droits des femmes incarne, mieux que d’autres, cette gauche qui a délaissé le social et l’économie pour investir le champ sociétal. «À son programme: culpabilisation et rééducation», résume le philosophe François-Xavier Bellamy. D’ailleurs, même le gouvernement a eu droit à son stage pour lutter contre le sexisme. Et, puisqu’il semble que nombre de Français sont déjà perdus pour ses causes, elle consacre une grande partie de son énergie à s’occuper des générations futures. Dans la novlangue dont est friande la ministre, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem se contente de sensibiliser à l’égalité femme-homme (comment être contre?), à l’identité de genre pour lutter contre les stéréotypes… Cela commence dès la crèche. Elle sensibilise. On dirait une caresse. Tout se fait dans la douceur. C’est «bienvenue dans Le Meilleur des mondes!» Une école qui rééduque avant d’instruire.

Dangereuse, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem? Ils sont de plus en plus nombreux à le penser dans les rangs de l’opposition. Le très médiatique abbé Grosjean, qui a eu l’occasion de débattre avec la jeune femme sur les plateaux de télévision et qui s’est invité à petit-déjeuner au 35, rue Saint-Dominique, préfère souligner «sa bienveillance et sa cordialité, qui buttent sur une difficulté à comprendre et connaître cette jeunesse qui est descendue dans la rue». Il n’est pas le seul à s’étonner de cette incapacité du gouvernement à trouver les mots pour apaiser cette France qui manifeste sans se lasser contre le mariage homosexuel et la théorie du genre.

Au mois d’août dernier, Bernard Poignant, l’un des plus proches conseillers du Président, évoquait justement, devant une centaine d’étudiants de l’association Acteurs d’avenir, les traits dominants de cette jeune génération socialiste qui s’est installée aux commandes de l’Etat, dans les cabinets ministériels et jusqu’à certains ministères. Une génération passée directement du MJS (Mouvement des jeunes socialistes) ou d’associations militantes au pouvoir, sans avoir jamais eu de mandats locaux, regrettait le maire de Quimper. «Ils ne connaissent pas la société», constatait l’ami de François Hollande pour expliquer l’arrogance de certains.

La ministre des Droits des femmes en est la parfaite illustration, tout comme ceux qui l’entourent dans son cabinet. On y retrouve des militants associatifs, à l’image de ses deux conseillers chargés de «l’accès aux droits et de la lutte contre les violences faites aux femmes et de la lutte contre les violences et les discriminations commises en raison de l’orientation sexuelle ou de l’identité de genre».

En l’occurrence, Caroline de Haas, la présidente d’Osez le féminisme, à laquelle a succédé Gilles Bon-Maury, l’ancien président d’Homosexualités et Socialisme. Idem pour Romain Prudent, un autre de ses conseillers, qui était jusqu’en 2012 secrétaire général de Terra Nova. Et ce n’est pas un hasard: Najat Vallaud-Belkacem a épousé le logiciel de ce laboratoire d’idées du PS qui préconisait en 2011, dans l’une de ses notes, que la gauche, pour espérer revenir au pouvoir, devait désormais viser un électorat constitué de femmes, de jeunes, de minorités et de diplômés, plutôt que d’essayer de convaincre une classe ouvrière largement ralliée aux idées du Front national. Nous y sommes. Tant et si bien qu’il est difficile de savoir ce que pense vraiment la ministre, tant elle est aujourd’hui habitée par la pensée dominante définie par ce think tank. «Quand on écoute Christiane Taubira, on découvre une personnalité. Quand on écoute Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, on entend Terra Nova», assure un responsable de l’UMP. «Elle coche toutes les cases», ajoute même un député de la Droite populaire, comme pour expliquer le succès de la ministre auprès des sympatisants du PS.

Un changement de société par déstabilisations successives

Bon chic mauvais genre, elle incarne très exactement le gauchisme culturel tel que le sociologue Jean-Pierre Le Goff l’a défini. Une école de pensée qui n’entend pas «changer la société par la violence et la contrainte», mais qui veut «changer les mentalités par les moyens de l’éducation, de la communication moderne et par la loi». Il procède par des tentatives de déstabilisation successives. Hier le pacs, aujourd’hui le mariage homosexuel, le genre, l’ABCD de l’égalité, et demain l’euthanasie… Certaines manœuvres opèrent. D’autres échouent au gré des résistances qu’elles rencontrent et suscitent. C’est le cas de la théorie du genre. Elle est devenue si sulfureuse que Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, qui en faisait pourtant la promotion à longueur de déplacements, et jusque dans les crèches, en est venue à expliquer qu’elle n’avait jamais existé. Pas plus tard que le vendredi 7 février, elle annulait un échange à Sciences-Po Paris avec Janet Halley, une juriste américaine spécialiste de la famille et du genre. Il figurait encore à son agenda le matin même. Mais, dans le contexte, cette rencontre aurait probablement fait désordre. Elle prenait le risque d’être soumise à la question et d’être une nouvelle fois obligée de se dédire sur la théorie du genre.

Pour autant, de l’aveu d’un proche, la ministre des Droits des femmes ne connaît pas le doute. On pense qu’elle recule. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem avance toujours. Il en va ainsi des «forces de progrès». Comme le dit Jean-Pierre Le Goff, «elle a beau avoir le sourire du dalaï-lama, elle n’en a pas moins la rage des sans-culottes».

Voir encore:

Racisme, sexisme : Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, la cible idéale

Barbara Krief

Le Nouvel Observateur
01-09-2014
La ministre subit de nombreuses attaques depuis sa nomination au ministère de l’Education nationale.

Manuel Valls lui a rendu dimanche, à La Rochelle, un hommage appuyé : « La République sait reconnaître le travail et l’engagement », s’est réjoui le Premier ministre, saluant « une femme si jeune occuper cette si lourde fonction ». Dans la salle, l’intéressée, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, a écrasé une larme. Il faut dire que depuis sa promotion il y a dix jours, sa jeunesse comme son genre féminin sont plutôt source d’insultes. Sexisme, racisme… Ses détracteurs, majoritairement de droite et d’extrême droite, s’autorisent tous les écarts pour mettre en cause la légitimité de la nouvelle ministre de l’Education. Retour sur les pires attaques.

La promotion par la jupe
« Quels atouts Najat Vallaud-Belkacem a utilisé pour convaincre Hollande de la nommer à un grand ministère », s’interrogeait hier Franck Keller, conseiller municipal UMP de Neuilly-sur-Seine. Le tweet, accompagné d’une photo de la ministre en jupe, a depuis été supprimé.

SOS Racisme a lancé une pétition pour soutenir la ministre. L’initiative a récolté plus de 4.300 signatures. L’association explique ainsi les remarques désobligeantes à l’encontre de la nouvelle ministre de l’Education :

Najat Vallaud-Belkacem est une cible idéale pour tous ceux qui veulent distiller l’idée qu’une femme d’origine immigrée ne saurait avoir légitimement sa place au sein d’un gouvernement »
« Claudine Dupont »
Une fausse carte d’identité lui attribuant le nom de Claudine Dupont, mise en circulation sur les réseaux sociaux en 2013, est réapparue sur Twitter, le 28 août, eux jour après la nomination de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem à l’éducation. L’ancienne porte-parole du gouvernement se voit soupçonnée d’avoir échangé son « vrai nom » pour celui de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. Le but ? Encore une fois, faciliter une promotion.

Son illégitimité est à nouveau décriée par ses détracteurs. Selon eux, sa nomination est une « provocation ». Les opposants au mariage pour tous ont fait de la ministre de l’Education leur cible. Ils lui reprochent d’avoir soutenue ouvertement le mariage homosexuel et de prôner « l’idéologie du genre à l’école ». Le spectre de la « théorie du genre » pourrit la promotion de l’ancienne porte-parole du gouvernement, qui subit une troisième attaque en ce premier jour de septembre.

« Viêt-minh souriante »
Le 14 février, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem se faisait taxer de « khmer rose » par le « Figaro magazine », en référence au mouvement politique et militaire communiste radical. Dans une interview accordée à l’hebdomadaire, le député UMP Hervé Mariton, qui soutient la Manif pour tous, invite à se méfier de celle qu’il qualifie de « Viêt-minh souriante » qui veut « désaliéner le peuple ».

Voir de plus:

Najat Vallaud-Belkacem cible de « Minute » et « Valeurs actuelles »: des provocations ignobles
Mehdi Thomas Allal
Militant anti-discriminations

Tribune cosignée par Loreleï Mirot, consultante en communication politique, et Mehdi Thomas Allal, responsable du pôle anti-discriminations de la fondation Terra Nova.

Le Nouvel Observateur

03-09-2014

LE PLUS. Après avoir été, dans la foulée de sa nomination au poste de ministre de l’Éducation nationale, la cible de la « Manif pour tous », Najat Vallaud-Belkacem est visée par « Minute » et « Valeurs actuelles ». Des choix éditoriaux qui font vivement réagir nos deux contributeurs, Loreleï Mirot, consultante en communication politique, et Mehdi Thomas Allal, responsable du pôle anti-discriminations de Terra Nova.
Édité par Hélène Decommer

Christiane Taubira, Myriam El Khomri et, plus récemment, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem… Parce qu’elles sont femmes, issues de la diversité, et qu’elles occupent des postes à fortes responsabilités, elles concentrent sur elles des discours de haine inacceptables.

Le personnel politique, mais aussi les médias de droite et d’extrême droite, à l’instar de « Valeurs actuelles » et de « Minute » n’hésitent pas à inciter à la haine vis-à-vis de ces personnalités, qui symbolisent en réalité la réussite de certaines couches des minorités visibles…

Un procès en illégitimité permanent

Les unes des hebdomadaires « Valeurs actuelles » et « Minute » rivalisent cette semaine d’ignominies pour salir l’image de la ministre de l’Education nationale ; c’est à celui qui exploitera le mieux ses origines.

« Minute » qui n’en est pas à sa première polémique – rappelons notamment sa une non dépourvue de sous-entendus racistes sur Christiane Taubira – évite de s’embarrasser de la double nationalité de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, pour ne mettre en avant que son ascendance marocaine ! Son titre « Une marocaine musulmane à l’Education nationale – la provocation Najat Vallaud-Belkacem », souligne également, sans une hésitation, le fait qu’elle soit de confession musulmane…

Interpréter les origines et les croyances supposées de la ministre comme étant l’antithèse des qualités exigées pour occuper sa fonction conforte « Minute » dans une ligne éditoriale d’extrême droite. Et contredit l’article 1er de la Constitution selon lequel « la République (…) assure l’égalité devant la loi de tous les citoyens sans distinction d’origine, de race ou de religion. »

Racisme : le maux derrière les mots

Si « Valeurs actuelles » ne fait guère davantage dans la finesse, l’hebdomadaire de droite tente, quant à lui, d’échapper aux critiques sur son racisme latent en jouant sur le sens des mots.

Sur sa une, une photo de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem apparaît sur fond noir, sous le titre « L’ayatollah ». Ce terme désigne, selon le communiqué de presse du journal, qui tente de se justifier et indique qu’il va porter plainte contre ses détracteurs, une « personne aux idées rétrogrades qui use de manière arbitraire et tyrannique des pouvoirs étendus dont elle dispose ».

Or, ce mot s’utilise aussi comme un titre honorifique donné aux principaux chefs religieux de l’islam chiite. Nul doute qu’il s’agit bien des origines et de la religion, arbitrairement attribuée à la ministre de l’Education nationale, sur lesquelles « Valeurs actuelles » a souhaité attirer l’attention.

Par son sous-titre « Enquête sur la ministre de la Rééducation nationale », le journal entend par ailleurs démontrer sa volonté de bouleverser le système éducatif et ses conventions (en imposant par exemple l’imaginaire « théorie du genre »).

Najat Vallaud-Belkacem clôt avec subtilité la polémique

« Valeurs actuelles » et « Minute » s’emploient à utiliser les origines de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem pour diffuser leurs thématiques islamophobes et rétrogrades.

La dénonciation de leurs campagnes immondes aura au moins le mérite d’unir la gauche et une partie de la droite, et de permettre aux deux camps de réaffirmer les principes et les valeurs de la République.

Dans un communiqué, le premier secrétaire du Parti socialiste Jean-Christophe Cambadélis a déclaré : « La une de Minute est une incitation à la haine. Elle doit être juridiquement condamnée ». Des associations telles que la Licra et SOS Racisme montent au créneau ; cette dernière a notamment publié une pétition de soutien.

Najat Vallaud-Belkacem qui se définit comme un « pur produit de la République » et un exemple d' »intégration heureuse » ne craint pas ces attaques sur la forme ; ses preuves, elle les a faites en occupant successivement les postes de ministre des Droits des femmes, à la Ville, et de ministre de l’Education nationale.

La déclaration de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem à la sortie du conseil des ministres ce jour clôture avec subtilité cette polémique en invoquant feu l’humoriste Pierre Desproges et sa fameuse formule sur l’hebdomadaire d’extrême droite : « Pour le prix d’un journal, vous avez la nausée et les mains sales », deux ouvrages de Jean-Paul Sartre qui méritent, eux, d’être lus.

Voir enfin:

Tribunes
Il faut condamner les attaques contre Najat Vallaud-Belkacem
Yann GALUT Député PS du Cher, fondateur et porte-parole de la Gauche forte, Mehdi Thomas ALLAL Délégué general de la Gauche forte, Colette CAPDEVIELLE Députée PS des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Alexis BACHELAY Député PS des Hauts-de-Seine et porte-parole de la Gauche forte, Marie-Anne CHAPDELAINE Députée PS d’Ille-et-Vilaine et Loreleï MIROT Consultante en communication politique

Libération

1 septembre 2014 à 17:54

TRIBUNE Récemment nommée au ministère de l’Education nationale, elle concentre de violentes critiques sexistes et racistes entremêlées.

La ministre de l’Education nationale irrite l’extrême-droite par ses origines, de même que les militants hostiles au mariage homosexuel, pour lesquels elle symbolise le retour de la théorie du genre dont elle serait l’initiatrice, ainsi qu’une partie de la droite, qui loin d’opter pour la modération, se prête aux allusions sexistes. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem se retrouve confrontée aux deux types de discriminations les plus souvent subies par les élèves à l’école ; l’occasion pour le ministère de réaffirmer les principes et les valeurs de la République que l’école est censée promouvoir.

La promotion de l’Egalité Femme-Homme
Avant même l’annonce de sa nomination au ministère de l’Education nationale, Christine Boutin mettait en garde Najat Vallaud-Belkacem en dénonçant une «provocation non tolérable». L’aversion de la présidente d’honneur du Parti chrétien démocrate résulte de la prise de position de Najat Vallaud-Belkacem en faveur du mariage pour tous, mais aussi de sa volonté de mettre en place un plan d’action pour l’égalité entre les filles et les garçons à l’école intitulé ABCD de l’égalité. Pour Christine Boutin, cet outil pédagogique ne représentait rien d’autre qu’une façon d’imposer insidieusement la «théorie du genre» (ou gender theory) !

Par la fabrication et la diffusion de multiples hoax sur les ABCD de l’égalité (elle viserait à supprimer l’altérité sexuelle, pervertir les élèves, imposer l’homosexualité aux enfants…), les militants anti-gender, qui se confondent avec les militants anti-mariage pour tous, sont finalement parvenus à semer le trouble parmi les esprits, notamment ceux des parents d’élèves. Un débat concernant la lutte contre une prétendue «théorie du genre» menaçante pour les enfants s’est finalement substitué à la légitime et nécessaire lutte contre les discriminations de genre.

En tant qu’ancienne ministre des Droits des femmes, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem ne peut rester insensible à la question malheureusement négligée de l’enseignement en faveur de l’égalité femme-homme dès le plus jeune âge. Les anti-gender ont gagné la bataille de la communication en révélant une homophobie latente et des stéréotypes archaïques sur les rôles sexuels dits naturels.

D’autant que la ministre de l’Education n’est pas épargnée par ces stéréotypes ; le conseiller municipal UMP de Neuilly-sur-Seine s’interrogeait le premier septembre sur Twitter sur les «atouts» employés par Najat Vallaud-Belkacem pour «convaincre Hollande de la nommer à un grand ministère». Accompagné d’une photo de la ministre en jupe, le message a indigné la gauche sur la toile et fort heureusement, des personnalités de tous bords.

La lutte contre le racisme
Najat Vallaud-Belkacem fait également l’objet d’attaques à caractère raciste, à l’instar d’autres personnalités du gouvernement telles que la Garde des Sceaux Christiane Taubira ou encore la secrétaire d’Etat à la Ville Myriam El Khomri. Une fausse carte d’identité prétendant dévoiler la véritable identité de la ministre de l’Education nationale circule sur la toile depuis sa nomination ; elle s’appellerait en réalité Claudine Dupont et emprunterait un autre nom pour jouer la carte de la diversité et obtenir des postes politiques à forte valeur ajoutée !

Diversité, un mot qui suscite l’effroi au sein de la droite réactionnaire et de l’extrême droite. La page Facebook du ministère de l’Education nationale a déclenché une vague de commentaires insidieux et injurieux, après la publication d’une photo d’une dizaine d’enfants de maternelle, dont plusieurs de couleur de peau noire.

Dénonçant un «grand remplacement» des «Français de souche» par des immigrés (sic), les internautes ont réussi à forcer le ministère à censurer l’objet du scandale, confirmant ainsi l’absolue nécessité pour le système éducatif de cesser de se plier au jeu des extrémistes et de leurs campagnes diffamatoires. Le racisme demeure un fléau à combattre aussi bien sur les bancs de l’école que sur les réseaux sociaux, ainsi que sur ceux du personnel politique.

Pour tout ce qu’elle représente et tout ce qu’elle entreprend, démontrant sa compétence et sa légitimité, nous réaffirmons notre soutien et notre fierté de compter Najat Vallaud-Belkcacem comme la numéro trois du gouvernement. Elle incarne une France jeune, diverse et moderne, que rejettent les extrémistes de tout poil. C’est la raison pour laquelle les attaques dont elle fait l’objet doivent être condamnées et dénoncées comme autant d’actes répréhensibles par la loi.
Yann GALUT Député PS du Cher, fondateur et porte-parole de la Gauche forte, Mehdi Thomas ALLAL Délégué general de la Gauche forte, Colette CAPDEVIELLE Députée PS des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Alexis BACHELAY Député PS des Hauts-de-Seine et porte-parole de la Gauche forte, Marie-Anne CHAPDELAINE Députée PS d’Ille-et-Vilaine et Loreleï MIROT Consultante en communication politique


Obama: Nous n’avons pas encore de stratégie (Inaction also has its price)

7 septembre, 2014

C’est un terrible avantage de n’avoir rien fait, mais il ne faut pas en abuser. Rivarol
The truth of the matter is that it’s a big world out there, and that as indispensable as we are to try to lead it, there’s still going to be tragedies out there, and there are going to be conflicts, and our job is to make sure to project what’s right, what’s just, and, you know, that we’re building coalitions of like-minded countries and partners in order to advance not only our core security interests, but also the interests of the world as a whole. Obama
Nous n’avons pas encore de stratégie. Obama
Il faut que je revienne sur un aspect de la conférence d’hier qui a attiré l’attention. Le président assume pleinement sa décision prise hier… de porter son costume d’été à la conférence de presse. Josh Earnes (porte-parole de la Maison Blanche)
Barack Obama est un amateur L’économie est une catastrophe (…) Les États-Unis ont perdu leur triple  A. (…) Il ne sait pas ce que c’est que d’être président. (…) C’est un incompétent. Bill Clinton
Les grandes nations ont besoin de principes directeurs, et  »ne pas faire des choses idiotes » n’est pas un principe directeur. Hillary Clinton
To announce he had no plan, even if he had a plan, to announce he had no plan does not help the United States of America against ISIS and terrorism throughout the globe. My father . . . didn’t announce what he was going to do. He just, in the middle of the night, sent a couple of planes into Tripoli, took out a couple of the homes real quick and Gadhafi stayed quiet for 20-plus years. Michael Reagan
The real conundrum is why the president seems so compelled to take both sides of every issue, encouraging voters to project whatever they want on him, and hoping they won’t realize which hand is holding the rabbit. That a large section of the country views him as a socialist while many in his own party are concluding that he does not share their values speaks volumes — but not the volumes his advisers are selling: that if you make both the right and left mad, you must be doing something right. As a practicing psychologist with more than 25 years of experience, I will resist the temptation to diagnose at a distance, but as a scientist and strategic consultant I will venture some hypotheses. The most charitable explanation is that he and his advisers have succumbed to a view of electoral success to which many Democrats succumb — that “centrist” voters like “centrist” politicians. Unfortunately, reality is more complicated. Centrist voters prefer honest politicians who help them solve their problems. A second possibility is that he is simply not up to the task by virtue of his lack of experience and a character defect that might not have been so debilitating at some other time in history. Those of us who were bewitched by his eloquence on the campaign trail chose to ignore some disquieting aspects of his biography: that he had accomplished very little before he ran for president, having never run a business or a state; that he had a singularly unremarkable career as a law professor, publishing nothing in 12 years at the University of Chicago other than an autobiography; and that, before joining the United States Senate, he had voted « present » (instead of « yea » or « nay ») 130 times, sometimes dodging difficult issues. Drew Westen (Emory university, Aug. 2011)
Le manque de soutien des Américains aux Français est, en vérité, la marque de fabrique de Barack Obama (…) Le Président américain avait trouvé une stratégie d’évitement pour ne pas intervenir, à condition que le gouvernement syrien renonce à son arsenal chimique : toutes les autres formes d’assassinat de masse restaient donc tolérées par le Président américain. Un million de morts et deux millions de réfugiés plus tard n’empêchent apparemment pas Barack Obama de dormir la nuit : il a d’autres priorités, tel lutter contre un hypothétique déréglement du climat ou faire fonctionner une assurance maladie, moralement juste et pratiquement dysfonctionnelle. On connaît les arguments pour ne pas intervenir en Syrie : il serait difficile de distinguer les bons et les mauvais Syriens, les démocrates authentiques et les islamistes cachés. Mais ce n’est pas l’analyse du sénateur John Mc Cain, plus compétent qu’Obama sur le sujet : lui réclame, en vain, que les États-Unis arment décemment les milices qui se battent sur les deux fronts, hostiles au régime de Assad et aux Islamistes soutenus par l’Iran. Par ailleurs, se laver les mains face au massacre des civils, comme les Occidentaux le firent naguère au Rwanda – et longtemps en Bosnie et au Kosovo – n’est jamais défendable. Il est parfaitement possible, aujourd’hui encore en Syrie, d’interdire le ciel aux avions de Assad qui bombardent les civils, de créer des couloirs humanitaires pour évacuer les civils, d’instaurer des zones de sécurité humanitaire. C’est ce que Obama refuse obstinément à Hollande. Comment expliquer cette obstination et cette indifférence d’Obama : ne regarde-t-il pas la télévision ? Il faut en conclure qu’il s’est installé dans un personnage, celui du Président pacifiste, celui qui aura retiré l’armée américaine d’Irak, bientôt d’Afghanistan et ne l’engagera sur aucun autre terrain d’opérations. Obama ignorerait-il qu’il existe des « guerres justes » ? Des guerres que l’on ne choisit pas et qu’il faut tout de même livrer, parce que le pacifisme, passé un certain seuil, devient meurtrier. « À quoi sert-il d’entretenir une si grande armée, si ce n’est pas pour s’en servir ? », avait demandé Madeleine Albright, Secrétaire d’État de Bill Clinton, au Général Colin Powell, un militaire notoirement frileux. Les États-Unis sont le gendarme du monde, la seule puissance qui compte : les armées russes et chinoises, par comparaison, sont des nains. On posera donc à Obama – si on le pouvait – la même question que celle de Madeleine Albright : « À quoi sert l’armée américaine et à quoi sert le Président Obama ? ». Il est tout de même paradoxal que Hollande, un désastre en politique intérieure, pourrait passer dans l’Histoire comme celui qui aura dit Non à la barbarie et Barack Obama, Prix Nobel de la Paix, pour celui qui se sera couché devant les Barbares. Guy Sorman
Le Président Barack Obama est désormais plus populaire en Europe qu’aux États-Unis. De ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, nous restons fascinés par l’élégance, le cool et l’aura du premier couple Noir à la Maison Blanche, mais nous n’en subissons pas, pas directement, les retombées politiques. Le désamour des Américains ne s’explique pas que par l’usure du pouvoir – après six ans de mandat – mais par une déception certaine, un écart béant entre la promesse initiale et des résultats insaisissables. (…) Quand le Président n’est pas modeste – et Obama n’est pas modeste, contrairement à Ronald Reagan qui le fut – les Américains et le reste du monde comprennent d’autant plus  mal le gouffre entre des annonces tonitruantes et des résultats insignifiants. L’extension de l’assurance maladie obligatoire à tous les Américains qui devait être une révolution sociale, a ainsi accouché d’une souris bureaucratique parce qu’Obama avait promis à tous ce qu’il ne pouvait pas garantir : les Américains à revenus modestes sont un peu moins inégaux face à la maladie, mais ils le restent néanmoins. La sortie de crise, après le krach financier de 2008, était l’autre priorité intérieure de Barack Obama : la croissance est restaurée, le plein emploi l’est quasiment, mais les Américains n’en sont pas trop reconnaissants au Président. De fait, le mérite en revient aux entrepreneurs innovants, à la politique monétaire de la Banque fédérale (peut-être) mais Obama a plutôt retardé la reprise par des augmentations d’impôts, par des réglementations nouvelles (pour protéger la Nature), par ses tergiversations sur l’exploitation des ressources énergétiques, du gaz de schiste en particulier. Peu versé en économie, Barack Obama est certainement le plus anti-capitaliste de tous les présidents américains dans une société dont le capitalisme reste le moteur incontesté sauf par quelques universitaires socialistes et marginaux. Il reste la politique étrangère où le Président dispose, au contraire de l’économie et des affaires sociales (qui sont plutôt de compétence locale), d’une grande latitude. Élu, il le rappelle incessamment, pour terminer deux guerres et ramener les troupes « à la maison », il a tenu parole. Il a également reflété le sentiment qui régnait au début de son mandat, d’une lassitude des Américains envers les aventures extérieures. Mais en six ans, les circonstances ont profondément changé, en Mer de Chine, au Proche-Orient, en Ukraine, Obama n’en a tenu aucun compte, comme prisonnier de son image pacifiste, et décidé à le rester alors même que son pacifisme est interprété par tous les ennemis de la démocratie comme un aveu de pusillanimité. Du pacifisme, Obama aura basculé dans l’irréalisme, dénoncé par Hillary Clinton : l’incapacité idéologique d’Obama de reconnaître que l’armée américaine, nolens volens, est le policier du monde. Le policier peut s’avérer maladroit – George Bush le fut – habile comme l’avait démontré Ronald Reagan, médiocre comme le fut Bill Clinton, mais il ne peut pas s’abstenir. S’il renonce, à la Obama, le Djihad conquiert, la Russie annexe, la Chine menace. La majorité des Américains, les déçus de l’Obamania ont aujourd’hui compris que le pacifiste avait les mains blanches mais qu’il n’avait pas de mains. (…) Obama, au total, n’est peut-être qu’une image virtuelle : il a été élu sur une photo retouchée, la sienne, sur un slogan (Yes we can), sur un mythe (la réconciliation des peuples, des civilisations), sur une absence de doctrine caractéristique de sa génération pour qui tout est l’équivalent de rien, et grâce à l’influence décisive des réseaux sociaux. Barack Obama est de notre temps, un reflet de l’époque : ce qui le condamne à l’insuffisance. Guy Sorman
With Obama, there was always more than a whiff of the overconfident dilettante, so sure of his powers that he could remain supremely comfortable with his own ignorance. His express-elevator ascent from Illinois state senator to U.S. president in the space of just four years didn’t allow much time for maturation or reflection, either. Obama really is, as Bill Clinton is supposed to have said of him, “an amateur.” When it comes to the execution of policy, it shows. And yet this view also sells Obama short. It should be obvious, but bears repeating, that it is no mean feat to be elected, and reelected, president, whatever other advantages Obama might have enjoyed in his races. In interviews and press conferences, Obama is often verbose and generally self-serving, but he’s also, for the most part, conversant with the issues. (…) The myth of Obama’s brilliance paradoxically obscures the fact that he’s no fool. The point is especially important to note because the failure of Obama’s foreign policy is not, ultimately, a reflection of his character or IQ. It is the consequence of an ideology. That ideology is what now goes by the name of progressivism, which has effectively been the dominant (if often disavowed) view of the Democratic Party since George McGovern ran on a “Come Home, America” platform in 1972—and got 37.5 percent of the popular vote. Progressivism believes that the United States must lead internationally by example (especially when it comes to nuclear-arms control); that the U.S. is as much the sinner as it is the sinned against when it comes to our adversaries (remember Mosaddegh?); and that the American interest is best served when it is merged with, or subsumed by, the global interest (ideally in the form of a UN resolution).  (…) Above all, progressivism believes that the United States is a country that, in nearly every respect, treads too heavily on the Earth: environmentally, ideologically, militarily, and geopolitically. The goal, therefore, is to reduce America’s footprint; to “retrench,” as the administration would like to think of it, or to retreat, as it might more accurately be called. (…)  Little wonder that leaders in Tehran, Beijing, and Moscow quickly understood that, with Obama in the White House, they had a rare opportunity to reshape and revise regional arrangements in a manner more to their liking. Iran is doing so today in southern Iraq, Lebanon, and Syria. Beijing is extending its reach in the South and East China Sea. Russia is intervening in Ukraine. It’s no accident that, while acting independently from one another, they are all acting now. The next American president might not be so cavalier about challenges to the global status quo, or about enforcing his (or her) own red lines. Better to move while they can. (…) In a prescient 2004 essay in Foreign Policy, the historian Niall Ferguson warned that “the alternative to [American] unipolarity” would not be some kind of reasonably tolerable world order. It would, he said, “be apolarity—a global vacuum of power.” “If the United States retreats from global hegemony—its fragile self-image dented by minor setbacks on the imperial frontier—its critics at home and abroad must not pretend that they are ushering in a new era of multipolar harmony, or even a return to the good old balance of power. Be careful what you wish for.” (…) Two years ago, Obama was considered a foreign-policy success story. Not many people entertain that illusion now; the tide of public opinion, until recently so dull and vociferous in its opposition to “neocons,” is beginning to shift as Americans understand that a policy of inaction also has its price. Bret Stephens

Attention: une incompétence peut en cacher une autre !

Alors que, des deux côtés de l’Atlantique et chacun à sa manière, ceux qui nous servent de gouvernants semblent rivaliser de vacuité …

Que ce soit un président français dont l’interventionnisme militaire contre le djihadisme africain est salué de partout mais qui, après avoir plongé en seulement deux ans et sans compter ses délires sociétaux et ses frasques personnelles, son économie dans la plus grave des crises, pourrait réussir l’exploit historique de descendre sous la barre fatidique des 10% de popularité

Ou un président américain dont l’économie semble contre tous ses efforts finalement repartie mais qui, face à la menace djihadiste et après six ans au pouvoir, reconnait qu’il n’a « pas encore de stratégie  » …

Comment ne pas repenser à l’incroyable décalage avec les espoirs soulevés par leurs élections après des prédécesseurs tant honnis et critiqués mais dont ils ont fini par reprendre la plupart des mesures ?

Mais surtout résister à la tentation de n’y voir que l’effet de l’amateurisme et de l’incompétence ?

Alors que, comme le rappelle l’éditorialiste Bret Stephens pour le cas américain, on a là le résultat le plus pur d’une idéologie …

A savoir, face à un monde qui a plus que jamais besoin de souplesse au niveau économique mais de fermeté au niveau international, l’idéologie progressiste de l’interventionnisme forcené en politique intérieure et du retrait et des bons sentiments en politique extérieure …

The Meltdown
Bret Stephens
Commentary
09.01.14

In July, after Germany trounced Brazil 7–1 in the semifinal match of the World Cup—including a first-half stretch in which the Brazilian soccer squad gave up an astonishing five goals in 19 minutes—a sports commentator wrote: “This was not a team losing. It was a dream dying.” These words could equally describe what has become of Barack Obama’s foreign policy since his second inauguration. The president, according to the infatuated view of his political aides and media flatterers, was supposed to be playing o jogo bonito, the beautiful game—ending wars, pressing resets, pursuing pivots, and restoring America’s good name abroad.
Instead, he crumbled.
As I write, the foreign policy of the United States is in a state of unprecedented disarray. In some cases, failed policy has given way to an absence of policy. So it is in Libya, Syria, Egypt, Iraq, and, at least until recently, Ukraine. In other cases the president has doubled down on failed policy—extending nuclear negotiations with Iran; announcing the full withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan.
Sometimes the administration has been the victim of events, such as Edward Snowden’s espionage, it made worse through bureaucratic fumbling and feckless administrative fixes. At other times the wounds have been self-inflicted: the espionage scandal in Germany (when it was learned that the United States had continued to spy on our ally despite prior revelations of the NSA’s eavesdropping on Chancellor Angela Merkel); the repeated declaration that “core al-Qaeda” was “on a path to defeat”; the prisoner swap with the Taliban that obtained Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl’s release.
Often the damage has been vivid, as in the collapse of the Israel–Palestinian talks in April followed by the war in Gaza. More frequently it can be heard in the whispered remarks of our allies. “The Polish-American alliance is worthless, even harmful, as it gives Poland a false sense of security,” Radek Sikorski, Poland’s foreign minister and once one of its most reliably pro-American politicians, was overheard saying in June. “It’s bullshit.”
This is far from an exhaustive list. But it’s one that, at last, people have begun to notice. Foreign policy, considered a political strength of the president in his first term, has become a liability. In June, an NBC/Wall Street Journal poll found that Americans disapproved of his handling of foreign affairs by a 57-to-37 percent ratio. Overseas, dismay with Obama mounts. Among Germans, who greeted the future president as a near-messiah when he spoke in Berlin in the summer of 2008, his approval rating fell to 43 percent in late 2013, from 88 percent in 2010. In Egypt, another country the president went out of his way to woo, he has accomplished the unlikely feat of making himself more unpopular than George W. Bush. In Israel, political leaders and commentators from across the political spectrum are united in their disdain for the administration. “The Obama administration proved once again that it is the best friend of its enemies, and the biggest enemy of its friends,” the center-left Haaretz columnist Ari Shavit noted in late July. It’s an observation being echoed by policymakers from Tokyo to Taipei to Tallinn.
But perhaps the most telling indicator is the collapsing confidence in the president among the Democratic-leaning foreign-policy elite in the United States. “Under Obama, the United States has suffered some real reputational damage,” admitted Washington Post columnist David Ignatius in May, adding: “I say this as someone who sympathizes with many of Obama’s foreign-policy goals.” Hillary Clinton, the president’s once loyal secretary of state, offered in early August that “great nations need organizing principles, and ‘don’t do stupid stuff’ is not an organizing principle.” Zbigniew Brzezinski, Jimmy Carter’s national-security adviser, warned in July that “we are losing control of our ability at the highest levels of dealing with challenges that, increasingly, many of us recognize as fundamental to our well-being.” The United States, he added, was “increasingly devoid of strategic will and a sense of direction.”
And there was this: “What kind of figure will Obama cut at Omaha?” Roger Cohen, the reliably liberal New York Times columnist, wondered on the eve of the 70th D-Day commemoration at Omaha Beach in June. “I wish I could say he will cut a convincing figure.” But, he continued:

Obama at bloody Omaha, in the sixth year of his presidency, falls short at a time when his aides have been defining the cornerstone of his foreign policy as: “Don’t do stupid stuff.”… He falls short at a time when Syria bleeds more than three years into the uprising… Obama falls short at a time when Vladimir Putin, emboldened by that Syrian retreat and the perception of American weakness, has annexed Crimea… Obama falls short as Putin’s Russian surrogates in eastern Ukraine wreak havoc… He falls short, also, when the Egyptian dreams of liberty and pluralism that arose in Tahrir square have given way to the landslide victory of a former general in an “election” only a little less grotesque than Assad’s in Syria.

Are we all neoconservatives again? Not quite—or at least not yet. Even as the evidence of the failure of Obama’s foreign policy abounds, the causes of that failure remain in dispute. Has the world simply become an impossibly complex place, beyond the reach of any American president to shape or master? Is the problem the president himself, a man who seems to have lost interest in the responsibilities (though not yet the perquisites) of his office? Or are we witnessing the consequences of foreign-policy progressivism, the worldview Obama brought with him to the White House and that he has, for the most part, consistently and even conscientiously championed?

Not surprisingly, many of the president’s supporters are attracted to the first explanation.
In this reading, the U.S. no longer enjoys its previous geopolitical advantages over militarily dependent and diplomatically pliant allies, or against inherently weaker and relatively predictable adversaries. On the contrary, our economic supremacy is fading and we may be in long-term decline. Our adversaries are increasingly able to confront us asymmetrically, imposing high costs on us without incurring significant costs for themselves. Limited budgetary resources require us to make “hard choices” about the balance between international and domestic priorities. What’s more, the sour experiences of Iraq and Afghanistan—another bad Bush legacy—limit Obama’s options, because Americans have made it plain that they are in no mood to intervene in places such as Syria or over conflicts such as the one in Ukraine. As the president told an interviewer in 2013,“I am more mindful probably than most of not only our incredible strengths and capabilities but also our limitations.”
It would be wrong to dismiss this argument out of hand. Can Obama fairly be blamed for the quarter-century of misgovernance in Kiev that created conditions in which Russian separatists in Crimea and Donetsk would flourish? Was there anything he could realistically have done to prevent Hosni Mubarak’s ouster, or to steer Egyptian politics in the tumultuous years that followed? Is it his fault that Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki pursued vendettas against Iraq’s Sunni leaders, creating the political conditions for al-Qaeda’s resurgence, or that Hamid Karzai has proved to be such a disappointing leader for Afghanistan? If the price of better relations with Pakistan was ending the program of drone strikes, was that a price worth paying?
Then again, every president confronts his share of apparently intractable dilemmas. The test of a successful presidency is whether it can avoid being trapped and defined by them. Did Obama inherit anything worse than what Franklin Roosevelt got from Herbert Hoover (the Great Depression) or Richard Nixon from Lyndon Johnson (the war in Vietnam and the social meltdown of the late ’60s) or Ronald Reagan from Jimmy Carter (stagflation, the ayatollahs, the Soviet Union on the march)?
If anything, the international situation Obama faced when he assumed the presidency was, in many respects, relatively auspicious. Despite the financial crisis and the recession that followed, never since John F. Kennedy has an American president assumed high office with so much global goodwill. The war in Iraq, which had done so much to bedevil Bush’s presidency, had been won thanks to a military strategy Obama had, as a senator, flatly opposed. For the war in Afghanistan, there was broad bipartisan support for large troop increases. Not even six months into his presidency, Obama was handed a potential strategic game changer when a stolen election in Iran led to a massive popular uprising that, had it succeeded, could have simultaneously ended the Islamic Republic and resolved the nuclear crisis. He was handed another would-be game changer in early 2011, when the initially peaceful uprising in Syria offered an opportunity, at relatively little cost to the U.S., to depose an anti-American dictator and sever the main link between Iran and its terrorist proxies in Lebanon and Gaza.
Incredibly, Obama squandered every single one of these opportunities. An early and telling turning point came in 2009, when, as part of the Russian reset, the administration abruptly cancelled plans—laboriously negotiated by the Bush administration, and agreed to at considerable political risk by governments in Warsaw and Prague—to deploy ballistic-missile defenses to Poland and the Czech Republic. “We heard through the media,” was how Witold Waszczykowski, the deputy head of Poland’s national-security team, described the administration’s consultation process. Adding unwitting insult to gratuitous injury, the announcement came on the 70th anniversary of the Nazi-Soviet pact, a stark reminder that Poland could never entrust its security to the guarantees of great powers.
And this was just the beginning. Relations would soon sour with France, as then-President Nicolas Sarkozy openly mocked Obama’s fantasies of nuclear disarmament. “Est-il faible?”—“Is he weak?”—the French president was reported to have wondered aloud after witnessing Obama’s performance at his first G20 summit in April 2009. Then relations would sour with Germany: A biography of Angela Merkel by Stefan Kornelius quotes her as telling then-British Prime Minister Gordon Brown that she found Obama “so peculiar, so unapproachable, so lacking in warmth.” Next was Saudi Arabia: U.S. policy toward Syria, the Kingdom’s Prince Turki al-Faisal would tell an audience in London, “would be funny if it were not so blatantly perfidious, and designed not only to give Mr. Obama an opportunity to back down, but also to help Assad butcher his people.” Canada—Canada!—would be disappointed. “We can’t continue in this state of limbo,” complained foreign minister John Baird about the administration’s endless delays and prevarications over approving the Keystone XL pipeline.
And there was Israel: “We thought it would be the United States that would lead the campaign against Iran,” Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon noted in March in a speech at Tel Aviv University. Instead, Obama was “showing weakness,” he added. “Therefore, on this matter, we have to behave as though we have nobody to look out for us but ourselves.”
This was quite a list of falling-outs. Still, most such differences can usually be finessed or patched up with a bit of diplomacy. Not so Obama’s failures when it came to consolidating America’s hard-won gains in Iraq, or advocating America’s democratic values in Iran, or pursuing his own oft-stated goal in Afghanistan—“the war that has to be won,” as he was fond of saying when he was running for the presidency in 2008. As for Syria, perhaps the most devastating assessment was offered by Robert Ford, who had been Obama’s man in Damascus in the days when Bashar al-Assad was dining with John Kerry and being touted by Hillary Clinton as a “reformer.”
“I was no longer in a position where I felt I could defend the American policy,” Ford told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour in June, explaining his decision to resign from government. “There really is nothing we can point to that’s been very successful in our policy except the removal of about 93 percent of some of Assad’s chemical materials. But now he’s using chlorine gas against his opponents.”
None of these fiascos— for brevity’s sake, I’m deliberately setting to one side the illusory pivot to Asia, the misbegotten Russian Reset, the mishandled Palestinian–Israeli talks, the stillborn Geneva conferences on Syria, the catastrophic interim agreement with Iran, the de facto death of the U.S. free-trade agenda, the overhyped opening to Burma, the orphaned victory in Libya, the poisoned relationship with Egypt, and the disastrous cuts to the Defense budget—can be explained away as a matter of tough geopolitical luck. Where, then, does the source of failure lie?
For those disposed to be ideologically sympathetic to the administration, it comes down to the personality of the president. He is, they say, too distant, not enough of a schmoozer, doesn’t forge the close personal relationships of the kind that Bush had with Tony Blair, or Clinton with Helmut Kohl, or Reagan with Margaret Thatcher. Also, he’s too professorial, too rational, too prudent: He thinks that foreign-policy success is a matter of hitting “singles and doubles,” as he put it on a recent visit to Asia, when what Americans want is for the president to hit home runs (or at least point toward the lights).
Alternatively, perhaps he’s too political: “The president had a truly disturbing habit of funneling major foreign-policy decisions through a small cabal of relatively inexperienced White House advisers whose turf was strictly politics,” recalled Vali Nasr, the academic who served as a State Department aide early in Obama’s first term. “Their primary concern was how any action in Afghanistan or the Middle East would play out on the nightly news.”
Another theory: The president is simply disconnected from events, indifferent to the details of governance, incompetent in the execution of policy. Last fall, following the disastrous rollout of the ObamaCare website, it emerged that the president had not had a single private meeting with Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius for more than three years—an indicator, given that this was his highest political priority, of the quality of attention he was giving lesser issues. It also turned out that the president had gone for nearly five years without knowing that the National Security Agency was bugging the phones of foreign leaders. In a revealing portrait from October 2013 in the New York Times, the president was described as “impatient and disengaged” during White House debates about Syria, “sometimes scrolling through messages on his BlackBerry or slouching and chewing gum.” The president is also known to have complained to aides about what he called “decision fatigue,” demanding memos where he can check “agree,” “disagree,” or “let’s discuss.”
The most devastating testimony of all came from Obama himself. Prepping for an interview on 60 Minutes after a late-night dinner in Italy, Politico reported, the president complained about his hard lot: “Just last night I was talking about life and art, big interesting things, and now we’re back to the minuscule things on politics”—those “minuscule things” being the crisis in Ukraine and his own health-care plan. Then there was this detail, about a presidential excursion in March as the crisis in Crimea was unfolding:

At a leisurely dinner with friends on that Saturday night, Obama expressed no regrets about the mini-vacation at the lush Ocean Reef Club resort or the publicity surrounding the trip, which reportedly required planes, five helicopters, more than 50 Secret Service agents and airspace restrictions over South Florida. After a difficult few weeks dealing with an international crisis, he relished the break, which included two rounds of golf.

Even allowing that presidents can get work done on the fairway and make executive decisions between fundraising events (Obama did 321 of them in his first term, according to the Washington Post, as compared with 173 for George W. Bush’s first four years and 80 for Reagan’s), there is still the reality that the American presidency remains a full-time job that requires something more than glancing attention. Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg, Germany’s former defense minister, described Obama as “probably the most detached President [in] decades.” William Galston, my (liberal) fellow columnist at the Wall Street Journal and a former aide to Bill Clinton, has noted that “this president doesn’t seem to be as curious about the processes of government—whether the legislative process or the implementation process or the administrative or bureaucratic process.”

Even the ordinarily sympathetic Washington press corps has cottoned to the truth about Obama’s style of management. “Former Obama administration officials,” the Washington Post’s Scott Wilson reported last year, “said the president’s inattention to detail has been a frequent source of frustration, leading in some cases to reversals of diplomatic initiatives and other efforts that had been underway for months.”
Should any of this have come as a surprise? Probably not: With Obama, there was always more than a whiff of the overconfident dilettante, so sure of his powers that he could remain supremely comfortable with his own ignorance. His express-elevator ascent from Illinois state senator to U.S. president in the space of just four years didn’t allow much time for maturation or reflection, either. Obama really is, as Bill Clinton is supposed to have said of him, “an amateur.” When it comes to the execution of policy, it shows.
And yet this view also sells Obama short. It should be obvious, but bears repeating, that it is no mean feat to be elected, and reelected, president, whatever other advantages Obama might have enjoyed in his races. In interviews and press conferences, Obama is often verbose and generally self-serving, but he’s also, for the most part, conversant with the issues. He may not be the second coming of Lincoln that groupies like historians Michael Beschloss (who called Obama “probably the smartest guy ever to become president”) or Robert Dallek (who said Obama’s “political mastery is on par with FDR and LBJ”) made him out to be. But neither is he a Sarah Palin, mouthing artless banalities about this great nation of ours, or a Rick Perry, trying, like Otto from A Fish Called Wanda, to remember the middle part. The myth of Obama’s brilliance paradoxically obscures the fact that he’s no fool. The point is especially important to note because the failure of Obama’s foreign policy is not, ultimately, a reflection of his character or IQ. It is the consequence of an ideology.
That ideology is what now goes by the name of progressivism, which has effectively been the dominant (if often disavowed) view of the Democratic Party since George McGovern ran on a “Come Home, America” platform in 1972—and got 37.5 percent of the popular vote. Progressivism believes that the United States must lead internationally by example (especially when it comes to nuclear-arms control); that the U.S. is as much the sinner as it is the sinned against when it comes to our adversaries (remember Mosaddegh?); and that the American interest is best served when it is merged with, or subsumed by, the global interest (ideally in the form of a UN resolution).
“The truth of the matter is that it’s a big world out there, and that as indispensable as we are to try to lead it, there’s still going to be tragedies out there, and there are going to be conflicts, and our job is to make sure to project what’s right, what’s just, and, you know, that we’re building coalitions of like-minded countries and partners in order to advance not only our core security interests, but also the interests of the world as a whole.” Thus did Obama describe his global outlook in an August 2014 press conference.
Above all, progressivism believes that the United States is a country that, in nearly every respect, treads too heavily on the Earth: environmentally, ideologically, militarily, and geopolitically. The goal, therefore, is to reduce America’s footprint; to “retrench,” as the administration would like to think of it, or to retreat, as it might more accurately be called.
To what end? “We are five days away from fundamentally transforming the United States of America,” Obama said on the eve of his election in 2008. If Obama-Care is anything to go by, that fundamental transformation involves a vast expansion of the entitlement state; the growth of federal administrative power at the expense of Congress and the states; the further subordination of private enterprise to government regulation—and, crucially, the end of Pax Americana in favor of some new global dispensation, perhaps UN-led, in which America would cease to be the natural leader and would become instead the largest net contributor. The phrase “nation-building at home” captures the totality of the progressive ambition. Not only does it mean an end to nation-building exercises abroad, but it suggests that an exercise typically attempted on failed states must be put to use on what progressives sometimes see as the biggest failed state of all: the United States.
That, at any rate, is the theory. Practice has proved to be a different story. If the United States were to go into retreat, to turn inward for the sake of building some new social democracy, just what would take the place of Pax Americana abroad? On this point, Obama has struggled to give an answer. “People are anxious,” he acknowledged at a fundraiser in Seattle in July:

Now, some of that has to do with some big challenges overseas…Part of people’s concern is just the sense that around the world the old order isn’t holding and we’re not quite yet to where we need to be in terms of a new order that’s based on a different set of principles, that’s based on a sense of common humanity, that’s based on economies that work for all people.

A new order that’s based on a different set of principles: Just what could that new order be? In the absence of a single dominant power, capable and willing to protect its friends and deter its foes, there are three conceivable models of global organization. First, a traditional balance-of-power system of the kind that briefly flourished in Europe in the 19th century. Second, “collective security” under the supervision of an organization like the League of Nations or the United Nations. Third, the liberal-democratic peace advocated, or predicted, by the likes of Immanuel Kant, Norman Angell, and Francis Fukuyama.

Yet, with the qualified exception of the liberal-democratic model, each of these systems wound up collapsing of its own weight—precisely the reason Dean Acheson, Harry Truman, Winston Churchill, and the other postwar statesmen “present at the creation” understood the necessity of the Truman Doctrine, the Atlantic Alliance, containment, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, and all the rest of the institutional and ideological architecture of America’s post–World War II leadership. These were men who knew that isolationism, global-disarmament pledges, international law, or any other principle based on “common humanity” could provide no lasting security against ambitious dictatorships and conniving upstarts. The only check against disorder and anarchy was order and power. The only hope that order and power would be put to the right use was to make sure that a preponderance of power lay in safe, benign, and confident hands.
In 1945 the only hands that fit that description were American. It remains true today—even more so, given the slow-motion economic and strategic collapse of Europe. Yet here was Obama, blithely proposing to substitute Pax Americana with an as-yet-unnamed and undefined formula for the maintenance of global order. Little wonder that leaders in Tehran, Beijing, and Moscow quickly understood that, with Obama in the White House, they had a rare opportunity to reshape and revise regional arrangements in a manner more to their liking. Iran is doing so today in southern Iraq, Lebanon, and Syria. Beijing is extending its reach in the South and East China Sea. Russia is intervening in Ukraine. It’s no accident that, while acting independently from one another, they are all acting now. The next American president might not be so cavalier about challenges to the global status quo, or about enforcing his (or her) own red lines. Better to move while they can.
Then again, the next American president might not have options of the sort that Obama enjoyed when he took office in 2009. By 2017, the U.S. military will be an increasingly hollow force, with the Army as small as it was in 1940, before conscription; a Navy the size it was in 1917, before our entry into World War I; an Air Force flying the oldest—and smallest—fleet of planes in its history; and a nuclear arsenal no larger than it was during the Truman administration.
By 2017, too, the Middle East is likely to have been remade, though exactly how is difficult to say. As I write, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, which had seized eastern Syria and most of Anbar Province in Iraq in June, is now encroaching simultaneously into Lebanon and Iraq’s Kurdish regions. It is too soon to tell what kind of nuclear deal the West will strike with Iran—assuming it strikes any deal at all. But after years of prevarication on one side and self-deceit on the other, the likeliest outcomes are that a) Iran will get a bomb; b) Iran will be allowed to remain within a screw’s twist of a bomb; or c) Israel will be forced, at great risk to itself, to go to war to prevent a) or b) because the United States would not do the job. As for Asia and our supposed pivot, a comment this spring by Assistant Secretary of Defense Katrina McFarland could not have been lost on Chinese—or, for that matter, Japanese—ears. “Right now,” she said, “the ‘pivot’ is being looked at again because candidly it can’t happen.” There just aren’t enough ships.
And these are just the predictable consequences of the path we’ve been taking under Obama. What happens if there’s more bad news in store? If Vladimir Putin were to invade one, or all, of the Baltic states tomorrow, there is little short of nuclear war that NATO could do to stop him, and the alliance would stand exposed as the shell it has already become. Or, to take another no-longer-implausible scenario, is it inconceivable that Saudi Arabia, unhappy as it is over the Obama administration’s outreach toward Tehran, might choose to pursue its own nuclear options? The Saudis are already widely believed to own a piece of Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal; why not test one of the weapons somewhere in the Saudi desert as a warning shot to Tehran, and perhaps to Washington also?
Or how about this: What if inflation in the United States prompts the Federal Reserve finally to raise interest rates in a major way? What effect would that have on commodity-dependent emerging markets? And what if the crisis in the Eurozone isn’t over at all, and a second deep recession brings a neo-fascist such as Marine Le Pen to power in France? The depressions of the 1920s and ’30s were caused, not least, by America’s original retreat from the world after it soured on international politics and the promise of global democracy. Now Obama is sounding the same retreat, for many of the same reasons, and probably with the same consequences.
In a prescient 2004 essay in Foreign Policy, the historian Niall Ferguson warned that “the alternative to [American] unipolarity” would not be some kind of reasonably tolerable world order. It would, he said, “be apolarity—a global vacuum of power.” “If the United States retreats from global hegemony—its fragile self-image dented by minor setbacks on the imperial frontier—its critics at home and abroad must not pretend that they are ushering in a new era of multipolar harmony, or even a return to the good old balance of power. Be careful what you wish for.”
For nearly 250 years it has been America’s great fortune to have always found just the right leadership in the nick of time. Or perhaps that’s not quite accurate: It has, rather, been our way first to sleepwalk toward crisis and catastrophe, then to rouse ourselves when it is almost too late. As things stand now, by 2017 it will be nearly too late. Who sees a Lincoln, or a Truman, or a Reagan on the horizon?
Still, we should not lose hope. We may be foolish, but our enemies, however aggressive and ill-intended, are objectively weak. We may be a nation in deliberate retreat, but at least we are not—at least not yet—in inexorable decline. Two years ago, Obama was considered a foreign-policy success story. Not many people entertain that illusion now; the tide of public opinion, until recently so dull and vociferous in its opposition to “neocons,” is beginning to shift as Americans understand that a policy of inaction also has its price. Americans are once again prepared to hear the case against retreat. What’s needed are the spokesmen, and spokeswomen, who will make it.
Since I am writing these words on the centenary of the First World War, it seems appropriate to close with a line from the era. At the battle of the Marne, with Germany advancing on Paris, General Ferdinand Foch sent the message that would rally the French army to hold its ground. “My center is yielding. My right is retreating. Situation excellent. I am attacking.” Words to remember and live by in this new era of headlong American retreat.

About the Author

Bret Stephens is the foreign-affairs columnist and deputy editorial-page editor of the Wall Street Journal. In 2013 he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize. His first book, America in Retreat: The New Isolationism and the Coming Global Disorder will be published by Sentinel in November.

class= »ecxp1″ style= »text-align: justify; »>Voir aussi:

Obama’s Endless Vacation
In the 1990s, America had a holiday from history. Today, it has a president on holiday
Matthew Continetti
National Review
August 23, 2014

The headline was brutal. “Bam’s Golf War: Prez tees off as Foley’s parents grieve,” read the cover of Thursday’s New York Daily News. Obama’s gaffe was this: He had denounced the beheading of James Foley from a vacation spot in Martha’s Vineyard, then went to the golf course. Seems like he had a great time. Such a great time that he returned to the Farm Neck Golf Club — sorry, membership is full — the next day.

Technically, Obama’s vacation began on August 9. It is scheduled to end on Sunday, August 24. With the exception of a two-day interlude in D.C., it has been two weeks of golf, jazz, biking, beach going, dining out, celebrating, and sniping from critics, not all of them conservative, who are unnerved by the president’s taking time off at a moment of peril.

Attacking the president for vacation is usually the job of the out party. But these days it is the job of all parties. Ukraine, Syria, Iraq, the Islamic State, Ebola, child migrants on the border, racial strife in Ferguson, an American murdered by the caliphate — critics say the president who danced to every song at Ann Jordan’s birthday partyseems remote and aloof from, and even mildly annoyed by, such concerns.

I disagree. Not with the judgment that Obama is detached, dialing it in, contemptuous of events that interfere with his plans. I disagree with the idea that this August has been different, in any meaningful way, from the rest of Obama’s second term. For this president, the distinction between “time off” and “time on” is meaningless. For this president, every day is a vacation. And has been for some time. He is like Cosmo Kramer of Seinfeld. “His whole life is a fantasy camp,” George Costanza says of his friend. “People should plunk down $2,000 to live like him for a week.” Imagine what they would pay to live like Obama.

Uncomfortable with all of the golf on Martha’s Vineyard? It is but a fraction of Obama’s habit. Since 2009, the president has played more than 185 rounds, typically with Wall Street cronies such as Robert Wolf and sports celebrities such as Alonzo Mourning, Tony Kornheiser, and Michael Wilbon. So devoted to golf is Obama that he wears Game Golf, which tracks how well a golfer shoots. Game Golf is not something you wear as a lark. You use it to study and hone your game. The hours on the course are just the start; there are also the hours spent analyzing results at home. Obama is not golfing like an amateur. He’s golfing like a man who wants to join the PGA tour.

While on vacation, the Obamas dined at Atria, where the cioppino costs $42 and sides include olive-oil-whipped potatoes and truffle parmesan fries. But fine dining is not something the Obamas limit to the beach. They are foodies, patronizing the best restaurants in Chicago, D.C., Old Town, New York, Key Largo, and Los Angeles. I have been to some of these restaurants; the president has great taste. Recently, as part of his “bear is loose” shtick, he has visited sandwich places, bars, and coffee shops. He meets the public, he becomes associated with a fashionable locale, and he spends a few dollars on small businesses. It’s a good thing. Here, at last, is an Obama initiative that does not harm the economy.

Good food is not a luxury for Obama. It is a staple. Before the president departed for Martha’s Vineyard, he shared a limo ride with the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey. The general explained to the president the situation in Iraq. He warned of horrible consequences for the Yazidis, for Iraq, and for the United States if the jihadists conquered Mount Sinjar and took Erbil. Obama decided to meet with his national-security team. The presidential limo was diverted. Guess where it had been going. “The Italian dinner in Georgetown with Michelle Obama would have to wait,” Politico reported.

Think two weeks in Martha’s Vineyard sends the wrong message? On July 31, Katy Perry performed at the White House. She was there to celebrate the Special Olympics — a worthy cause. But the same standard applies. If cutting loose in Martha’s Vineyard while the Islamic State is rampaging abroad is “bad optics,” so is hosting a teenage dream while, in the words of Chuck Hagel, the “Middle East is blowing up.” “Propriety” is not a word one associates with Katy Perry. The refrain of her latest hit: “So let me get you in your birthday suit / It’s time to bring out the big balloons.” She’s not talking about party favors.

Voir également:

Is Obama Still President?
His cadences soar on, through scandal after fiasco after disaster
Victor Davis Hanson
October 29, 2013

We are currently learning whether the United States really needs a president. Barack Obama has become a mere figurehead, who gives speeches few listen to any more, issues threats that scare fewer, and makes promises that almost no one believes he will keep. Yet America continues on, despite the fact that the foreign and domestic policies of Barack Obama are unraveling, in a manner unusual even for star-crossed presidential second terms.

Abroad, American policy in the Middle East is leaderless and in shambles after the Arab Spring — we’ve had the Syrian fiasco and bloodbath, leading from behind in Libya all the way to Benghazi, and the non-coup, non-junta in Egypt. This administration has managed to unite existential Shiite and Sunni enemies in a shared dislike of the United States. While Iran follows the Putin script from Syria, Israel seems ready to preempt its nuclear program, and Obama still mumbles empty “game changers” and “red line” threats of years past.

We have gone from reset with Russia to Putin as the playmaker of the Middle East. The Persian Gulf sheikhdoms are now mostly anti-American. The leaders of Germany and the people of France resent having their private communications tapped by Barack Obama — the constitutional lawyer and champion of universal human rights. Angela Merkel long ago grasped that President Obama would rather fly across the Atlantic to lobby for a Chicago Olympic Games — or tap her phone — than sit through a 20th-anniversary commemoration of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan are beginning to see that the U.S. is more a neutral than a friend, as Obama negotiates with Putin about reducing the nuclear umbrella that protects America’s key non-nuclear allies. Perhaps they will soon make the necessary adjustments. China, Brazil, and India care little that Barack Obama still insists he is not George W. Bush, or that he seems to be trying to do to America what they seek to undo in their own countries.

The world’s leaders do not any longer seem much impressed by the president’s cat-like walk down the steps of Air Force One, or the soaring cadences that rechannel hope-and=change themes onto the world scene. They acknowledge that their own publics may like the American president, and especially his equivocation about the traditional role of American power in the world. But otherwise, for the next three years, the world is in a holding pattern, wondering whether there is a president of the United States to reckon with or a mere teleprompted functionary. Certainly, the Obama Nobel Peace Prize is now the stuff of comedy.

At home, the signature Affordable Care Act is proving its sternest critics prescient. The mess can best be summed up by Republicans’ being demonized for trying to delay or defund Obamacare — after the president himself chose not to implement elements of his own law — followed immediately by congressional Democrats’ seeking to parrot the Republicans. So are the Democrats followers of Ted Cruz or Barack Obama? Is Obama himself following Ted Cruz?

The problem is not just that all the president’s serial assurances about Obamacare proved untrue — premiums and deductibles will go up, many will lose their coverage and their doctors, new taxes will be needed, care will be curtailed, signups are nearly impossible, and businesses will be less, not more, competitive — but that no one should ever have believed they could possibly be true unless in our daily lives we usually get more and better stuff at lower cost.

More gun control is dead. Comprehensive immigration legislation depends on Republicans’ trusting a president who for two weeks smeared his House opponents as hostage-takers and house-breakers. Moreover, just as no one really read the complete text of the Obamacare legislation, so too no one quite knows what is in the immigration bill. There are few assurances that the border will be first secured under an administration with a record of nullifying “settled law” — or that those who have been convicted of crimes or have been long-time recipients of state or federal assistance will not be eligible for eventual citizenship. If the employer mandate was jettisoned, why would not border security be dropped once a comprehensive immigration bill passed? Or for that matter, if it is not passed, will the president just issue a blanket amnesty anyway?

 Voir encore:

Obama’s Made-for-TV Worldview
In real life, Mr. President, the good guys don’t automatically win.
Jonah Goldberg
National review
August 22, 2014

Does the president think the world is a TV show?

One of the things you learn watching television as a kid is that the hero wins. No matter how dire things look, the star is going to be okay. MacGyver always defuses the bomb with some saltwater taffy before the timer reaches zero. There was no way Fonzie was going to mess up his water-ski jump and get devoured by sharks.

Life doesn’t actually work like that. That’s one reason HBO’s Game of Thrones is so compelling. Despite being set in an absurd fantasy world of giants, dragons, and ice zombies, it’s more realistic than a lot of dramas set in a more plausible universe in at least one regard. Heroes die. The good guys get beaten by more committed and ruthless bad guys. No one is safe, nothing is guaranteed. There is no iron law of the universe that says good will ultimately triumph.

President Obama often says otherwise.

In his mostly admirable remarks about the beheading of American journalist James Foley by the jihadists of the so-called “Islamic State,” Obama returned to two of his favorite rhetorical themes: 1) the idea that in the end the good guys win simply because they are good, and 2) that world opinion is a wellspring of great moral authority.

Obama invokes the “right side of history” constantly, not only that such a thing exists but that he knows what it is and actually speaks for it as well. Perhaps his favorite quote comes from Martin Luther King Jr.: “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

As for world opinion, particularly in the form of that global shmoo the “international community,” there’s apparently nothing it can’t do. It is the secret to “leading from behind.” Behind what, you ask? The international community. What is the international community? The thing we’re leading from behind. From Russia to Syria, Iran to North Korea, the president is constantly calling on the international community to do something he is unwilling to do. When Russia was carving Crimea away from Ukraine, Obama vowed that “the United States will stand with the international community in affirming that there will be costs for any military intervention in Ukraine.” After pro-Russian forces shot down a civilian plane over Ukraine, and as Russia lined up troops for a possible invasion, Obama sternly warned that Russia “will only further isolate itself from the international community.”

Taken together, these two ideas — that everything will work out in the long run, and that there’s some entity other than the U.S. that will take care of things — provide a license to do, well, if not nothing, then certainly nothing that might detract from your golf game.

“One thing we can all agree on,” the president said in his statement Wednesday, “is that a group like ISIL has no place in the 21st century.” The jihadists will “ultimately fail . . . because the future is won by those who build and not destroy. The world is shaped by people like Jim Foley and the overwhelming majority of humanity who are appalled by those who killed him.”

It’s a very nice thought. But is it actually true? The jihadists are building something. They call it the Caliphate, and in a remarkably short amount of time they’ve made enormous progress. If I had to bet, I’d guess that they will ultimately fail, but it will be because someone actually takes the initiative and destroys — as in kills — those trying to build it. Until that happens, there will be more beheadings, more enslaved girls, more mass graves. Obama has been very slow to learn this lesson.

Perhaps this is because there’s a deep-seated faith within progressivism that holds that the mere passage of time drives moral evolution. As if simply tearing pages from your calendar improves the world. It is as faith-based as saying evil will not stand because God will not let it, and far, far less effective at rallying men of goodwill to fight. No doubt some people will face death to defend an arbitrary date, but not many.

Sometimes lazy TV writers will resort to what is called a deus ex machina, a godlike intervention or stroke of luck that saves the day and ensures a happy ending. But in real life, as in Game of Thrones, that doesn’t happen. The good guys get beheaded while scanning the horizon for a savior more concrete than world opinion and more powerful than a date on the calendar.

— Jonah Goldberg is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and editor-at-large of National Review Online. You can write to him by e-mail at goldbergcolumn@gmail.com or via Twitter @JonahNRO. © 2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

Voir enfin:

Obama, un si mauvais Président ?
Guy Sorman
Le futur, c’est tout de suite
L’Hebdo
22.08.2014

Le Président Barack Obama est désormais plus populaire en Europe qu’aux États-Unis. De ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, nous restons fascinés par l’élégance, le cool et l’aura du premier couple Noir à la Maison Blanche, mais nous n’en subissons pas, pas directement, les retombées politiques. Le désamour des Américains ne s’explique pas que par l’usure du pouvoir – après six ans de mandat – mais par une déception certaine, un écart béant entre la promesse initiale et des résultats insaisissables. À quelques semaines du renouvellement du Congrès où Barack Obama devrait perdre sa majorité au Sénat après l’avoir perdue, il y a deux ans, à la Chambre des représentants, il est remarquable que les candidats Démocrates ne se réclament surtout pas d’Obama et ne sollicitent pas son soutien. Hillary Clinton, candidate à la succession après six ans de fidélité inconditionnelle, vient de marquer ses distances en dénonçant la vacuité de la diplomatie américaine. Nul doute qu’Obama restera, quoi qu’il fasse, le premier Président noir – mais pas véritablement afro-américain – des États-Unis : il est envisageable qu’il n’en restera pas grand-chose de plus. Ce jugement commun aux États-Unis, est-il injuste ? Probablement oui parce qu’il repose sur une surestimation de ce que peut véritablement tout Président. La Constitution américaine a été délibérément conçue pour ficeler le pouvoir exécutif dans mille liens qui cantonnent sa liberté d’agir. Ce décalage entre l’image de l’homme le plus puissant de la planète et sa faculté d’agir ne peut que frustrer les attentes : exactement ce que souhaitent les pères fondateurs des États-Unis. Quand le Président n’est pas modeste – et Obama n’est pas modeste, contrairement à Ronald Reagan qui le fut – les Américains et le reste du monde comprennent d’autant plus  mal le gouffre entre des annonces tonitruantes et des résultats insignifiants. L’extension de l’assurance maladie obligatoire à tous les Américains qui devait être une révolution sociale, a ainsi accouché d’une souris bureaucratique parce qu’Obama avait promis à tous ce qu’il ne pouvait pas garantir : les Américains à revenus modestes sont un peu moins inégaux face à la maladie, mais ils le restent néanmoins.

La sortie de crise, après le krach financier de 2008, était l’autre priorité intérieure de Barack Obama : la croissance est restaurée, le plein emploi l’est quasiment, mais les Américains n’en sont pas trop reconnaissants au Président. De fait, le mérite en revient aux entrepreneurs innovants, à la politique monétaire de la Banque fédérale (peut-être) mais Obama a plutôt retardé la reprise par des augmentations d’impôts, par des réglementations nouvelles (pour protéger la Nature), par ses tergiversations sur l’exploitation des ressources énergétiques, du gaz de schiste en particulier. Peu versé en économie, Barack Obama est certainement le plus anti-capitaliste de tous les présidents américains dans une société dont le capitalisme reste le moteur incontesté sauf par quelques universitaires socialistes et marginaux.

Il reste la politique étrangère où le Président dispose, au contraire de l’économie et des affaires sociales (qui sont plutôt de compétence locale), d’une grande latitude. Élu, il le rappelle incessamment, pour terminer deux guerres et ramener les troupes « à la maison », il a tenu parole. Il a également reflété le sentiment qui régnait au début de son mandat, d’une lassitude des Américains envers les aventures extérieures. Mais en six ans, les circonstances ont profondément changé, en Mer de Chine, au Proche-Orient, en Ukraine, Obama n’en a tenu aucun compte, comme prisonnier de son image pacifiste, et décidé à le rester alors même que son pacifisme est interprété par tous les ennemis de la démocratie comme un aveu de pusillanimité. Du pacifisme, Obama aura basculé dans l’irréalisme, dénoncé par Hillary Clinton : l’incapacité idéologique d’Obama de reconnaître que l’armée américaine, nolens volens, est le policier du monde. Le policier peut s’avérer maladroit – George Bush le fut – habile comme l’avait démontré Ronald Reagan, médiocre comme le fut Bill Clinton, mais il ne peut pas s’abstenir. S’il renonce, à la Obama, le Djihad conquiert, la Russie annexe, la Chine menace. La majorité des Américains, les déçus de l’Obamania ont aujourd’hui compris que le pacifiste avait les mains blanches mais qu’il n’avait pas de mains.

Le Président Truman se moquait des juristes qui le conseillaient en pesant le pour et le contre : « on one hand, on the other hand ». Il était heureux, commentait Truman, que ces juristes n’avaient pas trois mains. Il ne pouvait imaginer qu’Obama aurait cette troisième main, une remarquable capacité d’analyser et une tout aussi remarquable faculté de ne rien décider. Obama, au total, n’est peut-être qu’une image virtuelle : il a été élu sur une photo retouchée, la sienne, sur un slogan (Yes we can), sur un mythe (la réconciliation des peuples, des civilisations), sur une absence de doctrine caractéristique de sa génération pour qui tout est l’équivalent de rien, et grâce à l’influence décisive des réseaux sociaux. Barack Obama est de notre temps, un reflet de l’époque : ce qui le condamne à l’insuffisance.


Mort de Simon Leys: Hommage aux hérissons rusés ! (The worst way to be wrong: Looking back at an intellectual by any other name)

25 août, 2014
Sa vigilance nous manque déjà. Sartre (à la mort de Gide)
On ne sait pas si le président russe, Vladimir Poutine, où l’un de ses subordonnés, a donné l’ordre de faire sauter en vol le Boeing 777 de la Malaysia Airlines. Mais il y a déjà cinq fois plus de civils innocents massacrés à Gaza, ceux-là soigneusement ciblés et sur l’ordre direct d’un gouvernement. Les sanctions de l’Union européenne contre Israël restent au niveau zéro. L’annexion de la Crimée russophone déclenche indignation et sanctions. Celle de la Jérusalem arabophone nous laisserait impavides ? Peut-on à la fois condamner M. Poutine et absoudre M. Nétanyahou ? Encore deux poids deux mesures ? Nous avons condamné les conflits interarabes et intermusulmans qui ensanglantent et décomposent le Moyen-Orient. Ils font plus de victimes locales que la répression israélienne. Mais la particularité de l’affaire israélo-palestinienne est qu’elle concerne et touche à l’identité des millions d’Arabes et musulmans, des millions de chrétiens et Occidentaux, des millions de juifs dispersés dans le monde. Ce conflit apparemment local est de portée mondiale et de ce fait a déjà suscité ses métastases dans le monde musulman, le monde juif, le monde occidental. Il a réveillé et amplifié anti-judaïsme, anti-arabisme, anti-christianisme (les croisés) et répandu des incendies de haine dans tous les continents. (…) N’ayant guère d’accointances avec les actuels présidents du Conseil et de la Commission européens, ce n’est pas vers ces éminentes et sagaces personnalités que nous nous tournons mais vers vous, François Hollande, pour qui nous avons voté et qui ne nous êtes pas inconnu. C’est de vous que nous sommes en droit d’attendre une réponse urgente et déterminée face à ce carnage, comme à la systématisation des punitions collectives en Cisjordanie même. Les appels pieux ne suffisent pas plus que les renvois dos à dos qui masquent la terrible disproportion de forces entre colonisateurs et colonisés depuis quarante-sept ans. L’écrivain et dissident russe Alexandre Soljenitsyne (1918-2008) demandait aux dirigeants soviétiques une seule chose : « Ne mentez pas. » Quand on ne peut résister à la force, on doit au moins résister au mensonge. Ne vous et ne nous mentez pas, monsieur le Président. On doit toujours regretter la mort de militaires en opération, mais quand les victimes sont des civils, femmes et enfants sans défense qui n’ont plus d’eau à boire, non pas des occupants mais des occupés, et non des envahisseurs mais des envahis, il ne s’agit plus d’implorer mais de sommer au respect du droit international. (…) Nous n’oublions pas les chrétiens expulsés d’Irak et les civils assiégés d’Alep. Mais à notre connaissance, vous n’avez jamais chanté La Vie en rose en trinquant avec l’autocrate de Damas ou avec le calife de Mossoul comme on vous l’a vu faire sur nos écrans avec le premier ministre israélien au cours d’un repas familial. (…) Israël se veut défenseur d’un Occident ex-persécuteur de juifs, dont il est un héritier pour le meilleur et pour le pire. Il se dit défenseur de la démocratie, qu’il réserve pleinement aux seuls juifs, et se prétend ennemi du racisme tout en se rapprochant d’un apartheid pour les Arabes. L’école stoïcienne recommandait de distinguer, parmi les événements du monde, entre les choses qui dépendent de nous et celles qui ne dépendent pas de nous. On ne peut guère agir sur les accidents d’avion et les séismes – et pourtant vous avez personnellement pris en main le sort et le deuil des familles des victimes d’une catastrophe aérienne au Mali. C’est tout à votre honneur. A fortiori, un homme politique se doit de monter en première ligne quand les catastrophes humanitaires sont le fait de décisions politiques sur lesquelles il peut intervenir, surtout quand les responsables sont de ses amis ou alliés et qu’ils font partie des Nations unies, sujets aux mêmes devoirs et obligations que les autres Etats. La France n’est-elle pas un membre permanent du Conseil de sécurité ? Ce ne sont certes pas des Français qui sont directement en cause ici, c’est une certaine idée de la France dont vous êtes comptable, aux yeux de vos compatriotes comme du reste du monde. Rony Brauman, Régis Debray, Edgar Morin et Christiane Hessel
Puisqu’ils ont osé, j’oserai aussi, moi. La vérité, je la dirai, car j’ai promis de la dire, si la justice, régulièrement saisie, ne la faisait pas, pleine et entière. Mon devoir est de parler, je ne veux pas être complice. Mes nuits seraient hantées par le spectre de l’innocent qui expie là-bas, dans la plus affreuse des tortures, un crime qu’il n’a pas commis. (…) C’est un crime d’avoir accusé de troubler la France ceux qui la veulent généreuse, à la tête des nations libres et justes, lorsqu’on ourdit soi-même l’impudent complot d’imposer l’erreur, devant le monde entier. C’est un crime d’égarer l’opinion, d’utiliser pour une besogne de mort cette opinion qu’on a pervertie jusqu’à la faire délirer. C’est un crime d’empoisonner les petits et les humbles, d’exaspérer les passions de réaction et d’intolérance, en s’abritant derrière l’odieux antisémitisme, dont la grande France libérale des droits de l’homme mourra, si elle n’en est pas guérie. C’est un crime que d’exploiter le patriotisme pour des œuvres de haine, et c’est un crime, enfin, que de faire du sabre le dieu moderne, lorsque toute la science humaine est au travail pour l’œuvre prochaine de vérité et de justice. (…) Je le répète avec une certitude plus véhémente : la vérité est en marche et rien ne l’arrêtera.  (…) Je l’ai dit ailleurs, et je le répète ici : quand on enferme la vérité sous terre, elle s’y amasse, elle y prend une force telle d’explosion, que, le jour où elle éclate, elle fait tout sauter avec elle. On verra bien si l’on ne vient pas de préparer, pour plus tard, le plus retentissant des désastres. Emile Zola (J’accuse, 1898)
Chaque jour j’attache moins de prix à l’intelligence. Chaque jour je me rends mieux compte que ce n’est qu’en dehors d’elle que l’écrivain peut ressaisir quelque chose de nos impressions passées, c’est-à-dire atteindre quelque chose de lui-même et la seule matière de l’art. (…) Mais d’une part les vérités de l’intelligence, si elles sont moins précieuses que ces secrets du sentiment dont je parlais tout à l’heure, ont aussi leur intérêt. Un écrivain n’est pas qu’un poète. Même les plus grands de notre siècle, dans notre monde imparfait où les chefs-d’œuvre de l’art ne sont que les épaves naufragées de grandes intelligences, ont relié d’une trame d’intelligence les joyaux de sentiment où ils n’apparaissent que çà et là. Et si on croit que sur ce point important on entend les meilleurs de son temps se tromper, il vient un moment où on secoue sa paresse et où on éprouve le besoin de le dire. La méthode de Sainte-Beuve n’est peut-être pas au premier abord un objet si important. Mais peut-être sera-t-on amené, au cours de ces pages, à voir qu’elle touche à de très importants problèmes intellectuels, peut-être au plus grand de tous pour un artiste, à cette infériorité de l’intelligence dont je parlais au commencement. Et cette infériorité de l’intelligence, c’est tout de même à l’intelligence qu’il faut demander de l’établir. Car si l’intelligence ne mérite pas la couronne suprême, c’est elle seule qui est capable de la décerner. Et si elle n’a dans la hiérarchie des vertus que la seconde place, il n’y a qu’elle qui soit capable de proclamer que l’instinct doit occuper la première. Marcel Proust (préface de  « Contre Sainte Beuve », édition posthume, 1954)
Les hommes dont la fonction est de défendre les valeurs éternelles et désintéressées, comme la justice et la raison, que j’appelle les clercs, ont trahi fonction au profit d’intérêts pratiques. Julien Benda (La Trahison des clercs, 1927)
Cherchant à expliquer l’attitude des intellectuels, impitoyables aux défaillances des démocraties, indulgents aux plus grands crimes, pourvu qu’ils soient commis au nom des bonnes doctrines, je rencontrai d’abord les mots sacrés : gauche, Révolution, prolétariat. Raymond Aron
Si la tolérance naît du doute, qu’on enseigne à douter des modèles et des utopies, à récuser les prophètes de salut, les annonciateurs de catastrophes. Appelons de nos vœux la venue des sceptiques s’ils doivent éteindre le fanatisme. Raymond Aron (L’Opium des intellectuels, 1955)
L’écrivain est en situation dans son époque : chaque parole a des retentissements. Chaque silence aussi. Je tiens Flaubert et Goncourt pour responsables de la répression qui suivit la Commune parce qu’ils n’ont pas écrit une ligne pour l’empêcher. Ce n’était pas leur affaire, dira-t-on. Mais le procès de Calas, était-ce l’affaire de Voltaire ? La condamnation de Dreyfus, était-ce l’affaire de Zola ? L’administration du Congo, était-ce l’affaire de Gide ? Chacun de ces auteurs, en une circonstance particulière de sa vie, a mesuré sa responsabilité d’écrivain.  Sartre
Intellectuels : personnes qui ayant acquis quelque notoriété par des travaux qui relèvent de l’intelligence abusent de cette notoriété pour sortir de leur domaine  et se mêler de ce qui ne les regarde pas. Jean-Paul Sartre
Cette violence irrépressible il le montre parfaitement, n’est pas une absurde tempête ni la résurrection d’instincts sauvages ni même un effet du ressentiment : c’est l’homme lui-même se recomposant. Cette vérité, nous l’avons sue, je crois, et nous l’avons oubliée : les marques de la violence, nulle douceur ne les effacera : c’est la violence qui peut seule les détruire. Et le colonisé se guérit de la névrose coloniale en chassant le colon par les armes. Quand sa rage éclate, il retrouve sa transparence perdue, il se connaît dans la mesure même où il se fait ; de loin nous tenons sa guerre comme le triomphe de la barbarie ; mais elle procède par elle-même à l’émancipation progressive du combattant, elle liquide en lui et hors de lui, progressivement, les ténèbres coloniales. Dès qu’elle commence, elle est sans merci. Il faut rester terrifié ou devenir terrible ; cela veut dire : s’abandonner aux dissociations d’une vie truquée ou conquérir l’unité natale. Quand les paysans touchent des fusils, les vieux mythes pâlissent, les interdits sont un à un renversés : l’arme d’un combattant, c’est son humanité. Car, en ce premier temps de la révolte, il faut tuer : abattre un Européen c’est faire d’une pierre deux coups, supprimer en même temps un oppresseur et un opprimé : restent un homme mort et un homme libre ; le survivant, pour la première fois, sent un sol national sous la plante de ses pieds. Sartre (préface aux damnés de la terre, 1961)
J’ai résumé L’Étranger, il y a longtemps, par une phrase dont je reconnais qu’elle est très paradoxale : “Dans notre société tout homme qui ne pleure pas à l’enterrement de sa mère risque d’être condamné à mort.” Je voulais dire seulement que le héros du livre est condamné parce qu’il ne joue pas le jeu. En ce sens, il est étranger à la société où il vit, où il erre, en marge, dans les faubourgs de la vie privée, solitaire, sensuelle. Et c’est pourquoi des lecteurs ont été tentés de le considérer comme une épave. On aura cependant une idée plus exacte du personnage, plus conforme en tout cas aux intentions de son auteur, si l’on se demande en quoi Meursault ne joue pas le jeu. La réponse est simple : il refuse de mentir. (…) Meursault, pour moi, n’est donc pas une épave, mais un homme pauvre et nu, amoureux du soleil qui ne laisse pas d’ombres. Loin qu’il soit privé de toute sensibilité, une passion profonde parce que tenace, l’anime : la passion de l’absolu et de la vérité. Il s’agit d’une vérité encore négative, la vérité d’être et de sentir, mais sans laquelle nulle conquête sur soi et sur le monde ne sera jamais possible. On ne se tromperait donc pas beaucoup en lisant, dans L’Étranger, l’histoire d’un homme qui, sans aucune attitude héroïque, accepte de mourir pour la vérité. Il m’est arrivé de dire aussi, et toujours paradoxalement, que j’avais essayé de figurer, dans mon personnage, le seul Christ que nous méritions. On comprendra, après mes explications, que je l’aie dit sans aucune intention de blasphème et seulement avec l’affection un peu ironique qu’un artiste a le droit d’éprouver à l’égard des personnages de sa création. Camus (préface américaine à L’Etranger)
Le thème du poète maudit né dans une société marchande (…) s’est durci dans un préjugé qui finit par vouloir qu’on ne puisse être un grand artiste que contre la société de son temps, quelle qu’elle soit. Légitime à l’origine quand il affirmait qu’un artiste véritable ne pouvait composer avec le monde de l’argent, le principe est devenu faux lorsqu’on en a tiré qu’un artiste ne pouvait s’affirmer qu’en étant contre toute chose en général. Albert Camus
Le besoin de se justifier hante toute la littérature moderne du «procès». Mais il y a plusieurs niveaux de conscience. Ce qu’on appelle le «mythe» du procès peut être abordé sous des angles radicalement différents. Dans L’Etranger, la seule question est de savoir si les personnages sont innocents ou coupables. Le criminel est innocent et les juges coupables. Dans la littérature traditionnelle, le criminel est généralement coupable et les juges innocents. La différence n’est pas aussi importante qu’il le semble. Dans les deux cas, le Bien et le Mal sont des concepts figés, immuables : on conteste le verdict des juges, mais pas les valeurs sur lesquelles il repose. La Chute va plus loin. Clamence s’efforce de démontrer qu’il est du côté du bien et les autres du côté du mal, mais les échelles de valeurs auxquelles il se réfère s’effondrent une à une. Le vrai problème n’est plus de savoir «qui est innocent et qui est coupable?», mais «pourquoi faut-il continuer à juger et à être jugé?». C’est là une question plus intéressante, celle-là même qui préoccupait Dostoïevski. Avec La Chute, Camus élève la littérature du procès au niveau de son génial prédécesseur. Le Camus des premières oeuvres ne savait pas à quel point le jugement est un mal insidieux et difficile à éviter. Il se croyait en-dehors du jugement parce qu’il condamnait ceux qui condamnent. En utilisant la terminologie de Gabriel Marcel, on pourrait dire que Camus considérait le Mal comme quelque chose d’extérieur à lui, comme un «problème» qui ne concernait que les juges, alors que Clamence sait bien qu’il est lui aussi concerné. Le Mal, c’est le «mystère» d’une passion qui en condamnant les autres se condamne elle-même sans le savoir. C’est la passion d’Oedipe, autre héros de la littérature du procès, qui profère les malédictions qui le mènent à sa propre perte. […] L’étranger n’est pas en dehors de la société mais en dedans, bien qu’il l’ignore. C’est cette ignorance qui limite la portée de L’Etranger tant au point de vue esthétique qu’au point de vue de la pensée. L’homme qui ressent le besoin d’écrire un roman-procès n’appartient pas à la Méditerranée, mais aux brumes d’Amsterdam. Le monde dans lequel nous vivons est un monde de jugement perpétuel. C’est sans doute le vestige de notre tradition judéo-chrétienne. Nous ne sommes pas de robustes païens, ni des juifs, puisque nous n’avons pas de Loi. Mais nous ne sommes pas non plus de vrais chrétiens puisque nous continuons à juger. Qui sommes-nous? Un chrétien ne peut s’empêcher de penser que la réponse est là, à portée de la main : «Aussi es-tu sans excuse, qui que tu sois, toi qui juges. Car en jugeant autrui, tu juges contre toi-même : puisque tu agis de même, toi qui juges». Camus s’était-il aperçu que tous les thèmes de La Chute sont contenus dans les Epîtres de saint Paul ? […] Meursault était coupable d’avoir jugé, mais il ne le sut jamais. Seul Clamence s’en rendit compte. On peut voir dans ces deux héros deux aspects d’un même personnage dont le destin décrit une ligne qui n’est pas sans rappeler celle des grands personnages de Dostoïevski. » René Girard – Critique dans un souterrain, Pour un nouveau procès de l’Etranger, p.140-142)
Attention, l’Amérique a la rage (…) La science se développe partout au même rythme et la fabrication des bombes est affaire de potentiel industriel. En tuant les Rosenberg, vous avez tout simplement esayé d’arrêter les progrès de la science. Jean-Paul Sartre (« Les animaux malades de la rage », Libération, 22 juin 1953)
Les groupes n’aiment guère ceux qui vendent la mèche, surtout peut-être lorsque la transgression ou la trahison peut se réclamer de leurs valeurs les plus hautes. (…) L’apprenti sorcier qui prend le risque de s’intéresser à la sorcellerie indigène et à ses fétiches, au lieu d’aller chercher sous de lointains tropiques les charmes rassurant d’une magie exotique, doit s’attendre à voir se retourner contre lui la violence qu’il a déchainée. Pierre  Bourdieu
Manet a deux propriétés uniques […] : premièrement, il a rassemblé des choses qui avaient été séparées, et […] c’est une des propriétés universelles des grands fondateurs. […] Et, deuxième propriété, il pousse à la limite les propriétés de chacun de ces éléments constitutifs de l’assemblage qu’il fabrique. Donc, il y a systématicité et passage à la limite. Pierre Bourdieu
Dans la grande maison du symbolique, l´I.T. occupe le palier supérieur parce qu´il a reçu de l´histoire et de l´inconscient collectif le supérieur en charge : la lyre, plus la morale. Position princière. Comme le roi Charles X disait au dauphin, de Chateaubriand venu le visiter en exil à Prague, avec un respect mêlé d´effroi : attention, mon fils, voici « une des puissances de la Terre » . Un magistrat de l´essentiel, qui a « le secret des mots puissants. (…) La capitale, qui excite l´intellectuel, gâte l´artiste. L´iode et la chlorophylle entretiennent les vertus d´enfance ; poètes et enchanteurs, enfants prolongés (c´est un labeur), vieillissent prématurément dans nos bousculades. Calme et silence. Avec son optimisme végétal, Rilke a dit l´essentiel. S´en remettre au lent travail des profondeurs intimes, « laisser mûrir comme l´arbre qui ne précipite pas le cours de sa sève. (…) Quiconque veut se mettre en mesure d´écouter sa musique d´enfance aura tout à gagner à se montrer dur d´oreille aux trompettes et violons qui font frémir les cœurs dans le voisinage. Car il en va des inspirations comme des civilisations : si elles s´ouvrent trop aux autres, elles perdent leur sève et le fil. C´est en quoi l´artiste, au contraire de l´intellectuel, cet être de débat, d´échange ou de collectif, a intérêt, s´il ne veut pas diminuer ses chances, à ne pas trop communiquer avec son époque, le public et les autres artistes. Régis Debray (I.F. suite et fin, 2000)
Il importe de rapporter l’état ultime d’une figure à son état princeps pour déceler ce qui unit et distingue l’I.O. et l’I.T. D’embrasser d’un même trait l’élan, l’inflexion et la chute ; reconnaître la continuité depuis le point de lancement sans déguiser la déconvenue de l’arrivée. L’héritier du nom est à la fois le continuateur du dreyfusard et son contraire. L’I.F. fut un éclaireur, c’est devenu un exorciste. Il accroissait l’intelligibilité, il renchérit sur l’opacité des temps. Il favorisa la prise de distance, il s’applique à resserrer les rangs. Ce fut un futuriste, c’est, tout accrocheur qu’il soit, et volumineux, un déphasé, qui n’aide plus personne à devenir contemporain. Et c’est de lui qu’il faudrait maintenant s’émanciper. Régis Debray (I.F. suite et fin, 2000)
Certes, les attaques faciles où Bourdieu traite Reagan et Bush de « bellâtres de série B », n’étaient pas indispensables… En revanche, quiconque a ressenti la contrainte des rues à angle droit, funestes à toute improvisation, ce commandement totalitaire de sympathie, de familiarité, de véridicité qui rend normal de promettre sur une fiche de douane qu’on ne vient aux Etats-unis ni pour tuer ni pour répandre une infection mortelle, ne peut qu’approuver le diagnostic bourdieusien devant une société déterminée par des principes d’inexorable bienveillance et la conviction de la dichotomie entre logique et éthique. Marie-Anne Lescourret
The idea that art, ethics, and matters of the spirit, including religious faith, come from the same place is central to Leys’s concerns. All his essays, about André Gide or Evelyn Waugh no less than the art of Chinese calligraphy, revolve around this. Leys once described in these pages the destruction of the old walls and gates of Beijing in the 1950s and 1960s as a “sacrilege.” The thick walls surrounding the ancient capital were “not so much a medieval defense apparatus as a depiction of a cosmic geometry, a graphic of the universal order.” Pre-modern Chinese politics were intimately linked with religious beliefs: the ruler was the intermediary between heaven and earth, his empire, if ruled wisely, a reflection of the cosmic order. Classical Beijing, much of it built in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, was deliberately planned to reflect this order. It survived almost intact until the 1950s. Apart from a few pockets, such as the Forbidden City, nothing of this old city remains. Critics over the years have attacked Leys for being an elitist, a Western mimic of Chinese literati, an aesthete who cares more about high culture than people, more about walls and temples than the poor Beijingers who had to live in dark and primitive alleys, oppressed by absolute rulers and feudal superstition. But this misses the point. It was not Leys’s intention to defend the Chinese imperial or feudal system. On the contrary, he lamented the fact that Maoists decided to smash the extraordinary artifacts of the past instead of the attitudes that made feudalism so oppressive in the first place. The stones were destroyed; many of the attitudes, alas, remained, albeit under different rulers. Iconoclasts, not only in China, are as enthralled by the sacred properties of the objects they destroy as those who venerate them. This much we know. But Leys goes further. In his view, Maoists didn’t just reduce the walls of Beijing, and much else besides, to rubble because they believed such acts would liberate the Chinese people; they smashed Yuan and Ming and Qing Dynasty treasures because they were beautiful. Yet beauty, as Leys himself insists, is rarely neutral. His use of the term “sacrilege” suggests that there was more to Maoist iconoclasm than a philistine resentment of architectural magnificence. Leys quotes Guo Moruo, one of the most famous mandarins of the Chinese Communist revolution, on the city walls in Sichuan where the scholar and poet grew up. People approaching a town near Guo’s native village felt a “sense of religious awe when confronted with the severe majestic splendor” of the city gate. Guo notes the rarity of such superb walls outside Sichuan—“except in Peking, of course, where the walls are truly majestic.” Guo was a Communist, but not a vandal. He paid a common price for his love of the wrong kind of beauty. Persecuted during the Cultural Revolution, he was forced to declare that his books were worthless and should be burned. Two of his children were driven to suicide, and Guo had to write odes in praise of Chairman Mao for the rest of the Great Helmsman’s life. The point about the walls is, of course, not merely aesthetic, nostalgic, or even to do with awe. Heinrich Heine’s famous dictum—“Where they burn books, they will ultimately also burn people”—applies to China too. It wasn’t just buildings that were shattered under Chairman Mao, but tens of millions of human lives. In one of his essays, Leys refers to the first Communist decades in China as “thirty years of illiterates’ rule,” which might be construed as snobbish; but the relative lack of education among the top Communist cadres is not actually the main issue for Leys. His targets are never uneducated barbarians, people too ignorant or stupid to know what they are doing. The objects of his devastating and bitterly funny barbs are fellow intellectuals, often fellow academics, most often fellow experts on China, people who faithfully followed every twist and turn of the Chinese Communist Party line, even though they knew better. Such people as the writer Han Suyin, for example, who declared that the Cultural Revolution was a Great Leap Forward for mankind until she observed, once the line had changed, that it had been a terrible disaster. (…) Still, the reasons why Leys finds Orwell attractive might be applied in equal measure to Leys himself: “[Orwell’s] intuitive grasp of concrete realities, his non-doctrinaire approach to politics (accompanied with a deep distrust of left-wing intellectuals) and his sense of the absolute primacy of the human dimension.” Both Orwell and Chesterton were good at demolishing cant. Leys is right about that: “[Chesterton’s] striking images could, in turn, deflate fallacies or vividly bring home complex principles. His jokes were irrefutable; he could invent at lightning speed surprising short-cuts to reach the truth.” When Confucius was asked by one of his disciples what he would do if he were given his own territory to govern, the Master replied that he would “rectify the names,” that is, make words correspond to reality. He explained (in Leys’s translation): If the names are not correct, if they do not match realities, language has no object. If language is without an object, action becomes impossible—and therefore, all human affairs disintegrate and their management becomes pointless. Leys comments that Orwell and Chesterton “would have immediately understood and approved of the idea.” If this reading is right, Confucius wanted to strip the language of cant, and reach the truth through plain speaking, expressing clear thoughts. But Leys believes that he also did more than that: “Under the guise of restoring their full meaning, Confucius actually injected a new content into the old ‘names.’” One example is the interpretation of the word for gentleman, junzi. The old feudal meaning was “aristocrat.” But for Confucius a gentleman’s status could be earned only through education and superior virtue. This was a revolutionary idea; the right to rule would no longer be a matter of birth, but of intellectual and moral accomplishment, tested in an examination system theoretically open to all. (…) To be sure, words are used to obfuscate and lie, as well as to tell the truth. Leys believes that grasping the truth is largely a matter of imagination, poetic imagination. Hence his remark that the “Western incapacity to grasp the Soviet reality and all its Asian variants” was a “failure of imagination” (his italics). Fiction often expresses truth more clearly than mere factual information. Truth, Leys writes, referring to science and philosophy, as well as poetry, “is grasped by an imaginative leap.” The question is how we contrive such leaps. Ian Buruma
Le renard sait beaucoup de choses mais le hérisson une seule grande. Archiloque
Mieux vaut les critiques d’un seul que l’assentiment de mille. Sima Qian
People all know the usefulness of what is useful, but they do not know the usefulness of what is useless. Zhuang Zi
Hamlet was my favourite Shakespearean play. Read in a Chinese labour camp, however, the tragedy of the Danish prince took on unexpected dimensions. All the academic analyses and critiques that had engrossed me over the years now seemed remote and irrelevant. The outcry ‘Denmark is a prison’ echoed with a poignant immediacy and Elsinore loomed like a haunting metaphor of a treacherous repressive state. The Ghost thundered with a terrible chorus of a million victims of proletarian dictatorship. Rozencrantz and Guildenstern would have felt like fish in the water had they found their way into a modern nation of hypocrites and informers. As to Hamlet himself, his great capacity for suffering gave the noble Dane his unique stature as a tragic hero pre-eminently worthy of his suffering. I would say to myself ‘I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be’, echoing Eliot’s Prufrock. Rather I often felt like one of those fellows ‘crawling between earth and Heaven’ scorned by Hamlet himself. But the real question I came to see was neither ‘to be, or not to be’ nor whether ‘in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune’, but how to be worthy of one’s suffering. Wu Ningkun
As if I also was hearing it for the first time: like the blast of a trumpet, like the voice of God. For a moment I forget who I am and where I am. The companion begs me to repeat it. How good he is, he is aware that it is doing me good. Or perhaps it is something more – perhaps he has received the message, he has felt that it had to do with him, that it has to do with all men who suffer, and with us in particular; and that it has to do with us two, who dare to reason of these things with the poles for the soup on our shoulders. (…) I have forgotten at least twelve lines; I would give today’s soup to know how to connect the last fragment to the end of the Canto. I try to reconstruct it through the rhymes, I close my eyes, I bite my fingers, but it is no use, the rest is silence. Primo Levi
Let each one examine what he has most desired. If he is happy, it is because his wishes have not been granted.  Prince de Ligne
The madness of tomorrow is not in Moscow, much more in Manhattan. It has been left to the very latest Modernists to proclaim an erotic religion which at once exalts lust and forbids fertility. The next great heresy is going to be simply an attack on morality, and especially on sexual morality. G.K. Chesterton (1926)
I do not believe for instance that it is a mere coincidence that we are witnessing simultaneously the development of a movement supporting euthanasia and the development of a movement in favour of homosexual marriage. Simon Leys
S’il est une chose dont le Belge est pénétré, c’est de son insignifiance. Cela, en revanche, lui donne une incomparable liberté – un salubre irrespect, une tranquille impertinence, frisant l’insouciance. Simon Leys
La pire manière d’avoir tort c’est d’avoir eu raison trop tôt ! Simon Leys
Dans une controverse, on reconnait le vainqueur à ce que ses adversaires finissent par s’approprier ses arguments en s’imaginant les avoir inventés.  Simon Leys
Whenever a minute of silence is being observed in a ceremony, don’t we all soon begin to throw discreet glances at our watches? Exactly how long should a ‘decent interval’ last before we can resume business-as-usual with the butchers of Peking? (…) they may even have a point when they insist, in agreeing once more to sit at the banquet of the murderers, they are actively strengthening the reformist trends in China. I only wish they had weaker stomachs. Simon Leys
The other day, I was reading the manuscript of a forthcoming book by a young journalist – a series of profiles of women living in the Outback – farmer wives battling solitude and natural disasters on remote stations in the bush. One woman was expressing concern for the education and future of her son, and commented on the boy’s choice of exclusively practical subjects for his courses at boarding school. « And I can’t say I blame his choice, as I too, would prefer to be out in the bush driving a tractor of building cattleyards rather than sitting in a classroom learning about Shakespeare, which is something he will never need… » (…) Oddly enough, this disarming remark on the uselessness of literature unwittingly reduplicates, in one sense, a provocative statement by Nabokov. In fact the brave woman from the outback here seems to echo a sardonic paradox of the supreme literate aesthete of our age. Nabokov wrote this (which I shall never tire of quoting, perhaps because I myself taught literature for some time): ‘Let us not kid ourselves; let us remember that literature is of no use whatever, except in the very special case of somebody’s wishing to become, of all things, a Professor of Literature.’ And yet even Professors of Literature, when they are made of the right mettle, but find themselves in extreme situations – divested of their titles, deprived of their books, reduced to their barest humanity, equipped only with their tears and their memory – can reach the heart of the matter and experience in their flesh what literature is really about: our very survival as human beings. Simon Leys
The need to bring down to our own wretched level, to deface, to deride and debunk any splendour that is towering above us, is probably the saddest urge of human nature. Simon Leys
L’intuition de Chesterton est que le christianisme a renversé la vieille croyance platonicienne que la matière est mauvaise et que le spirituel est bon. Simon Leys
Comme Chesterton et comme Bernanos (autres écrivains de génie qui ont montré quel art le journalisme peut et doit être), Orwell a semé des perles un peu partout ; là, il faut donc tout lire, ce n’est pas une obligation, c’est un régal. (…) Chez Orwell, la qualité qui frappe le plus, c’est l’originalité. La vraie originalité, c’est le fait d’un homme qui, ayant d’abord réussi à devenir lui-même, n’a plus qu’à écrire naturellement. L’originalité échappe invinciblement à qui la poursuit pour elle-même, ne trouvant que la fausse originalité – cette lèpre qui ronge les lettres… Or un homme vrai ne saurait se réduire à des simplifications abstraites, à des définitions à sens unique (gauche, droite, progressiste, réactionnaire) ; c’est un noeud naturel de contradictions, un vivant paradoxe, comme Orwell l’a bien suggéré en se décrivant lui-même comme un « anarchiste conservateur ». (…) Orwell a explicitement récusé une façon de lire 1984 comme une description d’événements à venir. Il a lui-même défini son livre comme une « satire », développant les implications logiques de la prémisse totalitaire. Il serait donc vain d’essayer de mettre 1984 à jour. Anthony Burgess a jadis commis un 1985 qui montrait seulement sa profonde incompréhension du livre. Le vrai maître d’Orwell, c’est Swift, qu’il lisait et relisait sans se lasser. Comment concevoir une révision des Voyages de Gulliver ? À la lecture d’une intéressante interview que le professeur Jacques Le Goff vient de donner au Point (n° 1777, 5 octobre), je suis frappé par cette remarque qu’exprime le grand historien en passant : « Je déteste un livre comme 1984 d’Orwell à cause de sa non-insertion dans l’histoire. » Mais, précisément, c’est là le sujet même dont traite Orwell. Car le totalitarisme en action, c’est la négation de l’histoire – à tout le moins, sa suspension effective et délibérée. Orwell en eut la première intuition lors de la guerre d’Espagne ; et l’on peut voir dans la révélation qu’il eut alors comme le premier germe de1984. Il en fit la réflexion à Arthur Koestler, qui avait partagé cette même expérience : « L’Histoire s’est arrêtée en 1936. » Ainsi, la propagande stalinienne effaça toutes traces de batailles gagnées par les républicains lorsqu’il s’agissait de milices anarchistes et inventa de grandes victoires communistes là où nul combat n’avait été livré. Dans la presse communiste, l’expérience du front qu’avaient vécue Orwell et ses camarades se trouva frappée de totale irréalité. L’exercice du pouvoir totalitaire ne peut tolérer l’existence d’une réalité historique. Simon Leys
Le divorce de la littérature et du savoir est une plaie de notre époque et un des aspects caractéristiques de la barbarie moderne où, la plupart du temps, on voit des écrivains incultes tourner le dos à des savants qui écrivent en charabia. Simon Leys
Il est normal que les imbéciles profèrent des imbécillités comme les pommiers produisent des pommes, mais je ne peux pas accepter, moi qui ai vu le fleuve Jaune charrier des cadavres chaque jour depuis mes fenêtres, cette vision idyllique de la Révolution culturelle. Simon Leys
Je pense… que les idiots disent des idioties, c’est comme les pommiers produisent des pommes, c’est dans la nature, c’est normal. Le problème c’est qu’il y ait des lecteurs pour les prendre au sérieux et là évidemment se trouve le problème qui mériterait d’être analysé. Prenons le cas de Madame Macciocchi par exemple — je n’ai rien contre Madame Macciocchi personnellement, je n’ai jamais eu le plaisir de faire sa connaissance — quand je parle de Madame Macciocchi, je parle d’une certaine idée de la Chine, je parle de son œuvre, pas de sa personne. Son ouvrage De la Chine, c’est … ce qu’on peut dire de plus charitable, c’est que c’est d’une stupidité totale, parce que si on ne l’accusait pas d’être stupide, il faudrait dire que c’est une escroquerie. Simon Leys
Une nouvelle interprétation de la Chine par un “China watcher” français de Hongkong travaillant à la mode américaine. Beaucoup de faits, rapportés avec exactitude, auxquels se mêlent des erreurs et des informations incontrôlables en provenance de la colonie britannique. Les sources ne sont d’ordinaire pas citées, et l’auteur n’a manifestement pas l’expérience de ce dont il parle. La Révolution culturelle est ramenée à des querelles de cliques. Alain Bouc (Le Monde)
Une sinologue, Michelle Loi, publie en 1975 un court livre intitulé Pour Luxun. Réponse à Pierre Ryckmans (Simon Leys) (Lausanne, Alfred Eibel éditeur), dont le titre dévoile le nom réel de Simon Leys, au risque de lui interdire de pouvoir retourner en Chine. Wikipedia
« La “Révolution culturelle‘ qui n’eut de révolutionnaire que le nom et de culturel que le prétexte tactique initial, fut une lutte pour le pouvoir, menée au sommet entre une poignée d’individus, derrière le rideau de fumée d’un fictif mouvement de masses […] En Occident, certains commentateurs persistent à s’attacher littéralement à l’étiquette officielle et veulent prendre pour point de départ de leur glose le concept de révolution de la culture, voire même de révolution de la civilisation (le terme chinois wenhua’ laisse en effet place à cette double interprétation). En regard d’un thème aussi exaltant pour la réflexion, toute tentative pour réduire le phénomène à cette dimension sordide et triviale d’une ‘lutte pour le pouvoir sonne de façon blessante, voire diffamatoire aux oreilles des maoïstes européens.  Simon Leys
Le spectacle de cet immense pays terrorisé et crétinisé par la rhinocérite maoïste a-t-il entièrement anesthésié sa capacité d’indignation ? Non, mais il réserve celle-ci à la dénonciation de la détestable cuisine qu’Air France lui sert dans l’avion du retour : «Le déjeuner Air France est si infect (petits pains comme des poires, poulet avachi en sauce graillon, salade colorée, chou à la fécule chocolatée – et plus de champagne !) que je suis sur le point d’écrire une lettre de réclamation ». […] Devant les écrits ‘ chinois ’ de Barthes (et de ses amis de Tel Quel), une seule citation d’Orwell saute spontanément à l’esprit : ‘ Vous devez faire partie de l’intelligentsia pour écrire des choses pareilles ; nul homme ordinaire ne saurait être aussi stupide.‘  Simon Leys
Nos admirations nous définissent, mais parfois elles peuvent aussi cerner nos manques (par exemple, un bègue qui admire un éloquent causeur, un écrivain crispé et taciturne comme Jules Renard qui vénère la tonitruante prolixité de Victor Hugo, ou un romancier concis et pur comme Chardonne qui célèbre le formidable flot deTolstoï…). Quand on rend visite à quelqu’un que l’on souhaiterait mieux connaître, on est naturellement tenté de regarder les livres de sa bibliothèque: ce n’est pas plus indiscret que de regarder son visage -c’est tout aussi révélateur (bien que parfois trompeur). Simon Leys
Je crois à l’universalité et à la permanence de la nature humaine; elle transcende l’espace et le temps. Comment expliquer sinon pourquoi les peintures de Lascaux ou la lecture de Zhuang Zi (Tchouang-tseu) ou de Montaigne peuvent nous toucher de façon plus immédiate que les informations du journal de ce matin? Pour le meilleur et pour le pire, je ne vois donc pas comment les intellectuels du XXIe siècle pourraient fort différer de ceux du siècle précédent. Malraux disait que l’intellectuel français est un homme qui ne sait pas comment on ouvre un parapluie (je soupçonne d’ailleurs qu’il parlait d’expérience; et personnellement je ne me flatte pas d’une bien grande dextérité). Du fait de leur maladresse et de leur faiblesse, certains intellectuels seraient-ils plus vulnérables devant les séductions du pouvoir, et de son incarnation dans des chefs totalitaires? Je me contente de constater mélancoliquement la récurrence du phénomène -je ne suis pas psychologue. Simon Leys
Comme je l’évoque dans le post-scriptum de mon essai sur Liu Xiaobo, par la faute d’un agent consulaire belge, mes fils (jumeaux) se sont trouvés réduits à l’état d’apatrides. La faute aurait pu être rectifiée; malheureusement, elle était tellement grotesque que les autorités responsables n’auraient pu le reconnaître sans se rendre ridicules – aussi fallait-il la cacher. Comme toujours dans ce genre de mésaventure administrative, la tentative de camouflage est cent fois pire que ce qu’elle tente de dissimuler. Le problème devient monumental et rigide, il s’enfle et gonfle comme un monstrueux champignon vénéneux qui, en fin de compte, ne contient RIEN: un vide nauséabond. Ayant jadis passé pas mal de temps à analyser et à décrire divers aspects du phénomène bureaucratique au sein du totalitarisme marxiste, j’ai découvert avec stupeur qu’il avait son pendant naturel dans un ministère bruxellois: des bureaucrates belges placés dans le plus toxique des environnements pékinois se seraient aussitôt sentis comme des poissons dans l’eau. Je voudrais tâcher de dépasser l’anecdote personnelle pour cerner une leçon universelle. De nombreux lecteurs, victimes d’expériences semblables, m’ont d’ailleurs offert des rapports d’une hallucinante absurdité. J’envisage donc de faire une petite physiologie du bureaucrate. Cela pourrait s’intituler Le Rêve de Zazie -par référence à l’héroïne de Queneau: comme on demande à Zazie ce qu’elle voudrait devenir quand elle sera grande, elle répond: « Institutrice! -Ah, fort bien et pourquoi? -Pour faire chier les mômes! » Simon Leys
 No tyrant can forsake humanity and persecute intelligence with impunity: in the end, he reaps imbecility and madness. When he visited Moscow in 1957, Mao declared that an atomic war was not to be feared since, in such an eventuality, only half of the human race would perish. This remarkable statement provided a good sample of the mind that was to conceive the “Great Leap Forward” and the “Cultural Revolution.” The human cost of these ventures was staggering: the famines that resulted from the “Great Leap” produced a demographic black hole into which it now appears that as many as fifty million victims may have been sucked. The violence of the “Cultural Revolution” affected a hundred million people. If, on the whole, the Maoist horrors are well known, what has not been sufficiently underlined is their asinine lunacy. In a recent issue of The New York Review, Jonathan Mirsky quoted an anecdote (from Liu Binyan, Ruan Ming, and Xu Gang’s Tell the World) that is so exemplary and apposite here that it bears telling once more: one day, Bo Yibo was swimming with Mao. Mao asked him what the production of iron and steel would be for the next year. Instead of replying, Bo Yibo told Mao that he was going to effect a turn in the water; Mao misunderstood him and thought that he had said “double.” A little later, at a Party meeting, Bo Yibo heard Mao announce that the national production of iron and steel would double the next year.3 The anecdote is perfectly credible in the light of all the documentary evidence we have concerning Mao’s attitude at the time of the “Great Leap”: we know that he swallowed the gigantic and grotesque deceptions fabricated by his own propaganda, and accepted without discussion the pleasing suggestion that miracles were taking place in the Chinese countryside; he genuinely believed that the yield of cotton and grain could be increased by 300 to 500 percent. And Liu Shaoqi himself was no wiser: inspecting Shandong in 1958, and having been told that miraculous increases had been effected in agricultural output, he said: “This is because the scientists have been kicked out, and people now dare to do things!” The output of steel, which was 5.3 million tons in 1957, allegedly reached 11 million tons in 1958, and it was planned that it would reach 18 million in 1959. The grain output which was 175 million tons in 1957, allegedly reached 375 million tons in 1958, and was planned to reach 500 million in 1959. The Central Committee solemnly endorsed this farce (Wuchang, Sixth Plenum, December 1958)—and planned for more. Zhou Enlai—who never passed for a fool—repeated and supported these fantastic figures and announced that the targets laid in the Second Five Year Plan (1958–1962) had all been reached in the plan’s first year! All the top leaders applauded this nonsense. Li Fuchun and Li Xiannian poured out “Great Leap” statistics that were simply lies. What happened to their common sense? Only Chen Yun had the courage to remain silent. Graphic details of the subsequent famine were provided in the official press only a few years ago, confirming what was already known through the testimonies of countless eyewitnesses. As early as 1961, Ladany published in China News Analysis some of these reports by Chinese travelers from all parts of China. All spoke of food shortage and hunger; swollen bellies, lack of protein and liver diseases were common. Many babies were stillborn because of their mothers’ deficient nutrition. Few babies were being born. As some workers put it, their food barely sufficed to keep them standing on their feet, let alone allowing them to have thoughts of sex. Peasants lacked the strength to work, and some collapsed in the fields and died. City government organisations and schools sent people to the villages by night to buy food, bartering clothes and furniture for it. In Shenyang the newspaper reported cannibalism. Desperate mothers strangled children who cried for food. Many reported that villagers were flocking into the cities in search of food; many villages were left empty…. It was also said that peasants were digging underground pits to hide their food. Others spoke of places where the population had been decimated by starvation. According to the Guang Ming Daily (April 27, 1980), in the North-West, the famine generated an ecological disaster: in their struggle to grow some food, the peasants destroyed grasslands and forests. Half of the grasslands and one third of the forests vanished between 1959 and 1962: the region was damaged permanently. The People’s Daily (May 14, 1980) said that the disaster of the “Great Leap” had affected the lives of a hundred million people who were physically devastated by the prolonged shortage of food. (Note that, at the time, China experts throughout the world refused to believe that there was famine in China. A BBC commentator, for instance, declared typically that a widespread famine in such a well-organized country was unthinkable.) Today, in order to stem the tide of popular discontent which threatens to engulf his rule, Deng Xiaoping is invoking again the authority of Mao. That he should be willing to call that ghost to the rescue provides a measure of his desperation. Considering the history of the last sixty years, one can easily imagine what sort of response the Chinese are now giving to such an appeal. Deng’s attempts to revive and promote Marxist studies are no less unpopular. Marxism has acquired a very bad name in China—which is quite understandable, though somewhat unfair: after all, it was never really tried. Simon Leys
In any debate, you really know that you have won when you find your opponents beginning to appropriate your ideas, in the sincere belief that they themselves just invented them. This situation can afford a subtle satisfaction; I think the feeling must be quite familiar to Father Ladany, the Jesuit priest and scholar based in Hong Kong who for many years published the weekly China News Analysis. Far away from the crude limelights of the media circus, he has enjoyed three decades of illustrious anonymity: all “China watchers” used to read his newsletter with avidity; many stole from it—but generally they took great pains never to acknowledge their indebtedness or to mention his name. Father Ladany watched this charade with sardonic detachment: he would probably agree that what Ezra Pound said regarding the writing of poetry should also apply to the recording of history—it is extremely important that it be written, but it is a matter of indifference who writes it. China News Analysis was compulsory reading for all those who wished to be informed of Chinese political developments—scholars, journalists, diplomats. In academe, however, its perusal among many political scientists was akin to what a drinking habit might be for an ayatollah, or an addiction to pornography for a bishop: it was a compulsive need that had to be indulged in secrecy. China experts gnashed their teeth as they read Ladany’s incisive comments; they hated his clearsightedness and cynicism; still, they could not afford to miss one single issue of his newsletter, for, however disturbing and scandalous his conclusions, the factual information which he supplied was invaluable and irreplaceable. What made China News Analysis so infuriatingly indispensable was the very simple and original principle on which it was run (true originality is usually simple): all the information selected and examined in China News Analysis was drawn exclusively from official Chinese sources (press and radio).  (…) What inspired his method was the observation that even the most mendacious propaganda must necessarily entertain some sort of relation with the truth; even as it manipulates and distorts the truth, it still needs originally to feed on it. Therefore, the untwisting of official lies, if skillfully effected, should yield a certain amount of straight facts. Needless to say, such an operation requires a doigté hardly less sophisticated than the chemistry which, in Gulliver’s Travels, enabled the Grand Academicians of Lagado to extract sunbeams from cucumbers and food from excreta.  (…) Without an ability to decipher non-existent inscriptions written in invisible ink on blank pages, no one should ever dream of analyzing the nature and reality of Chinese communism. Very few people have mastered this demanding discipline, and, with good reason, they generally acknowledge Father Ladany as their doyen. Simon Leys
 G K. CHESTERTON, whose formidable mind drew inspiration from a vast culture – literary, political, poetical, historical and philosophical – once received the naive praise of a lady: “Oh, Mr Chesterton, you know so many things!” He suavely replied: “Madam, I know nothing: I am a journalist.” The many enemies of French philosopher Jean-François Revel (1924-2006) often attempted to dismiss him as a mere journalist which, of course, he was among many other things, and very much in the Chestertonian fashion. At first he may seem odd to associate these two names: what could there be in common between the great Christian apologist and the staunch atheist, between the mystical poet and the strict rationalist, between the huge, benevolent man mountain and the short, fiery, nimble and pugnacious intellectual athlete (and, should we also add, between the devoted husband and the irrepressible ladies’ man)? One could multiply the contrasts, yet, on a deeper level, the essence of their genius was very much alike. Revel was an extrovert who took daily delight in the company of his friends (…) Always sparring with his interlocutors, he was passionately commited to is ideas, but if he took his own beliefs with utter seriousness, he did not take his own person seriously. Again, one could apply to him what Chesterton’s brother said of his famous sibling: “He had a passionate need to express his opinions, but he would express them as readily and well to a man he met on a bus.” Revel’s capacity for self-irony is the crowning grace of his memoirs, The Thief in an Empty House. Personal records can be a dangerous exercice, but in his case it eventuated in a triumphant masterpiece. His humour enchanted his readers, but kept disconcerting the more pompous pundits. The French greatly value wit, which they display in profusion, but humour often makes them uneasy, especially when it is applied to important subjects; they do not have a word for it, they do not know the thing. Whereas wit is a form of duelling – it aims to wound or to kill – the essence of humour is self-deprecatory. Once again, a Chestertonian saying could be apposite: “My critics think that I am not serious, but only funny, because they think that ‘funny’ is the opposite of ‘serious’. But ‘funny’ is the opposite of ‘not funny’ and nothing else. Whether a man chooses to tell the truth in long sentences or in short jokes is analogous to whether he chooses to tell the truth in French or German.” What compounded the dismay of Revel’s pretentious critics was his implacable clarity. One of his close friends and collaborators said he doubted if Revel, in his entire career, had written a single sentence that was obscure. In the Parisian intellectual world such a habit can easily ruin a writer’s credit, for simple souls and solemn mediocrities are impressed only by what is couched in opaque jargon. And, in their eyes, how could one possibly say something important if one is not self-important? With the accuracy of his information and the sharpness of his irony, Revel deflated the huge balloons of cant that elevate the chattering classes. They felt utterly threatened, for he was exposing the puffery of the latest intellectual fashions upon which their livehood depended. At times they could not hide their panic; for instance, the great guru of the intelligentsia, Jacques Lacan, during one of his psychoanalytical seminars at the Sorbonne, performed in front of his devotees a voodoo-like exorcism. He frantically trampled underfoot and destroyed a copy of Revel’s book Why Philosophers?, in which Lacan’s charlatanism was analysed. Yet such outbursts weere mere circus acts; far more vicious was the invisible conspiracy that surrounded Revel with a wall of silence, well documented in Pierre Boncenne’s Pour Jean-François Revel: Un esprit libre (Plon, Paris, 2006), a timely and perceptive book that takes the full measure of Revel’s intellectual, literary and human stature. A paradoxical situation developed: Revel’s weekly newspaper columns were avidly read, nearly every one of his 30-odd books was an instant bestseller, and yet the most influential “progressive” critics studiously ignored his existence. His books were not reviewed, his ideas were not discussed, if his name was mentioned at all it was with a patronising sneer, if not downright slander. Revel was quintessentially French in his literary tastes and sensitivity (his pages on Michel de Montaigne, Francois Rabelais and Marcel Proust marry intelligence with love; his anthology of French poetry mirrors his original appreciation of the poetic language), in his art of living (his great book on gastronomy is truly a “feast in words”) and in his conviviality (he truly cared for his friends). And yet what strikingly set him apart from most other intellectuals of his generation was his genuinely cosmopolitan outlook. He had spent abroad the best part of his formative and early creative years, mostly in Mexico and Italy. In addition to English (spoken by few educated French of his time) he was fluent in Italian, Spanish and German; until the end of his life he retained the healthy habit to start every day (he rose at 5am) by listening to he BBC news and reading six foreign newspapers. On international affairs, on literature, art and ideas, he had universal perspectives that broke completely from the suffocating provincialism of the contemporary Parisian elites. In the 18th century, French was the common language of the leading minds of continental Europe; 20th-century French intellectuals hardly noticed that times had changed in this respect; they retained the dangerous belief that whatever was not expressed in French could hardly matter. Revel never had enough sarcasm to denounce this sort of self-indulgence; on the bogus notion of le rayonnement français, he was scathing: “French culture has radiated for so long, it’s a wonder mankind has not died from sunstroke.” He fiercely fought against chauvinist cultural blindness, and especially against its most cretinous expression: irrational anti-Americanism. At the root of this attitude he detected a subconscious resentment: the French feel that when Americans are playing a leading role in the political-cultural world they are usurping what is by birthright a French prerogative. By vocation and academic training Revel was originally a philosopher (he entered at an exceptionally early age the Ecole Normale Superieure, the apex of the French higher education system). He taught philosophy and eventually wrote a history of Western philosophy (eschewing all technical jargon, it is a model of lucid synthesis). However, he became disenchanted with the contemporary philosophers who, he flet, had betrayed their calling by turning philosophy into a professional career and a mere literary genre. “Philosophy,” he wrote “ought to return to its original and fundamental question: How should I live?” he preferred simply to call himslef “a man of letters”. Ancient Greek poet Archilochus famously said: “The fox knows many things but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” Revel was the archetypical fox, but at the same time he held with all the determination of a hedgehog to one central idea that inspires, pervades and motivates all his endeavours: The belief that each individual destiny, as well as the destiny of mankind, depends upon the accuracy – or the falsity – of the information at their disposal, and upon the way in which they put this information to use. He devoted one of his books specifically to this issue, La Connaissance Inutile (Useless Knowledge), but this theme runs through nearly all his writings. Politics naturally absorbed a great amount of his attention. From the outset he showed his willingness to commit himself personally, and at great risk: as a young man in occupied France he joined the Resistance against the Nazis. After the war, his basic political allegiance was, and always remainded, to the Left and the principles of liberal democracy. He was sharply critical of Charles de Gaulle and of all saviours and providential leaders in military uniforms. Yet, like George Orwell before him, he always believed that only an uncompromising denunciation of all forms of Stalinist totalitarianism can ensure the ultimate victory of socialism. Thus – again, like Orwell – he earned for himself the hostility of his starry-eyed comrades. Simon Leys

Attention: un intellectuel peut ne pas en cacher un autre !

Belge de naissance, chinois de coeur, australien de résidence, chrétien revendiqué, admirateur de Chesterton, Bernanos, Orwell,  ami de Revel et Mario Vargas Llosa, intellectuel ayant fait de la nécessité de l’ « insignifiance » supposée de sa nationalité vertu, vendeur de mèche des secrets de sa tribu maolâtre et antichrétienne ayant osé dénoncer les habits neufs de l’empereur et défendre Mère Teresa, intellectuel n’hésitant pas à critiquer l’anti-intellectualisme tout en se méfiant de l’intelligence, à appeler un imbécile un imbécile,  à pratiquer tout en restant vigilant le meilleur des journalismes, à  mettre en doute  des conquêtes de l’humanité aussi grandes que l’euthanasie et le mariage homosexuel et même à révéler et remercier ses propres sources …

En ces temps étranges où, sur fond de purification ethnique et de génocide revendiqué des derniers chrétiens et juifs du Moyen-Orient …

Et où, après la tentation du fascisme, du nazisme, du communisme, du stalinisme, du maoïsme et de l’antiaméricanisme primaire, ceux qui ont toujours préféré avoir tort avec Sartre semblent repartis à la case départ de l‘antisémitisme qui avait justement, avec le fameux « J’accuse » de Zola, marqué leur acte de naissance …

Comment ne pas repenser à l’occasion de la récente disparition du sinologue Pierre Ryckmans (dit Simon Leys) dont la vigilance, pour reprendre le mot de Sartre à la mort d’un Gide dont ladite vertu lui sera hélas de peu d’utilité,  nous manque déjà …

A tous ces véritables intellectuels que nos médiacrates actuels ont indûment éclipsés quand, à la manière de l’ancien compagnon de route de Che Guevara et ex-conseiller spécial de François Mitterrand Régis Debray, ils ne les ont pas confondus avec leur version française et n’en ont pas fait l’acte de décès ?

Comment ne pas voir protégés peut-être par leur nationalité ou résidence étrangères à l’instar du sinologue belgo-australien qui fut aussi critique littéraire et écrivain …

Que ce sont aussi ceux qui correspondent le plus à la définition canonique que fit de cette version moderne des prophètes juifs d’antan après Benda et avant Bourdieu, le petit camarade d’Aron et de Camus si fier en son temps  de sa « stricte obédience stalinienne » ?

A savoir non d « ‘abuser » mais d’utiliser la notoriété acquise par leurs travaux pour défendre les « valeurs éternelles et désintéressées » de la justice et de la raison …

Mais aussi, refusant le compartimentage et l’amputation de  l’une ou l’autre des grandes voies d’accès à la vérité telles que la religion, l’art, la philosophie et la science et à l’image de Proust,  se  méfiant sans la rejeter de l’intelligence, de résister aux dérives du temps qui virent la plus grande indulgence aux plus grands crimes et de ne pas hésiter, au prix fort, à vendre la mèche sur sa propre tribu ?

Et quel meilleur hommage leur faire que ces deux textes et sortes d’autoportrait en creux dans lesquels Leys fit l’éloge de deux des intellectuels dont ils partageaient la volonté farouche d’allier la connaissance et le goût de la théorie du renard à la détermination et à l’intérêt pour le  travail de terrain du hérisson mais surtout  l’amour par dessus tout de la précision et de la vérité …

A savoir le père et sinologue polonais, Laszlo Ladany dont il ne taira jamais l’inspiration et l’essayiste qui fut l’un des rares intellectuels français à le soutenir Jean-Francois Revel ?

The Art of Interpreting Nonexistent Inscriptions Written in Invisible Ink on a Blank Page
Simon Leys

The New York Review of Books

OCTOBER 11, 1990 ISSUE
The Communist Party of China and Marxism, 1921––1985: A Self Portrait
by Laszlo Ladany, foreword by Robert Elegant
Hoover Institution Press, 588 pp., $44.95
1.

In any debate, you really know that you have won when you find your opponents beginning to appropriate your ideas, in the sincere belief that they themselves just invented them. This situation can afford a subtle satisfaction; I think the feeling must be quite familiar to Father Ladany, the Jesuit priest and scholar based in Hong Kong who for many years published the weekly China News Analysis. Far away from the crude limelights of the media circus, he has enjoyed three decades of illustrious anonymity: all “China watchers” used to read his newsletter with avidity; many stole from it—but generally they took great pains never to acknowledge their indebtedness or to mention his name. Father Ladany watched this charade with sardonic detachment: he would probably agree that what Ezra Pound said regarding the writing of poetry should also apply to the recording of history—it is extremely important that it be written, but it is a matter of indifference who writes it.

China News Analysis was compulsory reading for all those who wished to be informed of Chinese political developments—scholars, journalists, diplomats. In academe, however, its perusal among many political scientists was akin to what a drinking habit might be for an ayatollah, or an addiction to pornography for a bishop: it was a compulsive need that had to be indulged in secrecy. China experts gnashed their teeth as they read Ladany’s incisive comments; they hated his clearsightedness and cynicism; still, they could not afford to miss one single issue of his newsletter, for, however disturbing and scandalous his conclusions, the factual information which he supplied was invaluable and irreplaceable. What made China News Analysis so infuriatingly indispensable was the very simple and original principle on which it was run (true originality is usually simple): all the information selected and examined in China News Analysis was drawn exclusively from official Chinese sources (press and radio). This austere rule sometimes deprived Ladany’s newsletter of the life and color that could have been provided by less orthodox sources, but it enabled him to build his devastating conclusions on unimpeachable grounds.

What inspired his method was the observation that even the most mendacious propaganda must necessarily entertain some sort of relation with the truth; even as it manipulates and distorts the truth, it still needs originally to feed on it. Therefore, the untwisting of official lies, if skillfully effected, should yield a certain amount of straight facts. Needless to say, such an operation requires a doigté hardly less sophisticated than the chemistry which, in Gulliver’s Travels, enabled the Grand Academicians of Lagado to extract sunbeams from cucumbers and food from excreta. The analyst who wishes to gather information through such a process must negotiate three hurdles of thickening thorniness. First, he needs to have a fluent command of the Chinese language. To the man-in-the-street, such a prerequisite may appear like elementary common sense, but once you leave the street level, and enter the loftier spheres of academe, common sense is not so common any longer, and it remains an interesting fact that, during the Maoist era, a majority of leading “China Experts” hardly knew any Chinese. (I hasten to add that this is largely a phenomenon of the past; nowadays, fortunately, young scholars are much better educated.)

Secondly, in the course of his exhaustive surveys of Chinese official documentation, the analyst must absorb industrial quantities of the most indigestible stuff; reading Communist literature is akin to munching rhinoceros sausage, or to swallowing sawdust by the bucketful. Furthermore, while subjecting himself to this punishment, the analyst cannot allow his attention to wander, or his mind to become numb; he must keep his wits sharp and keen; with the eye of an eagle that can spot a lone rabbit in the middle of a desert, he must scan the arid wastes of the small print in the pages of the People’s Daily, and pounce upon those rare items of significance that lie buried under mountains of clichés. He must know how to milk substance and meaning out of flaccid speeches, hollow slogans, and fanciful statistics; he must scavenge for needles in Himalayan-size haystacks; he must combine the nose of a hunting hound, the concentration and patience of an angler, and the intuition and encyclopedic knowledge of a Sherlock Holmes.

Thirdly—and this is his greatest challenge—he must crack the code of the Communist political jargon and translate into ordinary speech this secret language full of symbols, riddles, cryptograms, hints, traps, dark allusions, and red herrings. Like wise old peasants who can forecast tomorrow’s weather by noting how deep the moles dig and how high the swallows fly, he must be able to decipher the premonitory signs of political storms and thaws, and know how to interpret a wide range of quaint warnings—sometimes the Supreme Leader takes a swim in the Yangtze River, or suddenly writes a new poem, or sponsors a ping-pong game: such events all have momentous implications. He must carefully watch the celebration of anniversaries, the noncelebration of anniversaries, and the celebration of nonanniversaries; he must check the lists of guests at official functions, and note the order in which their names appear. In the press, the size, type, and color of headlines, as well as the position and composition of photos and illustrations are all matters of considerable import; actually they obey complex laws, as precise and strict as the iconographic rules that govern the location, garb, color, and symbolic attributes of the figures of angels, archangels, saints, and patriarchs in the decoration of a Byzantine basilica.

To find one’s way in this maze, ingenuity and astuteness are not enough; one also needs a vast amount of experience. Communist Chinese politics are a lugubrious merry-go-round (as I have pointed out many times already), and in order to appreciate fully the déjà-vu quality of its latest convolutions, you would need to have watched it revolve for half a century. The main problem with many of our politicians and pundits is that their memories are too short, thus forever preventing them from putting events and personalities in a true historical perspective. For instance, when, in 1979, the “People’s Republic” began to revise its criminal law, there were good souls in the West who applauded this initiative, as they thought that it heralded China’s move toward a genuine rule of law. What they failed to note, however—and which should have provided a crucial hint regarding the actual nature and meaning of the move in question—was that the new law was being introduced by Peng Zhen, one of the most notorious butchers of the regime, a man who, thirty years earlier, had organized the ferocious mass accusations, lynchings, and public executions of the land reform programs.

Or again, after the death of Mao, Western politicians and commentators were prompt to hail Deng Xiaoping as a sort of champion of liberalization. The Selected Works of Deng published at that time should have enlightened them—not so much by what it included, as by what it excluded; had they been able to read it as any Communist document should be read, i.e., by concentrating first on its gaps, they would have rediscovered Deng’s Stalinist-Maoist statements, and then, perhaps, they might have been less surprised by the massacres of June 4.

More than half a century ago, the writer Lu Xun (1889–1936), whose prophetic genius never ceases to amaze, described accurately the conundrum of China watching:

Once upon a time, there was a country whose rulers completely succeeded in crushing the people; and yet they still believed that the people were their most dangerous enemy. The rulers issued huge collections of statutes, but none of these volumes could actually be used, because in order to interpret them, one had to refer to a set of instructions that had never been made public. These instructions contained many original definitions. Thus, for instance, “liberation” meant in fact “capital execution”; “government official” meant “friend, relative or servant of an influential politician,” and so on. The rulers also issued codes of laws that were marvellously modern, complex and complete; however, at the beginning of the first volume, there was one blank page; this blank page could be deciphered only by those who knew the instructions—which did not exist. The first three invisible articles of these non-existent instructions read as follows: “Art. 1: some cases must be treated with special leniency. Art. 2: some cases must be treated with special severity. Art. 3: this does not apply in all cases.”

Without an ability to decipher non-existent inscriptions written in invisible ink on blank pages, no one should ever dream of analyzing the nature and reality of Chinese communism. Very few people have mastered this demanding discipline, and, with good reason, they generally acknowledge Father Ladany as their doyen.

2.

After thirty-six years of China watching, Father Ladany finally retired and summed up his exceptional experience in The Communist Party of China and Marxism, 1921–1985: A Self Portrait. In the scope of this article it would naturally not be possible to do full justice to a volume which analyzes in painstaking detail sixty-five years of turbulent history; still, it may be useful to outline here some of Ladany’s main conclusions.

The Communist party is in essence a secret society. In its methods and mentality it presents a striking resemblance to an underworld mob.1 It fears daylight, feeds on deception and conspiracy, and rules by intimidation and terror. “Communist legality” is a contradiction in terms, since the Party is above the law—for example, Party members are immune from legal prosecution; they must be divested of their Party membership before they can be indicted by a criminal court (that a judge may acquit an accused person is inconceivable: since the accused was sent to court, it means that he is guilty). Whereas even Mussolini and Hitler orginally reached power through elections, no Communist party ever received an electorate’s mandate to govern.

In China, the path that led the Communists to victory still remains partly shrouded in mystery. Even today, for Party historians, many archives remain closed, and there are entire chapters that continue to present insoluble riddles; minutes of decisive meetings are nowhere to be found, important dates remain uncertain; for some momentous episodes it is still impossible to identify the participants and to reconstruct accurately the sequence of events; for some periods one cannot even determine who were the Party leaders!

As Ladany points out, a Communist regime is built on a triple foundation: dialectics, the power of the Party, and a secret police—but, as to its ideological equipment, Marxism is merely an optional feature; the regime can do without it most of the time. Dialectics is the jolly art that enables the Supreme Leader never to make mistakes—for even if he did the wrong thing, he did it at the right time, which makes it right for him to have been wrong, whereas the Enemy, even if he did the right thing, did it at the wrong time, which makes it wrong for him to have been right.

Before securing power, the Party thrives on political chaos. If confronted with a deliquescent government, it can succeed through organization and propaganda, even when it operates from a minuscule base: in 1945, the Communists controlled only one town, Yan’an, and some remote tracts of countryside; four years later, the whole of China was theirs. At the time of the Communist takeover, the Party members in Peking numbered a mere three thousand, and Shanghai, a city of nine million people, had only eight thousand Party members. In a time of social and economic collapse, it takes very few people—less than 0.01 percent of the population in the Chinese case—to launch emotional appeals, to stir the indignation of the populace against corrupt and brutal authorities, to mobilize the generosity and idealism of the young, to enlist the support of thousands of students, and eventually to present their tiny Communist movement as the incarnation of the entire nation’s will.

What is even more remarkable is that, before 1949, wherever the population had been directly exposed to their rule the Communists were utterly unpopular. They had introduced radical land reform in parts of North China during the civil war, and, as Ladany recalls,

Not only landowners but all suspected enemies were treated brutally; one could walk about in the North Chinese plains and see hands sticking out from the ground, the hands of people buried alive…. Luckily for the Communists, government propaganda was so poorly organised that people living in regions not occupied by the Communists knew nothing of such atrocities.

Once the whole country fell under their control, it did not take long for the Communists to extend to the rest of the nation the sort of treatment which, until then, had been reserved for inner use—purging the Party and disciplining the population of the so-called liberated areas. Systematic terror was applied on a national scale as early as 1950, to match first the land reform and then the campaign to suppress “counterrevolutionaries.” By the fall of 1951, 80 percent of all Chinese had had to take part in mass accusation meetings, or to watch organized lynchings and public executions. These grim liturgies followed set patterns that once more were reminiscent of gangland practices: during these proceedings, rhetorical questions were addressed to the crowd, which, in turn, had to roar its approval in unison—the purpose of the exercise being to ensure collective participation in the murder of innocent victims; the latter were selected not on the basis of what they had done, but of who they were, or sometimes for no better reason than the need to meet the quota of capital executions which had been arbitrarily set beforehand by the Party authorities.

From that time on, every two or three years, a new “campaign” would be launched, with its usual accompaniment of mass accusations, “struggle meetings,” self-accusations, and public executions. At the beginning of each “campaign,” there were waves of suicides: many of the people who, during a previous “campaign,” had suffered public humiliation, psychological and physical torture at the hands of their own relatives, colleagues, and neighbors, found it easier to jump from a window or under a train than to face a repeat of the same ordeal.

What is puzzling is that in organizing these recurrent waves of terror the Communists betrayed a strange incapacity to understand their own people. As history has amply demonstrated, the Chinese possess extraordinary patience; they can stoically endure the rule of a ruthless and rapacious government, provided that it does not interfere too much with their family affairs and private pursuits, and as long as it can provide basic stability. On both accounts, the Communists broke this tacit covenant between ruler and ruled. They invaded the lives of the people in a way that was far more radical and devastating than in the Soviet Union. Remolding the minds, “brainwashing” as it is usually called, is a chief instrument of Chinese communism, and the technique goes as far back as the early consolidation of Mao’s rule in Yan’an.

To appreciate the characteristics of the Maoist approach one need simply compare the Chinese “labor rectification” camps with the Soviet Gulag. Life in the concentration camps in Siberia was physically more terrifying than life in many Chinese camps, but the mental pressure was less severe on the Soviet side. In the Siberian camps the inmates could still, in a way, feel spiritually free and retain some sort of inner life, whereas the daily control of words and thoughts, the actual transformation and conditioning of individual consciousness, made the Maoist camps much more inhuman.

Besides its cruelty, the Maoist practice of launching political “campaigns” in relentless succession generated a permanent instability, which eventually ruined the moral credit of the Party, destroyed much of society, paralyzed the economy, provoked large-scale famines, and nearly developed into civil war. In 1949, most of the population had been merely hoping for a modicum of order and peace, which the Communists could easily have granted. Had they governed with some moderation and abstained from the needless upheavals of the campaigns, they could have won long-lasting popular support, and ensured steady economic development—but Mao had a groundless fear of inner opposition and revolt; this psychological flaw led him to adopt methods that proved fatally self-destructive.

History might have been very different if the original leaders of the Chinese Communist party had not been decimated by Chiang Kai-shek’s White Terror of 1927, or expelled by their own comrades in subsequent Party purges. They were civilized and sophisticated urban intellectuals, upholding humanistic values, with cosmopolitan and open minds, attuned to the modern world. While their sun was still high in the political firmament, Mao’s star never had a chance to shine; however bright and ambitious, the young self-taught peasant was unable to compete with these charismatic figures. Their sudden elimination marked an abrupt turn in the Chinese revolution—one may say that it actually put an end to it—but it also presented Mao with an unexpected opening. At first, his ascent was not exactly smooth; yet, by 1940 in Yan’an, he was finally able to neutralize all his rivals and to remold the entire Party according to his own conception. It is this Maoist brigade of country bumpkins and uneducated soldiers, trained and drilled in a remote corner of one of China’s poorest and most backward provinces, that was finally to impose its rule over the entire nation—and, as Ladany adds, “This is why there are spittoons everywhere in the People’s Republic.”

Mao’s anti-intellectualism was deeply rooted in his personal experiences. He never forgot how, as a young man, intellectuals had made him feel insignificant and inadequate. Later on, he came to despise them for their perpetual doubts and waverings; the competence and expertise of scholarly authorities irritated him; he distrusted the independence of their judgments and resented their critical ability. In the barracks-like atmosphere of Yan’an, a small town without culture, far removed from intellectual centers, with no easy access to books, amid illiterate peasants and brutish soldiers, intellectuals were easily singled out for humiliating sessions of self-criticism and were turned into exemplary targets during the terrifying purges of 1942–1944. Thus the pattern was set for what was to remain the most characteristic feature of Chinese communism: the persecution and ostracisim of intellectuals. The Yan’an brigade had an innate dislike of people who thought too much; this moronic tradition received a powerful boost in 1957, when, in the aftermath of the Hundred Flowers campaign, China’s cultural elite was pilloried; nine years later, finally, the “Cultural Revolution” marked the climax of Mao’s war against intelligence: savage blows were dealt to all intellectuals inside and outside the Party; all education was virtually suspended for ten years, producing an entire generation of illiterates.

Educated persons were considered unfit by nature to join the Party; especially at the local level resistance to accepting them was always greatest, as the old leadership felt threatened by all expressions of intellectual superiority. Official figures released in 1985 provide a telling picture of the level of education within the Communist party—which makes up the privileged elite of the nation: 4 percent of Party members had received some university education—they did not necessarily graduate—(against 30 percent in the Soviet Union); 42 percent of Party members only attended primary school; 10 percent are illiterate….

The first casualty of Mao’s anti-intellectualism was to be found, interestingly enough, in the field of Marxist studies. When, after fifteen years of revolutionary activity, the Party finally felt the need to acquire some rudiments of Marxist knowledge (at that time virtually no work of Marx had yet been translated into Chinese!), Mao, who himself was still a beginner in this discipline, undertook to keep all doctrinal developments under his personal control. In Yan’an, like an inexperienced teacher who has gotten hold of the only available textbook and struggles to keep one lesson ahead of his pupils, he simply plagiarized a couple of Soviet booklets and gave a folksy Chinese version of some elementary Stalinist-Zhdanovian notions. How these crude, banal, and derivative works ever came to acquire in the eyes of the entire world the prestige and authority of an original philosophy remains a mystery; it must be one of the most remarkable instances of mass autosuggestion in the twentieth century.

In one respect, however, the Thoughts of Mao Zedong did present genuine originality and dared to tread a ground where Stalin himself had not ventured: Mao explicitly denounced the concept of a universal humanity; whereas the Soviet tyrant merely practiced inhumanity, Mao gave it a theoretical foundation, expounding the notion—without parallel in the other Communist countries of the world—that the proletariat alone is fully endowed with human nature. To deny the humanity of other people is the very essence of terrorism; millions of Chinese were soon to measure the actual implications of this philosophy.

At first, after the establishment of the People’s Republic the regime was simply content to translate and reproduce elementary Soviet introductions to Marxism. The Chinese Academy of Sciences had a department of philosophy and social sciences but produced nothing during the Fifties, not even textbooks on Marxism. Only one university in the entire country—Peking University—had a department of philosophy; only Mao’s works were studied there.

When the Soviet Union denounced Stalin and rejected his History of the Communist Party—Short Course, the Chinese were stunned: this little book contained virtually all they knew about Marxism. Then, the Sino-Soviet split ended the intellectual importations from the USSR, and it was conveniently decided that the Thoughts of Mao Zedong represented the highest development of Marxist-Leninist philosophy; therefore, in order to fill the ideological vacuum, Mao’s Thoughts suddenly expanded and acquired polyvalent functions; its study became a reward for the meritorious, a punishment for the criminal, a medicine for the sick; it could answer all questions and solve all problems; it even performed miracles that were duly recorded; its presence was felt everywhere: it was broadcast in the streets and in the fields, it was put to music, it was turned into song and dance; it was inscribed everywhere—on mountain cliffs and on chopsticks, on badges, on bridges, on ashtrays, on dams, on teapots, on locomotives; it was printed on every page of all newspapers. (This, in turn, created some practical problems: in a poor country, where all paper is recycled for a variety of purposes, one had always to be very careful when wrapping groceries or when wiping one’s bottom, not to do it with Mao’s ubiquitous Thoughts—which would have been a capital offence.) In a way, Mao is to Marx what Voodoo is to Christianity; therefore, it is not surprising that the inflation of Mao’s Thoughts precluded the growth of serious Marxist studies in China.2

No tyrant can forsake humanity and persecute intelligence with impunity: in the end, he reaps imbecility and madness. When he visited Moscow in 1957, Mao declared that an atomic war was not to be feared since, in such an eventuality, only half of the human race would perish. This remarkable statement provided a good sample of the mind that was to conceive the “Great Leap Forward” and the “Cultural Revolution.” The human cost of these ventures was staggering: the famines that resulted from the “Great Leap” produced a demographic black hole into which it now appears that as many as fifty million victims may have been sucked. The violence of the “Cultural Revolution” affected a hundred million people. If, on the whole, the Maoist horrors are well known, what has not been sufficiently underlined is their asinine lunacy. In a recent issue of The New York Review, Jonathan Mirsky quoted an anecdote (from Liu Binyan, Ruan Ming, and Xu Gang’s Tell the World) that is so exemplary and apposite here that it bears telling once more: one day, Bo Yibo was swimming with Mao. Mao asked him what the production of iron and steel would be for the next year. Instead of replying, Bo Yibo told Mao that he was going to effect a turn in the water; Mao misunderstood him and thought that he had said “double.” A little later, at a Party meeting, Bo Yibo heard Mao announce that the national production of iron and steel would double the next year.3

The anecdote is perfectly credible in the light of all the documentary evidence we have concerning Mao’s attitude at the time of the “Great Leap”: we know that he swallowed the gigantic and grotesque deceptions fabricated by his own propaganda, and accepted without discussion the pleasing suggestion that miracles were taking place in the Chinese countryside; he genuinely believed that the yield of cotton and grain could be increased by 300 to 500 percent. And Liu Shaoqi himself was no wiser: inspecting Shandong in 1958, and having been told that miraculous increases had been effected in agricultural output, he said: “This is because the scientists have been kicked out, and people now dare to do things!” The output of steel, which was 5.3 million tons in 1957, allegedly reached 11 million tons in 1958, and it was planned that it would reach 18 million in 1959. The grain output which was 175 million tons in 1957, allegedly reached 375 million tons in 1958, and was planned to reach 500 million in 1959. The Central Committee solemnly endorsed this farce (Wuchang, Sixth Plenum, December 1958)—and planned for more. Zhou Enlai—who never passed for a fool—repeated and supported these fantastic figures and announced that the targets laid in the Second Five Year Plan (1958–1962) had all been reached in the plan’s first year! All the top leaders applauded this nonsense. Li Fuchun and Li Xiannian poured out “Great Leap” statistics that were simply lies. What happened to their common sense? Only Chen Yun had the courage to remain silent.

Graphic details of the subsequent famine were provided in the official press only a few years ago, confirming what was already known through the testimonies of countless eyewitnesses.

As early as 1961, Ladany published in China News Analysis some of these reports by Chinese travelers from all parts of China.

All spoke of food shortage and hunger; swollen bellies, lack of protein and liver diseases were common. Many babies were stillborn because of their mothers’ deficient nutrition. Few babies were being born. As some workers put it, their food barely sufficed to keep them standing on their feet, let alone allowing them to have thoughts of sex. Peasants lacked the strength to work, and some collapsed in the fields and died. City government organisations and schools sent people to the villages by night to buy food, bartering clothes and furniture for it. In Shenyang the newspaper reported cannibalism. Desperate mothers strangled children who cried for food. Many reported that villagers were flocking into the cities in search of food; many villages were left empty…. It was also said that peasants were digging underground pits to hide their food. Others spoke of places where the population had been decimated by starvation.

According to the Guang Ming Daily (April 27, 1980), in the North-West, the famine generated an ecological disaster: in their struggle to grow some food, the peasants destroyed grasslands and forests. Half of the grasslands and one third of the forests vanished between 1959 and 1962: the region was damaged permanently. The People’s Daily (May 14, 1980) said that the disaster of the “Great Leap” had affected the lives of a hundred million people who were physically devastated by the prolonged shortage of food. (Note that, at the time, China experts throughout the world refused to believe that there was famine in China. A BBC commentator, for instance, declared typically that a widespread famine in such a well-organized country was unthinkable.)

Today, in order to stem the tide of popular discontent which threatens to engulf his rule, Deng Xiaoping is invoking again the authority of Mao. That he should be willing to call that ghost to the rescue provides a measure of his desperation. Considering the history of the last sixty years, one can easily imagine what sort of response the Chinese are now giving to such an appeal.

Deng’s attempts to revive and promote Marxist studies are no less unpopular. Marxism has acquired a very bad name in China—which is quite understandable, though somewhat unfair: after all, it was never really tried.

1
Looking at this phenomenon from an East European angle, Kazimierz Brandys made similar observations in his admirable Warsaw Diary (Random House, 1983).↩

2
Epilogue: in 1982, a People’s Daily survey revealed that over 90 percent of Chinese youth do not have an inkling of what Marxism is.↩

3
The New York Review, April 26, 1990.↩

Voir aussi:

Cunning like a hedgehog

Cunning like a heldgehog. In memory of Jean-François Revel, man of letters, man of integrity, friend

Simon Leys

The Australian Literary Review, 1 August 2007

G K. CHESTERTON, whose formidable mind drew inspiration from a vast culture – literary, political, poetical, historical and philosophical – once received the naive praise of a lady: “Oh, Mr Chesterton, you know so many things!” He suavely replied: “Madam, I know nothing: I am a journalist.”

The many enemies of French philosopher Jean-François Revel (1924-2006) often attempted to dismiss him as a mere journalist which, of course, he was among many other things, and very much in the Chestertonian fashion.

At first he may seem odd to associate these two names: what could there be in common between the great Christian apologist and the staunch atheist, between the mystical poet and the strict rationalist, between the huge, benevolent man mountain and the short, fiery, nimble and pugnacious intellectual athlete (and, should we also add, between the devoted husband and the irrepressible ladies’ man)? One could multiply the contrasts, yet, on a deeper level, the essence of their genius was very much alike.

Revel was an extrovert who took daily delight in the company of his friends:

I am the most sociable creature; other people’s society is my joy. Though, for me, a happy day should have a part of solitude, it must also afford a few hours of the most intense of all the pleasures of the mind: conversation. Friendship has always occupied a central place in my life, as well as the keen desire to make new acquaintances, to hear them, to question them, to test their reactions to my own views.

Always sparring with his interlocutors, he was passionately commited to is ideas, but if he took his own beliefs with utter seriousness, he did not take his own person seriously. Again, one could apply to him what Chesterton’s brother said of his famous sibling: “He had a passionate need to express his opinions, but he would express them as readily and well to a man he met on a bus.”

Revel’s capacity for self-irony is the crowning grace of his memoirs, The Thief in an Empty House. Personal records can be a dangerous exercice, but in his case it eventuated in a triumphant masterpiece.

His humour enchanted his readers, but kept disconcerting the more pompous pundits. The French greatly value wit, which they display in profusion, but humour often makes them uneasy, especially when it is applied to important subjects; they do not have a word for it, they do not know the thing.

Whereas wit is a form of duelling – it aims to wound or to kill – the essence of humour is self-deprecatory. Once again, a Chestertonian saying could be apposite: “My critics think that I am not serious, but only funny, because they think that ‘funny’ is the opposite of ‘serious’. But ‘funny’ is the opposite of ‘not funny’ and nothing else. Whether a man chooses to tell the truth in long sentences or in short jokes is analogous to whether he chooses to tell the truth in French or German.”

What compounded the dismay of Revel’s pretentious critics was his implacable clarity. One of his close friends and collaborators said he doubted if Revel, in his entire career, had written a single sentence that was obscure. In the Parisian intellectual world such a habit can easily ruin a writer’s credit, for simple souls and solemn mediocrities are impressed only by what is couched in opaque jargon. And, in their eyes, how could one possibly say something important if one is not self-important?

With the accuracy of his information and the sharpness of his irony, Revel deflated the huge balloons of cant that elevate the chattering classes. They felt utterly threatened, for he was exposing the puffery of the latest intellectual fashions upon which their livehood depended. At times they could not hide their panic; for instance, the great guru of the intelligentsia, Jacques Lacan, during one of his psychoanalytical seminars at the Sorbonne, performed in front of his devotees a voodoo-like exorcism.

He frantically trampled underfoot and destroyed a copy of Revel’s book Why Philosophers?, in which Lacan’s charlatanism was analysed.

Yet such outbursts weere mere circus acts; far more vicious was the invisible conspiracy that surrounded Revel with a wall of silence, well documented in Pierre Boncenne’s Pour Jean-François Revel: Un esprit libre (Plon, Paris, 2006), a timely and perceptive book that takes the full measure of Revel’s intellectual, literary and human stature.

A paradoxical situation developed: Revel’s weekly newspaper columns were avidly read, nearly every one of his 30-odd books was an instant bestseller, and yet the most influential “progressive” critics studiously ignored his existence. His books were not reviewed, his ideas were not discussed, if his name was mentioned at all it was with a patronising sneer, if not downright slander.

Revel was quintessentially French in his literary tastes and sensitivity (his pages on Michel de Montaigne, Francois Rabelais and Marcel Proust marry intelligence with love; his anthology of French poetry mirrors his original appreciation of the poetic language), in his art of living (his great book on gastronomy is truly a “feast in words”) and in his conviviality (he truly cared for his friends).

And yet what strikingly set him apart from most other intellectuals of his generation was his genuinely cosmopolitan outlook.

He had spent abroad the best part of his formative and early creative years, mostly in Mexico and Italy. In addition to English (spoken by few educated Fench of his time) he was fluent in Italian, Spanish and German; until the end of his life he retained the healthy habit to start every day (he rose at 5am) by listening to he BBC news and reading six foreign newspapers.

On international affairs, on literature, art and ideas, he had universal perspectives that broke completely from the suffocating provincialism of the contemporary Parisian elites. In the 18th century, French was the common language of the leading minds of continental Europe; 20th-century French intellectuals hardly noticed that times had changed in this respect; they retained the dangerous belief that whatever was not expressed in French could hardly matter.

Revel never had enough sarcasm to denounce this sort of self-indulgence; on the bogus notion of le rayonnement français, he was scathing: “French culture has radiated for so long, it’s a wonder mankind has not died from sunstroke.” He fiercely fought against chauvinist cultural blindness, and especially against its most cretinous expression: irrational anti-Americanism. At the root of this attitude he detected a subconscious resentment: the french feel that when Americans are playing a leading role in the political-cultural world they are usurping what is by birthright a French prerogative.

By vocation and academic training Revel was originally a philosopher (he entered at an exceptionally early age the Ecole Normale Superieure, the apex of the French higher education system). He taught philosophy and eventually wrote a history of Western philosophy (eschewing all technical jargon, it is a model of lucid synthesis).

However, he became disenchanted with the contemporary philosophers who, he flet, had betrayed their calling by turning philosophy into a professional career and a mere literary genre. “Philosophy,” he wrote “ought to return to its original and fundamental question: How should I live?” he preferred simply to call himslef “a man of letters”.

Ancient Greek poet Archilochus famously said: “The fow knows many things but the hedgehog knows one big thing.” Revel was the archetypical fox, but at the same time he held with all the determination of a hedgehog to one central idea that inspires, pervades and motivates all his endeavours:

The belief that each individual destiny, as well as the destiny of mankind, depends upon the accuracy – or the falsity – of the information at their disposal, and upon the way in which they put this information to use.

He devoted one of his books specifically to this issue, La Connaissance Inutile (Useless Knowledge), but this theme runs through nearly all his writings.

Politics naturally absorbed a great amount of his attention. From the outset he showed his willingness to commit himself personaly, and at great risk: as a young man in occupied France he joined the Resistance against the Nazis. After the war, his basic political allegiance was, and always remainded, to the Left and the principles of liberal democracy. He was sharply critical of Charles de Gaulle and of all saviours and providential leaders in military uniforms.

Yet, like George Orwell before him, he always believed that only an uncompromising denunciation of all forms of Stalinist totalitarianism can ensure the ultimate victory of socialism. Thus – again, like Orwell – he earned for himself the hostility of his starry-eyed comrades.

Revel’s attempt at entering into active politics was short-lived, but the experience gave him an invaluable insight into the essential intellectual dishonesty that is unavoidably attached to partisan politicking. He was briefly a Socialist Party candidate at the 1967 national elections, which put him in close contact with François Mitterrand (then leader of the Opposition). The portrait he paints of Mitterrand in his memoirs is hilarious and horrifying.

Mitterrand was the purest type of political animal: he had no politics at all. He had a brilliant intelligence, but for him ideas were neither right or wrong, they were only useful or useless in the pursuit of power. The object of power was not a possibility to enact certain policies; the object of all policies was simply attain and retain power.

Revel, having drafted a speech for his own electoral campaign, was invited by Mitterrand to read it to him. The speech started, “Although I cannot deny some of my opponent’s achievements…” Mitterand interrupted him at once, screaming: “No! Never, never! In politics never acknowledge that your opponent has any merit. This is the basic rule of the game.”

Revel understood once and for all that this game was not for him and it was the end of his political ambition. Which proved to be a blessing: had politics swallowed him at that early stage in his life how much poorer the world of ideas and letters would have been. (And one could have said exactly the same about his close friend Mario Vargas Llosa, who – luckily for literature – was defeated in presidential elections in Peru.)

Dead writers who were also friends never leave us: whenever we open their books, we hear again their very personal voices and our old exchanges are suddenly revived. I had many conversations (and discussions: different opinions are the memorable spices of friendship) with Revel; yet what I wish to record here is not something he said, but a silence that had slightly puzzled me at the time. The matter is trifling and frivolous (for which I apologise), but what touches me is that I found the answer many years later, in his writings.

A long time ago, as we were walking along a street in Paris, chatting as we went, he asked me about a film I had seen the night before, Federico Fellini’s Casanova (which he had not seen). I told him that one scene had impressed me, by its acute psychological insight into the truth that love-making without love is but a very grim sort of gymnastics. He stopped abruptly and gave me a long quizzical look, as if he was trying to find out whether I really believed that, or was merely pulling his leg.

Unable to decide, he said, “Hmmm” and we resumed our walk, chatting of other things.

Many years later, reading his autobiography, I suddenly understood. When he was a precocious adolescent of 15, at school in Marseilles, he was quite brilliant in all humanities subjects but hopeless in mathematics. Every Thursday, pretending to his mother that he was receiving extra tuition in maths, he used to go to a little brothel. He would first do his school work in the common lounge and, after that, go upstairs with one of the girls. The madam granted him a “beginner’s rebate”, and the tuition fee generously advanced by his mother covered the rest.

One Thursday, however, as he was walking up the stairs his maths teacher came down. The young man froze, but the teacher passed impassively, merely muttering between clenched teeth: “You will always get passing marks in maths.” The schoolboy kept their secret and the teacher honoured his part of the bargain; Revel’s mother was delighted by the sudden improvement in his school results.

I belatedly realised that, from a rather early age, Revel had acquired a fairly different perspective on the subject of our chat.

At the time of Revel’s death in April last year, Vargas Llosa concluded the eloquent and deeply felt obituary he wrote for our friend in Spanish newspaper El pais: “Jean-François Revel, we are going to miss you so much.” How true.

Voir encore:

To the Editors:

Bashing an elderly nun under an obscene label does not seem to be a particularly brave or stylish thing to do. Besides, it appears that the attacks which are being directed at Mother Teresa all boil down to one single crime:she endeavors to be a Christian, in the most literal sense of the word—which is (and always was, and will always remain) a most improper and unacceptable undertaking in this world.

Indeed, consider her sins:

She occasionally accepts the hospitality of crooks, millionaires, and criminals. But it is hard to see why, as a Christian, she should be more choosy in this respect than her Master, whose bad frequentations were notorious, and shocked all the Hitchenses of His time.
Instead of providing efficient and hygienic services to the sick and dying destitutes, she merely offers them her care and her love. When I am on my death bed, I think I should prefer to have one of her Sisters by my side, rather than a modern social worker.
She secretly baptizes the dying. The material act of baptism consists in shedding a few drops of water on the head of a person, while mumbling a dozen simple ritual words. Either you believe in the supernatural effect of this gesture—and then you should dearly wish for it. Or you do not believe in it, and the gesture is as innocent and well-meaningly innocuous as chasing a fly away with a wave of the hand. If a cannibal who happens to love you presents you with his most cherished possession—a magic crocodile tooth that should protect you forever—will you indignantly reject his gift for being primitive and superstitious, or would you gratefully accept it as a generous mark of sincere concern and affection?
Jesus was spat upon—but not by journalists, as there were none in His time. It is now Mother Teresa’s privilege to experience this particular updating of her Master’s predicament.

Simon Leys
Canberra, Australia

Christopher Hitchens
DECEMBER 19, 1996 ISSUE
In response to:
In Defense of Mother Teresa from the September 19, 1996 issue

To the Editors:

Since the letter from Simon Leys [“In Defense of Mother Teresa,” NYR, September 19] is directed at myself rather than at your reviewer, may I usurp the right to reply?

In my book, The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa In Theory and Practice, I provide evidence that Mother Teresa has consoled and supported the rich and powerful, allowing them all manner of indulgence, while preaching obedience and resignation to the poor. In a classic recent instance of what I mean—an instance that occurred too late for me to mention it—she told the April 1996 Ladies’ Home Journal that her new friend Princess Diana would be better off when free of her marriage. (“It is good that it is over. Nobody was happy anyhow.”) When Mother Teresa said this, she had only just finished advising the Irish electorate to vote “No” in a national referendum that proposed the right of civil divorce and remarriage. (That vote, quite apart from its importance in separating Church from State in the Irish Republic, had an obvious bearing on the vital discussion between Irish Catholics and Protestants as to who shall make law in a possible future cooperative island that is threatened by two kinds of Christian fundamentalism.)

Evidence and argument of this kind, I have discovered, make no difference to people like Mr. Leys. Such people do not exactly deny Mother Teresa’s complicity with earthly powers. Instead, they make vague allusions to the gospels. Here I can claim no special standing. The gospels do not agree on the life of the man Jesus, and they make assertions—such as his ability to cast demonic spells on pigs—that seem to reflect little credit upon him. However, when Mr. Leys concedes that Mother Teresa “occasionally accepts the hospitality of crooks, millionaires, and criminals” and goes on to say, by way of apologetics, that her Master’s “bad frequentations were notorious,” I still feel entitled to challenge him. Was his Jesus ever responsible for anything like Mother Teresa’s visit to the Duvaliers in Haiti, where she hymned the love of Baby Doc and his wife for the poor, and the reciprocal love of the poor for Baby Doc and his wife? Did he ever accept a large subvention of money, as did Mother Teresa from Charles Keating, knowing it to have been stolen from small and humble savers? Did he ever demand a strict clerical control over, not just abortion, but contraception and marriage and divorce and adoption? These questions are of no hermeneutic interest to me, but surely they demand an answer from people like Leys who claim an understanding of the Bible’s “original intent.”

On my related points—that Mother Teresa makes no real effort at medical or social relief, and that her mission is religious and propagandistic and includes surreptitious baptism of unbelievers—I notice that Mr. Leys enters no serious dissent. It is he and not I who chooses to compare surreptitious baptism to the sincere and loving gesture of an innocent “cannibal” (his term) bestowing a fetish. Not all that inexact as a parallel, perhaps—except that the “cannibal” is not trying to proselytize.

Mr. Leys must try and make up his mind. At one point he says that the man called Jesus “shocked all the Hitchenses of His time”: a shocking thought indeed to an atheist and semi-Semitic polemicist like myself, who can discover no New Testament authority for the existence of his analogue in that period. Later he says, no less confidently, that “Jesus was spat upon—but not by journalists, as there were none in His [sic] time.” It is perhaps in this confused light that we must judge his assertion that the endeavor to be a Christian “is (and always was, and will always remain)” something “improper and unacceptable.” The public career of Mother Teresa has been almost as immune from scrutiny or criticism as any hagiographer could have hoped—which was my point in the first place. To represent her as a woman defiled with spittle for her deeds or beliefs is—to employ the term strictly for once—quite incredible. But it accords with the Christian self-pity that we have to endure from so many quarters (Justice Scalia, Ralph Reed, Mrs. Dole) these days. Other faiths are taking their place in that same queue, to claim that all criticism is abusive, blasphemous, and defamatory by definition. Mr. Leys may not care for some of the friends that he will make in this line. Or perhaps I misjudge him?

Finally, I note that he describes the title of my book as “obscene,” and complains that it attacks someone who is “elderly.” Would he care to say where the obscenity lies? Also, given that I have been criticizing Mother Teresa since she was middle-aged (and publicly denounced the senile Khomeini in his homicidal dotage), can he advise me of the age limit at which the faithful will admit secular criticism as pardonable? Not even the current occupant of the Holy See has sought protection from dissent on the ground ofanno domini.

Christopher Hitchens
Washington, DC

On Mother Teresa

Simon Leys
JANUARY 9, 1997 ISSUE
In response to:
Mother Teresa from the December 19, 1996 issue

The following is a reply to Christopher Hitchens’s letter in the December 19, 1996, issue.

To the Editors:

If Mr. Hitchens were to write an essay on His Holiness the Dalai Lama, being a competent journalist, he would no doubt first acquaint himself with Buddhism in general and with Tibetan Buddhism in particular. On the subject of Mother Teresa, however, he does not seem to have felt the need to acquire much information on her spiritual motivations—his book contains a remarkable number of howlers on elementary aspects of Christianity (and even now, in the latest ammunition he drew from The Ladies’ Home Journal, he displayed a complete ignorance of the position of the Catholic Church on the issues of marriage, divorce, and remarriage).

In this respect, his strong and vehement distaste for Mother Teresa reminds me of the indignation of the patron in a restaurant, who, having been served caviar on toast, complained that the jam had a funny taste of fish. The point is essential—but it deserves a development which would require more space and more time than can be afforded to me, here and now. (However, I am working on a full-fledged review of his book, which I shall gladly forward to him once it comes out in print.)

Finally, Mr. Hitchens asked me to explain what made me say that The Missionary Position is an obscene title. His question, without doubt, bears the same imprint of sincerity and good faith that characterized his entire book. Therefore, I owe him an equally sincere and straightforward answer: my knowledge of colloquial English being rather poor, I had to check the meaning of this enigmatic title in The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (Oxford University Press, 1993, 2 vols.—the only definition of the expression can be found in Vol. I, p. 1794). But Mr. Hitchens having no need for such a tool in the exercise of his trade probably does not possess a copy of it. It will therefore be a relief for his readers to learn that his unfortunate choice of a title was totally innocent: when he chose these words, how could he possibly have guessed what they actually meant?

Simon Leys
Canberra, Australia
T’IEN HSIA
An Interview with Pierre Ryckmans
Daniel Sanderson
The Australian National University
The following interview was originally published in the Chinese Studies Association of Australia Newsletter, No.41 (February 2011). It was conducted via correspondence between Daniel Sanderson, the editor of the Newsletter, and Pierre Ryckmans. China Heritage Quarterly takes pleasure in reproducing it here with permission and adding it to our archive related to New Sinology.

In The Hall of Uselessness: collected essays published in mid 2011, Professor Ryckmans includes the text of a speech he made in March 2006 entitled ‘The Idea of the University’. Discussing the tension between intellectual creativity at universities and the creep of managerialism that has increasingly benighted the life of the mind at universities he made the following observation:

Near to the end of his life, Gustave Flaubert wrote in one of his remarkable letters to his dear friend Ivan Turgenev a little phrase that could beautifully summarise my topic. ‘I have always tired to live in an ivory tower; but a tide of shit is beating at its walls, threatening to undermine it.’ These are indeed the two poles of our predicament: on one side, the need for an ‘ivory tower’, and on the other side, the threat of the ‘tide of shit’.
—’The Idea of the University’, in Simon Leys, The Hall of Uselessness—collected essays, Collingwood, Victoria: Black Inc., 2011, p.398.
From September 2011 over four issues of this e-journal we will serialize Professor Ryckmans’ Boyer Lectures, Aspects of Culture: A View From the Bridge, originally broadcast by ABC Radio National in 1996.—The Editor

An internationally renowned Sinologist, Professor Ryckmans spent seventeen years teaching at The Australian National University and six years as Professor of Chinese at the University of Sydney. Having retired from academic life in 1993, he remains a regular contributor to a range of publications including The New York Review of Books, Le Figaro Littéraire and The Monthly. Throughout his career, Ryckmans has combined meticulous scholarship and a vigorous public engagement with contemporary political and intellectual issues. His elegant yet forthright style is evident in these responses to questions submitted by the CSAA Newsletter.—Daniel Sanderson
Daniel Sanderson: Can you tell us about your childhood and teenage years? Where were you born? Where did you grow up? What kind of family life did you have as a child?

Pierre Ryckmans: I was born and grew up in Brussels; I had a happy childhood. To paraphrase Tolstoy: all happy childhoods are alike—(warm affection and much laughter—the recipe seems simple enough.)
The main benefit of this is that later on in life, one feels no compulsion to waste time in ‘The Pursuit of Happiness’—a rather foolish enterprise: as if happiness was something you could chase after.

DS: What form did your early education take?

PR: A traditional-classic education (Latin—Greek).

DS: Was China in any way an element of your childhood? Was there, for instance, any scope to study Chinese history or politics, or the Chinese language, at school?

PR: No—nothing at all (alas!).

DS: You studied law and art history at the Université Catholique de Louvain [now the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven]. This seems an unusual combination. What drew you to these subjects? Were you influenced particularly by any of your teachers?

PR: I studied Law to follow a family tradition, and Art History to follow my personal interest.
At university, personal contacts, intellectual debates and exchanges with friends and schoolmates (many of whom came from Asia and Latin America) were far more important, enriching and memorable than most lectures. Lately I noted with pleasure that John Henry Newman already made a similar observation in his great classic The Idea of a University (1852).

DS: I understand you visited the People’s Republic of China with a group of Belgian students in 1955. How was this visit arranged? What was your impression of the New China at that time? Did you ever return to the PRC? If so, under what circumstances? Do you think that some experience of living in China is necessary for the scholar of China?

PR: The Chinese Government had invited a delegation of Belgian Youth (10 delegates—I was the youngest, age nineteen) to visit China for one month (May 1955). The voyage—smoothly organized—took us to the usual famous spots, climaxing in a one-hour private audience with Zhou Enlai.
My overwhelming impression (a conclusion to which I remained faithful for the rest of my life) was that it would be inconceivable to live in this world, in our age, without a good knowledge of Chinese language and a direct access to Chinese culture.

DS: What did you do after completing your undergraduate degree? Did you progress directly to further study? Did you ever consider a career outside the academy?
PR: I started learning Chinese. Since, at that time, no scholarship was available to go to China, I went to Taiwan. I had no ‘career’ plan whatsoever. I simply wished to know Chinese and acquire a deeper appreciations of Chinese culture.

DS: I would like to learn something about your PhD. What was your topic? Why was it important to you?

PR: Loving Western painting, quite naturally I became enthralled with Chinese painting (and calligraphy) – and I developed a special interest for what the Chinese wrote on the subject of painting: traditionally, the greatest painters were also scholars, poets, men of letters – hence the development of an extraordinarily rich, eloquent and articulate literature on painting, philosophical, critical, historical and technical.
We are often tempted to do research on topics that are somewhat marginal and lesser-known, since, on these, it is easier to produce original work. But one of my Chinese masters gave me a most valuable advice: ‘Always devote yourself to the study of great works—works of fundamental importance—and your effort will never be wasted.’ Thus, for my PhD thesis, I chose to translate and comment what is generally considered as a masterpiece, the treatise on painting by Shitao, a creative genius of the early eighteenth century; he addresses the essential questions: Why does one paint? How should one paint? Among all my books, this one, first published forty years ago, has never gone out of print—and, to my delight, it is read by painters much more than by sinologists!

DS: You lived for some years in Taiwan, also spending time in Hong Kong and Singapore. Do you think your time spent on the ‘periphery’ of China has influenced your approach to the study of China?

PR: During some twelve years, I lived and worked successively in Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong (plus six months in Japan). It was a happy period of intense activity—living and learning in an environment where all my friends became my teachers, and all my teachers, my friends. I am fond of a saying by Prince de Ligne (a writer I much admire): ‘Let each one examine what he has most desired. If he is happy, it is because his wishes have not been granted.’ For some years, I had wished I could study in China; but now, in retrospect, I realise that, had I been given such a chance at that particular time (1958-1970), I would never have been allowed to enjoy in China such rich, diverse, easy and close human contacts.

DS: You arrived in Australia in 1970 to take up a position at the Australian National University. How did this come about? What was your role? Can you tell me a little about the atmosphere at ANU during your early years there?

PR: Professor Liu Ts’un-yan (Head of the Chinese department at ANU) came to see me in Hong Kong and invited me to join his department. Thus, with my wife and four (very young) children, we moved to Canberra for what was supposed to be a three-year stay, but turned out to become our final, permanent home. Professor Liu was not only a great scholar, he was also an exquisite man; for me, working in his department till his own retirement (fifteen years later) was sheer bliss—it also coincided with what must have been the golden age of our universities. Later on, the atmosphere changed—for various politico-economic and other reasons—and I took early retirement. The crisis of Higher Education is a vast problem, and a world phenomenon; I have spoken and written on the subject—there is no need and no space to repeat it here.

DS: The 1970s were a period of great political division within the field of Chinese Studies, and across society at large. The iconoclasm of the Cultural Revolution was attractive to many in the West. It was in this context that your book, The Chairman’s New Clothes, appeared in 1971, bursting the Maoist bubble. This was followed in 1976 by the equally controversial Chinese Shadows. Both these works stirred considerable debate in Europe. What was the reaction in Australia, particularly within the Chinese Studies community? Were you ever attracted to the Maoist experiment yourself?

PR: My own interest, my own field of work is Chinese literature and Chinese painting. When commenting on Chinese contemporary politics, I was merely stating common sense evidence and common knowledge. But at that time, this may indeed have disturbed some fools here and there—which, in the end, did not matter very much.

DS: Do you think political engagement is a necessary part of the intellectual life?

PR: In a democracy, political engagement is a necessary part of everyone’s life. (The political views of the greatest philosopher on earth may well be more silly than those of his ignorant housekeeper.)

DS: You spent seventeen years at ANU and a further six years at the University of Sydney engaged in the study and teaching of Chinese literature. Can you comment on the changes you saw within Chinese Studies at those institutions, and in Australia more generally, during that time?

PR: I am poorly informed on more recent developments (I left academic life sixteen years ago). When things began to change (education becoming mere training) and took an orientation that corresponded no longer to what I always believed a university ought to be, I opted for early retirement. In front of younger colleagues who keep bravely fighting the good fight, I feel like a deserter, ill-qualified to make further comments.

DS: It is perhaps a reductive question, but I wonder whether you could tell me what it is about the literature of China that you find appealing?

PR: The virtue and power of the Chinese literary language culminates in its classical poetry. Chinese classical poetry seems to me the purest, the most perfect and complete form of poetry one could conceive of. Better that any other poetry, it fits Auden’s definition: ‘memorable speech': and indeed, it carves itself effortlessly into your memory. Furthermore, like painting, it splendidly occupies a visual space in its calligraphic incarnations. It inhabits your mind, it accompanies your life, it sustains and illuminates your daily experiences.

DS: Why, in your opinion, is the study of China necessary in Australia? Or, indeed, is it necessary at all?

PR: Why is scholarly knowledge necessary in Australia? And why culture?

DS: A large proportion of your writing has been aimed at a general readership. Do you think academics, and China scholars in particular, bear a responsibility to communicate with the public?

PR: Sidney Hook said that the first moral obligation of an intellectual is to be intelligent. Regarding academics and China scholars one might paraphrase this statement and say that their first duty is to master their discipline. Yet communicating with the public is a special talent; very learned scholars do not necessarily possess it.

DS: Though based in Canberra, you continue to take part in European political and cultural life through your writings in French. Do you think your physical distance from Europe affects your approach to these issues?

PR: Distance also has its advantages.

DS: What are you reading at the moment?

PR: Leszek Kolekowski, My Correct Views of Everything; F.W. Mote, China and the Vocation of History in the Twentieth Century—A Personal Memoir; and for bedside reading, I keep constantly dipping into two huge collections of sardonic aphorisms (gloriously incorrect!) by two eccentric and lonely geniuses: Cioran’s posthumous notebooks (Cahiers) and Nicolás Gómez Dávila’s Escolios a un texto implícito (my Spanish is very primitive, but have the help of two volumes of French translations).

DS: When you reflect on your career as a whole, what makes you proudest?

PR: I had various (rather disjointed) activities—not exactly a ‘career’ on which I can ‘reflect’.

DS: Do you have any regrets?

PR: Regrets? Usually what we regret is what we did not do. Let me think about it.

DS: What are your thoughts on the current state of Chinese Studies in Australian universities? Do you think Australian scholars have particular strengths or weaknesses when it comes to the study of China?

PR: As I said earlier, I left academe some sixteen years ago. I am really not in a position to assess the current state of Chinese Studies in Australian universities.

DS: What are your hopes for the future?

PR: May cultural exchanges further develop! (In our capital city, ANU seems particularly well placed for discharging this important task.)

DS: Do you have any advice for aspiring scholars of China?

PR: First of all, learn the Chinese language to the best of your ability (and spend as much time as possible in a Chinese-speaking environment). Language fluency is the key which will open all doors for you—practically and spiritually.

The Man Who Got It Right
Ian Buruma

The New York Review of Books

AUGUST 15, 2013
The Hall of Uselessness: Collected Essays
by Simon Leys
New York Review Books, 572 pp., $19.95 (paper)
Buruma_1-081513.jpg
Ray Strange/Newspix
Pierre Ryckmans, who writes under the name of Simon Leys, Canberra, Australia, June 2009
1.

Near the beginning of Simon Leys’s marvelous collection of essays is an odd polemic between the author and the late Christopher Hitchens, fought out in these very pages. Leys takes Hitchens to task for attacking Mother Teresa in a book entitled The Missionary Position. He writes: “Bashing an elderly nun under an obscene label does not seem to be a particularly brave or stylish thing to do.” Hitchens replies: What do you mean, obscene? You know perfectly well, answers Leys. And so on and on.

What interested me about this exchange was not the relative merits of the arguments put forth by two writers who had at least one thing in common—a love of George Orwell and G.K. Chesterton, possibly for the same reasons, to which I shall return a little later. The most interesting thing, to me, was the anecdote related by Leys at the end of his account, about sitting in an Australian café minding his own business while a radio is blaring musical and spoken pap in the background. By chance, the program switched to a Mozart clarinet quintet, for a moment turning the café “into an antechamber of Paradise.” People fell silent, there were looks of bafflement, and then, “to the huge relief of all,” one customer “stood up, walked straight to the radio,” turned the knob to another station, and “restored at once the more congenial noises, which everyone could again comfortably ignore.”

Leys describes this event as a kind of epiphany. He is sure that philistinism does not result from the lack of knowledge. The customer who could not abide hearing Mozart’s music recognized its beauty. Indeed, he did what he did precisely for that reason. The desire to destroy beauty, according to Leys, applies not just to aesthetics but as much, if not more, to ethics: “The need to bring down to our own wretched level, to deface, to deride and debunk any splendour that is towering above us, is probably the saddest urge of human nature.”
I’m not sure whether the deeds of Mother Teresa can really be compared usefully to Mozart’s music. An alternative explanation for the behavior of the man in the café might be that he disliked Mozart’s music out of class resentment. The “philistines” wouldn’t put up with something they associated with people who might sneer at their lack of refinement. Perhaps. In fact, there is no way of knowing what really went through the man’s head. But the idea that art, ethics, and matters of the spirit, including religious faith, come from the same place is central to Leys’s concerns. All his essays, about André Gide or Evelyn Waugh no less than the art of Chinese calligraphy, revolve around this.

Leys once described in these pages the destruction of the old walls and gates of Beijing in the 1950s and 1960s as a “sacrilege.”1 The thick walls surrounding the ancient capital were “not so much a medieval defense apparatus as a depiction of a cosmic geometry, a graphic of the universal order.” Pre-modern Chinese politics were intimately linked with religious beliefs: the ruler was the intermediary between heaven and earth, his empire, if ruled wisely, a reflection of the cosmic order. Classical Beijing, much of it built in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, was deliberately planned to reflect this order. It survived almost intact until the 1950s. Apart from a few pockets, such as the Forbidden City, nothing of this old city remains.

Critics over the years have attacked Leys for being an elitist, a Western mimic of Chinese literati, an aesthete who cares more about high culture than people, more about walls and temples than the poor Beijingers who had to live in dark and primitive alleys, oppressed by absolute rulers and feudal superstition. But this misses the point. It was not Leys’s intention to defend the Chinese imperial or feudal system. On the contrary, he lamented the fact that Maoists decided to smash the extraordinary artifacts of the past instead of the attitudes that made feudalism so oppressive in the first place. The stones were destroyed; many of the attitudes, alas, remained, albeit under different rulers.

Iconoclasts, not only in China, are as enthralled by the sacred properties of the objects they destroy as those who venerate them. This much we know. But Leys goes further. In his view, Maoists didn’t just reduce the walls of Beijing, and much else besides, to rubble because they believed such acts would liberate the Chinese people; they smashed Yuan and Ming and Qing Dynasty treasures because they were beautiful. Yet beauty, as Leys himself insists, is rarely neutral. His use of the term “sacrilege” suggests that there was more to Maoist iconoclasm than a philistine resentment of architectural magnificence. Leys quotes Guo Moruo, one of the most famous mandarins of the Chinese Communist revolution, on the city walls in Sichuan where the scholar and poet grew up. People approaching a town near Guo’s native village felt a “sense of religious awe when confronted with the severe majestic splendor” of the city gate. Guo notes the rarity of such superb walls outside Sichuan—“except in Peking, of course, where the walls are truly majestic.”

Guo was a Communist, but not a vandal. He paid a common price for his love of the wrong kind of beauty. Persecuted during the Cultural Revolution, he was forced to declare that his books were worthless and should be burned. Two of his children were driven to suicide, and Guo had to write odes in praise of Chairman Mao for the rest of the Great Helmsman’s life.

The point about the walls is, of course, not merely aesthetic, nostalgic, or even to do with awe. Heinrich Heine’s famous dictum—“Where they burn books, they will ultimately also burn people”2—applies to China too. It wasn’t just buildings that were shattered under Chairman Mao, but tens of millions of human lives.

In one of his essays, Leys refers to the first Communist decades in China as “thirty years of illiterates’ rule,” which might be construed as snobbish; but the relative lack of education among the top Communist cadres is not actually the main issue for Leys. His targets are never uneducated barbarians, people too ignorant or stupid to know what they are doing. The objects of his devastating and bitterly funny barbs are fellow intellectuals, often fellow academics, most often fellow experts on China, people who faithfully followed every twist and turn of the Chinese Communist Party line, even though they knew better. Such people as the writer Han Suyin, for example, who declared that the Cultural Revolution was a Great Leap Forward for mankind until she observed, once the line had changed, that it had been a terrible disaster.

I recognize the type, since they were to be found among the Dutch professors who taught me Chinese literature and history at Leyden University in the early 1970s, when the Cultural Revolution was still raging. None of them was a Maoist, in the sense that they would have advocated Mao’s politics in their own country. But China, whose unique culture my professors spent their lives studying, was different. Ordinary Chinese, one world-famous expert of early Chinese Buddhism explained to us, loved the revolutionary operas that replaced the popular classical operas, which were banned. Presumably, they also didn’t mind being cooped up in rigidly controlled state communes, and believed in the justice of “struggle sessions” against “revisionists,” “bourgeois splitists” and other “enemies of the people” who were humiliated, tortured, and often murdered in public. In any case, was it not a smug illusion to think that we were so free in our Western democracies? And apart from anything else, it was important not to ruin one’s chances to visit China. It really wouldn’t do to upset the Chinese authorities.

So when Leys first published his scorching polemical essays against the idiocies of Western apologists for Mao’s misrule in the 1970s, some of my professors were very annoyed. And yet, in the fierce debate that followed, they kept curiously aloof. They simply dismissed Leys.3 His writings on China did, however, spark strong arguments among journalists and intellectuals, which had less to with China itself than with local concerns with student protest, ideological conflict, and the colonial past.

If Leys’s views were unwelcome in Leyden, this was even more true in France, where Maoism had captivated the minds of many more intellectuals. One conspicuous feature of the European Maoists in the 1970s was their obliviousness to actual conditions in China. The Chinese were discussed almost as an abstraction. Leys, who cared deeply about the Chinese, became a hate figure in Paris. I remember watching him on a French television chat show. The host, Bernard Pivot, asked him why he had decided to take on what seemed like the entire Parisian intellectual establishment. Leys replied with one word: chagrin—grief, sorrow, distress.

2.

Simon Leys is actually the nom de plume for Pierre Ryckmans, a French-speaking Belgian with a Flemish name. He fell in love with Chinese culture when he visited China as part of a student delegation in 1955. After studying law at the Catholic university in Louvain, Leys became a scholar of Chinese, living for several years in Taiwan, Singapore, and in Hong Kong, where he made friends with a young Chinese calligrapher who, in a traditional flourish of stylish humility, named his own slum dwelling the Hall of Uselessness. Ryckmans spent two “intense and joyful years” there, “when learning and living were one and the same thing.” The name Leys is a homage to René Leys, the wonderful novel by Victor Segalen (1878–1919) about a seventeen-year-old Belgian who penetrated the mysteries of the Chinese imperial court just before the revolution of 1911.4

Ryckmans/Leys went on to become a highly distinguished professor of Chinese literature in Australia, where he still lives today, writing essays and sailing boats. Few, if any, contemporary scholars of Chinese write as well about the classical Chinese arts—calligraphy, poetry, and painting—let alone about European literature, ranging in this collection from Balzac to Nabokov. None, so far as I know, have written novels as good as his Death of Napoleon. Leys is perhaps unique in that his prose in English is no less sparkling than in French.

Unlike in the 1970s, few people now dispute that Leys was right about the horrors of Mao’s regime. Even the Chinese government admits that more than fifteen million people died of starvation as the direct result of Mao’s deranged experiments in the late 1950s. Recent scholarship shows that the real figure might be as high as forty-five million deaths between 1958 and 1962 (see Frank Dikötter’s Mao’s Great Famine, 2010). The Cultural Revolution, although Mao’s own leading role in it can still not be discussed openly, is commonly referred to as the “great disaster.” One of the questions raised by Leys is why most people got it so wrong when Maoism was at its most murderous. Was it a matter of excusable ignorance about what was then a very closed society?

Leys has a tendency to overdo his expressions of humility, a bit like Chinese mandarins in old comic books: “My little talk,” “My readers will naturally forget this article,” and so on. But he is surely right in claiming that his insights into the Maoist terrors inflicted on the Chinese people owed very little to superior expertise. Famous apologists for Mao’s regime, such as the filmmaker Felix Greene, the once-popular author Ross Terrill, or indeed Han Suyin, had traveled far more extensively in China than Leys had. He hadn’t even set foot there between 1955 and 1972. All he did was listen to Chinese friends and “every day…read a couple of Chinese newspapers over breakfast.” The information he gleaned was freely available in English as well, in the superb China News Analysis, for example, published weekly in Hong Kong by the Jesuit scholar Father Laszlo Ladany, to whom Leys pays tribute in one of his essays. Ladany’s publication was read by every serious follower of Chinese affairs at the time.

So why were the “China experts” (we might as well leave other famous dupes, such as Shirley MacLaine, aside) so obtuse? As in the case of the man who couldn’t tolerate Mozart, Leys dismisses ignorance as an explanation. His answer: “What people believe is essentially what they wish to believe. They cultivate illusions out of idealism—and also out of cynicism.” The truth can be brutal, and makes life uncomfortable. So one looks the other way. This aspect of dealing with China, or any other dictatorship where interests might be at stake, has not changed.

In an essay written after the “Tiananmen Massacre” in 1989, Leys remarks that the mass killings of demonstrators all over China offered everyone, even the most thickheaded, a glimpse of truth; it was so glaring that it was impossible to avoid. But this, too, would pass: “Whenever a minute of silence is being observed in a ceremony, don’t we all soon begin to throw discreet glances at our watches? Exactly how long should a ‘decent interval’ last before we can resume business-as-usual with the butchers of Peking?”

Well, not long, as it turned out. Businessmen, politicians, academics, and others soon came flocking back. Indeed, as Leys says, “they may even have a point when they insist, in agreeing once more to sit at the banquet of the murderers, they are actively strengthening the reformist trends in China.” Then he adds, with a little flick of his pen: “I only wish they had weaker stomachs.”

Which brings me back to Orwell and Chesterton, so much admired by Leys and Christopher Hitchens. Orwell has served as a model for many soi-disant mavericks who like to depict themselves as brave tellers of truth. The case for Chesterton, as Hitchens acknowledged in his very last article, is a little more complicated. Chesterton’s opinions on Jews and “negroes,” though not uncommon in his time, were not entirely in line with the great wisdom Leys attributes to him. The much-vaunted “common sense,” claimed as the prime virtue of Orwell and Chesterton by their admirers, might sometimes be mistaken for philistinism. And Leys’s love of Chesterton occasionally leads him down paths where I find it hard to follow. When Chesterton huffs and puffs that modern people, especially for some reason in Manhattan, “proclaim an erotic religion which at once exalts lust and forbids fertility,” Leys adds, as though his hero’s statement were the pinnacle of prophetic sagacity, that it is surely no coincidence that people in our own time are supporting euthanasia as well as homosexual marriage. Whatever one thinks of euthanasia or homosexual marriage, lust surely has very little to do with it.

Still, the reasons why Leys finds Orwell attractive might be applied in equal measure to Leys himself: “[Orwell’s] intuitive grasp of concrete realities, his non-doctrinaire approach to politics (accompanied with a deep distrust of left-wing intellectuals) and his sense of the absolute primacy of the human dimension.” Both Orwell and Chesterton were good at demolishing cant. Leys is right about that: “[Chesterton’s] striking images could, in turn, deflate fallacies or vividly bring home complex principles. His jokes were irrefutable; he could invent at lightning speed surprising short-cuts to reach the truth.”

3.

When Confucius was asked by one of his disciples what he would do if he were given his own territory to govern, the Master replied that he would “rectify the names,” that is, make words correspond to reality. He explained (in Leys’s translation):

If the names are not correct, if they do not match realities, language has no object. If language is without an object, action becomes impossible—and therefore, all human affairs disintegrate and their management becomes pointless.
Leys comments that Orwell and Chesterton “would have immediately understood and approved of the idea.”

If this reading is right, Confucius wanted to strip the language of cant, and reach the truth through plain speaking, expressing clear thoughts. But Leys believes that he also did more than that: “Under the guise of restoring their full meaning, Confucius actually injected a new content into the old ‘names.’” One example is the interpretation of the word for gentleman, junzi. The old feudal meaning was “aristocrat.” But for Confucius a gentleman’s status could be earned only through education and superior virtue. This was a revolutionary idea; the right to rule would no longer be a matter of birth, but of intellectual and moral accomplishment, tested in an examination system theoretically open to all.

The question of language and truth is the main theme of Leys’s fascinating essays on classical Chinese poetry and art. We commonly assume that speech preceded the written word. In China, however, the earliest words, carved into “oracle bones” some 3,700 years ago, could have been read by people who would not have understood one another in any spoken language. Since these earliest Chinese ideographs, still recognizable in Chinese script today, had to do with forecasting harvests and military affairs, they were, as Leys puts it, “intimately associated with the spirits and with political authority.”

In a way this is still true. Chinese rulers, including the Communists, all like to display their prowess as calligraphers; banal maxims, supposedly written in their hand, are plastered all over public buildings, and even mountainsides, to show the rulers’ mastery of the word, and thus of civilization. The same custom persists not only in Japan but even in North Korea, where words of the Great Leader, or his son, the Dear Leader, or soon, no doubt, his son, General Kim Jong-un, are to be seen everywhere. The magical properties of the word were plainly believed by Red Guards who were quite ready to kill someone “sacriligious” enough to soil one of Mao’s Little Red Books.

To be sure, words are used to obfuscate and lie, as well as to tell the truth. Leys believes that grasping the truth is largely a matter of imagination, poetic imagination. Hence his remark that the “Western incapacity to grasp the Soviet reality and all its Asian variants” was a “failure of imagination” (his italics). Fiction often expresses truth more clearly than mere factual information. Truth, Leys writes, referring to science and philosophy, as well as poetry, “is grasped by an imaginative leap.” The question is how we contrive such leaps.

Leys identifies a basic difference between the Chinese and what he calls, perhaps a bit too loosely, the Western traditions. Classical Chinese poetry or paintings do not set out to mimic reality, to make the world look real in ink, or in poetry to express new ideas or come up with fresh descriptions. The aim is, rather, to make art into a manifestation of nature itself, or indeed vice versa—the found object in the shape of a perfect rock, for instance. The best traditional Chinese artists express themselves by breathing new life into old clichés—the mountains, the rivers, the lonely dwellings, etc. For poets, in Leys’s words, “the supreme art is to position, adjust and fit together…well-worn images in such a way that, from their unexpected encounter, a new life might spark.”

This is almost impossible to convey in translation, because the same images expressed in another language can lose their spark and easily become banal or incomprehensible. For that reason, Leys praises Ezra Pound’s efforts to render classical Chinese poetry in English, despite Pound’s gross linguistic misunderstandings. Pound understood that a Chinese poem “is not articulated upon a continuous, discursive thread, but that it flashes a discontinuous series of images (not unlike the successive frames of a film).”

Western artists often arrived by instinct at a similar understanding of art. Picasso, for example: “The question is not to imitate nature, but to work like it.” Or Paul Claudel: “Art imitates Nature not in its effects as such, but in its causes, in its ‘manner,’ in its process, which are nothing but a participation in and a derivation of actual objects, of the Art of God himself.”

Claudel was a devout Catholic, and thus perhaps (like Chesterton) especially dear to Leys, who makes his attachment to the Roman Church quite clear. But in this, as in other matters, Leys has a cosmopolitan spirit. Although keen to stress Chinese uniqueness in many respects, Leys also stretches himself as far as he can to find common spiritual ground between East and West. He is sensitive to the spirituality of many other traditions (though perhaps not so tolerant of people who reject organized religion per se, hence his spat with Christopher Hitchens). Classical Chinese art, in painting and in poetry, constitutes, as Leys puts it, “the visible manifestation” of “China’s true religion, which is a quest for cosmic harmony, an attempt to achieve communion with the world.”

This would seem, however, to take us a long way from George Orwell’s trust in plain speaking. Or at least, when it comes to spirituality, plain speaking clearly reaches its limits. The spiritual truth of Chinese art—and not only Chinese art—often lies in what is left unsaid or unpainted, the spaces deliberately left blank. In modern Western art, one thinks of the early paintings (White on White, say) by Malevich. But then he came from a Russian tradition, which also sees artworks as spiritual objects. Leys does not mention Russian icons; perhaps they are not part of a “Western” tradition. In any case, he quotes a modern Chinese critic, named Zhou Zuoren, to illustrate an essential part of classical Chinese aesthetics that would apply to many Western modernists as well: “All that can be spelled out is without importance.”

And yet the word remains. In one of Leys’s most interesting and provocative essays on Chinese culture, he tries to find an answer to an apparent paradox: why the Chinese are both obsessed with their past, specifically their five thousand years of cultural continuation, and such lax custodians of the material products of their civilization. India and Europe are full of historic churches, temples, cathedrals, castles, forts, mosques, manor houses, and city halls, while contemporary China has almost nothing of the kind. That this cannot be blamed entirely on Mao and his vandalizing Red Guards is obvious; far more of old Beijing disappeared at the hand of developers after Mao’s death than during the Cultural Revolution. European travelers already complained in the nineteenth century of the fatalistic indifference displayed by Chinese toward their ancient monuments.

People in the Chinese cultural sphere, and perhaps beyond, did not traditionally share the common Western defiance of mortality. The idea of erecting monumental buildings meant to last forever would have seemed a naive illusion. Everything is destined to perish, so why not build impermanence into our sense of beauty? The Japanese took this aesthetic notion even further than their Chinese masters: the cult of cherry blossoms, for example, fleetingness being the essence of their unique splendor. Chinese capital cities in the past were frequently abandoned, and new ones established elsewhere. What is considered to be historic in China is the site, not the buildings that happen to be there at any given time. Buddhist temples and Taoist halls, built a few years ago in concrete, on the same site where older buildings once stood, are still called “ancient” in the tourist guides.

But if even the strongest works of man cannot in the end withstand the erosion of time, what can? Leys’s answer: “Life-after-life was not to be found in a supernature, nor could it rely upon artefacts: man only survives in man—which means, in practical terms, in the memory of posterity, through the medium of the written word.” As long as the word remains, Chinese civilization will continue. Sometimes memories replace great works of art. Leys mentions the legendary fourth-century calligraphy of a prose poem whose extraordinary beauty was celebrated by generation after generation of Chinese, centuries after the original work was lost. Indeed, it may never even have existed.

With a civilization built on such an adaptable, supple, constantly self-replenishing, and indeed beautiful basis, who needs big city walls? But I would not wish to end my tribute to a writer I much admire on such a note of sacrilege. Better to end with a line from a poem by Victor Ségalen, deploring the barbaric Western habit of building monuments for eternity, which might equally apply to the modern Chinese habit of building dreadful kitsch on the ruins of their past:

You, sons of Han, whose wisdom reaches ten thousand years, no tens of tens of thousands of years, beware of such contempt.
1
“ Chinese Shadows,” The New York Review, May 26, 1977; reprinted in Simon Leys, Chinese Shadows (Viking, 1977). ↩

2
This line, from Heine’s play Almansor, actually refers to the burning of the Koran by the Spanish Inquisition. ↩

3
Although rumor had it that at least one tried to sabotage a Dutch translation of Leys’s first book on modern China, Les Habits neufs du président Mao [ The Chairman’s New Clothes ] (Paris: Champ libre, 1971). ↩

4
New York Review Books, 2003. ↩

Après Simon Leys : lettre ouverte aux sinologues et défenseurs des droits humains
Gregory B. Lee | sinologue
Rue 89/Le Nouvel Obs
16/08/2014

Depuis quelques jours nombre de sinologues et autres personnalités se succèdent pour rendre hommage à la mémoire de Pierre Ryckmans, le grand écrivain et sinologue belge qui écrivait sous le pseudonyme de Simon Leys.

Dans ses écrits, il a démasqué la réalité de la Chine révolutionnaire de Mao que tant d’intellectuels et d’écrivains n’ont cessé de louer jusqu’à la fin des années 1970.

Mais cette Chine-là, en dépit des vastes réformes économiques, reste un état totalitaire qui refuse à ses citoyens la liberté d’expression. Qui plus est, les autorités chinoises, non contentes de bâillonner leurs citoyens, tentent également d’imposer leur propre image de la Chine à travers le monde.

Il y a un mois, le prétendu « soft power » chinois, sous l’égide du réseau des Instituts Confucius, a été exposé comme un pouvoir dur et impitoyable, lorsque pendant le grand congrès bisannuel de la sinologie européenne, qui se tenait cette année au Portugal, les représentants du gouvernment chinois ont fait arracher des programmes une page d’information concernant la Fondation Chiang Ching-kuo de Taiwan.

Mais, pendant ce temps les médias avaient d’autres préoccupations que celles des sinologues : la situation épouvantable dans la bande de Gaza que notre gouvernement a eu tant de mal à condamner (sic), a choqué la vaste majorité des gens. Enfin, depuis une semaine nous avons également redécouvert les ravages occasionnés par les forces djihadistes de « l’état islamiste » en Iraq.

« Spectateur depuis mon canapé »

En tant que spécialiste de la Chine, que puis-je faire ? Je ne peux qu’assister en spectateur depuis mon canapé et exprimer mon désarroi et ma profonde indignation. Est-ce là vraiment tout ce que je peux faire ?

Simon Leys à aucun moment de sa carrière ne s’est limité à la seule observation et critique de la Chine. En tant que socialiste, dans le moule d’un Orwell, en tant qu’humaniste, il s’est intéressé à un large éventail de questions, de problèmes et de cultures. Et si sa critique de la Révolution culturelle et du régime qui lui a succédé fut si percutante c’est parce que l’intérêt qu’il portait aux Chinois était en tant qu’êtres humains et non pas en tant que constructions de nos propres fantasmes exotiques occidentaux.

Pour Leys, la Chine n’était pas un objet, mais une partie intégrale de l’histoire vécue et du présent de notre commune humanité.

Nous ne pouvons pas tous, hélas, prétendre à la grandeur humaniste d’un Pierre Ryckmans. Dans notre monde professionnalisé, spécialisé et micro-disciplinaire, nous avons déjà du mal à nous maintenir dans la petite sphère d’expertise que nous nous réservons.

Et pourtant nous sommes sensibles aux questions qui touchent à nos métiers, ou plutôt à l’image idéalisée que nous projetons de nos métiers. En tant qu’écrivains, scientifiques et universitaires nous sommes tous concernés par les questions de l’indépendance de l’écrivain, de la liberté d’expression des journalistes et des intellectuels.

Quel que soit notre domaine d’expertise, nous sommes tous, plus ou moins, prêts à prendre position et à faire preuve de solidarité quand nous décelons une privation ou un refus de ces droits essentiels à nos collègues.

En tant que membre de la classe intellectuelle, en tant qu’universitaire et chercheur, je dois constater que nous sommes rarement prêts à nous engager de manière collective ; individualistes, nous avons du mal à travailler en équipe.

Diplomatie culturelle chinoise

À cela il faut ajouter notre réticence à nous éloigner de ce qu’attendent de nous ceux qui contrôlent les avancements professionnels de nos carrières strictement encadrées et délimitées. Certains, cependant, à l’instar de nos collègues américains l’anthropologue sinisant Marshall Sahlins, le sociologue Perry Link ainsi que le sinologue Victor Mair, sont toujours prêts à s’élever contre ce que l’on targue de diplomatie culturelle chinoise et qui n’est en fait que tyrannie politico-culturelle.

Enfin, mon ami David Palumbo-Liu, professeur à l’université de Stanford a récemment mené courageusement campagne contre la politique de son gouvernement en Palestine, et est de surcroît un ardent défenseur de la liberté de pensée et d’expression dans le monde universitaire.

La question qui me préoccupe tout particulièrement depuis plusieurs mois est le sort réservé à mon collègue Ilham Tohti, professeur à l’Université Centrale des Nationalités de Pékin. Arrêté au mois de janvier 2014, il doit être jugé pour séparatisme dans un futur très proche.

La suppression des libertés universitaires, l’interdiction d’exprimer son opinion personnelle sur des questions sociopolitiques me révoltent où qu’elles se manifestent. Dans ce cas particulier et pour des raisons personnelles, je me sens encore plus interpellé par le cas de ce collègue et il me faut prendre position en sa faveur. Il se trouve que j’ai établi depuis de longues années des échanges universitaires et une collaboration de recherche étroite entre l’université d’Ilham Tohti et la mienne.

J’y connais plusieurs enseignants-chercheurs dont la carrière a été stoppée en raison de leur engagement courageux lors des événements de 1989 et leur refus de se rétracter. J’ai également dirigé de nombreux étudiants en Master et en doctorat de l’Université des Nationalités. Je me sens donc tout particulièrement concerné et je me dois d’exprimer ma solidarité avec Ilham Tohti accusé d’un « crime » passable de la peine de mort ou de la détention à perpétuité.

Le sort d’Ilham Tohti

Au cours de ces dernières semaines je me suis demandé pourquoi on entendait si peu parler d’Ilham Tohti dans les médias traditionnels et sur les réseaux sociaux en France. Est-ce parce qu’il est difficile d’obtenir des informations exactes, ou est-ce parce que la situation de la minorité ouïgoure que défend Tohti est trop difficile à expliquer au lecteur lambda ?

Le nom d’Ilham Tohti n’a peut-être pas suffisamment de consonances chinoises, mais il est chinois, citoyen de la République Populaire de Chine. Il défend sa minorité ethnique qui endure des problèmes semblables à ceux des Tibétains. Les Ouïgours n’ont que peu ou pas de pouvoir sur leur propre destin. Ils sont assujettis à une politique officielle d’immigration chinoise « Han » qui a pour but de diluer leur présence sur leurs terres.

Alors que le Tibet, fantasme exotique occupant une place privilégiée dans l’imaginaire occidental et dont la cause politique est personnifiée par le personnage charismatique du Dalaï Lama, bénéficie d’une grande attention de la part des Occidentaux, le Xinjiang demeure peu connu.

Le Xinjiang – ça se prononce comment ? (Les speakers radiophoniques ont déjà assez de mal à dire Beijing alors comment peuvent-il s’extirper du mot Xinjiang ?) Xinjiang, Nouvelle Frontière, nom chinois pour un territoire peuplé de non-Chinois. Je viens d’utiliser le terme de « Chinois » en référence aux Chinois Han, ce que font tous les non-initiés, ce que nous faisons tous dans la conversation de tous les jours.

Mais le terme « Han » me pose également problème : c’est un terme qui couvre une réalité beaucoup plus complexe, qui a été inventé pour désigner une ethnie majoritaire visant à rendre encore plus minoritaires les autres ethnies officiellement constituées en Chine Populaire, elles-mêmes produits d’une classification ethnologique officielle au service de la politique étatique.

Je pourrais rédiger des centaines de pages sur comment traduire « chinois » en « chinois », mais je me contenterai de me reprendre comme suit : Xinjiang, Nouvelle Frontière, (anciennement dénommé Turkestan chinois, ou connu sous le terme de Turkestan oriental), un nom en langue chinoise donné par l’état chinois à un territoire sous sa juridiction et peuplé de Ouïgours, Kazakhs, Kirghizes, Ouzbeks, Tadjiks, Hui, Mongols et de Chinois Han. L’essentiel étant que la majorité des habitants sont musulmans.

Méthodes disproportionnées

Même si depuis des semaines, des mois, des années nous assistons à la télévision aux bombardements et au massacre dans tout le Proche Orient, de musulmans, ces derniers, en raison de leur appartenance religieuse, sont toujours apparentés à des terroristes islamistes. C’est peut-être ce que nous avons le plus de mal à concevoir en regardant les bombardements de la Bande de Gaza : les responsables de la mort de près de 2000 personnes n’étaient pas musulmans. (sic)

Ce fait a bouleversé notre récit dominant de la malédiction islamiste et de la nécessité d’une alliance internationale contre la terreur (islamiste) qui a donné « carte blanche » à l’état chinois pour traiter comme de la « terreur » toute résistance et dissidence venant des peuples musulmans du Xinjiang.

Alors qu’Ilham Tohti est détenu à Urumqi, capitale du Xinjiang, des événements, émeutes et manifestations ont été réprimés dans une violence semblable à celle utilisée contre les Palestiniens de la Bande de Gaza sic). L’Etat chinois, qui n’a jamais hésité à utiliser des méthodes disproportionnées pour réprimer la dissidence au Xinjiang, a effectivement déclaré la guerre à sa population musulmane : les femmes voilées et les hommes barbus sont automatiquement soupçonnés de terrorisme.

La situation au Xinjiang est exacerbée par le fait qu’il existe très peu d’informations en provenance de sources indépendantes, et que les gens ordinaires, comme partout ailleurs sur le territoire chinois, n’ont pas la liberté de s’exprimer ou de nous informer de ce qui se passe réellement. Ainsi les médias étatiques chinois ont-ils toute liberté de diffuser leur récit unique sans aucune crainte d’être contredits.

En France, un commentateur respecté qui passe régulièrement, et pratiquement exclusivement, à la radio et à la télévision, quand on lui pose la question des droits humains en Chine répond en substance :

« Donnons encore 50 ans aux Chinois pour qu’il se démocratisent, après tout nous, nous avons bien mis deux siècles. »
Comme s’il suffisait de se réjouir du « miracle économique chinois », et que l’expérience de l’histoire démontrait que l’expansion massive du capitalisme était gage incontestable de démocratie à venir.

En fait, ce discours est ancré dans l’idée que les Chinois sont si différents de nous, ou nous sont si ’extérieurs’, que contrairement à Ryckmans, nous ne pouvons les traiter pas comme des sujets humains mais comme une catégorie à part. Personne ne devrait devoir attendre cinquante ans de plus pour bénéficier des droits humains essentiels.

Je ne suis ni viscéralement anti-Chine, ni anti-Chinois, ceux qui m’ont lu peuvent en témoigner. Je ne suis pas non plus anti-Chinois « Han », je sais pertinemment que l’immense majorité de la population de la Chine souffre de la même pauvreté, des mêmes catastrophes environnementales et de santé publique, du même manque d’autonomie et de la même incapacité de maîtriser leur propre destin.

Vers un procès spectacle

Cependant en ce moment précis, ce sont les musulmans du Xinjiang qui sont les plus touchés et qui se trouvent dans la situation la plus pernicieuse. Loin de l’attention internationale, cachés dans une région d’Asie centrale souvent rendue inaccessible aux visiteurs, et à un moment où l’Islam est considéré comme un credo terroriste, qui va leur venir en aide ?

Un homme, l’un des leurs, discrètement, savamment et avec diplomatie, a tenté d’attirer l’attention sur la réalité et la vérité des conditions d’existence de la population du Xinjiang. Pour cela il va lui falloir endurer un procès spectacle.

En tant que « China-watchers », commentateurs, journalistes, et universitaires notre devoir est de dénoncer cette injustice. Je suis sûr que c’est ce qu’aurait fait Simon Leys. De plus, je suis convaincu qu’il aurait apprécié le courage de cet homme confronté à la puissance de l’état.

Peut-être que Leys aurait alors évoqué une de ses citations préférées de l’historien chinois Sima Qian (145-90 av. notre ère), citation dont nous ferions bien de nous souvenir :

« Mieux vaut les critiques d’un seul que l’assentiment de mille. »

Simon Leys quitte la Chine pour l’éternité
Il ridiculisa les maoïstes de tous les pays
Causeur
14 août 2014

Pierre Ryckmans, plus connu sous son pseudonyme éditorial Simon Leys, est décédé, le 11 août, à l’âge de 78 ans, dans la lointaine ville de Canberra, improbable capitale administrative de l’Australie, où il résidait avec sa famille depuis le début des années soixante-dix du siècle dernier. Qu’on ne se méprenne pas à propos des louanges post mortem que  consacrent aujourd’hui les grands médias français à cet immense sinologue belge. L’encens qu’ils répandent aujourd’hui autour de son cercueil ne saurait dissiper l’odeur nauséabonde des tombereaux d’ordures qu’ils déversèrent sur lui lors de la publication de ses ouvrages consacrés à la Chine de Mao et à la Révolution culturelle, notamment Les habits neufs du président Mao , paru en 1971. Ce livre survient alors que la France intellectuelle est en pleine hystérie maoïste post soixante huitarde : de Normale Sup à Vincennes, la GRCP (Grande Révolution Culturelle Prolétarienne) la geste maoïste est venue au secours des orphelins d’une révolte tombée en quenouille. La fine fleur de l’intelligentsia hexagonale, Roland Barthes, Philippe Sollers, Michel Foucault, Jean Paul Sartre se font les chantres zélés de la geste maoïste, dont Louis Althusser et ses disciples Benny Lévy, les frères Miller (Jacques-Alain et Gérard), Jean-Claude Milner sont les coryphées. Et voilà qu’un obscur universitaire d’outre Quiévrain, inconnu au bataillon des habitués de la Closerie des Lilas, se permet, armé de sa seule connaissance de la langue, de la civilisation et de la société chinoise de démonter le mythe d’une Révolution culturelle émancipatrice de l’humanité entière.

Pour Ryckmans, devenu pour l’occasion Simon Leys pour ne pas obérer ses possibilités de retourner en Chine, cette GRCP se résume à une sanglante lutte de pouvoir au sommet de l’Etat communiste, où Mao et ses sbires instrumentalisent la jeunesse pour éliminer ceux qui l’avaient écarté du pouvoir réel à Pékin : Liu Shao Shi, Deng Hsiao Ping, puis Lin Biao. Cette interprétation, aujourd’hui universellement admise, fait alors scandale : en quelques lignes,  Le Monde  exécute l’ouvrage d’un « China watcher travaillant avec les méthodes américaines » et « comportant des erreurs et des faits incontrôlables en provenance de la colonie britannique ». Ce libelle est signé des initiales d’Alain Bouc, correspondant du  Monde à Pékin, dont la ferveur envers le «  Grand Timonier » justifiera la qualification, par les situationistes de Guy Debord,  du quotidien de la rue des Italiens de « principal organe de presse maoïste paraissant hors de Chine ».

Pierre Ryckmans, rejeton de la grande bourgeoisie belge, est pourtant tombé dans la controverse politique à son corps défendant. S’étant pris de passion pour la Chine lors d’un voyage d’étudiants belges dans les années cinquante, il se consacre à l’étude de la langue, de la littérature et des arts de ce pays. La politique, au mieux l’indiffère, au pire lui fait horreur, comme à celui qu’il reconnaîtra plus tard comme l’un de ses maîtres à penser, George Orwell. Un événement, pourtant, le précipite dans la controverse qui va marquer sa vie et son œuvre : en 1967, alors qu’il se trouve à Hong Kong, contractuel au consulat général de Belgique, un artiste de variété Li Ping est sauvagement assassiné devant sa porte par des sbires du régime de Pékin, coupable d’avoir brocardé Mao à la télévision hongkongaise. Il peut voir également chaque jour les cadavres des suppliciés de la Révolution Culturelle s’échouer sur les plages de la colonie, emmenés par milliers par le courant des fleuves se jetant dans la mer de Chine. Mettant de côté ses chères études sur la calligraphie et la peinture chinoise ancienne, il se plonge dans la sinistre langue de bois des publications maoïstes pour y déceler la part de vérité qui peut s’y cacher : un travail de décryptage dont le précurseur est un père jésuite, Lazlo Ladany, éditeur à Hong Kong de l’hebdomadaire China news analysis, épluchage minutieux des publications officielles. C’est ce qui rend le discours de Leys inattaquable : tout ce qu’il rapporte provient d’écrits dûment tamponnés par la censure maoïste, dont il suffit de connaître les codes de langages, de présentation et de mise en scène pour les décrypter. Qu’on fête, ou non, l’anniversaire d’un dirigeant national ou local, un recul ou une avancée dans la liste des personnalités présentes à une manifestation officielle, le choix des photos en une du «  Quotidien du peuple » constituent un métalangage qu’un travail de bénédictin permet de décrypter.

« La pire manière d’avoir tort c’est d’avoir eu raison trop tôt ! » dira Ryckman-Leys bien des années après avoir pu constater qu’en Occident, principalement en France, la cabale des dévots du maoïsme, de gauche comme de droite, réussira, pendant de nombreuses années, à confiner ses écrits dans la confidentialité. Il fallut attendre 1989, et la chute du communisme soviétique pour que  Les Habits neufs du président Mao soient édités en poche, et 1998 pour qu’une sélection de ses écrits sur la Chine soit publiée dans la collection «  Bouquins » à l’initiative de Jean-François Revel, l’un des rares intellectuels français ayant soutenu Ryckmans. Bernard Pivot, prudent comme de coutume, attendit 1983 avant de le convier à une séance d’Apostrophes sur le thème «  Les intellectuels face au communisme » 1. Il n’eut pas à le regretter : en quelques minutes, Ryckmans mit en pièces la maoïste de salon Maria Antonietta Macchiochi, qui avait commis un livre de 500 pages à la gloire du Grand Timonier à l’issue d’un mois de visite guidée à travers la Chine en 1971. Ryckmans «  Ce livre est stupide, c’est le plus charitable que l’on puisse en dire… si ce n’est pas une stupidité, alors c’est une escroquerie, ce qui est beaucoup plus grave… ». Pivot n’en est pas encore revenu : c’est la seule fois de sa carrière où un livre présenté à Apostrophes, celui de Macchiochi, a vu le rythme de ses ventes baisser après  l’émission…

« Dans une controverse, on reconnait le vainqueur à ce que ses adversaires finissent par s’approprier ses arguments en s’imaginant les avoir inventés » constatait encore Ryckmans dans un article de la  New York Review of Books  en hommage Lazlo Ladany, son maître en «  maologie ». Le triomphe de Ryckmans fut modeste, trop content qu’il était de pouvoir, enfin, se consacrer à ses passions littéraires, artistiques et maritimes à 20 000 km de Saint Germain des Près. La morgue de ses adversaires, en revanche, ne s’est en rien atténuée, trouvant dans d’autres passions exotiques matière à pontifier.

On peut se procurer cette émission pour la modeste somme de 2,99 euros sur le site de téléchargement de l’INA. C’est donné pour un moment jubilatoire… ↩

Voir aussi:

A propos de Pierre Ryckmans, alias Simon Leys, et des sources qui ont inspiré ‘Les Habits neufs du président Mao’
Eglise d’Asie

21/08/2014

Le sinologue et écrivain belge Pierre Ryckmans est décédé en Australie à l’âge de 78 ans. Il s’est éteint le 11 août 2014, à Canberra, capitale fédérale australienne, où il vivait et enseignait depuis les années 1970.

Pierre Ryckmans parlait peu des raisons de son exil en Australie, mais …

… les années qu’il avait vécues Hongkong, auparavant, avaient été pour lui les plus marquantes et les plus fécondes mais aussi les plus éprouvantes.

Avant tout sinologue à la culture encyclopédique, il a traduit Lu Xun et Les Entretiens de Confucius mais il restera dans la mémoire des observateurs de la Chine comme celui qui a courageusement dénoncé, avant tous et presque seul contre beaucoup, les monstruosités de la Révolution culturelle lancée par Mao de 1966 à 1976 en Chine. Son livre publié en 1971, Les Habits neufs du président Mao, dénonçant la nature meurtrière du communisme de Mao, fit l’effet d’un véritable coup de canon dans le monde des « maoïstes européens », si nombreux à l’époque qu’ils monopolisaient les informations concernant la Chine.

Ils accusèrent Pierre Ryckmans d’être un traitre et un faussaire, de colporter des ragots venus de Hongkong et des analystes de la CIA. Le fait d’avoir été si précoce dans sa dénonciation avait rendu ses propos inacceptables pour les sinologues de l’époque, admirateurs de Mao, qui refusaient de voir la véritable nature du régime chinois, habilement masquée par une intense propagande. C’est ce qui a probablement provoqué son exil en Australie. Pierre Ryckmans avait pris parti pour les victimes de la Révolution culturelle, y compris pour les milliers de chrétiens, protestants et catholiques, martyrisés par le régime.

Ce qui est moins connu, à propos de Pierre Ryckmans, c’est l’influence qu’a eue sur lui le sinologue, savant et  jésuite hongrois Laszlo (Ladislaus) Ladany (勞達一), qui dirigeait, à Hongkong, un centre qui rassemblait et analysait les informations sur la situation en Chine. Il publiait chaque mois un bulletin, China News Analysis, remarquablement bien informé et de très haut niveau. Les ambassades et consulats de la région y étaient tous abonnés malgré son prix exorbitant.

Dès le début de la Révolution culturelle, le P. Ladany avait compris que cette agitation était un conflit de personnes et une immense lutte pour le pouvoir. Il a voulu le dire haut et fort. Cependant, ses affirmations n’atteignaient pas les intellectuels d’Europe et des Etats-Unis et le P. Ladany avait le sentiment de prêcher dans le désert, jusqu’à ce que Pierre Ryckmans s’intéresse à ses écrits et les répercute dans le monde entier. Ce dernier a reconnu bien volontiers avoir puisé dans China News Analysis, notamment ses numéros 759, 761, 762, 763 (mai à juillet 1969) pour écrire son livre. Le fait est que c’est le P. Ladany qui a inspiré à Pierre Ryckmans, lui qui était un spécialiste de la littérature classique chinoise, toute sa vision de la Révolution culturelle par le biais de China News Analysis.

China News Analysis bulletin a été publié de 1953 à 1998 (1). En 1997, les jésuites avaient transféré la rédaction de Hongkong à Taipei de manière à éliminer tout risque d’éventuelles pressions politiques après la rétrocession de la colonie anglaise à la Chine continentale. Un an plus tard cependant, le bulletin était arrêté.

(eda)
Notes(1) En décembre 1982, lorsque le P. Ladany (1914-1990) se retire de la rédaction de China News Analysis, il rédige les ‘dix commandements’ qui, selon lui, devraient guider tout China Watcher digne de ce nom :
1. Remember that no one living in a free society ever has a full understanding of life in a regimented society.
2. Look at China through Chinese spectacles; if one looks at is through foreign glasses, one is thereby trying to make sense of Chinese events in terms of our own problems.
3. Learn something about other Communist countries.
4. Study the basic tenets of Marxism.
5. Keep in mind that words and terms do not have the same meaning in a Marxist society as they do elsewhere.
6. Keep your common sense: the Chinese may have the particular characteristics of Chinese, but they are human beings, and therefore have normal reactions of human beings.
7. People are not less important than issues; they are probably more so. A group may adopt the programme of those who oppose it in order to retain power.
8. Do not believe that you know all the answers. China poses more questions than it provides answers.
9. Do not lose your sense of humour. A regimented press is too serious to be taken very seriously.
10. Above all, read the small print!

Voir encore:

Le sinologue belge Simon Leys est décédé
Philippe Paquet

La Libre Belgique

11 août 2014

BELGIQUEPierre Ryckmans, alias Simon Leys, décédé à l’âge de 78 ans dans la nuit de dimanche à lundi à Sydney, où il était traité pour un cancer, est avant tout le sinologue belge devenu australien qui, avec « Les Habits neufs du président Mao » et « Ombres chinoises », fut le premier à faire voler en éclats le mythe maoïste, au début des années 70. Il démonta les rouages de la Révolution culturelle et exposa les réalités du régime communiste chinois avec une persévérance qui lui attira la haine tenace d’une certaine intelligentsia européenne, parisienne en particulier, mais aussi avec un talent littéraire qui vaut à ses « Essais sur la Chine » (réédités dans la collection « Bouquins ») d’être toujours aussi appréciés aujourd’hui.

Ce fils d’éditeur était, toutefois, aussi un romancier (quoique d’un seul roman, « La Mort de Napoléon », récit d’une imaginaire autant que rocambolesque évasion de Sainte-Hélène), un critique littéraire (aussi à l’aise avec Hugo et Cervantes qu’avec Conrad et Chesterton), un essayiste politique (passionné par George Orwell et Simone Weil), un caricaturiste amateur (à qui l’on a trouvé des airs de ressemblance avec Daumier), un amoureux de la mer (depuis que, encore adolescent, il avait fait les bancs d’Islande sur un chalutier ostendais)… Cependant, c’est peintre qu’il aurait voulu être, et il n’apprécia rien de plus que les cours pris auprès du talentueux Jacques Laudy. L’université, dirait-il, le détourna tristement de ce projet.

Une grande famille belge

Pierre Ryckmans est né, le 28 septembre 1935, à Uccle, dans une maison de l’avenue des Aubépines qui existe toujours. Dans une grande famille belge aussi, aux origines malinoises et anversoises (le grand-père, Alphonse, fut échevin de la métropole portuaire, avant d’être vice-président du Sénat). Son oncle et homonyme Pierre Ryckmans fut le meilleur gouverneur général du Congo, selon David Van Reybrouck. Un autre oncle, qui fut aussi son parrain, Gonzague Ryckmans, professeur à Louvain, était une sommité mondiale de l’épigraphie arabique. L’un et l’autre exercèrent une influence d’autant plus forte sur le futur Simon Leys qu’ils se substituèrent à un père mort prématurément, quand le jeune homme n’avait que dix-neuf ans.

Après avoir brièvement fréquenté l’école des Servites de Marie, à deux pas de la maison familiale, Pierre Ryckmans fit toute sa scolarité au collège Cardinal Mercier de Braine-l’Alleud. Il n’en garda pas un souvenir exagérément ému, se rappelant surtout les trajets en tram dans un décor qui était encore champêtre, mais aussi les leçons d’un maître, l’abbé Voussure, qui acheva d’ancrer en lui une foi chrétienne inébranlable. Inscrit à Louvain en 1953, il y fit des études de droit, pour se plier à une tradition familiale, et d’histoire de l’art, pour se faire plaisir.

Un voyage en Chine en 1955

C’est le hasard qui décida de la suite, exceptionnelle : Pierre Ryckmans fut convié de façon inattendue à se joindre, en avril 1955, à une délégation de la jeunesse belge invitée par une Chine avide de reconnaissance internationale. Le séjour eut beau être court et très encadré, il déclencha la passion d’une vie. L’étudiant en revint subjugué et transformé. Il lui sembla désormais impossible d’ignorer « l’autre pôle de l’expérience humaine », comme disait Malraux, et impensable de ne pas apprendre le chinois. Comme il n’était pas possible d’aller au-delà d’une simple initiation en Belgique, une fois diplômé de Louvain, il partit pour Taïwan, nanti d’une modeste bourse du gouvernement de Chiang Kai-shek.

Sur l’île qu’on appelait Formose, ou encore la « Chine libre » par opposition à la « Chine rouge » de Mao, Pierre Ryckmans s’éprit de littérature et de peinture chinoises (il eut pour professeur Pu Hsin-yu, un cousin du « dernier empereur » Pu Yi), amassant les matériaux pour la future thèse de doctorat qu’il consacrerait à Shitao, lettré du XVIIe siècle, et qui établirait d’emblée sa réputation dans le monde de la sinologie classique. C’est là aussi, et surtout, qu’il s’éprit de Hanfang, qui deviendrait son épouse et sa muse. Le couple eut quatre enfants : Etienne, Jeanne, et des jumeaux, Louis et Marc.

« Coopération au développement »

Sa formation taïwanaise terminée, Pierre Ryckmans fut ravi de profiter d’une nouvelle législation belge sur l’objection de conscience pour troquer son service militaire contre trois années de « coopération au développement » en Asie. Il étudia et enseigna en chinois à Singapour grâce à Han Suyin – avec qui il croiserait plus tard impitoyablement le fer. Suspecté de sympathies communistes (!) par le régime paranoïaque de Lee Kuan Yew, il dut plier bagage et s’installa en 1963 à Hong Kong, où il décrocha un emploi précaire au « New Asia College », embryon de la future Université chinoise. Le jeune sinologue produisit là-bas ses premiers travaux sinologiques (une traduction de Shen Fu, publiée aux… éditions Larcier que son père avait rachetées, une monographie sur le « peintre rebelle et fou » Su Renshan, couronnée par le prestigieux prix Stanislas Julien, des dizaines de notices sur les peintres chinois pour l’ »Encyclopædia Universalis »).

Mais, pour soutenir une famille nombreuse, il fallait trouver d’autres ressources. Pierre Ryckmans donna des cours à l’Alliance française de Hong Kong et – ce qui était bien plus captivant – alimenta le consulat de Belgique dans la colonie britannique en rapports bimensuels sur la Révolution culturelle, à partir de la presse chinoise qu’il dépouillait et du témoignage des réfugiés qu’il interviewait. Un jeune sinologue français de passage à Hong Kong, René Viénet, convainquit le « China watcher » en herbe de rassembler ses notes et de les publier. Il en résulta en 1971 « Les Habits neufs du président Mao » et une célébrité bientôt planétaire.
Attaché culturel à Pékin

C’est à la même époque que Pierre Ryckmans reçut une proposition qui l’enthousiasma : revoir la Chine en devenant l’attaché culturel de l’ambassade que la Belgique rouvrait à Pékin. Cet intermède diplomatique de six mois, aux côtés de Jacques Groothaert et Patrick Nothomb, serait l’occasion d’aventures mémorables en territoire maoïste et fournirait la matière d’ »Ombres chinoises ». Dans l’intervalle, pour éviter de froisser les Chinois, Pierre Ryckmans, le sinologue et diplomate, prit le pseudonyme de Simon Leys pour publier ses pamphlets, pseudonyme trouvé comme l’on sait dans un roman de Victor Segalen (« René Leys »), mais qui fait aussi référence – ce qu’on ignore généralement – à une dynastie de peintres anversois dont le plus célèbre fut Henri Leys.

Peu avant de partir pour Pékin, le hasard avait encore souri à Pierre Ryckmans. Un collègue rencontré à Hong Kong l’invita à venir enseigner temporairement à l’Université nationale d’Australie. Ce qui devait être une expérience de deux ou trois ans, le temps d’offrir aux enfants un cadre de vie plus aéré, allait être un voyage sans retour, choix que ni le professeur de chinois à Canberra, puis à Sydney, ni sa famille n’auraient de raisons de regretter. Aux antipodes, d’où il enverrait de savoureuses lettres au « Magazine littéraire » (elles seront réunies dans « Le Bonheur des petits poissons »), Ryckmans serait à l’abri des tempêtes parisiennes soulevées par le maoïsme et pourrait ainsi poursuivre tranquillement son travail. Car, dirait-il, « en Australie, on ne reçoit pas moins de bons livres. On a seulement plus de temps pour les lire ».

Des livres, Simon Leys – le pseudonyme finit par supplanter l’état civil – en lirait, et en critiquerait. Tout en continuant d’interpréter les convulsions de la Chine dans des essais souvent caustiques (« Images brisées », « La Forêt en feu », « L’Humeur, l’honneur, l’horreur »), il donna libre cours à toutes ses passions, sans se préoccuper du caractère apparemment disparate de son œuvre. Il consacra nombre de textes à la littérature, tant française qu’anglo-saxonne (l’installation en Australie fit aussi de lui un écrivain de langue anglaise, ce dont il se félicitait) ; on les retrouve dans « Protée et autres essais », « L’Ange et le Cachalot », « Le Studio de l’inutilité ». Il passa aussi beaucoup de temps « en mer », traduisant le chef-d’œuvre méconnu de Richard Henry Dana « Deux années sur le gaillard d’avant », racontant le naufrage du « Batavia », assemblant sa monumentale « Anthologie de la mer dans la littérature française ».

Dans toutes ses activités, Pierre Ryckmans s’amusa beaucoup – on le mesure en parcourant « Les Idées des autres idiosyncratiquement compilées par Simon Leys », un recueil qui était au départ un cadeau de Noël pour Hanfang. Ce n’est qu’exceptionnellement qu’il se résigna à feindre le sérieux (qui n’est pas le contraire d’amusant, se plaisait-il à rappeler en citant Chesterton), par exemple quand il accepta de rejoindre l’Académie royale de langue et de littérature françaises de Belgique, où on l’élit en 1990 et où il fut reçu deux ans plus tard (le temps de revenir d’Australie…). Le cadeau était empoisonné car il y succédait à Simenon, un homme et un écrivain pour lequel il n’avait qu’une admiration relative. Leys refusa, en revanche, l’invitation (pourtant inhabituelle) que lui adressa l’Académie française, dont il redoutait les contraintes mondaines.

Un « dernier combat » ubuesque

La retraite anticipée qu’il prit en 1994, parce qu’il était profondément inquiet de la mercantilisation de l’université (il la dénoncerait onze ans plus tard dans un discours iconoclaste prononcé à l’UCL lors de la remise d’un doctorat honoris causa à l’initiative du doyen Heinz Bouillon), devait être paisible et heureuse. Elle le fut jusqu’en décembre 2006, quand une bourde de notre administration priva Marc et Louis Ryckmans de leur nationalité belge. Ne mesurant pas à quel point cette grossière bévue blessait un homme resté si profondément attaché à la Belgique, le ministère des Affaires étrangères s’entêta dans l’erreur, obligeant Simon Leys à mener pour ses fils ce qu’il appela son « dernier combat ». Un combat qu’il gagna haut la main, en justice, sept ans plus tard, mais qui, aussi, le rongea.

Cet homme foncièrement bon aurait sans aucun doute mérité que sa patrie d’origine lui permît de terminer sa vie d’une façon plus paisible. Dans l’intimité, Simon Leys était en effet tout le contraire du pamphlétaire impitoyable que révélaient ses écrits. Pétri de gentillesse et de simplicité, il formait avec Hanfang, après cinquante ans de mariage, un couple extraordinairement attachant.

Voir aussi:

Quand « Le Monde » étrillait Simon Leys… avant de l’encenser
|Thomas Wieder

Le Monde

12.08.2014

Dix lignes seulement, mais dix lignes assassines. C’est ainsi, le 19 novembre 1971, que Le Monde rend compte des Habits neufs du président Mao, de Simon Leys : « Une nouvelle interprétation de la Chine par un “China watcher” français de Hongkong travaillant à la mode américaine. Beaucoup de faits, rapportés avec exactitude, auxquels se mêlent des erreurs et des informations incontrôlables en provenance de la colonie britannique. Les sources ne sont d’ordinaire pas citées, et l’auteur n’a manifestement pas l’expérience de ce dont il parle. La Révolution culturelle est ramenée à des querelles de cliques. » L’article est signé « A. B. », les initiales d’Alain Bouc, qui sera nommé en 1973 correspondant du Monde à Pékin.

La nécrologie : Mort du sinologue Simon Leys

Plus de quarante ans plus tard, Gérard Guégan, cofondateur de Champ libre, où parut le livre, se souvient parfaitement de ces quelques lignes. Et notamment du tract que ses amis situationnistes rédigèrent à l’époque contre leur auteur, sous le titre « Un Bouc qui pue »…

« SILENCE DE MORT »

S’il se rappelle lui aussi très bien de la « brève dédaigneuse du Monde », Raphaël Sorin, autre ancien de Champ libre, garde surtout en tête le « silence de mort » qui entoura la parution en France du livre de Simon Leys. A part Le Nouvel Observateur, qui publia une critique positive, mais en l’accompagnant prudemment d’un point de vue opposé, la presse fut avare de comptes rendus. Ce qui ne veut pas dire qu’il n’y eut pas de réaction. « Il y a eu quelques incidents notables avec les maoïstes », se souvient ainsi Gérard Guégan. Ils ont fait un jour une descente à la fac de Vincennes pour détruire les stands où on vendait le livre. Ils sont aussi venus à la maison d’édition pour distribuer quelques coups de poing… »

RECONNAISSANCE TARDIVE
L’ostracisme dont Simon Leys fut victime en France mit des années à se dissiper. Dans Le Monde, le changement de regard fut très progressif. En 1975, quand paraît Ombres chinoises, André Fontaine se contente d’évoquer un livre qui « dénonce sur le mode de la causticité allègre les tares d’un régime a jadis beaucoup admiré ». En 1979, quand le livre est réédité, Nicole Zand est nettement plus louangeuse. Rappelant que le livre fut « diversement accueilli à sa publication », ce qui est sans doute une allusion à ce qu’avait écrit André Fontaine non sans quelque ironie fielleuse, la journaliste note que « les événements de ces dernières années ne contredisent pas, c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire, l’analyse de Simon Leys ».

Pour ce dernier, la pleine reconnaissance de sa lucidité prémonitoire ne viendra cependant qu’une vingtaine d’années plus tard. « Leys, le juste », titre « Le Monde des livres », en 1998, lors de la réédition, chez Robert Laffont, des Essais sur la Chine. Signé Francis Deron, le portrait, élogieux, est accompagné d’un texte dithyrambique de Philippe Sollers saluant ce « déchiffreur immunisé contre la propagande totalitaire ». Une façon, pour le journal comme pour l’écrivain, dont la très maoïste revue Tel Quel n’avait pas été épargnée vingt-cinq ans plus tôt par Simon Leys, de reconnaître sur le tard leurs égarements d’antan.

Voir encore:

Are Books Useless?
An extract from the 1996 Boyer lectures
Pierre Ryckmans
Australian Humanities Review

Are books essentially useless? I suggest that we indeed subscribe to such a conclusion. But so long as we remain aware that uselessness is also the hallmark of what is truly priceless. Zhuang Zi summed it up well: « People all know the usefulness of what is useful, but they do not know the usefulness of what is useless ».

The other day, I was reading the manuscript of a forthcoming book by a young journalist – a series of profiles of women living in the Outback – farmer wives battling solitude and natural disasters on remote stations in the bush. One woman was expressing concern for the education and future of her son, and commented on the boy’s choice of exclusively practical subjects for his courses at boarding school. « And I can’t say I blame his choice, as I too, would prefer to be out in the bush driving a tractor of building cattleyards rather than sitting in a classroom learning about Shakespeare, which is something he will never need… »

In this passing remark, there is something which I find simply heartbreaking. For a woman who single-handedly raises and cares for a large family, while sharing in many of the men’s tasks – worrying about mortgage repayments, fighting loneliness and depression, bolstering her husband’s crumbling self-respect in front of looming bankruptcy, fending off the menaces of alcoholism and social disintegration, and who meanwhile, drives tractors and handles cattle, and faces a thousand emergencies – it would appear indeed that Shakespeare is something one will never need. And on what ground would we dare to challenge her view?

Oddly enough, this disarming remark on the uselessness of literature unwittingly reduplicates, in one sense, a provocative statement by Nabokov. In fact the brave woman from the outback here seems to echo a sardonic paradox of the supreme literate aesthete of our age. Nabokov wrote this (which I shall never tire of quoting, perhaps because I myself taught literature for some time): ‘Let us not kid ourselves; let us remember that literature is of no use whatever, except in the very special case of somebody’s wishing to become, of all things, a Professor of Literature.’

And yet even Professors of Literature, when they are made of the right mettle, but find themselves in extreme situations – divested of their titles, deprived of their books, reduced to their barest humanity, equipped only with their tears and their memory – can reach the heart of the matter and experience in their flesh what literature is really about: our very survival as human beings.

I know of one Professor of Literature at least, who would be qualified to teach the good woman from the outback how, even for people in her situation, particularly for people in her situation, there may be a very real need for reading Shakespeare.

The name of that Professor is Wu Ningkun. He is an elderly Chinese scholar. Nearly 50 years ago, moved by patriotism, he gave up a promising, and cosy, academic career in the United States where he was teaching English literature, and returned to China, knowing that his talents and expertise were sorely needed there. But under Maoism, there was no place in China for refined, cultivated and cosmopolitan minds. He was immediately suspected, ostracised, persecuted, and for the next 30 years became a victim of the totalitarian paranoia that sees humanist culture as a betrayal, intelligence as an ideological crime, and presumes that whoever reads T.S. Eliot in the original must be a dangerous international spy.

He has written a book about his experiences, A Single Tear , which is, to my mind, the best written and most essential reading on a subject on which so much has already been published, and yet so little is understood.

The darkest depth of his ordeal was reached when he was sent to a labour camp in the barren wilderness of North-Eastern China, close to the Siberian border. Around him, many inmates were crushed to death by the horrors of the camp – they were dying of starvation, brutal treatment, exhaustion and despair. Under such conditions, physical resilience was not enough to stay alive – one needed spiritual strength. Wu Ningkun sustained his spirit with poetry. He had succeeded in smuggling with him two small books: a copy of Hamlet and a collection of the Tang dynasty poet, Du Fu. Formerly, he had only studied Shakespeare; now, for the first time, he was truly reading it. Occasionally, when a blinding blizzard blew from Siberia, and the prisoners had to spend the day cooped up in a cell, he could come back to Hamlet:

« Hamlet was my favourite Shakespearean play. Read in a Chinese labour camp, however, the tragedy of the Danish prince took on unexpected dimensions. All the academic analyses and critiques that had engrossed me over the years now seemed remote and irrelevant. The outcry ‘Denmark is a prison’ echoed with a poignant immediacy and Elsinore loomed like a haunting metaphor of a treacherous repressive state. The Ghost thundered with a terrible chorus of a million victims of proletarian dictatorship. Rozencrantz and Guildenstern would have felt like fish in the water had they found their way into a modern nation of hypocrites and informers. As to Hamlet himself, his great capacity for suffering gave the noble Dane his unique stature as a tragic hero pre-eminently worthy of his suffering. I would say to myself ‘I am not Prince Hamlet, nor was meant to be’, echoing Eliot’s Prufrock. Rather I often felt like one of those fellows ‘crawling between earth and Heaven’ scorned by Hamlet himself. But the real question I came to see was neither ‘to be, or not to be’ nor whether ‘in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune’, but how to be worthy of one’s suffering. »

That a man may survive for quite a while without food, but cannot live one day without poetry, is a notion which we tend to dismiss too lightly, as a sort of 19th century romantic hyperbole. But our gruesome century has provided enough evidence: it is true, in a very literal sense. Wu Ningkun’s testimony which I just invoked, confirms from the other end of the world an earlier testimony from another House of the Dead – the voice of Primo Levi who, having survived Auschwitz, wrote the classic account of the camps, If This is a Man and devoted one entire chapter to an experience very similar to the one described by the Chinese scholar.

One day, as Levi and another inmate were on duty to fetch soup for the entire barrack, on their way to the kitchen, with the heavy soup bucket hanging from a pole which they carried on their shoulders, they enjoyed the brief respite of a summer day, and started chatting. The other prisoner was a clever young Frenchman with a gift for languages. Levi, who had been teaching him some Italian, suddenly was moved by a crazy and irresistible impulse to introduce him to Dante. He began to recite a passage from The Divine Comedy, the Canto of Ulysses, clumsily translating it for the other man, verse by verse: « Here, listen, open your ears and your mind, you have to understand, for my sake. »

The effect of this recitation of a few stanzas was « As if I also was hearing it for the first time: like the blast of a trumpet, like the voice of God. For a moment I forget who I am and where I am. The companion begs me to repeat it. How good he is, he is aware that it is doing me good. Or perhaps it is something more – perhaps he has received the message, he has felt that it had to do with him, that it has to do with all men who suffer, and with us in particular; and that it has to do with us two, who dare to reason of these things with the poles for the soup on our shoulders. » Then, sudden catastrophe: memory fails at the end of one stanza – to reach the end of the Canto, a crucial connection is missing: « I have forgotten at least twelve lines; I would give today’s soup to know how to connect the last fragment to the end of the Canto. I try to reconstruct it through the rhymes, I close my eyes, I bite my fingers, but it is no use, the rest is silence. »

The depth and truth of this particular moment were such that thirty years later – the year before he died – Levi returned to it in the last book he wrote, The Drowned and the Saved. Summing up his experience of the death camp, he concluded, « Culture was important to me, and perhaps it saved me. When I wrote ‘I would give today’s soup to know how to retrieve the forgotten passage’, I had neither lied nor exaggerated. I really would have given bread and soup – that is, blood – to save from nothingness those memories which today, with the sure support of printed paper I can refresh gratis whenever I wish, and which therefore seem of little value. »

In Auschwitz, the forgotten poem became literally priceless. In that place, at that instant, the very survival of Primo Levi’s humanity was dependent on it.

Pierre Ryckmans is an internationally renowned novelist, writing under the name Simon Leys, as well as a scholar, Sinologist, artist and calligrapher. His books include Chinese Shadows and The Death of Napoleon. From 1988 he was Chair of Chinese Studies at University of Sydney from where he has recently retired.

The Boyer lectures were broadcast by the Australian Broadcasting Commission on Radio National. The book and cassettes of the six Boyer lectures are now available from all ABC bookshops.

 


Suivre

Recevez les nouvelles publications par mail.

Rejoignez 315 autres abonnés

%d blogueurs aiment cette page :